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02/09/2021 - Work Session - Meeting MaterialsSALT LAKE CITY COUNCIL AGENDA WORK SESSION February 9,2021 Tuesday 3:45 PM This meeting will be an electronic meeting pursuant to the Salt Lake City Emergency Proclamation. SLCCouncil.com 3:45 PM Work Session Or immediately following the 2:00 PM Redevelopment Agency Meeting No Formal Meeting Please note:A general public comment period will not be held this day.This is the Council's monthly scheduled briefing meeting.Item start times and durations are approximate and are subject to change at the Chair’s discretion. Welcome and public meeting rules The Work Session is a discussion among Council Members and select presenters.The public is welcome to listen.Items scheduled on the Work Session or Formal Meeting may be moved and /or discussed during a different portion of the Meeting based on circumstance or availability of speakers. Please note:Dates not identified in the FYI -Project Timeline are either not applicable or will be made available as the agenda item progresses. Generated:10:18:27 This meeting will be an electronic meeting pursuant to the Chair’s determination that conducting the City Council meeting at a physical location presents a substantial risk to the health and safety of those who may be present at the anchor location. The Salt Lake City Council Chair has determined that conducting a meeting at an anchor location under the current state of public health emergency constitutes a substantial risk to the health and safety of those who may attend in person.For these reasons,the Council Meeting will not have a physical location at the City and County Building and all attendees will connect remotely. Members of the public are encouraged to participate in meetings.We want to make sure everyone interested in the City Council meetings can still access the meetings how they feel most comfortable.If you are interested in watching the City Council meetings,they are available on the following platforms: •Facebook Live:www.facebook.com/slcCouncil/ •YouTube:www.youtube.com/slclivemeetings •Web Agenda:www.slc.gov/council/agendas/ •SLCtv Channel 17 Live:www.slctv.com/livestream/SLCtv-Live/2 As always,if you would like to provide feedback or comment,please call us or send us an email: •24-Hour comment line:801-535-7654 •council.comments@slcgov.com More info and resources can be found at:www.slc.gov/council/contact-us/ Upcoming meetings and meeting information can be found here:www.slc.gov/council/agendas/ We welcome and encourage your comments!We have Council staff monitoring inboxes and voicemail, as always,to receive and share your comments with Council Members.All agenda-related and general comments received in the Council office are shared with the Council Members and added to the public meeting record.View comments by visiting the Council Virtual Meeting Comments page. Work Session items 1.Informational:Updates from the Administration ~4:00 p.m. 30 min. The Council will receive an update from the Administration on major items or projects,including but not limited to: •COVID-19,the March 2020 Earthquake,and the September 2020 Windstorm; •Updates on relieving the condition of people experiencing homelessness; •Police Department work,projects,and staffing,etc.;and •Other projects or updates. FYI –Project Timeline:(subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing -Recurring Briefing Set Public Hearing Date -n/a Hold hearing to accept public comment -n/a TENTATIVE Council Action -n/a Minutes: Lisa Shaffer provided updates/information regarding Cemetery windstorm damage:265 trees were lost on the grounds,225 stumps remaining with large holes being dangerous/impeding public traffic in the area,an archeologist had been on-site since December 2020 evaluating damage to headstones/monuments,10 headstones were heavily damaged/needing replacement,109 tree stumps scheduled to be removed beginning today,hiring of a monument contractor to extract headstones displaced by/entangled in fallen trees,damaged tree removal and headstone replacement work anticipated to be completed by Memorial Day 2021, along with information regarding apprenticeship program,including:hiring of three apprentices, one offer being extended,10 scheduled interviews,multiple apprentice positions offered within Public Utilities,as well as many new job opportunities within the City. Councilmember Fowler requested apprenticeship information to include in an email blast to her constituents. Mayor Mendenhall provided updates/information regarding:Camp Last Hope organizers working with City partners (camp closure on February 4,2021)including a resource fair provided two days before camp closure providing campers with access to resources/services and time to remove their belongings,outcomes of the resource fair included:40 individuals engaged by Volunteers of America (VOA)Youth Outreach (with eight qualifying for youth services),VOA City Outreach engaged 63 adult individuals,Road Home engaged 16 individuals for housing conversations (with one person admitted into the program),Valley Behavioral Health engaged 15 individuals (with six persons expressing interest in treatment programs),4th Street Clinic provided COVID-19 testing (20 individuals tested/one positive test),VOA City Outreach team placed seven individuals into shelter programs,Drivers License Division assisted with 29 appointments for identification cards,the City’s Justice Court was on-site for mobile court hearings (46 cases heard)and 3rd District Court hearing 11 total cases,updates regarding the City’s tiny home initiative,including:three working groups being formed (finance,land use, service providers)with plans to form a pilot program by winter 2021.(Council Members will be invited to participate in the working groups).Mayor Mendenhall also spoke regarding a recent tragic death of a woman camping in a City resident’s yard and provided facts/timeline of the situation leading up to the death. 2.Informational:Updates on Racial Equity and Policing ~4:30 p.m. 20 min. The Council will hold a discussion about recent efforts on various projects City staff are working on related to racial equity and policing in the City.The conversation may include issues of community concern about race,equity,and justice in relation to law enforcement policies, procedures,budget,and ordinances.Discussion may include: •An update or report on the Commission on Racial Equity in Policing;and •Other project updates or discussion. FYI –Project Timeline:(subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing -Recurring Briefing Set Public Hearing Date -n/a Hold hearing to accept public comment -n/a TENTATIVE Council Action -n/a Minutes: Allison Rowland provided information regarding upcoming Racial Equity in Policing (REP) Commission meeting date/time with two items of special interest on the agenda:Police Department budget audit introduction and questions/responses from listening session/discussion. Mike Brown provided information/updates regarding Violent Crime Task Force,including: team partners included US Attorneys,US Marshall,Department of Public Safety,Bureau of Alcohol,Tobacco,Firearms,and Explosives (ATF),Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI),Homeland Security,Adult Parole and Probation (APP), Sheriff Rivera,and jail personnel,task force accomplishments included multiple defendants being charged federally for illegal fire arms,drug trafficking,gang-affiliation,parole/probation violations,and current/prior domestic violations,and presentation of a sample dashboard to view department accomplishments/results (Crime Control Plan Public Dashboard –planned to go live next week)that included cases by week/year,cases with drugs/drug types/doses,cases with guns/total guns seized,etc. 3.Informational:State Legislative Briefing ~4:50 p.m. 20 min. The Council will be briefed by the Administration about issues affecting the City that may arise during the 2021 Utah State Legislative Session. FYI –Project Timeline:(subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing -Tuesday,January 12,2021;Tuesday,February 2,2021;and Tuesday,February 9,2021 Set Public Hearing Date -n/a Hold hearing to accept public comment -n/a TENTATIVE Council Action -n/a Minutes: Kate Bradshaw (Holland &Hart Law Firm,contract lobbyist)provided updates regarding:billboard legislation (Senate Bill (SB)61 –on-going negotiations),law enforcement legislation (lobbying efforts aligning with City values/directives),regulatory sandboxes (allowing new industries to test operations free of some regulations –with City suggested amendments for transparency),and Airport lobbying efforts that were outside of the legislative process (issues regarding flight paths,runway noise,land for potential development being impacted due to runway expansion,etc.). Councilmember Rogers requested more information regarding the Airport issues/what was agreed upon.Ms.Bradshaw said there were avigation easements agreed to,providing proper notice to those who might reside in newly developed areas surrounding the Airport,with the understanding (at the time of purchase)of such agreement and to be recorded in perpetuity with the property. Councilmember Fowler thanked Ms.Bradshaw and the legislative team for their efforts during this years session. 4.Ordinance:Amendment to Require Notice for Permits to Work in the Public Way Follow-up ~5:10 p.m. 20 min. The Council will receive a follow-up briefing on proposed amendments to City code that would require permit holders to provide notice to property owners whose properties are adjacent to above-ground work that will be performed in the public way.The key changes would require: •Evidence that notice was provided to all property owners whose properties are adjacent to the portion of the public way where the work is being performed. •Notice that includes the name of the permit holder performing the construction,the purpose of the construction,and a contact phone number and email for the permit holder. FYI –Project Timeline:(subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing -Tuesday,January 12,2021 and Tuesday,February 9,2021 Set Public Hearing Date -Tuesday,December 8,2020 Hold hearing to accept public comment -Tuesday,January 19,2021 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action -TBD Minutes: Nick Tarbet provided an introduction and follow-up information for the Council to consider, including:review of public comments expressing concern the public notice only pertained to above ground work and not below ground work,and specific requests/issues raised from Verizon Wireless. Straw Poll:Support for placing the ordinance “as is”on a future agenda item for Council action.All Council Members were in favor. Matt Cassel spoke on providing notice for above vs.below ground work,including:verified outreach broadened for below ground work would utilize more employees (resource issue),a database would be needed for recording/verifying notification to residences affected,the need for defining boundaries of who should receive notifications,current City notification policy (no City monitoring –not well defined,no specificity)vs.a new ordinance (holding companies accountable),City’s capability to enforce fines (unable to without a permit issued for work in the public right-of-way),possibility to deny permits if noticing was not provided (if stated in an ordinance),current noticing process for City work in the public right-of-way (email list,website posting,flyers left at residences –a year in advance for many projects),fines/fining being heavily restricted by State Code and not seen as a strong tool (notice was required and $25/day was barely impactful)but important to have in place,and the best leverage for the City being the issuance of a permit (allowing more control of the outcomes with contractors). Kimberly Chytrus provided information regarding:existing City policy for notifying residents (not codified),service providers currently providing noticing on barriers/traffic cones on intersections to notify the neighborhood and not on individual homes (needing to be addressed within the proposed ordinance),issue raised by Verizon Wireless that it was not appropriate for them notify adjacent property owners for potential construction when permits were not yet secured (having to provide notice before permits were approved)but willing to provide noticing after permitting/before construction (verification requiring additional City resources),and the need to codify the Council’s preferred parameters for above and below ground noticing requirements. Councilmember Mano expressed concerns that current noticing was vague,there were various stages of construction work done at different times,and landscaping was not always repaired promptly after work was completed and/or correctly.He suggested the requiring of noticing be the burden of the provider to track noticing/provide proof of noticing,and that noticing require specific details of the work to be done. Councilmember Johnston said he was sensitive to the volume of work it would entail for the providers regarding notification/verification of pending construction work,and would be interested in requiring (within an ordinance)an online posting of information regarding the work to be done (name of company doing work,where,when,and contact information)be made available to the public. Councilmember Wharton said he envisioned the required noticing to go as far as a flyer/postcard on the resident’s door,a mailer (and receipt of mass mailing and who they were sent to),or an affidavit (stating specifics of verified noticing),and if complaints arose for no notice provided –only then City resources/staff would be needed to look into it and suggested an online form for providers to confirm they completed the required noticing.He added that relying on good-faith for providers to provide noticing to residents was no longer working. Blake Thomas acknowledged there was a desire for an ordinance that spelled out best practices and it was Engineering/Community &Neighborhood’s role to work with Ms.Chytraus, et al to deliver that product with the providers maintaining those records,and hoped to come back to the Council with that in mind. Councilmember Folwer inquired what a reasonable time frame would be to revisit the underground noticing requirements portion,looking at policies in place,and perhaps add what was discussed today (noticing timeline/specifications).Ms.Chytraus said she recognized the importance of the issue and said she would prioritize it,inquired what the Council would want to see for underground work that was different from what was proposed for above ground work, and advised that the ordinance (as written)was for pre-permit notification to adjacent property owners (working with the provider on what evidence would be accepted).Councilmember Fowler offered that perhaps adding the term underground to the proposed ordinance would allow for revisiting the issue sooner than later.Ms Chytraus verified that adding the preferred requirements for underground work and elements of what was discussed today into the proposed ordinance would not take a lot of additional time. 5.Ordinance:Library Budget Amendment No.1 for Fiscal Year 2020-21 ~5:30 p.m. 30 min. The Council will be briefed about a proposal to amend the budget for the Library Fund for Fiscal Year 2020-21.Budget amendments happen several times each year to reflect adjustments to the City’s budgets,including proposed project additions and modifications.The proposed amendment includes funding to complete the Library’s Master Facilities Plan,a grant to increase digital access to underserved populations in the City,for earthquake repairs to the Main Library Branch,and Sprague Branch renovations,among other changes. FYI –Project Timeline:(subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing -Tuesday,February 9,2021 Set Public Hearing Date -Tuesday,February 16,2021 Hold hearing to accept public comment -TBD TENTATIVE Council Action -TBD Minutes: Russell Weeks provided a brief introduction to the proposal and noted the Council would set the public hearing date on February 16,2021 for March 2,2021. Peter Bromberg provided information regarding requests within the General Fund and Capital Fund,including:$170,895 for continuation of Master Facilities Planning process (out of Fund Balance –carried forward to Fiscal Year (FY)2021 budget),$30,000 for earthquake repairs (out of Fund Balance),$420,000 for Institute,Museum,and Library Services Grant from the federal government (added to the budget –no reduction of Fund Balance)for developing a model for increasing digital access to underserved populations in the City (Digital Navigators Program –providing one on one outreach/assistance –focused on the City’s west side neighborhoods),$105,000 for Sprague Branch renovations (addressing unforeseen additional construction work),and $30,000 to fully furnish the renovated portion (out of Fund Balance), and $125,000 for HVAC filtration for the safety of staff/patrons (installation of ionization filtration systems for all eight library locations). Councilmember Mano inquired how the Council and constituents could be more involved with the Master Facilities planning process.Mr.Bromberg said he could provide a presentation to the Council at a future work session,and/or set up individual/small group meetings with the Council to discuss further details.He added that public engagement sessions were conducted last year but was worth revisiting through updated virtual meetings via social media. 6.Resolution:Awarding U.S.Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)Coronavirus Aid,Relief,and Economic Security (CARES)Act Grant Funds Follow-up ~6:00 p.m. 20 min. The Council will receive a follow-up briefing about funding recommendations from resident advisory boards and the Mayor and approving an interlocal agreement between the City and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).This agreement allocates and awards funding to those applicants.Community partners submitted applications for one-time pandemic response funding from Community Development Block Grant (CDBG-CV),Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG- CV)and Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA)grants. FYI –Project Timeline:(subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing -Tuesday,January 19,2021;Tuesday,February 2,2021;and Tuesday,February 9,2021 Set Public Hearing Date -n/a Hold hearing to accept public comment -n/a TENTATIVE Council Action -Tuesday,February 16,2021 Minutes: Benjamin Luedtke provided the following information:this was the third briefing regarding funding recommendations with a potential vote scheduled for February 16,2021,the Council having previously determined food insecurity and equitable vaccination distribution as policy priorities for unallocated funds,remaining funds included:$468,900 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG-CV),and $460,828 Emergency Solutions Grants (ESG-CV), and details of the following:$40,000 difference in CDBG-CV between available funds and what would be requested (Council to decide on giving all funds to Nourish To Flourish,or make available for equitable distribution of vaccines),and $5,000 remaining in ESG-CV with no recommended use (Council to consider how to distribute). Lani Eggertsen-Goff and Tony Milner provided information regarding number of individuals served/clients who were served (Nourish To Flourish –62,000 meals –working with partners for clients to receive needed meals,etc.),Soap to Hope outreach (5,200 served – specializing with victims of human trafficking,others with substance abuse issues), Sustainability Department providing food boxes through various community partners (targeting hardest hit communities),and working closely with those receiving funding to record measurable output/outcomes. Mayor Mendenhall added that there was a lot of need with the community organizations that have been spoken about,but money did not seem to be the driving/motivating force. Councilmember Johnston requested the Sustainability Department provide information regarding their process in using community partners for the food boxes,making it clear the community was being served. 7.Informational:Update on Windstorm Budget ~6:20 p.m. 5 min. The Council will be briefed about proposed funding for repairs throughout the City from the September 8,2020 Windstorm and changes from what was previously estimated for the Council. The Administration is not requesting additional funding.Previously appropriated funding would be adjusted and reassigned due to new estimates of various project needs.Changes of use for the funding include additional sprinkler repairs at an estimated 150 locations,and multiple repair and restoration projects to the City Cemetery. FYI –Project Timeline:(subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing -Tuesday,February 9,2021 Set Public Hearing Date -n/a Hold hearing to accept public comment -n/a TENTATIVE Council Action -n/a Minutes: Jennifer Bruno and Mary Beth Thompson briefed the Council regarding:new/updated details regarding final funding estimates (with no action needed within a budget amendment), $5,925,000 was requested in Budget Amendment No.3 with several different areas of funding, now with two additional needs (sprinkler repairs from downed City trees in public right-of-way, and removal/reinstallation of monuments,sod replacement,headstone repair,etc.at the cemetery). Straw Poll:Support for approval of the Administration’s adjusted/reassigned funding for various project needs.All Council Members were in favor. Standing Items 8.Report of the Chair and Vice Chair Report of Chair and Vice Chair. Minutes: Council Chair Fowler made a statement regarding the recent death of a City employee,Greg Mikolash,and offered condolences on behalf of the Council to the Building Department and all of those who worked with him,as well as his family. 9.Report and Announcements from the Executive Director Report of the Executive Director,including a review of Council information items and announcements.The Council may give feedback or staff direction on any item related to City Council business,including but not limited to scheduling items. Minutes: A.COVID Memorial Day –Local Proclamation and Support A few Council Members received an email from Smart City Policy Group asking if the Salt Lake City Council would like to adopt a COVID-19 Victims and Survivors Memorial Day Resolution and recognize March 1st as COVID Memorial Day in Salt Lake City.Staff will work with the requestor to see if it’s possible to get a resolution prepared for next Tuesday’s meeting. Are Council Members supportive of considering a resolution? Councilmember Fowler suggested the Council review the email from Smart City Policy Group, coordinate with Staff if there are any questions,and let Staff know if they were interested/not interested. Cindy Gust-Jenson said the email would be redistributed for immediate attention,a draft of the resolution would be requested from the organization,and Staff will let them know that the Council’s decision is pending.She said a draft resolution will be made available to the Council as soon as possible (before a commitment is implied). 10.Closed Session The Council will consider a motion to enter into Closed Session.A closed meeting described under Section 52-4-205 may be held for specific purposes including,but not limited to: a.discussion of the character,professional competence,or physical or mental health of an individual; b.strategy sessions to discuss collective bargaining; c.strategy sessions to discuss pending or reasonably imminent litigation; d.strategy sessions to discuss the purchase,exchange,or lease of real property,including any form of a water right or water shares,if public discussion of the transaction would: (i)disclose the appraisal or estimated value of the property under consideration;or (ii)prevent the public body from completing the transaction on the best possible terms; e.strategy sessions to discuss the sale of real property,including any form of a water right or water shares,if: (i)public discussion of the transaction would: (A)disclose the appraisal or estimated value of the property under consideration;or (B)prevent the public body from completing the transaction on the best possible terms; (ii)the public body previously gave public notice that the property would be offered for sale;and (iii)the terms of the sale are publicly disclosed before the public body approves the sale; f.discussion regarding deployment of security personnel,devices,or systems;and g.investigative proceedings regarding allegations of criminal misconduct. A closed meeting may also be held for attorney-client matters that are privileged pursuant to Utah Code §78B-1-137,and for other lawful purposes that satisfy the pertinent requirements of the Utah Open and Public Meetings Act. Minutes: Council Members in Attendance:Fowler,Valdemoros,Rogers,Dugan,Johnston,Mano,and Wharton Other Attendees:Mayor Erin Mendenhall,Cindy Gust-Jenson,Benjamin Luedtke,David Salazar,Allison Rowland,Lehua Weaver,Jason Oldroyd,Jennifer Bruno,John Vuyk,Lisa Shaffer,Lorna Vogt,Mary Beth Thompson,Rachel Otto,Cindy Lou Trishman,Katherin Lewis, Robert Nutzman,Debra Alexander Closed Session Adjourned at Motion: Moved by Councilmember Wharton,seconded by Councilmember Dugan to enter into Closed Session to discuss collective bargaining strategies pursuant to Utah Code §52-4-205(1)(b). AYE:Andrew Johnston,James Rogers,Chris Wharton,Ana Valdemoros,Darin Mano,Daniel Dugan,Amy Fowler Final Result:7 –0 Pass CERTIFICATE OF POSTING On or before 5:00 p.m.on _____________________,the undersigned,duly appointed City Recorder, does hereby certify that the above notice and agenda was (1)posted on the Utah Public Notice Website created under Utah Code Section 63F-1-701,and (2)a copy of the foregoing provided to The Salt Lake Tribune and/or the Deseret News and to a local media correspondent and any others who have indicated interest. CINDY LOU TRISHMAN SALT LAKE CITY RECORDER Final action may be taken in relation to any topic listed on the agenda,including but not limited to adoption,rejection,amendment,addition of conditions and variations of options discussed. People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodation,which may include alternate formats,interpreters,and other auxiliary aids and services.Please make requests at least two business days in advance.To make a request,please contact the City Council Office at council.comments@slcgov.com, 801-535-7600,or relay service 711. COUNCIL STAFF REPORT CITY COUNCIL of SALT LAKE CITY TO:City Council Members FROM: Nick Tarbet, Policy Analyst DATE: February 9, 2021 RE:Text Amendment: Public Notice for Permits to Work in the Public Right of Way PROJECT TIMELINE: Written Briefing: Jan 12, 2021 Briefing #Feb 9, 2021 Set Date: December 8, 2020 Public Hearing 1: Jan 19, 2021 Potential Action: TBD PUBLIC HEARING SUMMARY During the public hearing members of the public spoke about the proposed changes and asked some questions, Additionally, a letter from Verizon was submitted pertaining to the proposed change. A few individuals requested the Council require public notice for below ground work as well. Some also said current contractors are not doing a good job of restoring property to the way it was before the work happened. Verizon representatives spoke during the public hearing and also submitted a letter, outlining their concerns. They stated the current process is efficient and they would prefer to provide notice to property owners after the permit has been received. The new ordinance would require them to provide notice before they obtain a permit. Council staff met with staff from CAN and the Attorney’s Office to go over the comments and formulate the following responses. 1. Request to apply the notification requirement to work “below ground” as well. Administrative staff said this is obviously possible, but it will likely require an increase in staff and costs for the city to monitor and / or respond to concerns about projects. The proposed change before the Council would only require public notice to adjacent property owners for above ground work – typically, this type of work is limited to a few properties that are near the above ground poles/facilities. Page | 2 Underground work can go for hundreds of yards (larger/longer projects would be miles). It would take more staff to verify and ensure the public notices were properly provided. Administrative staff have prepared some very preliminary estimates for cost/staffing impact to the City. They will be available during the briefing to respond to questions the Council may have about potential cost of notifying for below ground work. 2. Reponses to Verizon’s Letter Verizon’s request: Allow permit holders to post notice after the permit is obtained. Prefer to submit template with permit application and actual notice is provided 48-72 hours before work commences. Administration response: o CAN staff said the current process has not been working and that is the reason for the proposed changes. The goal is to get the notifications out sooner, so the public is aware of the work before the permit is issued. o The new process would require the permit holder to submit evidence that the notice was provided to adjacent property owners. They then submit that as part of their permit application. The work would typically commence about 2-3 weeks later. Verizon’s request: Clarify type of evidence that is required to demonstrate applicant has satisfied notification requirement. Administration response: o CAN staff said notice such as a door hangar, with timestamped photos is one way to satisfy this requirement. o The goal is to avoid situations where a piece of paper is placed on a doorstep that can easily be blown away. Verizon’s request: Adopt definition of adjacent owner currently in notification process. Administration response: o CAN staff stated this could be clarified. Verizon’s request: Clarify purpose of the notice and what is to be included in the description of the purpose of construction. Administration response: o CAN staff has stated they can help provide examples of the type of language they that should be on the notice. o They can do this to help ensure consistency for all permit holders. Verizon’s request: Clarify definition of above ground work; does it include excavation to run conduit or lay fiber. Administration response: o CAN staff has stated this type of work applies to facilities that are permanently above ground or on poles or anything that would fall under the master license agreement for small cells. o Typically, this type of work would also include trenching for conduit. Page | 3 Verizon’s request: Any other info reasonably required by City engineer is too broad Administration response: o CAN staff stated this is meant to be specific to notice requirements. They can provide some language to clarify that. POLICY QUESTIONS 1. Some Council Members have expressed interest to require more public notice for below ground work. Does the Council want to adopt these proposed changes and also adopt a legislative action asking the Administration to come back with a proposal for increased public outreach for underground work in the public right of way? o This may include identifying options to require contractors to do the outreach and an option for the city to be responsible for providing the public notice 2. The Council may want to ask about the description of information that would be suggested / requested for the notice. For example, location, description, duration of type of work; contact information for the contractor and City, etc.? 3. The Council may wish to ask what the change in the timeline for permit holders would be and how the Administration can notify potential applicants of the changes. The following information was provide for the January 19 public hearing. It is provided again for background purposes. WORK SESSION SUMMARY This item was on the January 12 agenda as a written briefing. Council Members did not raise any concerns or ask staff questions about the proposed changes. The public hearing is scheduled for January 19. The following information was provide for the January 12 work session briefing. It is provided again for background purposes. ISSUE AT-A-GLANCE The Council will be briefed on proposed amendments to City code requiring permit holders to provide notice to property owners whose properties are adjacent to the above groundwork that will be performed in the public way. The proposed changes were requested in response to numerous constituent inquiries about the lack of notice to adjacent property owners. Much of the right-of-way work that is performed is governed by State statute and limits the amount of interaction the City has with the work. However, in balancing the work that is performed and the impact to residents, some additional noticing steps are being added to the ordinance. The key changes would require the franchise holder/applicant to provide the following: Evidence that they provided notice to all property owners whose properties are adjacent to the portion of the public way where the work is being performed. Page | 4 Notice that includes the name of the permit holder performing the construction, the purpose of the construction, and a contact phone number and email for the permit holder. Evidence shall be satisfactory to the City Engineer that all adjacent property owners have received notice. Related text cleanups to match current practice. Since work in the public right of way is overseen by the City’s Engineering Division, they have reviewed the ordinance in collaboration with the Attorney’s Office. Engineering has expressed their support for these proposed changes. Administrative staff have noted the contractor will have to give notice of the construction prior to submitting an application for a permit to Engineering. Once Engineering approves the permit, the contractor may move forward with construction. PUBLIC PROCESS Engineering provided Council Staff a list of the companies who do much of the work in the public right of way. Council staff emailed this group to let them know about the proposed changes, and the dates of the briefing and public hearing. POLICY QUESTIONS 1. For the properties that would be included in the notification, the Council may wish to consider expanding the requirement beyond the proposal of adjacent property owners. 2. If the Council has questions about the timing of the when the notice must be given to when the permit is granted, the Council may wish to ask the administration to explain the process for when the notice must be given before receiving the permit for construction. 3. If it would be helpful, the Council may wish to ask the Attorney’s office or Administration representative to provide a quick review on the types of things the City is able to require or request versus items that are monitored or regulated by the State. 4. The Council may also ask Engineering to provide a description of their typical interaction with the permit holders. 5. The Council may wish to raise any other issues that have been raised by constituents. 6. The Council may wish to ask about options to address issues when the noticing requirements are not followed. 633 Seventeenth Street, Suite 3000, Denver, CO 80202-3622 Telephone: 303.297.2900 Fax: 303.298.0940 www.shermanhoward.com Active/52780466.1 Melissa Kerin Reagan Sherman & Howard L.L.C. Direct Dial Number: 303.299.8310 E-mail: mreagan@shermanhoward.com January 15, 2021 VIA E-MAIL Salt Lake City City Council 2001 South State Street, N2-200 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-4575 Email: council.comments@slcgov.com Re: Salt Lake City – Municipal Code – Amendments to Sections 14.32.030 and 14.32.035 to Require Notice for Permits to Work in the Public Way Dear City Council Members: We serve as counsel to Verizon Wireless. We appreciate the opportunity to provide comments on and participate in Salt Lake City’s proposed amendments to Sections 14.32.030 and 14.32.035 to require notice of permits to work in the public way (“SLC Wireless Code”). Verizon Wireless wishes to work with City Council and City Staff to adopt revisions to the SLC Wireless Code that address the City’s concerns of ensuring residents whose properties are adjacent to above groundwork that will be performed in the public way while balancing an efficient notification process prior to construction that falls within the parameters of what is permitted under federal and state law. Verizon Wireless currently provides notice to adjacent property owners after it receives its permit, which is typically 48-72 hours prior to performing its wireless and wireline work. The current process is efficient, notifies the correct property owners, provides notice at the appropriate time during the process, and complies with federal and state law. Verizon Wireless recommends City Council codify the notification process that currently is in practice. This letter outlines the notification process currently in place, provides comments regarding the proposed Sections to align with the process currently in place, and addresses the policy questions outlined in the City Staff’s agenda. Salt Lake City City Council January 15, 2021 Page 2 Active/52780466.1 1. Current Verizon Wireless Notification Process of Wireline and Wireless Work in Public Way Currently, for each Verizon Wireless small wireless facility deployed in public ways in Salt Lake City, Verizon Wireless notifies adjacent property owners (where work will be conducted in the public way) of its wireless and wireline work 48-72 hours in advance of performing the work. The notification process Verizon Wireless follows is: • Notice - Door Hanger Template. Verizon Wireless prepares a door hanger notification template for the above ground work it performs in the public way with respect to the small wireless facility. The door hanger template includes name, company identifying information, description of the work and where it will be performed, an email address, informational website, and phone number. A copy of Verizon Wireless’s door hanger notification template is enclosed as Exhibit 1. Verizon Wireless’s wireline counterpart also prepares a door hanger for notification template for the fiber work it performs in the public way and submits it with their application. This door hanger includes name, company identifying information, description of the work and where it will be performed, and an email address. A copy of wireline door hanger notification template is enclosed as Exhibit 2. • Notice Door Hanger Template submitted with Permit Application. The door hanger template is submitted as part of Verizon Wireless’s permit application, and the fiber contractor also submits its door hanger template as part of its permit application for the fiber work. The City provides the applicant notice if the door hanger template is not provided, and the applicant is provided the opportunity to submit the door hanger template. • Scope of Door Hanger Notification - Adjacent Property Owners. The door hangers are placed on the properties of adjacent property owners. Adjacent property owners are defined as all residential properties directly adjacent the path of the above- ground construction work being performed in the public way or directly impacted by the route of the work to the location of the proposed small wireless facility (e.g. the homes affected by boring and directly around the site construction). • Timing of Door Hanger Notification. After the permit application is approved by the City Engineer, Verizon Wireless places the door hanger notifications on the residential adjacent property owners approximately 72 hours prior to when the work is commenced in the public way. The timing of the notification aligns with the City’s goal to provide notice to adjacent property owners that work will be performed that may directly impact those property owners. As the City Staff notes in its January 12, 2021 memo, the current notification process is not a written requirement at this time in the SLC Wireless Code or the City’s Design Guidelines Salt Lake City City Council January 15, 2021 Page 3 Active/52780466.1 or application requirements. Importantly, Verizon Wireless has followed this notification process for the past two years commencing in 2019. The notification process the City currently uses is efficient and provides adequate notice because: 1) the notice is provided after the permit is issued and 48-72 hours prior to the construction work in the public way and notifies adjacent property owners that work is going to be performed; 2) the notice notifies “adjacent property owners” whose property is adjacent to the public way where work will be performed; and 3) the timing of the notification complies with the goal of the City to notify property owners that work will be performed and is within the scope of what the City may do with respect to approval of small wireless permits under state and federal law. 2. Verizon Wireless’s Comments to Proposed Amendments to Section 14.32.030 and 14.32.035 Verizon Wireless requests City Council kindly accept the following comments concerning the proposed Sections on behalf of Verizon Wireless. Also, attached you will find a redline of the proposed SLC Wireless Code with Verizon Wireless’s proposed changes and suggestions as set forth in detail below. a. Section 14.32.030(A)(13) i. Proposed Language in Ordinance: For all above ground installations, evidence that the applicant has provided notice to all property owners whose properties are adjacent to the portion of the public way where the work is being performed. The notice shall contain the name of the permit holder, the purpose of the construction, and a contact phone number and email for the permit holder. Such evidence shall be satisfactory to the City Engineer that all adjacent property owners have received notice. ii. VZW Comment - Timing of When Notice Is Required. The proposed amendment is in the section titled “Permit Application Requirements.” Under the proposed amendment, the applicant will have to provide evidence that “the applicant has provided notice” to adjacent property owners before it submits the permit application. Verizon Wireless respectfully requests that an applicant be required to provide the notification template that it will use to provide notice at the time it submits its application permit and, then, an application will provide the notification to the adjacent property owners 48-72 hours in advance of the work to be performed in the public way. This proposed timing is consistent with the current notice practice where an application submits the template with the permit application and, then, posts notice shortly before the work commences. It is not a logical step in the process to require an applicant to post a notice for construction work when the applicant does not yet have a permit. To do so may confuse the adjacent Salt Lake City City Council January 15, 2021 Page 4 Active/52780466.1 property owners as it may indicate the applicant has started the construction process when it has not yet started. Also, this proposed timing of notice aligns with the City’s goal of providing notice about the work that will be performed in the public way. Providing the notice in advance of the permit being issued does not allow the applicant to specify when the work will be done and may raise questions and confusion if the notice is provided weeks in advance of when the work will be performed. Further, providing notice in advance of the application permit may improperly suggest that the City may consider any public input as part of its decision making process to approve the permit. Small wireless facilities in the right-of-way; and the co-location, installation, operation, modification, maintenance or replacement of small wireless facilities are a permitted use by right in any zone and subject only to administrative review. Utah Code Annotated § 54-21-204(1). The Utah Legislature determined, in enacting S.B. 189 that deployment of small wireless facilities is most effective in rights-of-way to ensure that all citizens in the state will have access to advanced technology and information and is a matter of statewide concern and interest. By declaring that placement of small wireless facilities or networks in the right-of-way are “a permitted used under the authority’s zoning regulation and subject only to administrative review”, the statute furthers the legislative declaration that small wireless facilities should be deployed most effectively in public way. Under S.B. 189, a local authority has the power to give consent to any wireless provider to erect poles or construct any small cell facilities or small cell networks in public rights-of- way. However, the local authority’s consent cannot be unreasonably withheld and Utah Code Annotated § 54-21-103 specifies the limitations on a local authority’s permitting authority. Given the City is limited on when it may withhold its consent for a wireless provider’s permitted by use of the public way, it is important to be mindful of this as to when the City requires notice to adjacent property owners. If the City requires notice prior to the issuance of a permit, adjacent property owners may view this as providing discretion and consideration of their comments and the opportunity for valid applications to be denied in a process where a statutory right involved. To allow for any public input into this review process improperly conveys that the City Engineer may consider any public input as part of its decision making process. The City Engineer cannot improperly deny an application where the applicant has satisfied these requirements or the city will be in violation of state and federal law. Salt Lake City City Council January 15, 2021 Page 5 Active/52780466.1 iii. VZW Comment - Evidence of Notification Requirement. Verizon Wireless respectfully requests that City Council clarify the type of evidence that will be required to demonstrate an applicant has satisfied the notification requirement. Verizon Wireless recommends the City accept a one-page construction drawing that denotes which adjacent property owners the applicant notified of the work to be performed in the public way, the signature of the applicant representative that provided the notices, and the date the notices were provided. A copy of a sample of the proposed one- page form to evidence the notification is enclosed as Exhibit 3. This one page construction drawing is an excerpt from the construction drawings that are submitted to the City and approved as part of the permit application. The wireline / fiber provider would also provide a similar drawing after their notices have been provided, subject to whether notices are required for fiber work in the public way. The applicants would upload this document to the City’s system after the notices have been posted. iv. VZW Comment - Definition of Adjacent Property Owner. The proposed amendment does not define the term “adjacent property owner.” Verizon Wireless respectfully requests City Council adopt the definition that currently is used in the notification process. Adjacent property owners are defined as all properties directly adjacent the path of the above-ground construction work being performed in the public way or directly impacted by the route of the work to the location of the proposed small wireless facility (e.g. the homes affected by boring and directly around the site construction). This is the correct scope of which property owners should be notified as it aligns with the City’s goal of notifying the property owners who may be directly impacted by the above ground work and are directly adjacent to where the above ground work will be performed. The Utah state statute already provides wireless providers with the right to deploy small wireless facilities within the public way. If the application complies with state law and the City’s code, the City shall approve the application. No factual basis is given to expand the scope of adjacent property owners to properties within a certain radius or blocks of the proposed facility, and adds an impermissible regulatory burden when the current process is working well and fairly for all concerned. v. VZW Comment - Purpose of Construction. Verizon Wireless respectfully requests that City Council clarify the purpose of the notice and what is to be included in the description of the “purpose of construction”. Currently, Verizon Wireless’s door hangers include a description of the work and where it will be performed. This notice correctly and already aligns with the Salt Lake City City Council January 15, 2021 Page 6 Active/52780466.1 City’s goal to provide notice to property owners that construction is commencing and the application complies with local, state, and federal requirements. vi. VZW Comment - Above-Ground Work in Public Way. Verizon Wireless respectfully requests City Council clarify the definition of “above ground work” and whether it includes work such as excavation to run conduit or lay fiber. Verizon Wireless proposes that notification be provided if the primary purpose of the work to be performed in the public way is above- ground work such as constructing a wireless facility. If the primary purpose is to run conduit underground, then, the applicant is not required to provide notice of work in the public way. Currently, an adjacent property owner likely receives two notifications – one for above-ground wireless work and one for fiber work – and these notices may occur at different times. This may cause confusion for the property owners regarding what work is being performed and by which entity. b. Section 14.32.030(A)(14) i. Proposed Language in Ordinance: Any other information that may be reasonably be required by the City Engineer. ii. VZW Comment. This provision is significantly overbroad and allows for substantial amount of discretion on the part of the City Engineer as there are no limitations on “other information” that could be required. The current application process already requires all of the information needed under Section 14.32.035(A), and this provision was reviewed when the City Council enacted the provision, so no new regulation is needed. Further, the term “reasonably” is subject to varying interpretations. Verizon Wireless respectfully requests City Council remove this provision or provide more specificity as to what type of “other information” the City Engineer may request. One potential alternative may be “Any other technological, engineering, or construction information that may be reasonably required by the City Engineer subject to the requirements under federal, state, and local law.” c. Section 14.32.035(A)(8) i. Proposed Language in Ordinance: Evidence that the applicant has provided required notice to adjacent property owners. Salt Lake City City Council January 15, 2021 Page 7 Active/52780466.1 ii. VZW Comment. Verizon Wireless respectfully requests City Council adopt its proposal set forth in Section 2.a.iii above as to what is sufficient evidence for the applicant to submit to show it provided the required notice. 3. City Staff Report – Policy Questions In the City Staff Report regarding the proposed amendments to Sections 14.32.030 and 14.32.035, the City Staff includes six policy questions for City Council to consider. Verizon Wireless provides its comments and guidance on those policy questions that are appropriate for the City Council’s consideration based upon its experience with the current notice it provides in Salt Lake City as well as its experience with notice requirements in other jurisdictions through the west region. 1. For the properties that would be included in the notification, the Council may wish to consider expanding the requirement beyond the proposal of adjacent property owners. For the reasons set forth in Section 2.a.iv above, Verizon Wireless respectfully requests City Council focus the notification to the adjacent property owners. As noted in the City Staff’s report, the purpose of the notification is to ensure that adjacent property owners whose properties are adjacent to the above groundwork receive notice that will be performed in the public way and where the work is being performed. Focusing the notification to only adjacent property owners accomplishes the City’s objective and would be compliant with state and federal law in responding to those comments and denying permits. 2. If the Council has questions about the timing of the when the notice must be given to when the permit is granted, the Council may wish to ask the administration to explain the process for when the notice must be given before receiving the permit for construction. For the reasons set forth above in Section 2.a.ii, Verizon Wireless respectfully requests City Council require a notice template to be submitted with the permit application and the actual notice be provided after the permit is issued and 48-72 hours before the work commences in the public way. This also aligns with the City’s goal to provide timely notice to property owners when work in the public way may occur that is adjacent to their property. 6. The Council may wish to ask about options to address issues when the noticing requirements are not followed. Verizon Wireless proposes that if there is an issue when the notice requirements are not followed, the City provide the applicant with notice and either require the applicant to resubmit the notice template or provide the applicant with the contact information of any individuals or entities who did not receive the requisite notice and the applicant will be required to contact that individual or entity within 24 hours. Salt Lake City City Council January 15, 2021 Page 8 Active/52780466.1 Again, Verizon Wireless appreciates the opportunity to comment on Salt Lake City’s proposed amendments regarding notice requirements for work in the public way. Verizon Wireless wishes to work with Salt Lake City to enact regulations that which conform to state and federal law, are reasonable for implementation, and which are fair to all stakeholders. Verizon Wireless believes that such results can be accomplished. Verizon Wireless representatives will be in attendance at the City Council meeting on Tuesday, January 19 and available to answer any questions you may have. We would appreciate the opportunity to talk to you with you and discuss these matters. Thank you. Sincerely, Melissa K. Reagan Encl. cc: Ms. Kimberly Chytraus (via email) LEGISLATIVE DRAFT SALT LAKE CITY ORDINANCE 1 No. _____ of 2020 2 (Amendment to Require Notice for Permits to Work in the Public Way) 3 An ordinance amending sections 14.32.030 and 14.32.035 of the Salt Lake City Code 4 pertaining to notice of permits to work in the public way. 5 WHEREAS, the City Engineer has by policy requested that holders of a permit to work in 6 the public way provide notice of such work to adjacent property owners prior to commencing 7 such work; and 8 WHEREAS, the City Council desires that where there is an above ground installation, 9 notice to adjacent property owners will be a requirement to obtain a permit to work in the public 10 way; and 11 WHEREAS, the City Council now desires to amend this ordinance; and 12 WHEREAS, the City Council finds that this ordinance is in the best interest of the public. 13 NOW, THEREFORE, be it ordained by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah: 14 SECTION 1. Amending the Text of Salt Lake City Code Section 14.32.030. That Section 14.32.030 15 of the Salt Lake City Code (Permit Application Requirements) shall be and hereby is amended as follows: 16 14.32.030: PERMIT APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: 17 A. The permit applicationApplications for a permit shall be filed with the City Engineer on a 18 form or forms to be furnished by the City Engineer, and shall contain, as applicable: 19 20 1. The name, address, telephone number, and facsimile numberemail of the applicant. 21 Where an applicant is not the owner or in sole control of the facility to be installed, 22 maintained or repaired in the public way, the application also shall include the name, address, 23 telephone number, and facsimile numberemail of the owner; 24 25 2. A description of the location, purpose, method of the proposed work, and surface and 26 subsurface area to be affected; 27 28 3. Where required by the City Engineer, aA plan showing the proposed location of the 29 work and the dimensions of any excavation and the facilities to be installed, maintained, or 30 2 repaired in connection with the work, and such other details, existing utilities, and drawing 31 standards as the City Engineer may require; 32 33 4. The proposed start date of the work;A copy or other documentation of the use permit 34 authorizing the applicant or owner to use or occupy the public way for the purpose described 35 in the application, including the appropriate franchise agreement or master license 36 agreement. Where the applicant is not the owner of the facility or facilities to be installed, 37 maintained, or repaired, the applicant must demonstrate in a form and manner specified by 38 the City Engineer that the applicant is authorized to act on behalf of the owner; 39 5.4. 40 The proposed start date of the work; 41 42 6.5. The proposed duration of the work, which shall includeincluding the duration of 43 the restoration of the public way physically disturbed by the work; 44 45 7.6. The applicant’s signature, certifyingWritten certification that all material to be 46 used in the work and restoration of the public way, will be on hand and ready for use so as 47 not to delay the work and the prompt restoration of the public way; 48 49 8.7. The applicant’s signature, committing Written certification that the applicant and 50 owner are will perform the work in compliance with all terms and conditions of this chapter, 51 the orders, and all applicable rules and engineering regulations of the City Engineer, and that 52 the applicant and owner are not subject to any outstanding assessments, fees or penalties that 53 have been finally determined by the City; 54 55 9.8. Evidence that applicant carries of insurance as required by either 56 section 14.32.065 of this chapter or the applicable agreement with the City; 57 58 10.9. A performance deposit security device as required by section 14.32.070 of this 59 chapter; 60 61 11.10. A scaled site plan, rendering or photo simulation, scaled elevation view and 62 other supporting drawings and calculations, showing the location and dimension of all 63 improvements. The submittal must include sufficient information to determine compliance 64 with the standards and requirements of this chapter, specifically including information 65 concerning structure height and location within the public way, compliance with the City's 66 intersection and driveway sight distance standards, and compliance with the ADA; 67 68 12.11. Evidence of all regulatory approvals, permits, authorizations or licenses for the 69 offering of such services from the appropriate Federal, State, and local authorities (whether 70 3 the services are being offered by the permit provider or another person), upon request of 71 City; 72 73 13.12. Evidence that the owner franchise holder (if not the applicant) has provided 74 permission to perform the work on behalf of the owner franchise holder and, if applicable, 75 permission to use or attach to owner's franchise holder’s property in the public way; and 76 77 13. For all above ground installations, evidence that the applicant has provided notice to all 78 property owners whose properties are adjacent to the portion of the public way where the 79 work is being performed. The notice shall contain the name of the permit holder, the purpose 80 of the construction, and a contact phone number and email for the permit holder. Such 81 evidence shall be satisfactory to the City Engineer that all adjacent property owners have 82 received notice; and 83 84 14. Any other information that may reasonably be required by the City Engineer. 85 86 87 SECTION 2. Amending the Text of Salt Lake City Code Section 14.32.035. That Section 14.32.035 88 of the Salt Lake City Code (Permit Application Approval Criteria) shall be and hereby is amended as follows: 89 14.32.035: PERMIT APPLICATION APPROVAL CRITERIA; APPROVAL OR 90 DENIAL: 91 92 A. Factors to be considered by the City in In reviewing the permit application for approval, 93 and the scope and timing of approved work, shall includethe City Engineer shall consider, among 94 other things, the following: 95 1. The capacity of the public way to accommodate the facilities proposed to be constructed 96 and installed, and the compatibility of such new facilities with existing facilities; 97 98 2. Any damage to or disruption of public or private facilities, improvements, or 99 landscaping then existing in the public way; 100 101 3. The capacity of the public way to accommodate multiple work projects in the public 102 way or other conflicting uses of the public way; 103 3. The public interest in minimizing the cost and disruption of construction from numerous 104 excavations in the public way; 105 106 4. Any then existing excavation restrictions imposed by the City Engineer pursuant to 107 section 14.32.085 of this chapter; 108 4 109 5. The availability of alternatives to excavation, including, without limitation, the 110 existence of excess capacity in the public way, or the feasibility of using tunneling, boring, or 111 other trenchless technology; 112 113 6. The qualifications and reputation of the applicant; 114 115 7. The financial strength of the applicant, including the applicant's ability to provide the 116 required bonding and security; and 117 118 7.8. Evidence that tThe applicant has provided required notice to adjacent property 119 owners.and 120 121 8. Potential conflicts with other uses of the public way. 122 123 B. The City Engineer may deny the issuance of permits to persons who have shown by past 124 performance that they will not consistently conform to the engineering regulations, construction 125 specifications, design standards or the requirements of this chapter; provided that prior to any 126 such denial, such person shall be given written notice of the basis for such denial, and shall be 127 given a reasonable opportunity to be heard in connection therewith. 128 129 C. When necessary, in the judgment of the City Engineer, to fully determine the relationship 130 of the work proposed to existing or proposed facilities within the public ways, or to determine 131 whether the work proposed complies with the engineering regulations, construction 132 specifications and design standards, the City Engineer may require the filing of engineering 133 plans, specifications and sketches showing the proposed work in sufficient detail to permit 134 determination of such relationship or compliance, or both, and the application shall be deemed 135 suspended until such plans and sketches are filed and approved. 136 137 D. The disapproval or denial of an application by the City Engineer may be appealed by the 138 applicant to the Director of Public ServicesCommunity and Neighborhoods, by the filing of a 139 written notice of appeal within ten (10) days of denial. The Director of Community and 140 NeighborhoodsPublic Services shall hear such appeal and render his/her decision, within fifteen 141 (15) days following notice of such appeal. 142 143 E. In approving or disapproving work within the public way, or permits therefor; in the 144 inspection of such work; in reviewing plans, sketches or specifications; and generally in the 145 exercise of the authority conferred upon him/her by this chapter, the City Engineer shall act in 146 such manner as to preserve and protect the public way and the use thereof. 147 148 SECTION 3. Effective Date. This ordinance shall become effective on the date of its 149 passage. 150 5 Passed by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah, this ____ day of _________, 2020. 151 152 153 ______________________________ 154 CHAIRPERSON 155 156 ATTEST AND COUNTERSIGN: 157 158 159 ______________________________ 160 CITY RECORDER 161 162 163 Transmitted to Mayor on _______________________. 164 Mayor’s Action: _______Approved. _______Vetoed. 165 166 ______________________________ 167 MAYOR 168 169 ______________________________ 170 CITY RECORDER 171 172 173 (SEAL) 174 175 176 Bill No. ________ of 2020. 177 Published: ______________. 178 179 Approved As To Form Salt Lake City Attorney’s Office By: _________________________ Kimberly K. Chytraus Date: ______________________ SALT LAKE CITY ORDINANCE No. _____ of 2020 (Amendment to Require Notice for Permits to Work in the Public Way) An ordinance amending sections 14.32.030 and 14.32.035 of the Salt Lake City Code pertaining to notice of permits to work in the public way. WHEREAS, the City Engineer has by policy requested that holders of a permit to work in the public way provide notice of such work to adjacent property owners prior to commencing such work; and WHEREAS, the City Council desires that where there is an above ground installation, notice to adjacent property owners will be a requirement to obtain a permit to work in the public way; and WHEREAS, the City Council now desires to amend this ordinance; and WHEREAS, the City Council finds that this ordinance is in the best interest of the public. NOW, THEREFORE, be it ordained by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah: SECTION 1. Amending the Text of Salt Lake City Code Section 14.32.030. That Section 14.32.030 of the Salt Lake City Code (Permit Application Requirements) shall be and hereby is amended as follows: 14.32.030: PERMIT APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: A. The permit application shall contain, as applicable: 1. The name, address, telephone number, and email of the applicant. Where an applicant is not the owner or in sole control of the facility to be installed, maintained or repaired in the public way, the application also shall include the name, address, telephone number, and email of the owner; 2. A description of the location, purpose, method of the proposed work, and surface and subsurface area to be affected; 3. Where required by the City Engineer, a plan showing the proposed location of the work and the dimensions of any excavation and the facilities to be installed, maintained, or 2 repaired in connection with the work, and such other details, existing utilities, and drawing standards as the City Engineer may require; 4. The proposed start date of the work; 5. The proposed duration of the work, including the duration of the restoration of the public way physically disturbed by the work; 6. The applicant’s signature, certifying that all material to be used in the work and restoration of the public way, will be on hand and ready for use so as not to delay the work and the prompt restoration of the public way; 7. The applicant’s signature, committing that the applicant will perform the work in compliance with all terms and conditions of this chapter, and all applicable engineering regulations; 8. Evidence that applicant carries insurance as required by either section 14.32.065 or the applicable agreement with the City; 9. A security device as required by section 14.32.070; 10. A scaled site plan, rendering or photo simulation, scaled elevation view and other supporting drawings and calculations, showing the location and dimension of all improvements. The submittal must include sufficient information to determine compliance with the standards and requirements of this chapter, specifically including information concerning structure height and location within the public way, compliance with the City's intersection and driveway sight distance standards, and compliance with the ADA; 11. Evidence of all regulatory approvals, permits, authorizations or licenses for the offering of such services from the appropriate Federal, State, and local authorities (whether the services are being offered by the permit provider or another person), upon request of City; 12. Evidence that the franchise holder (if not the applicant) has provided permission to perform the work on behalf of the franchise holder and, if applicable, permission to use or attach to franchise holder’s property in the public way; 13. For all above ground installations, evidence that the applicant has provided notice to all property owners whose properties are adjacent to the portion of the public way where the work is being performed. The notice shall contain the name of the permit holder, the purpose of the construction, and a contact phone number and email for the permit holder. Such evidence shall be satisfactory to the City Engineer that all adjacent property owners have received notice; and 14. Any other information that may reasonably be required by the City Engineer. 3 SECTION 2. Amending the Text of Salt Lake City Code Section 14.32.035. That Section 14.32.035 of the Salt Lake City Code (Permit Application Approval Criteria) shall be and hereby is amended as follows: 14.32.035: PERMIT APPLICATION APPROVAL CRITERIA; APPROVAL OR DENIAL: A. In reviewing the permit application for approval, the City Engineer shall consider, among other things, the following: 1. The capacity of the public way to accommodate the facilities proposed to be constructed and installed, and the compatibility of such new facilities with existing facilities; 2. Any damage to or disruption of public or private facilities, improvements, or landscaping in the public way; 3. The capacity of the public way to accommodate multiple work projects in the public way or other conflicting uses of the public way; 4. Any existing excavation restrictions imposed by the City Engineer pursuant to section 14.32.085; 5. The availability of alternatives to excavation, including, without limitation, the existence of excess capacity in the public way, or the feasibility of using tunneling, boring, or other trenchless technology; 6. The qualifications and reputation of the applicant; 7. The financial strength of the applicant, including the applicant's ability to provide the required security; and 8. Evidence that the applicant has provided required notice to adjacent property owners. B. The City Engineer may deny the issuance of permits to persons who have shown by past performance that they will not consistently conform to the engineering regulations, construction specifications, design standards or the requirements of this chapter; provided that prior to any such denial, such person shall be given written notice of the basis for such denial, and shall be given a reasonable opportunity to be heard in connection therewith. C. When necessary, in the judgment of the City Engineer, to fully determine the relationship of the work proposed to existing or proposed facilities within the public ways, or to determine whether the work proposed complies with the engineering regulations, construction specifications and design standards, the City Engineer may require the filing of engineering plans, specifications and sketches showing the proposed work in sufficient detail to permit 4 determination of such relationship or compliance, or both, and the application shall be deemed suspended until such plans and sketches are filed and approved. D. The disapproval or denial of an application by the City Engineer may be appealed by the applicant to the Director of Community and Neighborhoods, by the filing of a written notice of appeal within ten (10) days of denial. The Director of Community and Neighborhoods shall hear such appeal and render his/her decision, within fifteen (15) days following notice of such appeal. E. In approving or disapproving work within the public way, or permits therefor; in the inspection of such work; in reviewing plans, sketches or specifications; and generally in the exercise of the authority conferred upon him/her by this chapter, the City Engineer shall act in such manner as to preserve and protect the public way and the use thereof. SECTION 3. Effective Date. This ordinance shall become effective on the date of its passage. Passed by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah, this ____ day of _________, 2020. ______________________________ CHAIRPERSON ATTEST AND COUNTERSIGN: ______________________________ CITY RECORDER Transmitted to Mayor on _______________________. Mayor’s Action: _______Approved. _______Vetoed. ______________________________ MAYOR ______________________________ CITY RECORDER (SEAL) Bill No. ________ of 2020. Published: ______________. Approved As To Form Salt Lake City Attorney’s Office By: _________________________ Kimberly K. Chytraus Date: ______________________ January 5, 2021 CITY COUNCIL OF SALT LAKE CITY 451 SOUTH STATE STREET, ROOM 304 P.O. BOX 145476, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84114-5476 SLCCOUNCIL.COM TEL 801-535-7600 FAX 801-535-7651 COUNCIL STAFF REPORT CITY COUNCIL of SALT LAKE CITY TO:City Council Members FROM: Russell Weeks Senior Policy Analyst DATE:May 1, 2021 at 4:18 PM RE: LIBRARY SYSTEM BUDGET AMENDMENT NO. 1 ISSUE AT-A-GLANCE Goal of the briefing: To discuss proposed amendments to the Salt Lake City Library System budget for the current fiscal year. o The proposed amendment is divided into two parts – an amendment to the System’s General Fund, and an amendment to the System’s Capital Projects Fund. o The proposed amendments would, among other things, recognize receipt of a grant, continue funding for the System’s Master Facilities Plan, and fund items for the Sprague Branch Library renovation. o Because there is no formal meeting February 9, 2021, the City Council would set a date for a public hearing at its February 16 meeting. POLICY QUESTIONS 1.Would the City Council like to schedule an update of progress on the System’s Master Facilities Plan? ADDITIONAL & BACKGROUND INFORMATION Item Schedule: Briefing: February 9, 2020 Set Date: February 16, 2020 Public Hearing: Potential Action: Page | 2 As the Administration transmittal indicates, the Library System Board of Directors at its December 2020 meeting adopted a motion to approve a budget amendment of $620,895 for the Library General Fund, and $260,000 for the Library Capital Projects Fund. The largest revenue source and allocation is a $420,000 grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to develop a model for increasing digital access to underserved populations in Salt Lake City. The grant originally was expected to be awarded in spring 2020. The grant will be used for the System’s Digital Navigators Program and help people in Rose Park, Poplar Grove, and Glendale get connected to the Internet. The program got under way in December 2020. “Navigators,” who work one-on-one with residents, helped 51 people during December, according to Library Director Peter Bromberg.1 The program goal is to help people get connected with affordable home internet, find affordable computing devices, and learn basic digital skills. The proposed amendment also would allocate $170,895 from fund balance to help complete the System’s Master Facilities Plan. The plan is under way, but was not completed by the end of the last fiscal year. The City Council first considered the plan in November 2019. According to Library Director Bromberg, the Master Facilities Plan will be used in conjunction with the 2019 Facilities Condition Assessment to guide the System’s long-term plans for buildings, services, and collections, and assuring that decisions are based on community and staff input about community aspirations, changing neighborhoods, demographics, and economic conditions.2 Another $30,000 would be allocated to help pay for damage to the Main Library from the March 2020 earthquake. According to the transmittal, “While Library staff was able to do many of the repairs, outside contractors were hired to replace broken glass in windows and partitions throughout the Main Library.” Two allocations pertaining to the Capital Projects Fund are $135,000 for the Sprague Branch Library renovation, and $125,000 to install specialized filters in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning units throughout the Library System. At the Library Board of Directors meeting January 25, Deputy Director Deborah Ehrman said the Sprague project is close to receiving a certificate of occupancy. The proposed allocation would help pay for a completely redone east entrance to branch and collections. The east entrance now will have outdoor areas for people to sit. Ms. Ehrman said furniture and computers are scheduled to be installed by mid-March. Allocating the $125,000 would speed up installation of ionization filtration systems in HVAC units at all libraries. According to the transmittal, “In addition to mitigating the spread of Covid-19, these systems kill mold, bacteria, and other viruses and reduce allergens, odors, smoke and particles.” 1 Library Director’s Report, Peter Bromberg, January 25, 2021, Page 1. 2 Library Director’s Report, Peter Bromberg, January 25, 2021, Page 5. MARY BETH THOMPSON Chief Financial Officer ERIN MENDENHALL Mayor DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE POLICY AND BUDGET DIVISION 451 SOUTH STATE STREET, ROOM 238 PO BOX 145467, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84114-5455 TEL 801-535-6394 CITY COUNCIL TRANSMITTAL ___________________________________ Date Received: ________________ Lisa Shaffer, Chief Administrative Officer Date sent to Council: ___________ ______________________________________________________________________________ TO: Salt Lake City Council DATE: January 6, 2021 Amy Fowler, Chair FROM: Mary Beth Thompson, Chief Financial Officer SUBJECT: Salt Lake City Library Budget Amendment #1 SPONSOR: NA STAFF CONTACT: John Vuyk, Budget Director (801) 535-6394 or Mary Beth Thompson (801) 535-6403 DOCUMENT TYPE: Budget Amendment Ordinance RECOMMENDATION: The Administration recommends that, subsequent to a public hearing, the City Council adopt the following amendments to the FY 2020-21 Library Fund adopted budget. BUDGET IMPACT: REVENUE EXPENSE LIBRARY FUND $ 420,000.00 $ 620,895.00 LIBRARY CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND 0.00 260,000.00 TOTAL $ 420,000.00 $ 880,895.00 Lisa Shaffer (Jan 15, 2021 15:20 MST) BACKGROUND/DISCUSSION: On December 14th, the Salt Lake City Public Library’s Board of Directors approved a budget amendment for the Library Fund that would leave an unrestricted fund balance well above the 16 percent target balance. The Administration is requesting the City Council adopt the proposed budget amendment of $620,895.00 for the Library Fund, and $260,000.00 for the Library Capital Projects Fund. PUBLIC PROCESS: Public Hearing MEMO | November 10, 2020 To: Salt Lake City Public Library Board of Directors, Salt Lake City Administration and City Council From: Peter Bromberg, Executive Director Re: Budget Amendment 1 for FY2020-21 Library Administration is proposing a $620,895 increase to the FY21 general fund budget and a $260,000 increase to the FY21 capital project budget for the following items: General Fund Increases 1. Master Facilities Plan-$170,895: The Library’s FY20 general fund budget was amended to carryover $30,000 from FY19 and add $195,400 in new funding for a comprehensive master facilities plan. The plan is underway but was not completed by June 30, 2020. The remaining funds are needed in FY21 to complete the plan. 2. Institute of Museum and Library Services Grant-$420,000: The Library received a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to develop a model for increasing digital access to underserved populations in our community. The Library is working with the National Digital Inclusion Alliance, the Urban Libraries Council and local partners to develop this model and increase access to technology and digital literacy education in identified areas of Salt Lake City. 3. Earthquake repairs-$30,000: The Library sustained minimal damage during the March earthquake. While Library staff was able to do many of the repairs, outside contractors were hired to replace broken glass in windows and partitions throughout the Main Library. General Fund – Proposed increase of $620,895 Account Name Budget Amount Requested Amount Amended Amount Funding Sources Federal Grants $0 $420,000 $420,000 Fund Balance-Appropriated $2,330,850 $200,895 $2,531,745 Totals $2,330,850 $620,895 $2,951,745 Expenditures Prof & Tech Services $265,400 $170,895 $436,295 Capital Outlay-Buildings $0 $30,000 $30,000 Federal Grants $0 $420,000 $420,000 Totals $265,400 $620,895 $886,295 Capital Project Fund Increases 1. Sprague renovation-$135,000: Additional funding of $105,000 is needed to accommodate construction challenges encountered on the east entrance and $30,000 to fully furnish the renovated Sprague Branch. 2. HVAC Filtration-$125,000: For the safety of staff and patrons, the Library would like to expedite the installation of ionization filtration systems in the HVAC units at all locations. In addition to mitigating the spread of Covid-19, these systems kill mold, bacteria, and other viruses and reduce allergens, odors, smoke and particles. Capital Project Fund – Proposed increase of $260,000 Account Name Budget Amount Requested Amount Amended Amount Funding Sources Fund Balance-Unappropriated $294,800 $260,000 $34,800 Totals $294,800 $260,000 $34,800 Expenditures Cap Outlay-Buildings $2,226,000 $260,000 $2,486,000 Totals $2,226,000 $260,000 $2,486,000 Recommended Motion: Move to approve an increase to the Library’s FY21 general fund budget of $620,895, and an increase to the Library’s FY21capital project fund budget of $260,000. SALT LAKE CITY ORDINANCE No. ______ of 2021 (Amending the Final Budget for the Library Budget of Salt Lake City, Utah for Fiscal Year 2020-21) An ordinance amending Salt Lake City Ordinance No. 25 of 2020 which adopted the final budget for the Library fund of Salt Lake City, Utah, for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2020 and ending June 30, 2021. PREAMBLE On June 16, 2020, the Salt Lake City Council adopted the final budget for the Library fund of Salt Lake City, Utah for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2020 and ending June 30, 2021, in accordance with the requirements of Section 10-6-118 of the Utah Code. The City’s Budget Director, acting as the City’s Budget Officer, prepared and filed with the City Recorder proposed amendments to said duly adopted budget, copies of which are attached hereto, for consideration by the City Council and inspection by the public. All conditions precedent to amend said budget have been accomplished. Be it ordained by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah: SECTION 1. Purpose. The purpose of this Ordinance is to amend the final budget for the Library fund of Salt Lake City as approved, ratified and finalized by Salt Lake City Ordinance No. 25 of 2020. SECTION 2. Adoption of Amendments. The budget amendments, attached hereto and made a part of this Ordinance shall be, and the same hereby are adopted and incorporated into the budget for the Library fund of Salt Lake City, Utah for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2020 and ending June 30, 2021, in accordance with the requirements of Section 10-6-128, of the Utah Code. 2 SECTION 3. Certification to Utah State Auditor. The City’s Policy and Budget Director, acting as the City’s Budget Officer, is authorized and directed to certify and file a copy of said budget amendments with the Utah State Auditor. SECTION 4. Filing of copies of the Budget Amendments. The said Budget Officer is authorized and directed to certify and file a copy of said budget amendments in the office of said Budget Officer and in the office of the City Recorder which amendments shall be available for public inspection. SECTION 5. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall take effect on its first publication. Passed by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah, this _____ day of _______________, 2021. ________________________ CHAIRPERSON ATTEST: ______________________________ CITY RECORDER Transmitted to the Mayor on __________________ Mayor’s Action: ____ Approved ____ Vetoed _________________________ MAYOR ATTEST: _______________________________ CITY RECORDER (SEAL) Bill No. _________ of 2020. Published: ___________________. Salt Lake City Attorney’s Office Approved As To Form _________________________ Jaysen Oldroyd Date:____________________ January 6, 2021 CITY COUNCIL OF SALT LAKE CITY 451 SOUTH STATE STREET, ROOM 304 P.O. BOX 145476, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84114-5476 SLCCOUNCIL.COM TEL 801-535-7600 FAX 801-535-7651 COUNCIL STAFF REPORT CITY COUNCIL of SALT LAKE CITY TO:City Council Members FROM: Ben Luedtke Budget & Public Policy Analyst DATE:February 9, 2021 RE: Awarding U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act grant funds for Community Development Block Grants (CDBG-CV), Emergency Solutions Grants (ESG-CV), and Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA-CV) NEW INFORMATION At the February 2 briefing, the Council discussed with the Administration updates from community partners and the Health Department about potential uses of the unallocated funds: $468,900 CDBG-CV and $460,828 ESG- CV. Additional information is expected after HAND staff meets with Salt Lake County to review applications for the County’s vaccine equity and access program targeted in low income and underserved communities including the residential westside of Salt Lake City. Some of the applications to the County might qualify to use some of the City’s unallocated funds but clarification on this possibility is pending. The County set aside $200,000 for the effort but received over $900,000 in applications. The Council also requested the Administration return with estimates on the number of persons and households served if existing applications to the City were to receive more funding than requested. HAND staff will confirm which applications are expected to be scalable and to what degree within HUD’s spending deadline. The Administration is reviewing how to split funding between three ESG-CV applications that would provide vaccine distribution assistance such as transportation to and from injection sites, provide reminders for when to get a second shot and outreach to specific populations. — The Council was briefed on the information below at the January 19 work session — At the January 19 meeting, the Council received a briefing about the process leading up to the proposed grant awards, deadlines to use the funds, program funding categories, the 23 applications and remaining funds without applications for how to use them. The Council can decide to approve some or all the applications including at funding amounts different than what is requested or recommended. The Council could also decide how to use the remaining funds at a separate time; approving funding for the applications is not dependent upon deciding how to use remaining funds. The Council may wish to discuss with the Administration gathering more information on options for the remaining funds and whether the Council is comfortable moving forward awarding funds to some or all eligible applications. The Council asked several questions for follow up. The questions and responses are shown below. Project Timeline: 1st Briefing: January 19, 2021 2nd Briefing: February 2, 2021 3rd Briefing: February 9, 2021 Potential Action: February 16, 2021 Page | 2 1. Could the Health Department provide a response / details about whether the remaining HUD-CV funds are a viable option to expedite distribution of COVID-19 vaccines, especially in low income and underserved communities in the City? It would be helpful to have details on how the Health Department would utilize these funds such as setting up a temporary distribution center in low income neighborhoods, hiring more staff, transportation for individuals, etc. o HAND Staff is in communication with SLCo Health Department. Health Dept is responsible for equitable access and distribution of vaccinations. Per conversation with Health Department Director responsible for vaccines, the need is additional support for outreach, education, and transportation. The Health Department has an open RFA (request for applications) to solicit requests that will help ensure equitable access and distribution of vaccines. Available funding is limited to $200,000. Current applications exceed $760,000. SLC could help fill the gap with the remaining CDBG-CV funds. We hope to have more info in advance of the 2/2 Council meeting and identify potential partners and the need that could be filled. o Fourth Street Clinic could use additional funding to support staff and supplies as they administer vaccines. o Soap to Hope could use additional funding to help with outreach, follow up reminders for second shot, and transportation services o Volunteers of America could use additional funding to help with outreach, coordination of vaccine shots, and transportation. 2. Council Member Johnston also suggested asking the Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness about how they could use the remaining funds. o Per Katherine at Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness, there is not a strong need for motel operations as a non-congregate shelter option. The scalable need is additional Rapid Rehousing supports to get homeless individuals and families housed. 3. Does Nourish to Flourish have eligible expenses for some of the HUD-CV funds? Some Council Members expressed interest in using the funds for food assistance. o Nourish to Flourish received funding in the past from City and County. They have utilized all previous funding that has been allocated. They can scale any dollar amount to quickly deploy food to low-income populations. o CDBG-CV – Community Stabilization could be utilized for this purpose. 4. Could you please provide the relevant regulations for using CDBG-CV and ESG-CV for purchasing housing to provide emergency pandemic housing? The idea shared by Council Members is to purchase a property such as a motel to provide emergency housing with social distancing (as opposed to traditional congregate settings). o State, City and County explored the use of ESG-CV funding for purchasing a motel to use as a non-congregate shelter, then transition it to an affordable housing opportunity (SRO, PSH, etc.) once the pandemic subsides. City would have to pay back any ESG-CV funding utilized to accomplish that goal. See attached for more details. Please reach back if you have additional questions. Staff Note: See Attachment 3 for notices and regulations related to this topic. It may be possible to dispose of a motel purchased with these funds by transferring the title to a third party instead of selling and paying back HUD with the proceeds. The City Attorney’s Office would need to review this option if the Council is interested in exploring further. 5. Could the Council use remaining ESG-CV funds for any CDBG-CV applications as a way to free up CDBG-CV funds for other uses? o Short answer yes. However, this would require parceling out specific budget requests of applications. Here are two examples. First Step House’s CDBG-CV COVID-19 Response Program: o ESG-CV can pay for some of the outreach supplies they are giving to individuals Page | 3 o ESG-CV can also pay for Hazard Pay and any training they may have to give to their staff 4th Street Clinic: o ESG-CV can pay for staff training and hazard pay o ESG-CV can pay for any of the supplies they can are giving to individuals — The Council was briefed on the information below at the January 19 work session — ISSUE AT-A-GLANCE As part of the CARES Act, Salt Lake City was awarded $7,138,203 in HUD grants for projects and programs directly related to responding to the COVID-19 pandemic. The funds must be spent by September 2022. All CDBG-CV funds must be under contract with community partners by June 1, 2021 and by May 17, 2021 for ESG- CV and HOPWA-CV funds. The CARES Act HUD grants are subject to separate regulations than the regular annual awards so the target area limitation and Consolidated Plan objectives do not control how these funds can be used. If the Council approved awards based on mayoral funding recommendations, then there would be remaining funds without applications for how to use them. Specifically, there would be $468,900 CDBG-CV and $460,828 ESG-CV remaining. The advisory board recommended remaining funds go to vaccination efforts for vulnerable communities (see Policy Question #1). In Budget Amendment #5 the Council approved the administrative portion of the three grants which award funds to the Attorney’s Office, Finance Department and Housing and Neighborhood Development (HAND) Division for managing the grants. In Budget Amendment #6 the Council supported via straw poll the $750,000 request from SwitchPoint for operating expenses at the temporary emergency winter shelter at the Salt Lake Airport Inn. These actions still need to be formalized in the CARES Act HUD grants adoption resolution and attached funding log. The Administration used an expedited public process allowed by HUD which included shortened public engagement steps and waiving the public hearing requirement so funds could benefit the community faster. The expedited process still mirrored the regular annual HUD grant awards process by offering an open application period for all interested parties, followed by resident advisory board review in public meetings, competitive scoring and funding recommendations from the advisory board and a second set of funding recommendations from the Mayor. The City Council makes the final funding decisions after considering the two sets of funding recommendations, public feedback and deliberation. The Administration allowed applicants to submit requests for additional funds after the open application period ended because requests were significant less than available funding. As a result, some applicants increased their funding requests and others did not such as if the program/project was not easily scalable. Attachment 1 shows projects ranked by the combined score within each grant category. Attachment 2 is the funding log for all three federal grants. The funding log combines advisory board and Administration scores as shown in the far-right column which also lists maximum potential scores. The Additional Info section has a timeline showing key dates over the past year on this topic and a table comparing the regular annual HUD grant awards to the City to the one-time CARES Act HUD grants (labeled “CV” to distinguish from regular grants). Comparing Requested Funding to Available Funding Unusually, the requested funding from applicants is less than available funds. Requests are 90% of available funding: $6,438,375 is requested compared to $7,138,203 in available funding. HUD has provided Salt Lake City’s final CARES Act grant award amounts. The table below summarizes requested and available funding by grant and the dollar difference. Grant Request Available Requests as % of Funding Available $ Difference CDBG Community Development Block Grant $ 2,810,449 $ 3,063,849 92% $ 253,400 ESG Emergency Solutions Grant $ 3,540,483 $ 3,986,911 89% $ 446,428 Page | 4 HOPWA Housing Opportunities for Person with AIDS $ 87,443 $ 87,443 100% $ - TOTAL $ 6,438,375 $ 7,138,203 90% $ 699,828 Goal of the briefing: Discuss the Council’s priorities for the one-time CARES Act HUD grants, award funding across eligible programs and projects, and decide how to use remaining funds. Scoring Applications and Funding Recommendations CDBG and ESG projects receive scores and funding recommendations from the Community Development and Capital Improvement Program (CDCIP) Board. HOPWA projects receive funding recommendations from the Housing Trust Fund (HTF) Advisory Board. The advisory board funding recommendations are provided to the Mayor and City Council. The Council receives another set of funding recommendations from the Mayor. The final decision is made by the Council for grant award amounts. Attachment 1 shows projects ranked by the combined score within each grant category. Disqualified Applications Three applications for CDBG-CV were fully disqualified and one was partially disqualified for proposing expenses ineligible under the pandemic relief grant regulations. One application for ESG-CV was fully disqualified. The applications are listed below. CDBG-CV: Housing Stability #4 NeighborWorks SLC Homebuyer down payment assistance and home repair assistance Note: the applicant submitted a new request for mortgage assistance to keep low income households from losing housing. This new application was not reviewed by the advisory board. Community Stabilization #12 Shelter the Homeless: Homeless Resource Center COVID Response Note: the application was partially disqualified for ineligible expenses such as an ADA door opener Small Business #14 9th South LLC Maven District Note: the applicant would have been paying themselves and HUD requires greater separation when awarding grants to for-profit firms Other Category #15 Salt Lake City: Healthy Home Program replacing and upgrading air systems Note: the application was ineligible because not directly related to pandemic responses ESG-CV: Emergency Shelter #7 The Inn Between: Medical Respite / Emergency Shelter Note: the application did not meet HUD’s definition of emergency temporary shelter Differences between Advisory Board and Mayoral Funding Recommendations A majority of board and mayoral recommendations are identical; however, three exceptions exist. Below is a table comparing the different funding recommendations for those applications. RecommendationsGrant Category Project # and Name Board Mayor Difference Between Notes CDBG- CV Housing Stability #4 NeighborWorks SLC Mortgage Assistance Program $0 $200,00 0 $200,000 The original application was disqualified as ineligible; a new application was submitted and not reviewed by the advisory board Page | 5 Small Business #13 International Rescue Committee Spice Kitchen Incubator Pandemic Resiliency Project $75,000 $150,000 $75,000 The applicant requested $75,000 ESG-CV Rapid Rehousing #3 The Road Home Eviction Prevention Assistance $50,000 $150,000 $100,000 The applicant requested $50,000 POLICY QUESTIONS 1.What to do with $929,728 of Remaining Funds – The Council may wish to discuss with the Administration what options are preferred with the remaining funds that did not receive applications to use. Remaining funds based on the Mayor’s recommendations are $468,900 CDBG-CV and $460,828 ESG-CV. The advisory board recommended remaining funds go to vaccination efforts for vulnerable communities. Another option is the competitive application process could be reopened for another round. Staff note: public health services are usually funded by and provided by the local health department, in this case Salt Lake County, which has received its own share of COVID relief funds. The Council may wish to encourage the Administration to discuss with the County if these funds would be helpful at this point, or if there are other ways to augment public health efforts. Alternately the Council may wish to discuss with the Administration if there are other eligible traditionally city services that could use these funds. 2.Different Recommendations from Board and Mayor – The Council may wish to ask the Administration why the Mayor’s recommendations for three applications (detailed in the table above) are different than the resident advisory Board’s funding recommendations. 3.Disqualified Applications – The Council may wish to ask the Administration for details on why four applications were disqualified, one was partially disqualified and if other City resources could help meet these community needs. 4.Coordination with Funding Our Future (FOF) Housing Programs – The Council may wish to discuss with the Administration how HUD grant awards are being coordinated with FOF housing programs. Most of the community organizations that received FOF housing allocations also have mayoral funding recommendations for HUD grant awards. Some of the community organizations are receiving FOF and HUD grant dollars for the same or similar programs. This approach could help the City and community organizations leverage multiple funding sources. ADDITIONAL & BACKGROUND INFORMATION Timeline The below timeline provides a general summary of key dates leading up to the Council’s consideration of individual applications seeking award of CARES Act HUD grants. This timeline is not comprehensive, for example meeting dates of resident advisory boards and internal City staff meetings are not listed. April 2 – HUD notifies City about first round of CARES Act grant awards June 9 – HUD notifies City about second round of CARES Act grant awards September 10 – HUD notifies City about third round of CARES Act grant awards September 11 – beginning of a two-week public comment period held by HAND for substantial amendments (updating) the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan October 13 – the Council held a briefing about amending the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan and associated 2020-2021 Annual Action Plan to utilize $7.1 million in CARES Act funding from HUD October 20 – the Council adopted amendments to the Consolidated Plan that identified the 13 project/program categories that organizations could submit applications for funding November 2 – beginning of three-week window for organizations to submit applications in an open and competitive process November 6 – HAND held a training session for interested applicants November 10 – the Council held an electronic public hearing as part of Budget Amendment #5 to establish the budgets to accept the $7.1 million November 17 – the Council held a second electronic public hearing as part of Budget Amendment #5 to establish the budgets to accept the $7.1 million Page | 6 December 8 – the Council adopted Budget Amendment #5 which established the budgets to accept the $7.1 million and approved the administration applications for CDBG-CV, ESG-CV and HOPWA-CV which provides funding to the Attorney’s Office, Finance Department HAND to manage the programs January 5 – at the Budget Amendment #6 briefing the Council unanimously supported via a straw poll early approval of the $750,000 ESG-CV request from SwitchPoint for operating expenses of the Salt Lake Emergency Winter Overflow Shelter at the Airport Inn Comparing One-time HUD-CV CARES Act Funds to Ongoing Annual Awards The below table compares the FY2021 annual grant awards from HUD to the one-time COVID relief funds. Overall, these relief funds represent a significant increase over the City’s annual HUD grant awards for FY2021. The ESG funds are more than three times as large as the annual awards. Emergency Solutions Grants (ESG) funds are for preventing homelessness and providing services to persons experiencing homelessness. Grant FY2021 Annual Awards HUD-CV CARES Act Funds Relief Funds as % of Annual Awards CDBG Community Development Block Grant $ 3,509,164 $ 3,063,849 87% ESG Emergency Solutions Grant $ 301,734 $ 3,986,911 1321% HOME Investment Partnership $ 1,632,427 N/A - HOPWA Housing Opportunities for Person with AIDS $ 720,867 $ 87,443 12% TOTAL $ 6,164,192 $ 7,138,203 116% ATTACHMENTS 1. Funding Recommendations Combined Score Sheet 2. Funding Log ACRONYMS CARES – Coronavirus Aid Relief and Economic Security Act CDBG – Community Development Block Grant CDCIP – Community Development and Capital Improvement Programs Advisory Board ESG – Emergency Solutions Grant FOF – Funding Our Future FY – Fiscal Year HAND – Housing and Neighborhood Development HOPWA – Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS HTF – Housing Trust Fund Advisory Board HUD – U.S. Housing and Urban Development Department APPLICANT PROJECT/PROGRAM SCORE REQUEST CDCIP BOARD FUNDING RECOMMENDATIONS MAYOR FUNDING RECOMMENDATIONS CDBG-CV HOUSING STABILITY NeighborWorks Salt Lake Community Resiliency Program (Mortgage Assistance Program) Not Eligible 200,000$ Application Not Eligible 200,000$ 200,000$ -$ 200,000$ 4th Street Clinic COVID-19 Response 108.80 300,000$ 300,000$ 300,000$ The Road Home Advocates for Gail Miller Resource Center 108.22 132,990$ 132,990$ 132,990$ Utah Community Action Public Service Agency 107.20 137,389$ 137,389$ 137,389$ First Step House First Step House COVID-19 Response Program 104.60 445,266$ 445,266$ 445,266$ The INN Between End of Life and Temporary Housing of Terminally Ill 94.90 154,221$ 154,221$ 154,221$ 1,169,866$ 1,169,866$ 1,169,866$ First Step House First Step House COVID-19 Response Program 104.40 178,320$ 178,320$ 178,320$ Salt Lake City Corporation Expand Emergency Food Delivery 100.22 141,334$ 141,334$ 141,334$ Shelter the Homeless HRC COVID-Response 78.10 183,159$ 142,659$ 142,659$ 502,813$ 462,313$ 462,313$ International Rescue Committee Spice Kitchen Incubator Pandemic Small Business Resiliency Project 105.10 75,000$ 75,000$ 150,000$ 9th South LLC Maven District Not Eligible 100,000$ Application Not Eligible -$ 175,000$ 75,000$ 150,000$ CDBG-CV OTHER Salt Lake City Corporation SLC Healthy Home Program Not Eligible 150,000$ Application Not Eligible -$ 150,000$ -$ -$ CDBG-CV ADMIN Salt Lake City Corporation Administration of Grant Programs *105.57 612,770$ 612,770$ 612,770$ 612,770$ 612,770$ 612,770$ 2,810,449$ 2,319,949$ 2,594,949$ Remaining to Allocate 468,900$ 2020-2021 Mayor's CARES Act HUD-CV Grant Funding Recommendations CDBG-CV COMMUNITY STABILIZATION * $314,748 Has been appropriated by City Council to cover administration costs for 2020-2021. Balance will be utilized for the remainder of the grant period. CATEGORY CDBG-CV PUBLIC SERVICE AGENCY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT - $3,063,849 CDBG-CV SMALL BUSINESS Page 1 of 2 APPLICANT PROJECT/PROGRAM SCORE REQUEST CDCIP BOARD FUNDING RECOMMENDATIONS MAYOR FUNDING RECOMMENDATIONS ESG-CV HOMELESS PREVENTION Utah Community Action Homeless Prevention 108.42 1,212,940$ 1,212,940$ 1,212,940$ 1,212,940$ 1,212,940$ 1,212,940$ Utah Community Action Rapid Rehousing 110.81 773,355$ 773,355$ 773,355$ The Road Home Prevention Assistance 105.89 50,000$ 50,000$ 150,000$ 823,355$ 823,355$ 923,355$ Volunteers of America Homeless Outreach Program 107.6 128,917$ 128,917$ 128,917$ Soap to Hope Street Outreach Program 71 112,180$ 112,180$ 112,180$ 241,097$ 241,097$ 241,097$ Friends of Switchpoint Salt Lake Winter Overflow Shelter 96.7 750,000$ 750,000$ 750,000$ The INN Between Medical Respite Emergency Shelter Housing Not Eligible 114,400$ Application Not Eligible -$ 864,400$ 750,000$ 750,000$ ESG-CV ADMIN Salt Lake City Corporation Administration of Grant Programs *103.9 398,691$ 398,691$ 398,691$ * $314,748 Has been appropriated by City Council to cover administration costs for 2020-2021. Balance will be utilized for the remainder of the grant period.398,691$ 398,691$ 398,691$ 3,540,483$ 3,426,083$ 3,526,083$ Remaining to Allocate 460,828$ APPLICANT PROJECT/PROGRAM SCORE REQUEST HTF BOARD FUNDING RECOMMENDATIONS MAYOR FUNDING RECOMMENDATIONS HOPWA-CV HOUSING STABILITY Utah Community Action Housing Stability 119.83 82,196$ 82,196$ 82,196$ 82,196$ 82,196$ 82,196$ CATEGORY HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES FOR PERSONS WITH AIDS - $87,443 CATEGORY $3,986,911EMERGENCY SOLUTIONS GRANT - ESG-CV RAPID REHOUSING ESG-CV STREET OUTREACH ESG-CV EMERGENCY SHELTER Page 2 of 2 2020‐2021 Funding Available:  $3,063,8491 Attorney's OfficeNew REQUEST: 26,042$                       Administration of Grant Programs*CDCIP: 26,042$                       MAYOR:26,042$                       COUNCIL:‐$                              Maximum Score 129Applicant Score: 105.572 Finance DivisionNewREQUEST:53,249$                       Administration of Grant Programs*CDCIP:53,249$                       MAYOR:53,249$                       COUNCIL:‐$                              Maximum Score 129Applicant Score: 105.573NewREQUEST:533,479$                     CDCIP:533,479$                     MAYOR:533,479$                     Administration of Grant Programs*COUNCIL:‐$                              Maximum Score 129Applicant Score: 105.57REQUEST:612,770$                     CDCIP:612,770$                     MAYOR:612,770$                     COUNCIL:‐$                              4 NeighborWorks Salt LakeNewREQUEST:200,000$                     CDCIP:‐$                              MAYOR:200,000$                     COUNCIL:‐$                              REQUEST:200,000$                     CDCIP:‐$                              MAYOR:200,000$                     COUNCIL:‐$                              2020‐2024 CONSOLIDATED PLAN and COVID‐19 ELIGIBILITY % OF GRANT AWARDThe applicant's original application (homebuyer and home repair assistance) was HUD‐CV ineligible, and the CDCIP did not score this application due to it's ineligibility.Aligns with Consolidated Plan and meets eligibility through the Prepare, Prevent, and Respond to COVID‐19 requirement of the CARES ACT.The Mayor recommended the applicant to administer a Mortgage Assistance Program, which the applicant said that they could administer.CDBG‐CV HOUSING STABILITY TOTALSALT LAKE CITY CDBG‐CV PROGRAM: FUNDING LOG 2020‐2021APPLICANT/ PROJECT NAMEPROJECT DESCRIPTIONPREVIOUS GRANT AWARDSREQUEST/RECOMMENDED2020‐2024 CONSOLIDATED PLAN and COVID‐19 ELIGIBILITY % OF GRANT AWARDCDBG‐CV  HOUSING STABILITYMortgage Assistance Program for households 80% AMI and affected by COVID‐19.Mortgage Assistance ProgramCDBG‐CV ADMINPartial funding for staff salary to provide contract administration for CV federal grants. * $314,748 Has been appropriated by City Council to cover administration costs for 2020‐2021. Balance will be utilized for the remainder of the grant period.Partial funding for staff salary to provide financial administration and accounting services for CV federal grants. * $314,748 Has been appropriated by City Council to cover administration costs for 2020‐2021. Balance will be utilized for the remainder of the grant period.Housing & Neighborhood Development DivisionAPPLICANT/ PROJECT NAMEFunding for salaries and operational expenses of HAND to administer and monitor the CV federal grants and to conduct the community processes.* $314,748 Has been appropriated by City Council to cover administration costs for 2020‐2021. Balance will be utilized for the remainder of the grant period.(Note: 20% is the maximum CDBG‐CV administration amount.) CDBG‐CV ADMIN TOTALPROJECT DESCRIPTIONPREVIOUS GRANT AWARDSREQUEST/RECOMMENDEDLast Updated January 28, 2021FY2021 CARES Act HUD Grants Funding LogPage 1 54th Street ClinicNew REQUEST: 300,000$                     CDCIP:300,000$                     MAYOR:300,000$                     COUNCIL:Maximum Score 129Applicant Score: 108.806The Road HomeNewREQUEST:132,990$                     Advocates for Gail Miller Resource CenterCDCIP:132,990$                     MAYOR:132,990$                     COUNCIL:Maximum Score 129Applicant Score: 108.227Utah Community Action NewREQUEST:137,389$                     Public Service AgencyCDCIP:137,389$                     MAYOR:137,389$                     COUNCIL:Maximum Score 129Applicant Score: 107.208First Step House NewREQUEST:445,266$                     First Step House COVID‐19 Response CDCIP:445,266$                     MAYOR:445,266$                     COUNCIL:Maximum Score 129Applicant Score: 104.609The INN Between NewREQUEST:154,221$                     CDCIP:154,221$                     MAYOR:154,221$                     COUNCIL:Maximum Score 129Applicant Score: 94.90REQUEST:1,169,866$                  CDCIP:1,169,866$                  MAYOR:1,169,866$                  COUNCIL:‐$                              Provide funding for temporary staff for the Intake Center, provides coordinated entry for all six Utah Community Action programs—Adult Education, Case Management and Housing, Head Start preschool, HEAT Utility Assistance, Nutrition and Weatherization.In order to prepare. respond, & prevent further spread of COVID‐19 in our congregate living facilities, this program will provide additional staff capacity & costs to ensure the continuation on‐site behavioral health, medical, & housing services to clients. This request is focused on providing a hazard pay increase to 37.5 staff to help with retention and bringing in temporary staff. First Step House also submitted an application for CDBG #10 in the Community Stabilization category. APPLICANT/ PROJECT NAMEPROJECT DESCRIPTIONPREVIOUS GRANT AWARDSREQUEST/RECOMMENDED2020‐2024 CONSOLIDATED PLAN and COVID‐19 ELIGIBILITY % OF GRANT AWARDEnd of Life and Temporary Housing of Terminally IllAligns with Consolidated Plan and meets eligibility through the Prepare, Prevent, and Respond to COVID‐19 requirement of the CARES ACT.Aligns with Consolidated Plan and meets eligibility through the Prepare, Prevent, and Respond to COVID‐19 requirement of the CARES ACT.Aligns with Consolidated Plan and meets eligibility through the Prepare, Prevent, and Respond to COVID‐19 requirement of the CARES ACT.Aligns with Consolidated Plan and meets eligibility through the Prepare, Prevent, and Respond to COVID‐19 requirement of the CARES ACT.Aligns with Consolidated Plan and meets eligibility through the Prepare, Prevent, and Respond to COVID‐19 requirement of the CARES ACT.Staffing costs for medical respite and end of life costs for homeless Salt Lake City residents who are vulnerable to COVID‐19.CDBG‐CV PUBLIC SERVICE AGENCY Funds will be used to pay the salaries, taxes, and benefits for FTE staff dedicated to the dorms at the Gail Miller Resource Center (GMRC). Fourth Street Clinic (FSC) will use funding to pay for contractual labor for a medical assistants to support testing for COVID‐19 as well as operation costs which include PPE supplies and increased utility cost to provide heating and electric to medical tents.In Budget Amendment #2 the Council approved $150,000 for temporary outdoor shelters at the clinic in coordination with the County. COVID‐19 Response CDBG‐CV PUBLIC SERVICE AGENCY TOTALLast Updated January 28, 2021FY2021 CARES Act HUD Grants Funding LogPage 2 10First Step HouseNew REQUEST: 178,320$                     First Step House COVID‐19 Response CDCIP:178,320$                     MAYOR:178,320$                     COUNCIL:‐$                              Maximum Score 129Applicant Score: 104.4011Salt Lake City CorporationNewREQUEST:141,334$                     CDCIP:141,334$                     MAYOR:141,334$                     COUNCIL:‐$                              Maximum Score 129Applicant Score: 100.2212Shelter the HomelessNewREQUEST:183,159$                     HRC COVID‐ResponseCDCIP:142,659$                     MAYOR:142,659$                     COUNCIL:‐$                              Maximum Score 129Applicant Score: 78.10REQUEST:502,813$                     CDCIP:462,313$                     MAYOR:462,313$                     COUNCIL:‐$                              Aligns with Consolidated Plan and meets eligibility through the Prepare, Prevent, and Respond to COVID‐19 requirement of the CARES ACT.Aligns with Consolidated Plan and meets eligibility through the Prepare, Prevent, and Respond to COVID‐19 requirement of the CARES ACT.Aligns with Consolidated Plan and meets eligibility through the Prepare, Prevent, and Respond to COVID‐19 requirement of the CARES ACT. The CDCIP board did not recommend the expenses for thermal cameras and operator, $32,700, but did approve the expenses for meals and admin.The expense for the ADA door opener, $7,800, was an ineligible HUD‐CV expense.  2020‐2024 CONSOLIDATED PLAN and COVID‐19 ELIGIBILITY CDBG‐CV COMMUNITY STABILIZATIONProvide for food costs, PPE, and additional staffing costs so FSH facilities can respond to COVID‐19. This request is focused on providing a hazard pay increase to 12.5 staff and resources for meal preparation and delivery and sanitation services at multiple locations. First Step House also submitted an application for CDBG #8 in the Public Services category. Purchase meals at the two Salt Lake City HRC's, as well as PPE, and thermal cameras to respond to COVID‐19 amongst the homeless population.  CDBG‐CV COMMUNITY STABILIZATION TOTALIncrease emergency food support and access to healthy culturallyrelevant food for low income refugee families with limited household resources to absorb the economic impacts due to the COVID‐19 pandemic.Expand Emergency Food DeliveryAPPLICANT/ PROJECT NAMEPREVIOUS GRANT AWARDSREQUEST/RECOMMENDED% OF GRANT AWARDPROJECT DESCRIPTIONLast Updated January 28, 2021FY2021 CARES Act HUD Grants Funding LogPage 3 13International Rescue CommitteeNewREQUEST:75,000$                       CDCIP:75,000$                       MAYOR:150,000$                     COUNCIL:‐$                              Maximum Score 129Applicant Score: 105.10149th South LLCNewREQUEST:100,000$                     Maven DistrictCDCIP:‐$                              MAYOR:‐$                              COUNCIL:‐$                              The CDCIP board did not score this application due to it's HUD‐CV ineligibility.REQUEST:175,000$                     CDCIP:75,000$                       MAYOR:150,000$                     COUNCIL:‐$                              15Salt Lake City CorporationNewREQUEST:150,000$                     SLC Healthy Home ProgramCDCIP:‐$                              MAYOR:‐$                              COUNCIL:‐$                              REQUEST:150,000$                     CDCIP:‐$                              MAYOR:‐$                              COUNCIL:‐$                              Spice Kitchen Incubator Pandemic Small Business Resiliency ProjectAPPLICANT/ PROJECT NAMEPROJECT DESCRIPTIONPREVIOUS GRANT AWARDSREQUEST/RECOMMENDED2020‐2024 CONSOLIDATED PLAN and COVID‐19 ELIGIBILITY Program will focus on replacing critical air health systems within the home and improving interior air quality for low income persons and vulnerable seniors.CDBG‐CV SMALL BUSINESS% OF GRANT AWARDThis application is HUD‐CV ineligible.  Applicant would be paying themselves and HUD requires an arms length transaction for For‐Profit entities.Aligns with Consolidated Plan and meets eligibility through the Prepare, Prevent, and Respond to COVID‐19 requirement of the CARES ACT.Offer a Pay What You Can program that provides membershipson a sliding scale pricing structure to serve diverse‐owned businesses and minority entrepreneurs.Requested funding will support staffing/operations for ongoing training and technical assistance (TTA) to COVID impacted businesses supporting LMI immigrant/refugee entrepreneurs in SLC and provide COVID‐grants to impacted SLC new American small food businesses.CDBG‐CV SMALL BUSINESS TOTALApplication not eligible for HUD‐CV Funding.  CV funds can be used to rehab private properties to directly quarantine COVID‐19 patients.  However, this application would only indirectly prevent COVID‐19 for non‐patients.CDBG‐CV OTHERPROJECT DESCRIPTIONPREVIOUS GRANT AWARDSREQUEST/RECOMMENDED2020‐2024 CONSOLIDATED PLAN and COVID‐19 ELIGIBILITY % OF GRANT AWARDAPPLICANT/ PROJECT NAME                                                                                                                                                            CDBG‐CV OTHER TOTALLast Updated January 28, 2021FY2021 CARES Act HUD Grants Funding LogPage 4 FUNDS REQUESTEDFUNDS AVAILABLEAdministration612,770$                                                                                                                       3,063,849$                  Housing Stability200,000$                                                                                                                       3,063,849$                  Public Service Agency1,169,866$                                                                                                                   Community Stabilization502,813$                                                                                                                       Small Business175,000$                                                                                                                       FUNDS RECOMMENDEDOther150,000$                                                                                                                       CDCIP:2,319,949$                  TOTAL FUNDS REQUESTED:2,810,449$                                                                                                                   2,594,949$                  ‐$                              CDCIP Board Recommendation:AVAILABLE FOR ALLOCATIONCDCIP:‐$                              468,900$                     Administration Staff Analysis:3,063,849$                  COUNCIL:COUNCIL:GRANT AWARD:TOTAL FUNDS AVAILABLE:Board Motion For Remaining ESG and CDBG Funding:  To go to homeless service agencies that could help with COVID‐19 vaccination, such as agencies that can help identify low income, homeless, marginalized populations,  and communities of color, to obtain and receive the COVID‐19 vaccine.MAYOR:MAYOR:TOTALSLast Updated January 28, 2021FY2021 CARES Act HUD Grants Funding LogPage 5 1Utah Community ActionNew REQUEST: 1,212,940$                            Homeless PreventionCDCIP: 1,212,940$                            MAYOR: 1,212,940$                            COUNCIL: ‐$                                         Maximum Score 129Applicant Score: 108.42REQUEST: 1,212,940$                            CDCIP: 1,212,940$                            MAYOR: 1,212,940$                            COUNCIL: ‐$                                         2Utah Community ActionNew REQUEST: 773,355$                                Rapid Rehousing CDCIP: 773,355$                               MAYOR: 773,355$                                COUNCIL: ‐$                                         Maximum Score 129Applicant Score: 110.813The Road HomeNew REQUEST: 50,000$                                  Prevention AssistanceCDCIP: 50,000$                                 MAYOR: 150,000$                                COUNCIL: ‐$                                         Maximum Score 129Applicant Score: 105.89REQUEST: 823,355$                                CDCIP: 823,355$                                 Aligns with Consolidated Plan and MAYOR:923,355$                                COUNCIL:‐$                                         PREVIOUS GRANT AWARDSREQUEST/RECOMMENDED2020‐2024 CONSOLIDATED PLAN and COVID‐19 ELIGIBILITY % OF GRANT AWARDAligns with Consolidated Plan and meets eligibility through the Prepare, Prevent, and Respond to COVID‐19 requirement of the CARES ACT.Aligns with Consolidated Plan and meets eligibility through the Prepare, Prevent, and Respond to COVID‐19 requirement of the CARES ACT.Aligns with Consolidated Plan and meets eligibility through the Prepare, Prevent, and Respond to COVID‐19 requirement of the CARES ACT.2020‐2021 Funding Available:Emergency rental assistance for clients experiencing a COVID related crisis, and funding for case managers to provide case management services to clients. This request is focused on rent assistance and support to prevent individuals and households from losing housing. Utah Community Action also submitted an application for ESG #2 in the Rapid Rehousing category. ESG‐CV HOMELESS PREVENTION TOTALEmergency rental assistance for clients experiencing a Covid related crisis, and funding for case managers to provide case management services to clients to ensure they are able to become self‐reliant. This request is focused on quickly getting individuals experiencing homelessness back into housing. Utah Community Action also submitted an application for ESG #1 in the Homeless Prevention category. ESG‐CV RAPID REHOUSINGAPPLICANT/ PROJECT NAMESALT LAKE CITY ESG‐CV PROGRAM: FUNDING LOG 2020‐2021Support for households who have recently exited RapidRe‐Housing Program and are in need of an immediate intervention to retain their housing stability.ESG‐CV RAPID REHOUSING TOTALPROJECT DESCRIPTIONPREVIOUS GRANT AWARDSREQUEST/RECOMMENDED2020‐2024 CONSOLIDATED PLAN and COVID‐19 ELIGIBILITY % OF GRANT AWARD$3,986,911ESG‐CV HOMELESS PREVENTIONAPPLICANT/ PROJECT NAME PROJECT DESCRIPTIONLast Updated January 28, 2021FY2021 CARES Act HUD Grants Funding LogPage 6 ES4Volunteers of AmericaNew REQUEST: 128,917$                                Homeless Outreach ProgramCDCIP: 128,917$                                MAYOR: 128,917$                                COUNCIL: ‐$                                         Maximum Score 129Applicant Score: 106.705Soap to HopeNew REQUEST: 112,180$                                Street Outreach ProgramCDCIP: 112,180$                                MAYOR: 112,180$                                COUNCIL: ‐$                                         Maximum Score 129Applicant Score: 71REQUEST: 241,097$                                CDCIP: 241,097$                                MAYOR: 241,097$                                COUNCIL: ‐$                                         6Friends of SwitchpointNew REQUEST: 750,000$                                Salt Lake Winter Overflow ShelterCDCIP: 750,000$                                MAYOR: 750,000$                                COUNCIL: ‐$                                         Maximum Score 129Applicant Score: 96.77The Inn BetweenNew REQUEST: 114,400$                                Medical Respite CDCIP: ‐$                                         MAYOR: ‐$                                         COUNCIL: ‐$                                         CDCIP did not score this application due to it's HUD‐CV ineligibility. REQUEST:864,400$                                CDCIP:750,000$                                MAYOR:750,000$                                COUNCIL:‐$                                         Emergency Shelter HousingFunds will be used for staffing two 24/7 facilities that will operate as winter overflows. Shelter rental costs, staffing, food andPPE supplies will be included in the use of funds.On January 5, at the Budget Amendment #6 briefing the Council unanimously supported via a straw poll early approval of this item.The applicant's original application (homebuyer and home repair assistance) APPLICANT/ PROJECT NAMEPROJECT DESCRIPTIONPREVIOUS GRANT AWARDSREQUEST/RECOMMENDED2020‐2024 CONSOLIDATED PLAN and COVID‐19 ELIGIBILITY % OF GRANT AWARDAligns with Consolidated Plan and meets eligibility through the Prepare, Prevent, and Respond to COVID‐19 requirement of the CARES ACT.Aligns with Consolidated Plan and meets eligibility through the Prepare, Prevent, and Respond to COVID‐19 requirement of the CARES ACT.ESG‐CV EMERGENCY SHELTER TOTALESG‐CV EMERGENCY SHELTERAPPLICANT/ PROJECT NAMEPROJECT DESCRIPTIONPREVIOUS GRANT AWARDSStaff costs for a medical housing, to medically frail and terminally ill homeless individuals, who need to be in a COVID‐free environment due to underlying health conditions and other high‐risk factors.Aligns with Consolidated Plan and meets eligibility through the Prepare, Prevent, and Respond to COVID‐19 requirement of the CARES ACT.Application is HUD‐CV ineligible.  Application does not meet the HUD‐CV definition of Emergency Temporary Shelter.REQUEST/RECOMMENDED2020‐2024 CONSOLIDATED PLAN and COVID‐19 ELIGIBILITY % OF GRANT AWARDEssential care and supplies for homeless persons living on the street, including substance abuse services. Staffing costs to increase outreach.Examples of supplies and care include hygiene kits, PPE, cooking kits, clothing, naloxone kits, syringe exchange program, fentanyl testing strips, case management, crisis phone line, transportation assistance.ESG‐CV STREET OUTREACH TOTALReach the increased number of unsheltered individuals experiencing homelessness due to COVID‐19. Funding will support new positions, and to provide basic needs items.New positions include a case manager and peer support specialist.Last Updated January 28, 2021FY2021 CARES Act HUD Grants Funding LogPage 7 8Salt Lake City CorporationNew REQUEST: 398,691$                                Administration of Grant Programs * CDCIP: 398,691$                                MAYOR: 398,691$                                COUNCIL: ‐$                                         Maximum Score 129Applicant Score: 103.9REQUEST: 398,691$                                CDCIP: 398,691$                                MAYOR: 398,691$                                COUNCIL: ‐$                                         FUNDS REQUESTEDFUNDS AVAILABLEHomeless Prevention 1,212,940$                                                                                                               3,986,911$                            Rapid Rehousing823,355$                                                                                                                  3,986,911$                            Street Outreach241,097$                                                                                                                  Emergency Shelter864,400$                                                                                                                  FUNDS RECOMMENDEDAdministration398,691$                                                                                                                  CDCIP:3,426,083$                            TOTAL FUNDS REQUESTED:3,540,483$                                                                                                               MAYOR:3,526,083$                            COUNCIL:‐$                                        CDCIP Board Recommendation:AVAILABLE FOR ALLOCATIONCDCIP:‐$                                        MAYOR:460,828$                                COUNCIL:3,986,911$                            Administration Staff Analysis:Grant administration for ESG‐CV Funding. * $314,748 Has been appropriated by City Council to cover administration costs for 2020‐2021. Balance will be utilized for the remainder of the grant period.ESG‐CV ADMINBoard Motion For Remaining ESG and CDBG Funding:  To go to homeless service agencies that could help with COVID‐19 vaccination, such as agencies that can help identify low income, homeless, marginalized populations, and communities of color, to obtain and receive the COVID‐19 vaccine.PREVIOUS GRANT AWARDSREQUEST/RECOMMENDED2020‐2024 CONSOLIDATED PLAN and COVID‐19 ELIGIBILITY % OF GRANT AWARDGRANT AWARD:(NOTE: 10% is the maximum ESG‐CV amount) ESG‐CV ADMIN TOTALAligns with Consolidated Plan and meets eligibility through the Prepare, Prevent, and Respond to COVID‐19 requirement of the CARES ACT.TOTAL FUNDS AVAILABLE:TOTALSAPPLICANT/ PROJECT NAME PROJECT DESCRIPTIONLast Updated January 28, 2021FY2021 CARES Act HUD Grants Funding LogPage 8  2020‐2021 Funding Available:  $87,4431 Utah Community ActionREQUEST:82,196$                           Housing StabilityHTFAB:82,196$                           MAYOR: 82,196$                           COUNCIL: ‐$                                 Max Score: 129Applicant Score 119.83REQUEST: 82,196$                           HTFAB: 82,196$                           MAYOR: 82,196$                           COUNCIL: ‐$                                 2 Salt Lake City CorporationREQUEST: 5,247$                             Administration of Grant Program*HTFAB: 5,247$                             MAYOR: 5,247$                             COUNCIL: ‐$                                Max Score: 129Applicant Score: 109.17REQUEST: 5,247$                            HTFAB 5,247$                            MAYOR: 5,247$                            COUNCIL: ‐$                                FUNDS REQUESTED FUNDS AVAILABLEHousing Stability $                                                                                                                       82,196 87,443$                          Administration 5,247$                                                                                                                         87,443$                          TOTAL FUNDS REQUESTED 87,443$                                                                                                                      HTF Board Recommendation:HTFAB:87,443$                          MAYOR:87,443$                          COUNCIL:‐$                                AVAILABLE FOR ALLOCATIONAdministration Staff Analysis:HTFAB:‐$                                MAYOR:‐$                                COUNCIL:87,443$                          HOPWA‐CV ADMINAPPLICANT/ PROJECT NAMEThis funding will be utilized to provide Permanent Housing Placement (PHP) and Short‐term Rent, Mortgage and Utility (STRMU) assistance for persons with HIV/AIDS, during the COVID‐19 CrisisGrant administration for HOPWA‐CV funding. * $314,748 Has been appropriated by City Council to cover administration costs for 2020‐2021. Balance will be utilized for the remainder of the grant period.PROJECT DESCRIPTIONPREVIOUS GRANT AWARDSREQUEST/RECOMMENDED2020‐2024 CONSOLIDATED PLAN and COVID‐19 ELIGIBILITY % OF GRANT AWARDAligns with Consolidated Plan and meets eligibility through the Prepare, Prevent, and Respond to COVID‐19 requirement of the CARES ACT.SALT LAKE CITY HOPWA‐CV PROGRAM: FUNDING LOG 2020‐2021APPLICANT/ PROJECT NAMEPROJECT DESCRIPTION2020‐2024 CONSOLIDATED PLAN and COVID‐19 ELIGIBILITY HOPWA‐CV HOUSING STABILITY TOTALHOPWA‐CV HOUSING STABILITYPREVIOUS GRANT AWARDSREQUEST/RECOMMENDED% OF GRANT AWARDTOTALSAligns with Consolidated Plan and meets eligibility through the Prepare, Prevent, and Respond to COVID‐19 requirement of the CARES ACT.GRANT AWARD:TOTAL FUNDS AVAILABLE:(NOTE: 6% is the HOPWA‐CV admin amount.) HOPWA‐CV ADMIN TOTALNOTE: Text in blue was added by Council StaffFUNDS RECOMMENDEDLast Updated January 28, 2021FY2021 CARES Act HUD Grants Funding LogPage 9 Re: SLC CARES HUD-CV to lease, acquire or renovate a Temporary Emergency Shelter Summary: CDBG-CV funds: Acquisitions or rehabs can justifiably be used to fulfill the CARES Act purposes depending upon the circumstances. ESG-CV funds: Can be used to either lease, acquire or renovate a building to be used as a temporary emergency shelter, not to exceed a total of $2.5M in ESG-CV funds. Lead based paint requirements apply, but not habitability standards, and grantees assume environmental review requirements. Can be used within Salt Lake County. Funds can be used from March 10, 2020 (the City’s COVID Declaration) to January 31, 2022. May deviate from applicable procurement procedures. Disposition: Retain or sell and then compensate HUD or transfer title to 3rd party. The State posed a question to HUD re: acquisition for a shelter (10/13/2020): HUD responded that SNAPS is working on other ways/options, but that currently the ONLY disposition options are retain or sell and then compensate HUD. ***************************************************************************** CDBG-CV Notice, 8/7/2020 III.B.5.(f) Eligible Activities Grantees may use CDBG-CV funds only for those activities carried out to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus. By law, use of funds for any other purpose is unallowable. To satisfy these purposes, grantees may assist activities that respond to direct effects, such as the need to rehabilitate a building to add isolation rooms for recovering coronavirus patients. A grantee may also undertake activities to address indirect effects of the virus, such as the economic and housing market disruptions caused by social distancing measures and stay at home orders implemented to prevent the spread of coronavirus. Some activities clearly tie back to the purposes of the CARES Act, such as public services, economic development and microenterprise assistance, public facilities, and the rehabilitation of private buildings to provide housing. However, HUD is not prohibiting grantees from carrying out any particular CDBG eligible activity described in the HCD Act and the part 570 regulations, because other CDBG eligible activities, such as acquisition, can justifiably be used to fulfill the CARES Act purposes depending upon the circumstances. ***************************************************************************** ESG-CV HUD Notice, 8/31/2020 3. Additional Eligible Activities. In addition to the eligible activities listed in 24 CFR 576 – Subpart B, funds may be used for the following activities: a. Temporary emergency shelters. As permitted by the CARES Act, ESG-CV funds may be used to pay for temporary emergency shelters for individuals and families experiencing homelessness in order to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus. (i) Eligible costs include: (a) Leasing existing real property or temporary structures to be used as temporary emergency shelters; (b) Acquisition of real property (e.g. hotels, ancillary structures, parking lots). The total amount of ESG-CV funds used for acquisition must not exceed $2.5 million per real property; (c) Renovation (including major rehabilitation and conversion) of real property (e.g., hotels) into temporary emergency shelters. Eligible costs include labor, tools, and other costs for renovation; (d) Shelter operations costs including the costs of maintenance (including minor or routine repairs), rent, security, fuel, equipment, insurance, utilities, food, furnishings, supplies necessary for the operation of the temporary emergency shelter; (e) Services, including essential services under 24 CFR 576.102(a)(1), housing search and placement services under 24 CFR 576.105(b)(1), and housing search and counseling services as provided under 24 CFR 578.53(e)(8); except as otherwise stated in this Notice or 24 CFR part 576.408; and, (f) Other shelter costs HUD pre-approves in writing. (ii) Requirements: (a) As permitted by the CARES Act, the use of funds for these shelters will not be subject to the habitability standards under section 417(c) of the McKinney-Vento Act, shelter standards at 24 CFR 576.403(b), or the environmental review requirements that otherwise apply to the use of ESG funds if the shelters have been determined by State or local health officials to be necessary to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus. Recipients and subrecipients must still comply with nondiscrimination and applicable accessibility requirements, including requirements under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Fair Housing Act, and their implementing regulations. See also 24 CFR 576.407(a); (b) These temporary emergency shelters shall not be subject to the minimum periods of use required by section 416(c)(1) of the McKinney-Vento Act and 24 CFR 576.102(c) and shall be considered as excluded by law from any certifications recipients submit pursuant to 24 CFR 91.225(c)(1) through (c)(4) or 91.325(c)(4)(i) through (c)(4)(iv); however, if funds were used for acquisition or renovation (including conversion or major rehabilitation), the property’s use and disposition will be subject to the real property requirements in 2 CFR 200.311; (c) In general, funds may be used to support temporary emergency shelters to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus until January 31, 2022. This January 31, 2022 limit will ensure that ESG-CV funds are available to serve more individuals and families with assistance to prevent, prepare for and respond to coronavirus. However, upon written request by the recipient, HUD may grant an exception to the January 31, 2022 limit, if the recipient demonstrates: (i) Why additional funding for a longer period of time is necessary and what planned activities the recipient will forgo to continue funding the temporary emergency shelter; (ii) The number of additional months the recipient will fund the temporary emergency shelter; and (iii) The plan for connecting program participants to permanent housing when the temporary emergency shelter is no longer funded; (d) In addition to the records required at 24 CFR 576.500, the recipient must retain documentation that the property or structure or portion of a structure used as temporary emergency shelter met the definition of temporary emergency shelter during the time it was so used. For example, a recipient could document that the property is typically a hotel and is only being used as an emergency shelter for the period of time that public health officials determine special measures are needed to prevent the spread of coronavirus; (e) Whether or not services are provided as part of temporary emergency shelter, the recipient or subrecipient must assure that for each program participant receiving shelter, the individual or family’s service needs are evaluated as required by 24 CFR 576.401(a) and appropriate services are made available as needed in accordance with 24 CFR 576.401(d)), and a program participant in temporary emergency shelter shall be eligible to receive essential services from the recipient or subrecipients other than the program participant’s shelter provider; (f) A temporary emergency shelter may provide space for program participants to receive services consistent with 24 CFR 576.401(d) even if the services are not ESG-funded or not funded as part of the shelter project; (g) Program participants cannot be required to sign leases or occupancy agreements, receive treatment, or perform any other prerequisite activities as a condition for staying in any shelter or receiving services; and (h) In all other respects, the funding and operation of temporary emergency shelters must comply with the ESG-CV requirements for emergency shelters under this Notice and 24 CFR part 57 6. Shelter and Housing Standards. The lead-based paint remediation requirements of 24 CFR 576.403(a) apply to all shelters for which ESG-CV funds are used and all housing occupied by program participants. The habitability requirements at 24 CFR 576.403(b) do not apply to temporary emergency shelters that have been determined by State or local health officials to be necessary to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus. However, recipients and subrecipients must still comply with nondiscrimination and applicable accessibility requirements, including requirements under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Fair Housing Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and their implementing regulations. See also 24 CFR 576.407(a). All other shelters and housing for which ESG-CV funds must meet the applicable standards in 24 CFR 576.403(b) and 576.403(c). 7. Environmental Review Requirements. Except as otherwise provided in this notice for temporary emergency shelters that have been determined by State or local health officials to be necessary to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus, “responsible entities” (as defined in 24 CFR 58.2) must assume all of the responsibilities with respect to environmental review, decision making, and action required under 24 CFR Part 58. Also, as required by 24 CFR 58.4(a), when a State distributes funds to a responsible entity, the State must provide for appropriate procedures by which these responsible entities will evidence their assumption of environmental responsibilities. In accordance with these requirements and section 100261(3) of the MAP-21 Act, 24 CFR 576.407(d) does not apply. Environmental regulations at 24 CFR 58.22 prohibit ESG recipients and any other participant in the development process from committing HUD or non-HUD funds to a project until the environmental compliance review process has been successfully completed or until receipt of the Authority to Use Grant Funds, if applicable. In addition, until the environmental compliance review process has been successfully completed or until receipt of the Authority to Use Grant Funds, neither a recipient nor any participant in the development process may commit non-HUD funds on or undertake an activity or project if the activity or project would have an adverse environmental impact or limit the choice of reasonable alternatives. Emergency Environmental Review Procedures: HUD’s environmental review regulations in 24 CFR Part 58 include two provisions that may be relevant to environmental review procedures for activities to prevent, prepare for, or respond to coronavirus. The first is 24 CFR § 58.34(a)(10), which provides an exemption for certain activities undertaken in response to a national or locally declared public health emergency. The second is a streamlined public notice and comment period in the regulation at 24 CFR 58.33, which may apply in some cases for emergency activities undertaken to prevent, prepare for, or respond to coronavirus. The application of these two provisions following a presidentially-declared or locally-declared public health emergency are discussed in the Notice, Guidance on conducting environmental review pursuant to 24 Part 58 for activities undertaken in response to the public health emergency as a result of COVID-19 (available at: https://www.hud.gov/sites/dfiles/OCHCO/documents/2020-07cpdn.pdf). 8. Procurement. As provided by the CARES Act, the recipient may deviate from the applicable procurement standards (e.g., 24 CFR 576.407(c) and (f) and 2 CFR 200.317-200.326) when procuring goods and services to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus. If the recipient deviates from its procurement standards then the recipient must establish alternative written procurement standards, and maintain documentation on the alternative procurement standards used to safeguard against fraud, waste, and abuse in the procurement of goods and services to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus. This alternative requirement is necessary to ensure the funds are used efficiently and effectively to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus. Notwithstanding this flexibility, the debarment and suspension regulations at 2 CFR part 180 and 2 CFR part 2424 apply as written. 2 CFR § 200.311 - Real property. CFR § 200.311 Real property. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to real property acquired or improved under a Federal award will vest upon acquisition in the non-Federal entity. (b) Use. Except as otherwise provided by Federal statutes or by the Federal awarding agency, real property will be used for the originally authorized purpose as long as needed for that purpose, during which time the non-Federal entity must not dispose of or encumber its title or other interests. (c) Disposition. When real property is no longer needed for the originally authorized purpose, the non- Federal entity must obtain disposition instructions from the Federal awarding agency or pass-through entity. The instructions must provide for one of the following alternatives: (1) Retain title after compensating the Federal awarding agency. The amount paid to the Federal awarding agency will be computed by applying the Federal awarding agency's percentage of participation in the cost of the original purchase (and costs of any improvements) to the fair market value of the property. However, in those situations where the non-Federal entity is disposing of real property acquired or improved with a Federal award and acquiring replacement real property under the same Federal award, the net proceeds from the disposition may be used as an offset to the cost of the replacement property. (2) Sell the property and compensate the Federal awarding agency. The amount due to the Federal awarding agency will be calculated by applying the Federal awarding agency's percentage of participation in the cost of the original purchase (and cost of any improvements) to the proceeds of the sale after deduction of any actual and reasonable selling and fixing-up expenses. If the Federal award has not been closed out, the net proceeds from sale may be offset against the original cost of the property. When the non-Federal entity is directed to sell property, sales procedures must be followed that provide for competition to the extent practicable and result in the highest possible return. (3) Transfer title to the Federal awarding agency or to a third party designated/approved by the Federal awarding agency. The non-Federal entity is entitled to be paid an amount calculated by applying the non-Federal entity's percentage of participation in the purchase of the real property (and cost of any improvements) to the current fair market value of the property. ************************************************************************************ Tricia Davis at the State’s HCD Office sent the following message re: temporary emergency shelter on 10/13/2020: The answer from the AAQ... Not as encouraging as I had hoped. "The SNAPS office is working on ways to give recipients other options, other than repayment, for disposition of temporary emergency shelters acquired or renovated with ESG-CV funds. However, recipients should know the current limitations when deciding to pursue this activity type." ~Tricia ---------- Forwarded message --------- From: <aaq@hudexchange.info> Date: Mon, Oct 12, 2020 at 7:52 AM Subject: Question Response for ESG Question ID 165827 - HUD Exchange Ask A Question To: <smmoore@utah.gov> Question Status: Answered Thank you for submitting a question via the HUD Exchange. The response to your question is listed below. Requestor Name: Sarah Moore Requestor Email: smmoore@utah.gov Question Related To: Emergency Solutions Grants Question ID: 165827 Question Subject: CARES Act unique activities - Building Acquisition Question Text: We need better guidance around the CV funded unique activity of temporary shelter building acquisition. d. ESG-CV means the Emergency Solutions Grants Program as funded by the CARES Act and governed by requirements HUD establishes in accordance with that Act. ESG-CV funds do not include annual ESG funds (e.g., FY 2020 ESG grant funds), although annual ESG funds may be used in accordance with the requirements established for purposes of ESG-CV funds as further described in Section IV of this Notice. e. Temporary Emergency Shelter means any structure or portion of a structure, which is used for a limited period of time because of a crisis, such as a natural disaster or public health emergency, to provide shelter for individuals and families displaced from their normal place of residence or sheltered or unsheltered locations. Notice: CPD-20-08 - E. Program Components and Eligible Activities. - 3. Additional Eligible Activities. In addition to the eligible activities listed in 24 CFR 576: a. Temporary emergency shelters. As permitted by the CARES Act, ESG-CV funds may be used to pay for temporary emergency shelters for individuals and families experiencing homelessness in order to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus. (i) Eligible costs include: (a) Leasing existing real property or temporary structures to be used as temporary emergency shelters; (b) Acquisition of real property (e.g. hotels, ancillary structures, parking lots). The total amount of ESG-CV funds used for acquisition must not exceed $2.5 million per real property; (c) Renovation (including major rehabilitation and conversion) of real property (e.g., hotels) into temporary emergency shelters. Eligible costs include labor, tools, and other costs for renovation; What are the expectations of the temporary shelters that may be purchased with CV funding after the "limited period of time because of a crisis" has expired? Response: The Real Property requirements at 2 CFR 200.311 still apply, even though minimum period of use requirements are waived for temporary emergency shelter acquired or renovated with ESG-CV funding. Part 200 requires that, when real property is no longer needed for the originally authorized purpose, the non-Federal entity must obtain disposition instructions from the Federal awarding agency or pass- through entity. Currently, there are two possible disposition options for recipients: 1. Retain title after compensating HUD. The amount paid to HUD will be computed by applying HUD's percentage of participation in the cost of the original purchase (and costs of any improvements) to the fair market value of the property. However, in those situations where the non-Federal entity is disposing of real property acquired or improved with a Federal award and acquiring replacement real property under the same Federal award, the net proceeds from the disposition may be used as an offset to the cost of the replacement property. 2. Sell the property and compensate HUD. The amount due to HUD will be calculated by applying HUD's percentage of participation in the cost of the original purchase (and cost of any improvements) to the proceeds of the sale after deduction of any actual and reasonable selling and fixing-up expenses. If the Federal award has not been closed out, the net proceeds from sale may be offset against the original cost of the property. When the non-Federal entity is directed to sell property, sales procedures must be followed that provide for competition to the extent practicable and result in the highest possible return. In either case, HUD will provide recipients with disposition instructions to further explain the process. The SNAPS office is working on ways to give recipients other options, other than repayment, for disposition of temporary emergency shelters acquired or renovated with ESG-CV funds. However, recipients should know the current limitations when deciding to pursue this activity type. Please note: the response provided in this email is specific to the question you submitted and may not apply to similar questions. Therefore, please use discretion in providing the response to others as the answer may not apply to their particular situation. 1 RESOLUTION NO.________ OF 2021 An appropriations resolution adopting the CARES Act 2020 Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Coronavirus funding that includes Community Development Block Grant funding, Emergency Solutions Grant funding, and Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS funding, and approving the signing of an Interlocal Cooperation agreement between Salt Lake City and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. WHEREAS, Salt Lake City Corporation (City) is eligible under Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 24, Part 91, et. al., to receive CARES Act 2020 Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Coronavirus Community Development Block Grant (CDBG-CV) funds in the amount of $3,063,849, Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG-CV) funds in the amount of $3,986,911, and Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA-CV) funds in the amount of $87,443 from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for the program year; and WHEREAS, in order to receive said funds, the City is required to update the adopted 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan, and 2020-2021 Annual Action Plan with appropriations to eligible recipients; and WHEREAS, the public notices and other pre-submission requirements as set forth in 24 CFR Part 91 have been accomplished by the City, including but not limited to the following: A public comment period was held August 21 through September 3, 2020 in relation to the associated substantial amendments to the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan, 2020-2025 Citizen Participation Plan and 2020-2021 Annual Action Plan; and WHEREAS, the City Council does now meet on this day of _______________, 2021 to adopt appropriation updates to the City’s 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan, and 2020-2021 Annual Action Plan for CDBG-CV, ESG-CV, and HOPWA-CV funds. NOW, THEREFORE, be it resolved by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah, that the City hereby adopts an update to the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan, and 2020-2021 Annual Action Plan for CDBG-CV, ESG-CV, and HOPWA-CV funds as set forth in Exhibit “A” attached hereto and made a part hereof by this reference. 2 Passed by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah, this day of _______________, 2021. SALT LAKE CITY COUNCIL By _____________________________ CHAIR Approved as to form: __________________________ Kimberly K. Chytraus Salt Lake City Attorney’s Office Date: ___________________________ ATTEST: _________________________________ CITY RECORDER January 29, 2021 3 EXHIBIT “A” Funding Recommendations and Appropriations for CARES Act 2020 HUD Coronavirus funding. See the attached that includes funding recommendations and appropriation for the CDBG-CV Program, funding recommendations for the ESG-CV Program, and funding recommendations for the HOPWA-CV Program. Federal HUD‐CV Remaining Amounts, Updated Program Budgets and Outcomes for CouncilUpdated 2/8/2021Applicant ProgramOriginal RequestAdditional Revised RequestNeed Clients Served Target Areas NotesSLC Corporation / SustainabilityExpand Emergency Food Delivery 141,334$    ‐$                                Emergency FoodNo response from Sustainability as of close of business 2/8.Total SLC Corp request: TBDNourish to FlourishFood Assistance for Low‐Income Residents and Economic Assistance for Local Restaurants Affected by COVID‐19 ‐$                 468,900$                   Emergency Food$7.50/meal+62,000 meals 84104, 84116At an avg cost of $7.50 per meal, Nourish to Flourish can provide over 62,000 meals and target zip codes 84104 & 84116. Economies of scale happen at +$250,000.Community Partners TBDPublic Service Agencies ‐ Vaccination Outreach to Underserved Communities in SLC's Westside Communities‐$                 40,000$                    Equitable Distributions of Vaccinations TBDSLC Minority Populations, Poplar Grove, Rose Park, GlendaleThe County Health Department (CHD) recently held a application solicitation to assist with equitable access to vaccination effort. CHD received $930k of requests, and made available $300k in funding. CHD anticipates making awards publicly known this week. However the CHD reviewed with HAND staff the applications of 2 proven applicants who would serve residents of SLC's Westside communities, that have been hardest hit and impacted by COVID. The request between these agencies is the sum total of approximately $40,000. However, Council could identify additional funding for this effort and HAND staff will work to identify additional partners based upon applications that were not fully funded via CHD process and are eligible for HUD‐CV funding taking into account any Council direction/preference for targeting specific populations. Outputs were not requested by the CHD and are unknown at this time.   508,900$                   Revised Request468,900$                   HUD CDBG‐CV Unallocated Funding(40,000)$                  DifferenceApplicant ProgramOriginal RequestAdditional Revised RequestNeed Clients Served Target Areas NotesVolunteers of AmericaHomeless Outreach Program ‐ City ESG‐CV Homeless Outreach and Vaccine Coordination  128,917$    355,880$                  Equitable Distributions of Vaccinations3,000 unduplicated County‐wide Total VOA Request: $484,797Soap2HopeSoap2Hope Street Outreach Program 112,180$    100,000$                  Equitable Distributions of Vaccinations5,200 duplicated County‐wideDue to the nature of interactions and needs specific to the homeless populations, outputs are estimated as many clients will have multiple engagements. The clients served represents the number of interactions anticipated. The total number of clients served will be fewer.Total Soap to Hope request: $212,180455,880$                   Revised RequestLink to Zoomgrants, HUD‐CV read‐only applications460,828$                   HUD ESG‐CV Unallocated Funding4,948$                      DifferenceCDBG‐CVCommunity Development Block Grant‐COVIDESG‐CVEmergency Solutions Grant‐COVID ERIN MENDENHALL DEPARTMENT of COMMUNITY Mayor and NEIGHBORHOODS BLAKE THOMAS Director SALT LAKE CITY CORPORATION 451 SOUTH STATE STREET, ROOM 404 WWW.SLC.GOV P.O. BOX 145460, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84114-5460 TEL 801.535.6230 CITY COUNCIL TRANSMITTAL ________________________ Rachel Otto, Chief of Staff Date Received: _________________ Date sent to Council: _________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ TO: Salt Lake City Council DATE: 9/17/2020 Chris Wharton, Chair UPDATED DATE: 12/28/2020 FROM: Blake Thomas, Director, Department of Community & Neighborhoods __________________________ SUBJECT: UPDATED_DECEMBER_2020 Substantial Amendments to the Salt Lake City 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan, 2020-2024 Citizen Participation Plan, and 2020-2021 Annual Action Plan for utilization of U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Securities Act (CARES Act) funds for coronavirus response and recovery. STAFF CONTACT: Lani Eggertsen-Goff, Director, Housing and Neighborhood Development 801-535-6240, lani.eggertsen-goff@slcgov.com Tony Milner, Policy and Program Manager, Housing and Neighborhood Development 801-535-6168, tony.milner@slcgov.com DOCUMENT TYPE: Resolution RECOMMENDATION: Approve the Substantial Amendments and appropriate the associated funding. Per the statutory requirements outlined in the CARES Act to utilize $7,138,203 of HUD funding Salt Lake City must request Substantial Amendments to: •The 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan •The 2020-2024 Citizen Participation Plan •The 2020-2021 Annual Action Plan These amendments are required for utilization of CARES HUD-CV funds for coronavirus response and recovery. 12/29/2020 12/29/2020 BUDGET IMPACT: CARES HUD-CV funding and programmatic expenses will not impact the City’s General Fund or future annual HUD allocations. BACKGROUND/DISCUSSION: The requested amendments will allow the award from HUD for CARES Act funding to Salt Lake City, a total of $7,138,203 for coronavirus response and recovery. These funds will be used in Salt Lake City for eligible activities and services in accordance with Community Development Block Grant (CDBG-CV), Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG-CV) and Housing Opportunities for People With AIDS/HIV (HOPWA-CV) HUD regulations and CARES Act waivers. CARES HUD-CV1 funds were allocated to Salt Lake City on April 2, 2020 via notification from HUD Acting Assistant Secretary for Community Planning and Development. On June 9, 2020, Salt Lake City was notified of an additional allocation of ESG-CV2 funds. On September 11, 2020, Salt Lake City was notified of an additional allocation of CDBG-CV3 funds. • Community Development Block Grant (CDBG-CV), first round $2,064,298, third round $999,551 • Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG-CV), first round $1,040,462 and second round $2,946,449 • Housing Opportunities for People With HIV/AIDS (HOPWA-CV), first round $87,443 Housing and Neighborhood Development (HAND) staff will administer the CARES HUD-CV funds. HAND staff will continue to communicate with the Administration and City Council about the CARES HUD-CV allocation process. The process is anticipated to mirror the regular, annual HUD allocation process. This includes a competitive application process, review and recommendation by the Community Development and Capital Improvement Program (CD-CIP) and Housing Trust Fund Advisory Board (HTFAB) that serve as resident advisory boards, the Mayor’s recommendations, and the Council’s recommendations. The City Attorney’s Office has reviewed the attached resolution (Exhibit 11) and approves it as to form. These Substantial Amendments are in-compliance with HUD Requirements, Substantial Amendment Section HUD 24 CFR 91.505 (b). ~~~~~UPDATED/NEW INFORMATION (December 2020)~~~~~ A public comment period for the Substantial Amendments to 2020-24 Consolidated Plan and 2020-21 Annual Action Plan regarding the associated HUD-CV funding from the CARES Act began September 11, 2020 and ended September 24, 2020. No comments from the public were received by city staff. Council adopted the Substantial Amendments to the 2020-24 Consolidated Plan and the 2020-21 Annual Action Plan on October 20, 2020. The City notified the public and opened a competitive process to accept requests for CARES Act HUD-CV funding from November 2, 2020 to November 22, 2020 in ZoomGrants. An application training session was held November 6, 2020 for interested applicants and HAND staff made themselves available to answer specific questions. The CD-CIP and HTFA boards reviewed applications in November and December 2020 and provided funding recommendations to the Mayor. Typically for the City’s annual action plan for federal funding HUD requires a public hearing, however the CARES Act provided a waiver of this requirement to expedite disbursal of funds as outlined on page 6 of the HUD guidance, dated June 22, 2020, Flexibilities/Waivers Granted by the CARES Act + Mega Waiver and Guidance. RECOMMENDATIONS Approve the Funding Recommendations provided by the CD-CIP and HTFA boards, and the Mayor. These recommendations are outlined in Exhibit 12. CARES Act HUD-CV Funding Recommendations Log. During the competitive application process, the requests received were lower than the total funding made available from HUD. For CDBG-CV the requests left a remaining balance of $468,900 and for ESG-CV a remaining balance of $460,828. Many of the community partners were contacted by HAND staff after the application window closed to determine if they have capacity to utilize more funding; the amounts in Exhibit 12 reflect several adjustments from the initial application requests. Council now has the option to disburse the remaining amounts of CDBG-CV and ESG-CV to eligible activities that prepare, prevent, and respond to COVID-19. The Council may consider the following disbursement options: •The CD-CIP board adopted a motion to recommend the remaining ESG-CV and CDBG- CV funding go to homeless service agencies that could help with COVID-19 vaccination, such as agencies that can help identify low-income, homeless, marginalized populations, and communities of color, to obtain and receive COVID-19 vaccines. •Increase any line item in the CARES Act HUD-CV Funding Recommendation Log. •Provide funding to past federal funding applicants for FY 2020-2021 who did not receive HUD funding. However, these applications were submitted in the fall of 2019, and no specific COVID-19 activities were addressed in those funding requests. •Reopen the CDBG-CV and ESG-CV funding for another competitive application process immediately. •Council may choose to reserve funds in a holding account to be disbursed later. If this option is selected, there are very time sensitive parameters: o HUD 24 CFR 576.203 states that a 180-day time period to obligate funds starts after HUD signs the grant agreement. HUD signed Salt Lake City’s grant agreements for ESG-CV and HOPWA-CV on November 19, 2020, and CDBG- CV on December 3, 2020. This would require that all funding be under contract with community partners by May 17, 2021 and by June 1, 2021, respectively. UPDATED EXHIBITS: Exhibit 12. CARES HUD-CV Funding Recommendations Log 2020-2021 ~~~~~ORIGINAL TRANSMITTAL~~~~~ ADDITIONAL BACKGROUND CARES HUD-CV FUNDING: On March 27, 2020, the United States Congress passed The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) (H.R. 748, Public Law 116- 136), which makes available $5 billion in supplemental Community Development Block Grant (CDBG-CV) funding, $1 billion for Emergency Solutions Grants (ESG-CV) and $53.7 million for Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA-CV) grants to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus (CV). The CARES Act stipulated that HUD-CV funding must not fund duplicative activities and requires tracking to ensure no other funding source could be utilized for the expense. Salt Lake City is an entitlement city and serves as the Grantee receiving the funding. Use of HUD-CV funds may address activities to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus. Funds must serve low- to moderate-income individuals or households, underserved communities or populations, and align with HUD National Objectives. PROPOSED SUBSTANTIAL AMENDMENTS: Due to the City’s allocated CARES HUD-CV funding Substantial Amendments are required for the recently adopted 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan, 2020-2024 Citizen Participation Plan, and the 2020-2021 Annual Action Plan. These Substantial Amendments were prepared following the guidance from HUD, as issued to date. HUD REQUIREMENTS HUD’s Substantial Amendment Section 24 CFR 91.505 (b), outlines the criteria for Substantial Amendment and states “the jurisdiction shall identify in its Citizen Participation Plan the criteria it will use for determining what constitutes a Substantial Amendment. It is these Substantial Amendments that are subject to a citizen participation process, in accordance with the jurisdiction's citizen participation plan.” SALT LAKE CITY 2020-2024 CONSOLIDATED PLAN REQUIREMENTS Salt Lake City’s Consolidated Plan for 2020-2024 Citizen Participation Plan defines a Substantial Amendment as: 1. A proposed use of funds that does not address a goal or underlying strategy identified in the governing Consolidated Plan or Annual Action Plan; or 2. Increasing funding levels for a given project by 100% or more of the previously adopted amount; or 3. Decreasing funding levels for a given project by 100% AND pivoting impacted funds to another approved use during an action plan period; or 4. A change to a regulatory requirement or additional allocated funding from the US Department of Housing & Urban Development that defines that a Substantial Amendment must be completed. Substantial Amendment to 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan: #1 Accept Additional Allocations of Funding Section SP-35, The Strategic Plan, Anticipated Resources. HUD 24 CFR 91.215 (a)(4), 91.220 (c)(1,2). Located on page 146 of the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan. The CARES HUD-CV allocations represent an additional allocation of funding from HUD to Salt Lake City’s 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan, thus requiring a Substantial Amendment. With Council’s adoption of the resolution the City’s current 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan will be amended to reflect the additional funding and eligible uses of the grant funds. (See Exhibit 4, Substantial Amendment to SP-35 Anticipated Resources and AP- 15 Expected Resources) Substantial Amendments to 2020-2024 Citizen Participation Plan (Appendix C of the 2020- 2024 Consolidated Plan): #1 Shortened Public Comment Period Citizen Participation, HUD 24 CFR 91.105. Located on page 281 of the 2020- 2024 Citizen Participation Plan (Appendix C of the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan) Substantial Amendments are required to follow the City’s Citizen Participation Plan, as outlined in the Consolidated Plan for 2020-2024, which under normal circumstances, requires a public comment period for the Substantial Amendment of thirty (30) days. However, to quickly implement the funds and activities of the CARES HUD-CV, HUD has waived that requirement with amendment to the City’s Citizen Participation Plan, reducing the public comment period to five (5) days. Further, HUD is allowing the Citizen Participation Plan and the Substantial Amendment to the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan and 2020 Annual Action Plan to run concurrently. Although the CARES Act has shortened the potential public comment period to five (5) days, Salt Lake City Ordinance requires a fourteen (14) day public comment period. Thus, HAND staff will implement a fourteen (14) day public comment period for this Substantial Amendment. The City’s current 2020-2024 Citizen Participation Plan will be amended to reflect this change and accept a fourteen-day public comment period. This Shortened Public Comment Period amendment only applies to the CARES- HUD-CV allocation, and not to any other funding allocated by HUD. Substantial Amendment to 2020-2021 Annual Action Plan: #1 Accept Additional Allocations of Funding Section AP-15, Expected Resources. HUD 24 CFR 91.215 (a)(4), 91.220 (c)(1,2). Located on page 33 of the 2020-2021 Annual Action Plan. A Substantial Amendment is required to accept the CARES HUD-CV. These funds represent an additional allocation of funding from HUD to Salt Lake City’s 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan and 2020-2021 Annual Action Plan. The City’s current 2020-2021 Annual Action Plan will be amended to reflect the additional funding and eligible uses of grant funds. (See Exhibit 4, Substantial Amendment to SP-35 Anticipated Resources and AP- 15 Expected Resources) PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD: A public comment period began September 11, 2020 and is set to end September 24, 2020 specifically for the above-mentioned Substantial Amendment components. The public comment period was posted in English and Spanish through the State’s Public Notice website, sent to community partners to post, and provided to the Mayor’s Office and the Council Office for dissemination on social media platforms and other applicable forms of electronic communication and noticing. COORDINATION WITH COMMUNITY PARTNERS: Salt Lake City has worked closely with Salt Lake County, the State of Utah and other community partners to ensure funds will be strategically targeted to reach our most vulnerable residents who are impacted by coronavirus and that programs will not be duplicative. Community Partners include: • Other regional CARES HUD-CV grantees • Salt Lake City CARES HUD-CV Internal Working Group • Salt Lake City’s Resident Advisory Group: the Community Development and Capital Improvement Program Board • HUD Regional Office • HUD Technical Assistance Representatives • National homeless and affordable housing consultants and advocacy groups HUD requires HUD-CV grantees to prevent the duplication of services. This translates to grant funds may not be used to pay costs if another source of financial assistance is available to pay that cost. HAND staff will work with community partners and track other funding and community benefits in order to prevent duplication of services. EXPECTED RESOURCES: See Exhibit 5. SLC CARES HUD-CV Funding Recommendations See Exhibit 10. HAND Grant Management EXHIBITS: Exhibit 1. 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan and 2020-2024 Citizens Participation Plan (Appendix C of the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan) Exhibit 2. 2020-2021 Annual Action Plan Exhibit 3. Substantial Amendments Regarding SLC CARES HUD-CV Allocation Exhibit 4. Substantial Amendments to SP-35 Anticipated Resources and AP-15 Expected Resources Exhibit 5. SLC CARES HUD-CV Funding Recommendations Exhibit 6. HUD Memo, March 31, 2020, Availability of Community Planning and Development (CPD) Grant Program and Consolidated Plan Requirements to Prevent the Spread of COVID-19 and Mitigate Economic Impacts Caused by COVID-19 Exhibit 7. Substantial Amendments, Public Notice fliers, English and Spanish Exhibit 8. Summary of Public Comments Exhibit 9. HAND HUD Public Process Exhibit 10. HAND Grant Management Exhibit 11. Resolution Exhibit 12. CARES HUD-CV Funding Recommendations Log 2020-2021 Exhibit 1 Consolidated Plan with Appendices 2020-2024 2020 - 2024 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan HUD PROGRAM YEARS 2020 - 2024 FISCAL YEARS 2021 - 2025 SALT LAKE CITY 2020-2024 CONSOLIDATED PLAN MAYOR ERIN MENDENHALL CITY COUNCIL JAMES ROGERS ANDREW JOHNSTON CHRIS WHARTON ANA VALDEMOROS DARIN MANO DAN DUGAN AMY FOWLER Prepared by S A L T L A K E C I T Y HOUSING and NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT DIVISION DEPARTMENT of COMMUNITY and NEIGHBHORHOODS 2 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Executive Summary (ES) ...................................................................................................................................... 4 a. ES-05 Executive Summary – 24 CFR 91.200(c), 91.220(b) ................................................................... 5 II. The Process (PR) .................................................................................................................................................. 10 a. PR-05 Lead & Responsible Agencies – 24 CFR 91.200(b) ............................................................ 11 b. PR-10 Consultation – 91.100, 91.200(b ), 91.215(l) ............................................................................. 11 c. PR-15 Citizen Participation ................................................................................................................ 26 III. Needs Assessment (NA) ................................................................................................................................ 48 a. NA-05 Overview .................................................................................................................................... 49 b. NA-10 Needs Assessment – Housing Needs Assessment – 91.205 (a,b,c) ..................................... 54 c. NA-15 Disproportionately Greater Need: Housing Problems – 91.205 (b)(2) ..................... 69 d. NA-20 Disproportionately Greater Need: Severe Housing Problems – 91.205 (b)(2)....... 72 e. NA-25 Disproportionately Greater Need: Housing Cost Burdens – 91.205 (b)(2) ............. 74 f. NA-30 Disproportionately Greater Need: Discussion – 91.205 (b)(2) .................................... 75 g. NA-35 Public Housing – 91.205 (b) .................................................................................................... 78 h. NA-40 Homeless Needs Assessment – 91.205 (c) ........................................................................ 81 i. NA-45 Non-Homeless Special Needs Assessment – 91.205 (b,d) .......................................... 85 j. NA-50 Non-Housing Community Development Needs – 91.215 (f) .................................... 93 IV. Housing Market Analysis (MA) .................................................................................................................. 96 a. MA-Overview ......................................................................................................................................... 97 b. MA-10 Number of Housing Units 91.120(a) & (b)(2) ..................................................................... 99 c. MA-15 Housing Market Analysis: Cost of Housing – 91.210 (a) ...........................................103 d. MA-20 Housing Market Analysis: Condition of Housing – 91.210 (a ) ................................106 e. MA-25 Public and Assisted Housing – 91.210 (b) ......................................................................110 f. MA-30 Homeless Facilities and Services – 91.210 (c) ...............................................................112 g. MA-35 Special Needs Facilities and Services – 91.210 (d) ......................................................115 h. MA-40 Barriers to Affordable Housing – 91.210 (e) ..................................................................117 i. MA-45 Non-Housing Community Development Assets – 91.210 (f) ..................................118 j. MA-50 Needs and Market Analysis: Discussion .....................................................................126 k. MA-60 Broadband Needs of Housing Occupied by Low - and Moderate-Income Households – 91.210(a)(4), 91.310(a)(2 ) ..............................................................................................130 l. MA-65 Hazard Mitigation – 91.210(a)(5), 91.310(a)(2) ...................................................................131 V. Strategic Plan (SP) ............................................................................................................................................132 a. SP -05 Overview ...................................................................................................................................133 b. SP -10 Geographic Priorities – 91.215 (a)(1) ...................................................................................134 c. SP -25 Priority Needs – 91.215 (a)(2) .................................................................................................139 d. SP -30 Influence of Market Conditions – 91.215 (a)(2) ...............................................................144 e. SP -35 Anticipated Resources – 91.215 (a)(4), 91.220 (c)(1,2) ........................................................145 3 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 f. SP -40 Institutional Delivery Structure – 91.215 (k) .....................................................................150 g. SP -45 Goals ..........................................................................................................................................156 h. SP -50 Public Housing Accessibility and Involvement – 91.215 (c) .......................................158 i. SP-55 Strategic Plan Barriers to Affordable Housing – 91.215 (h) ......................................158 j. SP -60 Homelessness Strategy – 91.215 (h) ...................................................................................162 k. SP -65 Lead-based Paint Hazards – 91.215 (i) ..............................................................................165 l. SP -70 Anti-Poverty Strategy – 91.215 (j) .......................................................................................166 m. SP -80 Monitoring – 91.230 ................................................................................................................167 VI. Appendix A: 2020-2024 Fair Housing Action Plan .........................................................................169 VII. Appendix B: Summary of Publ ic Comment and Citizen Participation ...............................181 VIII. Appendix C: 2020-2024 Citizen Participation Plan......................................................................281 IX. Appendix D: 2020-2021 Action Plan......................................................................................................291 4 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Executive Summary serves as an introduction and summar izes the process of developing the plan, the key findings utilized to develop priorities, and how the proposed goals and objectives will address those priorities. 5 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 ES-05 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 24 CFR 91.200(c), 91.220(b) 1. INTRODUCTION Salt Lake City’s 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan is the product of a collaborative process to identify housing and community development needs and to establish goals, priorities, and strategies to address those needs. This five-year plan provides a framework for maximizing and leve raging the city’s block grant allocations to build healthy and sustainable communities that better focus funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) formula block grant programs. The entitlement grant programs guided by the Consolidated Plan are as follows:  Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) The CDBG program’s primary objective is to promote the development of viable urban communities by providing decent housing, suitable living environments, and expanded economic activiti es to persons of low- and moderate-income.  Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) The ESG program’s primary objective is to assist individuals and families regain housing stability after experiencing a housing or homelessness crisis.  HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME) The HOME program’s primary objective is to create affordable housing opportunities for low -income households.  Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) The HOPWA program’s primary objective is to provide housing assistance and re lated supportive services to persons living with HIV/AIDS and their families. Similar to cities across the country, Salt Lake City is faced with housing prices that are rising more rapidly than wages, resulting in a lack of affordable housing. This Consol idated Plan outlines a comprehensive set of policies that respond to the City’s current challenges by utilizing new and collaborative strategies. Affordable and safe housing serves as the foundation for individuals to move out of poverty and to avoid hom elessness. However, it is increasingly recognized that housing must be connected to opportunities for education, transit, recreation, economic development, healthcare, and services. Instead of addressing these needs separately, Salt Lake City takes a comprehensive and geographic approach to community development by integrating these various aspects into its Consolidated Plan. The 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan encourages investment in neighborhoods with concentrated poverty and supports at-risk populations by promoting goals that increase access to housing, transportation, economic development, and critical services. By building upon the growth and successes realized in the previous Consolidated Plan, Salt Lake City is continuing to work toward closing the gap in a number of socioeconomic indicators, such as improving housing affordability, job training, access to transportation for low -income households, homeless prevention services, and medical/dental/behavioral health services for at -risk populations. In addition to expanding opportunity for low -income households living in concentrated areas of poverty, Salt Lake City will continue to support essential housing and supportive services for the City’s most vulnerable populations, with focus on the chronically h omeless, homeless families, disabled persons, victims of domestic violence, persons living with HIV/AIDS, and low -income elderly persons. Process & Overview 6 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 The 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan is organized into four primary sections, as follows: I. The Proce ss The Process section of the Plan outlines the development of the Plan, including citizen participation efforts and stakeholder involvement. II. Needs Assessment (NA) The Needs Assessment section provides an analysis of housing, homeless and community development needs, with focus on the needs of low -income households, racial and ethnic minorities, homeless persons, and non-homeless special needs populations. III. Housing Market Analysis (MA) The Housing Market Analysis section provides information and data on Salt Lake City’s housing market, including an evaluation of local resources. The housing market analysis supplements information supplied by the needs assessment and establishes a framework for five -year goals and priorities to be developed. IV. Five -Year Strategic Plan (SP) Once community needs, market conditions, and resources are identified, program goals, specific strategies, and benchmarks for measuring progress are set forth in the Strategic Plan section of the Consolidated Plan. Efforts are prioritized to direct the allocation of federal funding to maximize impact within the community. Throughout this Plan period, Salt Lake City will look to address strategies and funding resources that help address community responses to emergency need. This may include preparing for, responding to, and recovery from community wide emergencies. These emergencies would likely be identified through a national, state or local declaration of a state of emergency. Where appropriate, Salt Lake City will maximize all resources to address such instances. The 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan planning process will conclude with the development of the City’s First -Year Action Plan. The First-Year Action Plan will outline the activities and funding prio rities for the first year of the Consolidated Plan, covering July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021. THE PROCESS NEEDS ASSESSMENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS 5-YEAR STRATEGIC PLAN 7 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 2. OBJECTIVES AND OUTCOMES IDENTIFIED IN THE PLAN Salt Lake City’s 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan is a strategic plan focused on building Neighborhoods of Opportunity to promote capacity in neighborhoods with concentrated poverty and to support the City’s most vulnerable populations. Identified below are 5 goals with associated strategies to achieve the goals. Housing To provide expanded housing options for all ec onomic and demographic segments of Salt Lake City’s population while diversifying the housing stock within neighborhoods.  Support housing programs that address the needs of aging housing stock through targeting rehabilitation efforts and diversifying the housing stock within neighborhoods  Support affordable housing development that increases the number and types of units available for income eligible residents  Support programs that provide access to home ownership via down payment assistance, and/or housing subsidy, and/or financing  Support rent assistance programs to emphasize stable housing as a primary strategy to prevent and end homelessness  Expand housing support for aging resident that ensure access to continued stable housing Transportation To prom ote accessibility and affordability of multimodal transportation options.  Improve bus stop amenities as a way to encourage the accessibility of public transit and enhance the experience of public transit in target areas  Support access to transportation prioritizing very low -income and vulnerable populations  Expand and support the installation of bike racks, stations, and amenities as a way to encourage use of alternative modes of transportation in target areas Build Community Resiliency Build resiliency by providing tools to increase economic and/or housing stability.  Provide job training/vocational training programs targeting low -income and vulnerable populations including, but not limited to; chronically homeless; those exiting treatment centers/program s and/or institutions; and persons with disabilities  Economic Development efforts via supporting the improvement and visibility of small businesses through façade improvement programs  Provide economic development support for microenterprise businesses  Direct financial assistance to for-profit businesses  Expand access to early childhood education to set the stage for academic achievement, social development, and change the cycle of poverty  Promote digital inclusion through access to digital communication te chnologies and the internet  Provide support for programs that reduce food insecurity for vulnerable population Homeless Services To expand access supportive programs that help ensure that homelessness is rare, brief, and non -recurring.  Expand support for medical and dental care options for those experiencing homelessness  Provide support for homeless services including Homeless Resource Center Operations and Emergency overflow operations  Provide support for programs providing outreach services to address t he needs of those living an unsheltered life 8 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024  Expand case management support as a way to connect those experiencing homelessness with permanent housing and supportive services Behavioral Health To provide support for low -income and vulnerable populations experiencing behavioral health concerns such as substance abuse disorders and mental health challenges.  Expand treatment options, counseling support, and case management for those experiencing behavioral health crisis  Support programs that provide connecti on to permanent housing upon exiting behavioral health programs. Support may include, but is not limited to supporting obtaining housing via deposit and rent assistance and barrier elimination to the extent allowable to regulation 3. EVALUATION OF PAST PERFORMANCE In preparation for development of the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan, Salt Lake City’s Housing and Neighborhood Development Division reviewed Consolidated Annual Performance Reports (CAPERs) submitted to HUD under the 2015-2019 Consolidated Plan. Th e CAPERs provide an evaluation of past performance and accomplishments in relation to established goals and priorities. The City’s program year 2016 -2017 & 2017- 2018 CAPER can be viewed at https://www.hudexchange.info/programs/consolidated -plan/con-plans-aaps- capers/. During the course of the 2015-2019 Consolidated Plan, the City has been able to meet the vast majority of established goals and priorities. In addition, the City was able to comply with statutes and regulations set by HUD. TABLE ES -05.1 SALT LAKE CITY 2015-2019 CONSOLIDATED PLAN ACCOMPLISHMENTS Goal Description Estimated Projected 1 Improve and Expand the Affordable Housing Stock 1,325 1,430 2 Expand Homeownership Opportunities 110 70 3 Provide Housing & Related Services to Persons with HIV/AIDS 725 925 4 Provide Housing for Homeless & At -Risk of Homeless Individuals and Families 965 3,217 5 Provide Day-to-Day Services for Homeless Individu als & Families 15,000 7,380 6 Provide Public Services to Expand Opportunity & Self -Sufficiency for At-Risk Populations 35,000 24,385 7 Revitalize Business Nodes in Target Areas 75 50 8 Improve the Quality of Public Facilities 1,093 1,344 9 Improve Infrastructure in Distressed Neighborhoods & Target Areas 100,000 139,112 4. SUMMARY OF CITIZEN PARTICIPATION PROCESS AND CONSULTATION PROCESS: Citizen participation is an integral part of the Consolidated Plan planning process, as it ensures goals and priorities are defined in the context of community needs and preferences. In addition, the citizen participation process provides a format to educate the community about the City’s federal grant programs. To this end, Salt Lake City solicited involvement from a diverse group of stakeholders and community members during the development of the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan. A comprehensive public engagement process included a citywide survey (2,000+ respondents), public hearings, public meetings, one -on-one meetings, stakeholder 9 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 committee meetings, task force meetings, internal technical committee meetings, and a public comment period. In total, over 4,000 residents participated in providing input into this plan. The City received input and buy -in from residents, homeless service providers. Low -income service providers, anti-poverty advocates, healthcare providers, housing advocates, housing developers, housing authorities, community development organizations, educational institutions, transit authority planners, Cit y divisions and departments, among others. For more information on citizen participation efforts, refer to the PR-15 Citizen Participation section of this Plan. 5. PUBLIC COMMENTS: A summary of public comments will be available in the appendix of the fina lized Consolidated Plan. 6. SUMMARY OF COMMENTS OR VIEWS NOT ACCE PTED AND THE REASONS FOR NOT ACCEPTING THEM: Comments received to date have been considered and utilized to inform the needs assessment, goal setting, and prioritization of funding. 7. SUMMARY: The Salt Lake City Council is scheduled to adopt the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan on April 21, 2020. 10 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 THE PROCESS The Process section of the Consolidated Plan identifies the lead agencies responsible for the development of the plan and the administration of the grants. In addition, this section outlines the process of consulting with service providers and other stakeholders, as well as citizens participation efforts. 11 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 PR-05 LEAD & RESPONSIBLE AGENCIES - 24 CFR 91.200(b) DESCRIBE AGENCY/ENTITY RESPONSIBLE FOR PREPARING THE CONSOLIDATE D PLAN AND THOSE RESPONSIBLE FO R ADMINISTRATION OF EACH GRANT PROGRAM AND FUNDING SOURCE. The following agencies/entities are responsible for preparing the Consolidated Plan and administrating gr ant programs: TABLE PR -05.1 LEAD AND RESPONSIBLE AGENCIES Agency Role Name Department/Agency CDBG Administrator SALT LAKE CITY Housing and Neighborhood Development Division HOPWA Administrator SALT LAKE CITY Housing and Neighborhood Development Divisio n HOME Administrator SALT LAKE CITY Housing and Neighborhood Development Division ESG Administrator SALT LAKE CITY Housing and Neighborhood Development Division Salt Lake City is the Lead Agency for grant funds received from the United States Departmen t of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) entitlement programs as listed above. The City’s Housing and Neighborhood Development (HAND) Division in the Department of Community and Neighborhoods (CAN) is responsible for the administration of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) entitlement grants which includes the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), the HOME Investment Partnerships Program (HOME), the Emergency Solutions Grants (ESG), and the Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) program. H AND is also responsible for the preparation of the Consolidated Plan, Annual Action Plans, and Consolidated Annual Performance Evaluation Reports (CAPER). Consolidated Plan Public Contact Information: Salt Lake City welcomes questions or comments regarding the Consolidated Plan. Please contact the following: Deputy Director of Housing and Neighborhood Development, Jennifer Schumann at Jennifer.Schumann@slcgov.com or (801) 535-7276. PR- 10 CONSULTATION- 91.100, 91.200(B), 91.215(I) INTRODUCTION: The City conducted robust outreach with representatives of low -income neighborhoods, housing and social services providers, homeless shelter and homeless services providers, faith -based organizations, community stakeholders, City departments, and many others. In total, these comprehensive outreach efforts engaged over 4,000 stakeholders during a one-year period. The citizen participation process is described in greater detail in ‘PR-15 Citizen Participation.’ Provide a concise summary of the jurisdiction’s activities to enhance coordination between public and assisted housing providers and private and governmental health, mental health and service agencies. (91.215(I)). 12 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 The City led a proactive, community-based process to solicit public and stakeholder input for the development of the Consolidated Plan goals, strategies, and priorities. The City created a Stakeholder Advisory Committee that met three times during the planning process. In addition, the City wor ked directly with service providers and other government agencies to gather data used in the technical analysis for the Consolidated Plan. Describe coordination with the Continuum of Care and efforts to address the needs of homeless persons (particularly chronically homeless individuals and families, families with children, veterans, and unaccompanied youth) and persons at risk of homelessness: Salt Lake City representatives actively participated in the Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness (SLVC EH), the entity responsible for oversight of the Continuum of Care (CoC). SLVCEH’s primary goal is to end homelessness in Salt Lake Valley through a system -wide commitment of resources, services, data collection, analysis and coordination among all stakeho lders. The Coalition gathers community consensus to create and fulfill established outcomes. Using these goals, the Coalition partners with key stakeholders to fill the needs of the Salt Lake County Valley community. City representatives served on the SLVC EH Steering Committee and actively participated in meetings and efforts. Describe consultation with the Continuum of Care that serves the jurisdiction’s area in determining how to allocate ESG funds, develop performance standards and evaluate outcomes, a nd develop funding, policies and procedures for the administration of HMIS: Working closely with the other two CoCs in the state- Mountainlands and Balance of State, as well as other city, state, and county representatives, City representatives provided di rection and support for how funding SLVCEH’s priorities are considered in Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) allocations. Utilizing data sources like the annual ‘Point-in-Time Count’ and Utah Homeless Management Information System (UHMIS) outputs, City representatives worked with other SLVCEH members to assess progress on shared metrics such as an individual’s average length of homelessness, likelihood to return to homelessness, and the percentage of exits from emergency shelter, transitional housing, and rapi d rehousing projects to permanent housing. The City has agreed to use common measures with other SLVCEH members to grade service providers. City representatives also actively participated in meetings regarding the funding, policies and procedures for the administration of the UHMIS. UHMIS helps homeless providers coordinate care, manage operations, and better serve clients by tracking client service needs over time. All ESG-funded entities participate in UHMIS. City representatives helped to develop con sistent data standards and create a HMIS training manual. The manual provides guidance on HMIS data elements for CoCs, HMIS Lead Agencies, HMIS System Administrators, and users. City representatives helped to disseminate information regarding the accompany ing HMIS Data Dictionary to define data elements and requirements for HMIS compliance for HMIS Vendors and System Administrators. 13 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 DESCRIBE AGENCIES, GROUPS, ORGANIZATIONS AND OTHERS WHO PARTICIPATED IN THE PROCESS AND DESCRIBE THE JURISDICTION’S CONSULTATIONS WITH HOUSING, SOCIAL SERVICE AGENCIES AND OTHER ENTITIES: TABLE PR -10.1 CONSULTATION AND PUBLIC PARTICIPATION PARTICIPANTS STAKEHOLDER ADVISORY COMMITTEE 1 Agency/Group/Organization Refugee and Immigration Center - Asian Association of Utah Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Refugees What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non-Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From th ese efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 2 Agency/Group/Organization ASSIST Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Persons with Disabilities, Housing What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Housing Needs Assessment, Non-Homeless Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 3 Agency/Group/Organization Columbus Community Center Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Employment, Persons with Disabilities What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non-Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 4 Agency/Group/Organization Community Development Corporation, Utah 14 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Housing What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Housing Needs Assessment How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 5 Agency/Group/Organization Community Health Center of Utah Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Health What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non-Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 6 Agency/Group/Organization Disability Law Center Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Law, Persons with Disabilities What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non-Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback f rom the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 7 Agency/Group/Organization Donated Dental Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Health What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Homeless Needs - Families with Children, Non-Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities 15 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 8 Agency/Group/Organization First Step House Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Housing, Persons with Disabilities, Homeless, Health What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Housing Need Assessment, Homeless Needs - Chronically Homeless, Homeless Needs - Veterans, Homeless Strategy, Non-Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved c oordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 9 Agency/Group/Organization Habitat for Humanity Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Housing What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Housing Need Assessment How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 10 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake County Housing Authority DBA Housing Connect Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Housing, Homeless What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Housing Need Assessment, Homeless Strategy How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those w e are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 11 Agency/Group/Organization Intermountain Healthcare Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Health, Impact Investment 16 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non-Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipat ed outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 12 Agency/Group/Organization Maliheh Free Clinic Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Health, Refugess What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non-Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipat ed outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 13 Agency/Group/Organization NeighborWorks Salt Lake Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Housing What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Housing Needs Assessment How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outc omes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 14 Agency/Group/Organization Optum Health Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Health What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non-Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consu ltation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus 17 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 15 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Housing Authority Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Housing, Homeless What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Housing Needs Assessment, Homeless Strategy How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 16 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake County Aging and Adult Services Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Seniors, Aging Services What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non-Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leverag ed community wide. 17 Agency/Group/Organization Shelter the Homeless Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Homeless What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Housing Needs Assessment, Homeless Strategy, Homeless Needs - Chronically Homeless How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collabo rative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 18 Agency/Group/Organization South Valley Services Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Domestic Violence What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non-Homeless Special Needs 18 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The coll aborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service fo cus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 19 Agency/Group/Organization Utah Community Action Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Housing, Food Bank, Early Education What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Housing Needs Assessment, Homeless Strategy, Anti - Poverty Strategy How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assist ed in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 20 Agency/Group/Organization Utah Department of Workforce Services Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Medicaid, Food, Employment What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Homeless Strategy, Economic Development, Anti -Poverty Strategy, Non-Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 21 Agency/Group/Organization Utah Health and Human Rights Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Mental Health What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non-Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcom es of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to th ose we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 22 Agency/Group/Organization Utah Transit Authority 19 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Transit, Transportation What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non-Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 23 Agency/Group/Organization Volunteers of America - Utah Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Housing, Persons with Disabilities, Homeless, Health What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Housing Needs Assessment, Homeless Needs - Chronically Homeless, Homeless Needs - Families with Children, Homeless Needs - Veterans, Homeless Needs - Unaccompanied Youth, Homeless Strategy, Anti -Poverty Strategy How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consul tation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 24 Agency/Group/Organization Young Women's Christian Association Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Housing, Children, Victims of Domestic Violence, Homeless, Victims What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Homeless Needs - Families with Children, Homeless Strategy, Non-Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the commun ity. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific publ ic service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. INTERDEPARTMENTAL TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE GROUP 25 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Community and Neighborhoods Department Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental - Local, Planning Organization 20 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? City Infrastructure, Community Needs, Community Safety, Economic Development, Homeless Services, Housing Needs Assessment, Market Analysis, Non -Homeless Special Needs, Planning/Zoning/Land Use, Public Services How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The City assembled an Interdepartmental Technical Comm ittee to discuss the necessity of leveraging federal and non-federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts and discuss other funding tools that may be available. The group committed to working collaboratively to maximize resources. Collaborations will continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically focused area. 26 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Counc il Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental - Local, Planning Organization What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? City Infrastructure, City Policy, Community Needs, Community Safety, Economic Development, Homeless Services, Housing Needs Assessment, Market Analysis, Non-Homeless Special Needs, Planning/Zoning/Land Use, Public Services How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The City assembled an Interdepartmental Technical Committee to discuss the necessity of leveraging federal and non-federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts and discuss other fu nding tools that may be available. The group committed to working collaboratively to maximize resources. Collaborations will continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically focused area. 27 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Division of Economic Development Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental - Local, Planning Organization What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? City Infrastructure, Community Needs, Community Safety, Economic Development, Homeless Services, Housing Needs Assessment, Market Analysis, Non -Homeless Special Needs, Planning/Zoning/Land Use, Public Services How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The City assembled an Interdepartmental Technical Committee to discuss the necessity of leveraging federal and non-federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts and discuss other funding tools that may be available. The group committed to working 21 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 collaboratively to maximize resources. Collaborations will continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically focused area. 28 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Engineering Division Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental - Local, Planning Organization What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? City Infrastructure, Community Needs, Community Safety, Economic Development, Homeless Services, Housing Needs Assessment, Market Analysis, Non -Homeless Special Needs, Planning/Zoning/Land Use, Public Services How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The City assembled an Interdepartmental Technical Committee to discuss the necessity of leveraging federal and non-federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts and discuss other funding tools that may be available. The group committed to working collaboratively to maximize resources. Collaborations will continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically focused area. 29 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Parks & Public Lands Division Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental - L ocal, Planning Organization What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? City Infrastructure, Community Needs, Community Safety, Economic Development, Homeless Services, Housing Needs Assessment, Market Analysis, Non -Homeless Special Needs, Planning/Zoning/Land Use, Public Services How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The City assembled an Interdepartmental Technical Committee to discuss the necessity of leveraging federal and non-federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts and discuss other funding tools that may be available. The group committed to working collaboratively to maximize resources. Collaborations will continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically focused area. 30 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Redevelopment Agency Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental - Local, Planning Organization What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? City Infrastructure, Community Needs, Community Safety, Economic Development, Homeless Services, Housing Needs Assessment, Market Analysis, Non -Homeless Special Needs, Planning/Zoning/Land Use, Public Services 22 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The City assembled an Interdepartmental Technical Committee to discuss the necessity of leveraging federal and non-federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts and discuss other funding tools that may be available. The group committed to working collaboratively to maximize resources. Collaborations will continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically focused area. 31 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Transportation Division Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental - Local, Planning Organization What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? City Infrastructure, Community Needs, Community Safety, Ec onomic Development, Homeless Services, Housing Needs Assessment, Market Analysis, Non -Homeless Special Needs, Planning/Zoning/Land Use, Public Services How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The City assembled an Interdepartmental Technical Committee to discuss the necessity of leveraging federal and non-federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically foc us city-wide efforts and discuss other funding tools that may be available. The group committed to working collaboratively to maximize resources. Collaborations will continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically focused area. 32 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Civic Engagement Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental – Local, Planning Organization What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? City Infrastructure, Community Needs, Community Safety, Economic Development, Homeless Services, Housing Needs Assessment, Market Analysis, Non -Homeless Special Needs, Planning/Zoning/Land Use, Public Services How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The City assembled an Interdepartmental Technical Committee to discuss the necessity of leveraging federal and non-federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts and discuss other funding tools that may be available. The group committed to working collaboratively to maximize resources. Collaborations will continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically focused area. 23 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 33 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Police Department Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental - Local What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Community Safety, Homeless Services, Non -Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The City assembled an Interdepartmental Technical Committee to discuss the necessity of leveraging federal and non-federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts and discuss other funding tools that may be available. The group committed to working collaboratively to maximize resources. Collaborations will continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically focused area. 34 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Sustainability Division Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental - Local Planning Organization What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? City Infrastructure, Community Needs, Community Safety, Economic Development, Homeless Services, Housing Needs Assessment, Market Analysis, Non -Homeless Special Needs, Planning/Zoning/Land Use, Public Services How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The City assembled an Interdepartmental Technical Committee to discuss the necessity of leveraging federal and non-federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts and discuss other funding tools that may be available. The group committed to working collaboratively to maximize resources. Collaborations will continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically focused area. 35 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Planning Division Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental – Local Planning Organization What sections of the Plan was addressed by consultation? City Infrastructure, Community Needs, Community Safety, Economic Development, Homeless Services, Housing Needs Assessment, Market Analysis, Non -Homeless Special Needs, Planning/Zoning/Land Use, Public Services How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The City assembled an Interdepartmental Technical Committee to discuss the necessity of leveraging federal and non-federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts and discuss other funding tools that may be available. The group committed to working collaboratively to maximize resources. Collaborations will 24 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically focused area. TABLE PR -10.2 PLAN CONSULTATION Community Plan Consultations 1 Name of Plan 10-Year Plan to End Chronic Homelessness Lead Organization State of Utah How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan? Created in 2004, updated in 2013, this plan highlights initiatives centered on using the Housing First Model to end chronic homelessness. This plan places minimal restriction on persons to pl ace them into safe housing. Housing goals include promoting the construction of safe, decent, and affordable homes for all income levels and to put specific emphasis on housing homeless persons. 2 Name of Plan Annual Point-in-Time Count Lead Organization State of Utah How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan? This plan highlights an initiative to find homeless persons living on the streets and gather information in order to connect them with available services. By doi ng so, this will help policymakers and program administrators set benchmarks to measure progress toward the goal of ending homelessness, help plan services and programs to appropriately address local needs, identify strengths and gaps in a community’s current homelessness assistance system, inform public opinion, increase public awareness, attract resources, and create the most reliable estimate of people experiencing homelessness throughout Utah. 3 Name of Plan Growing SLC Lead Organization Salt Lake City How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan? Policy solutions over the five year period of this plan will focus on: 1) updates to zoning code, 2) preservation of long-term affordable housing, 3) establishment of a significant funding source, 4)stabilizing low -income tenants, 5) innovation in design, 6) partnerships and collaboration in housing, and 7) equitability and fair housing. 4 Name of Plan Salt Lake City Master Plans Lead Organization Salt Lake City How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan? Salt Lake City's master plans provide vision and goals for future development in the City. The plans guide the development and use of land, as well as provide recommendations for particular places within the City. HAND utilized the City's master plans to align policies, goals, and priorities. 5 Name of Plan Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness 25 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Lead Organization Salt Lake County How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan? This plan emphasizes the promotion of a community ‐wide commitment to the goal of ending homelessness, provide funding for efforts to quickly re ‐house individuals and families who are homeless, which minimizes the trauma and dislocation caused by homelessness, promote access to and effective use of mainstream programs, optimize self ‐sufficiency among individuals and families experiencing homelessness 6 Name of Plan State of Utah Strategic Plan on Homelessness Lead Organization State of Utah How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan? The strategic plan establishes statewide goals and benchmarks on which to measure progress toward these goals. The plan recognizes that every community in Utah is different in their challenges, resources available, and needs of those who ex perience homelessness. 7 Name of Plan Strategic Economic Development Plan Lead Organization Salt Lake City Economic Development How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan? The Strategic Plan establishes an assessment of existing economic conditions of Salt Lake City through analysis of quantitative and qualitative data. This information guided a strategic framework that builds on existing strengths and seeks to overcome identified challenges to ensure the City’s fiscal health, enhance its business climate, and promote economic growth. 8 Name of Plan Housing Gap Coalition Report Lead Organization Salt Lake Chamber How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan? Initiative that seeks to safeguard Utah's economic prosperity by ensuring home ownership is attainable and housing affordability is a priority, protecting Utahns quality of life and expanding opportunities for all. 9 Name of Plan Housing Affordability Crisis Lead Organization Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan? Policy brief regarding the current and projected state of rising housing prices in Utah and recommendations regarding what to do about it. 10 Nam e of Plan Continuum of Care Lead Organization Salt Lake County How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan? Salt Lake County is responsible for coordinating the HUD Continuum of Care (CoC) grant application process and c ommunity-wide goals on ending homelessness for the Salt Lake County CoC (UT-500). The CoC provides annual funding for local homeless housing and service programs. Although Salt Lake County Government manages the local process, ultimate funding decisions ar e made at the national level by HUD. The Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness is responsible for oversight of the CoC. 26 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 DESCRIBE COORDINATION AND COOPERATION WITH OTHER PUBLIC ENTITIES, INCLUDING THE STATE AND ANY AD JACENT UNITS OF GENE RAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT, IN THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE CONSOLIDATED PLAN: (91.215(I)) The City coordinated and cooperated with other public entities, including the State of Utah, Salt Lake County, and neighboring cities on the implementation of the Consolidated Plan. T hese coordination efforts included City representatives serving on the Commission on Housing Affordability, the Utah Lt. Governor’s Affordable Housing Taskforce, the SLVCEH Steering Committee, and other State agencies. In addition, the City worked closely with Salt Lake County’s Housing and Community Development Division to foster regional collaboration for implementation. PR- 15 CITIZEN PARTICIPATION SUMMARIZE CITIZEN PARTICIPATION PROCESS AND HOW IT IMPACTED GOAL SETTING. The City seeks to develop and enhance livable, healthy, and sustainable neighborhoods through robust planning and actions that reflect the needs and values of the local community. The City has stayed true to its values of inclusiveness and innovation by embracing opportunities to pr ovide equitable services, offer funding, and create housing opportunities that improve lives for individuals and families in underserved and under - resourced communities. The City recognizes that citizen participation is critical for the development of a C onsolidated Plan that reflects the needs of affected persons and residents. In accordance with 24 CFR 91.105, the City solicited robust citizen participation over the course of an entire year. Between May 2019 and May 2020, over 4,000 residents, stakeholders, agency partners, and City officials participated through proactive, community -based outreach, facilitated stakeholder engagement, and online surveys. The City involved affected persons and residents through stakeholder consultation, a community survey, community events, public meetings, public hearings, public comment periods, and one-on-one consultations. The following provides a synopsis of these efforts. CONSOLIDATED PLAN SURVEY The City created a survey to solicit feedback from residents regarding their priorities for the provision of housing, economic development, and public services in the most underserved and under -resourced areas of the community. The survey and all accompanying collateral material was translated into Spanish, with additional language translation services available upon request. The survey was posted on the City website and social media platforms, third -party digital applications like Nextdoor and was distributed to thousands of residents through the City’s email listserv. In addition, digital flyers with Quick Response (QR) codes were created and distributed to stakeholder advisory and interdepartmental working group members. Members of these groups were asked to distribute the flyer to their respective constituencies. 27 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 FIGURE PR -15.1 FLYER - ENGLISH FIGURE PR -15.2 FLYER - SPANISH 28 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 The survey fielding occurred from August 15 through September 30, 2019, with a total of 2,068 respondents completing it. Respondents ranked homeless and transportation servi ces as their top priorities for City services. Street improvements, job creation, and rental assistance were the top priorities for community, economic development, and housing investments respectively. FIGURE PR -15.3 QUESTION #1 SURVEY RESULTS 29 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Respondents identified Poplar Grove, Fairpark, and Ballpark as the areas of the City with the most unmet needs for underserved individuals and families. The overwhelming majority of residents did not feel that the current housing stock was sufficient to meet th e needs of a growing City, particularly for low -income populations, seniors, and individuals with disabilities. FIGURE PR -15.4 MAP OF UNDERSERVED COMMUNITIES 30 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 FIGURE PR -15.5 MAP OF WHERE RESPONDENTS LIVE 31 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Since the Consolidated Plan survey was open to anyone who wanted to take it, results may have included self - selection bias. To supplement these results with a more representative understanding of resident sentiment, the City also compared them with the recently completed annual resident sur vey results. Both surveys showed that residents wanted more housing and transportation investments for underserved areas of the community. FIGURE PR -15.6 KEY TAKE-AWAYS FROM SLC ANNUAL SURVEY 32 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 REGIONAL COLLABORATION The City collaborated closely with Salt Lake County as the two entities worked in tandem on their respective Consolidated Plans. City staff consistently attended County meetings, and vice versa. In addition, the two entities worked together on the question wording and format for th eir respective surveys to ensure an “apples- to-apples” comparison of survey results. This approach allowed the City to consider both qualitative stakeholder feedback and quantitative survey results within a broader, regional context. In total, 222 Salt Lak e City residents took the Salt Lake County survey. STAKEHOLDER ADVISORY COMMITTEE The City assembled a Stakeholder Advisory Committee comprised of nonprofit providers and agency partners. The Committee met three times in 2019 on July 30, September 24, an d December 11. These meetings were strategically scheduled at critical milestones to maximize the impact stakeholder feedback would have in the identification of Consolidated Plan goals, objectives, and priorities. On average, approximately 40 stakeholders attended the meetings. FIGURE PR -15.7 STAKEHOLDER MEETING 33 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Initial Meeting- July 30, 2019 To maintain consistency with the resident survey, the City asked the same survey questions to the stakeholder advisory committee members via real -time, interactive polling software. Stakeholders ranked housing, homelessness, and mental health services as their top three unmet, unfunded/underfunded needs. They indicated street improvements, job training, and the construction of more affordable housing units shou ld be top priorities for City inv estment. Stakeholders identified Glendale, Fairpark, Ballpark, and Poplar Grove as the areas within the city with the most unmet needs for under -served individuals and families. FIGURE PR -15.8 POLL RESULTS 34 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Sec ond Meeting- September 24, 2019 To ensure stakeholder feedback would be meaningfully considered in the development of Consolidated Plan goals, the City held a second meeting and asked stakeholders to prioritize the unmet, unfunded needs that they had identified at the initial stakeholder meeting in July. Stakeholders indicated that their first and second priorities were housing and transportation respectively. They outlined a number of suggested funding strategies that the City, in partnership with nonprof it service providers, could consider employing. These strategies include, but are not limited to:  Provide ‘aging in place’ programs  Offer affordable housing voucher programs  Provide client centered community -based case management  Eliminate housing barriers  Integrate transportation and land use considerations to facilitate affordable housing along transit corridors  Improve regional collaboration with public and private-sector partners to improve efficiencies in the allocation of resources and to reduce redu ndancies  Leverage innovative technologies to improve access to information regarding affordable housing demand and supply  Offer free fare or reduced transit options  Expand transit service in underserved communities  Subsidize rideshare options FIGURE PR -15.9 35 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 FIGURE PR -15.10 Third Meeting- December 11, 2019 36 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 To further refine goals based on previous stakeholder feedback, the City held a third and final stakeholder advisory committee meeting in December. The meeting was held in conjunction with the City’s Interdepartmental Technical Advisory Group (ITAG) members to ensure collaborat ion between City departments and nonprofit service providers. The meeting centered around the following five objectives:  Homeless Services  Housing Services  Transportation  Economic Development  Behavioral Health: Mental Health & Substance Abuse Stakeholders and City staff indicated that client centered community -based case management, treatment services for mental health and substance abuse, as well as the provision of housing, transit passes, and job training to income-eligible residents were their top pri orities to meet these five objectives. FIGURE PR -15.11 HOMELESS OBJECTIVE FIGURE PR -15.12 37 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 HOUSING OBJECTIVE FIGURE PR -15.13 TRANSPORTATION OBJECTIVE FIGURE PR -15.14 38 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE FIGURE PR -15.15 SUBSTANCE ABUSE & MENTAL HEALTH OBJECTIVE INTERDEPARTMENTAL TE CHNICAL ADVISORY GRO UP To facilitate coordination across the various City departments and ensure input from the City’s subject -matter experts was incorporated into the Consolidated Plan, the City created an Interdepartmental Technical Advisory Group (ITAG). Similar to the approach taken with the Stakeholder Advisory Committee, the City met with this 39 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 internal group three times during the course of the Consolidated Plan development process. Meetings occurred on July 29, September 23, and December 11, 2019. Initial Meeting- July 29, 2019 Similar to the approach taken with the Stakeholder Advisory Committee, the City surveyed ITAG m embers via real-time, interactive polling using the same questions as the resident survey to ensure consistency and compare feedback “apples-to-apples.” ITAG members ranked housing and transportation as top priorities and expressed concern that there was i nsufficient housing to meet the needs of a growing population, particularly for low-income individuals and families, seniors, and persons with disabilities. While feedback differed somewhat from the resident survey results, ITAG members generally expressed similar concerns as residents. ITAG members were also asked a series of questions regarding their most unfunded/underfunded, unmet needs. Through an interactive “sticky -note” exercise, they wrote their answers on notes and posted them on a wall in the room. A discussion regarding the results of the feedback then ensued and the notes were categorized based on key themes. Q1- What are your biggest unmet needs related to underserved and/or under resourced communities within the city? FIGURE PR -15.16 Q1 RESPONSES 40 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Q2- What are you currently doing to try to meet these needs? FIGURE PR -15.17 Q2 RESPONSES Q3- What are your suggested strategies to help address these unmet needs through the Consolidated Plan? FIGURE PR -15.18 Q3 RESPONSES 41 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Q4- From your perspective, what is or could be your role as it relates to the Consolidated Plan? FIGURE PR -15.19 Q4 RESPONSES Second Meeting- September 23, 2019 To ensure feedback from City staff would be meaningfully considered in the development of Consolidated Plan goals, the City held a second meeting and asked ITAG members to prioritize the unmet, unfunded/underfunded needs that they had identified at the initial ITAG meeting in July. Housing, transportation and the provision of needed services ranked as the highest priorities. FIGURE PR -15.20 42 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 FIGURE PR -15.21 FIGURE PR -15.22 43 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Final Meeting, December 11, 2019 As mentioned previously, the City held a third and final ITAG meeting in December in conjunction with the Stakeholder Advisory Committee to further refine goals based on feedback from previous meetings. The objective of a combined meeting was to ensure collaboration between City departments and nonprofit service providers. The meeting centered around the following five goals:  Homeless Services  Housing Services  Transportation  Economic Development  Behavioral Health: Mental Health & Substance Abuse Stakeholders and City staff indicated that client centered community-based case management, treatment services for mental health and substance abuse, as well as the provision of housing, transit passes, and job training to income-eligible residents were their top priorities to meet these five goals. COMMUNITY EV ENTS The City led a robust, grassroots citizen participation effort between May 2019 and November 2019. Staff attended community events such as the Rose Park Festival, the Sorenson CommUNITY Fair, Partners in the Park, Groove in the Grove, the Monster Bloc k Party, and many others. In keeping with recommendations outlined in the SLC Citizen Engagement Guide, the City engaged directly with the public through exi sting forums where opportunities existed to reach hundreds of people at a time. City staff managed information booths at dozens of events and solicited input from residents and stakeholders through interactive materials such as “sticker dots” that could be placed on poster boards to indicate priorities for City services and to identify neighborhoods with the most unmet, unfunded/underfunded needs. The efforts were hugely successful, with over 1,322 people participating. 44 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 FIGURE PR -15.23 COMMUNITY PRIORITIES FOR FEDERAL FUNDING PUBLIC MEETINGS City staff gave presentations regarding the Consolidated Plan to the Planning Commission and City Council on September 25, 2019 and October 8, 2019, respectively. In these public meetings, staff presented information regarding the following: challenges of rising housing and transportation costs; housing and stability needs of an aging population; the homelessness challenges our community faces; and discussed the need to address behavioral health concerns which include both mental health and substance abuse. Staff provided a high -level explanation regarding the Consolidated Plan funding programs, the process and tim eline for developing the Plan, and eligible activities. Staff provided an interim report regarding citizen participation efforts and through 45 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 conversation responded to questions regarding the outcomes of the 2015-2019 Consolidated Plan and the evolution of the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan. PUBLIC HEARINGS On October 24, 2019, the City conducted a General Needs Hearing to gather public comments on housing and community development needs as they relate to low - and moderate-income residents. One resident attended the hearing and two residents submitted comments via email. Comments were accepted from October 21 - November 1, 2019 and identified needs associated with streets, police, community gardens, and tennis courts. To ensure that as many residents as possible are able to participate in public hearings, subsequent public hearings were held to seek feedback on the Consolidated Plan and the Annual Action Plan (AAP). These City Council Public Hearings were held on March 24, April 7, and April 21, 2020. Approxima tely 20 residents attended the public hearings and submitted electronic and/or provide direct feedback to the Council Members via WebEx Teleconference. All comments were accepted and considered in the final adoption of the plan. Notices of all public hearings were communicated within 14 calendar days of the hearing and posted on Utah’s Public Notice website. PUBLIC COMMENT PERIODS In addition to the 30-day public comment period required by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the City requires a 45-day public comment period on all master plan documents, including the Consolidated Plan. Both the HUD-required public comment period and the City -required public comment periods occurred simultaneously from February 7, 2020 throu gh March 22, 2020. The City initiated the public comment period by contacting all impacted Registered Community Organizations. The proposed Consolidated Plan was published on the C ity’s website and the Utah Public Notice website, and printed copies were made available in the City Main Library and City Hall. PUBLIC COMMENT SUMMARY FIGURE PR -15.24 SUMMARY CHART Mode of Outreach Effort Target of Outreach Summary of Response/Atten dance Summary of Comments Received Summary of Comments not Accepted & Reasons Internet Outreach Survey Minorities; Non- English Speaking; Spanish; Persons with Disabilities; Non- Targeted/Broad community; residents of Public and Assisted Housing 2,068 Respondents Respondents ranked homeless and transportation services as their top priorities for City services. Street improvements, job creation, and rental assistance were the top priorities for community, economic development, All comments were accepted and taken into consideration as the Consolidated Plan developed. 46 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Mode of Outreach Effort Target of Outreach Summary of Response/Atten dance Summary of Comments Received Summary of Comments not Accepted & Reasons and housing investments respectively. Other: City Collaboration Interdepartmental Technical Advisory Committee Other: City Departments/Div isions On average, approximately 30-40 City staff attended multiple meetings to discuss targeted approach to utilizing federal funding sources. Discussions focused on identifying where the City could collaborate to better leverage federal funding, city priorities, and local efforts. Topics included all areas of City infrastructure, services, and investment. All comments were accepted and taken into consideration as the Consolidated Plan developed. Focus Group Stakeholder Advisory Committee Minorities; Non- English Speaking; Spanish; Persons with Disabilities; Non- Targeted/Broad community; residents of Public and Assisted Housing On average, approximately 40-50 representatives from non -profit service providers and government entities attended multiple meetings to discuss targeted approach to utilizing federal funding sources. Discussions focused on identifying where the City could collaborate to better leverage federal funding, city priorities, and local efforts. Topics included all areas of City infrastructure, services, and investment. All comments were accepted and taken into consideration as the Consolidated Plan developed. Public Meeting Presentation to City Council Minorities; Non- English Speaking; Spanish; Persons with Disabilities; Non- Targeted/Broad community; residents of Public and Assisted Housing Approximately 30 members of the public attended this meeting. Discussions focused on how the City could better leverage federal funding, city priorities, and local efforts. Topics included all areas of City infrastructure, services, and investment. All comments were accepted and taken into consideration as the Consolidated Plan developed. Public Meeting Presentation to Planning Commission Minorities; Non- English Speaking; Spanish; Persons with Disabilities; Non- Targeted/Broad community; residents of Public and Approximately 30 members of the public attended this meeting. Discussions focused on how the City could better leverage federal funding, city priorities, and local efforts. Topics included all areas of City infrastructure, All comments were accepted and taken into consideration as the Consolidated Plan developed. 47 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Mode of Outreach Effort Target of Outreach Summary of Response/Atten dance Summary of Comments Received Summary of Comments not Accepted & Reasons Assisted Housing services, and investment. Public Hearing General Needs Hearing Minorities; Non- English Speaking; Spanish; Persons with Disabilities; Non- Targeted/Broad community; residents of Public and Assisted Housing 1 resident attended the hearing and 2 residents emailed public comments Discussions focused on how the City could better leverage federal funding, city priorities, and local efforts. Topics included all areas of City infrastructure, services, and investment. All comments were accepted and taken into consideration as the Consolidated Plan developed. Public Hearing Consolidated Plan & Annual Action Plan (AAP) Hearing Planning Commissioners, City staff, Minorities; Non- English Speaking; Spanish; Persons with Disabilities; Non- Targeted/Broad community; residents of Public and Assisted Housing 2 hearings were held, 8 members of the public attended, and 117 members of the public emailed public comments. Discussion focused on the support of individual applications and projects covering a range of immediate and long-term needs for the city. All comments were accepted and taken into consideration as the Consolidated Plan developed. Public Hearing Consolidated Plan Hearing City Councilmembers , City staff, Minorities; Non- English Speaking; Spanish; Persons with Disabilities; Non- Targeted/Broad community; residents of Public and Assisted Housing 3 hearings were held, 6 members of the public emailed public comments. Discussion focused on the detail of the long-term planning document, the supporting data, and the priorities of the plan. All comments were accepted and taken into consideration as the Consolidated Plan developed. Other: Community Events Community Events Minorities; Non- English Speaking; Spanish; Persons with Disabilities; Non- Targeted/Broad community; residents of Public and Over 1,322 respondents Staff attended dozens of community events over the course of the Consolidated Plan development process. Respondents ranked All comments were accepted and taken into consideration as the Consolidated Plan developed. 48 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Mode of Outreach Effort Target of Outreach Summary of Response/Atten dance Summary of Comments Received Summary of Comments not Accepted & Reasons Assisted Housing homelessness, substance abuse & mental health, and transportation services as their top priorities for the City. 49 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 NEEDS ASSESSMENT The Needs Assessment of the Consolidated Plan, in conjunction with information gathered through consultations and the citizen participation process, provides a clear picture of Salt Lake City’s needs related to affordable housing, special needs housing, community development, and homelessness. From the Needs Assessment, the City identifies those needs with the highest priority to form the basis for th e Strategic Plan and the programs and projects to be administered. 50 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 NA-05 OVERVIEW Salt Lake City’s 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan is intended to identify the most critical, unfunded gaps in community needs within the City, while coordinating with the larger regional needs of the entire Salt Lake Valley. The purpose of this Needs Assessment (NA) is to identify and evaluate needs, along with funding resources, and align those needs with the input received through the pub lic participation process. Goals and strategies are then developed to target priority geographic locations and needed services in those areas, as well as citywide. Numerous news articles over the past year have spotlighted what is termed an “affordable h ousing crisis” in Utah. Due to public concern over housing issues, the Governor commissioned the Utah Department of Workforce Services to compile a statewide Affordable Housing Report in 2018 to identify causes and address issues. That report concludes: Significant population growth from natural increase and economic development continue to drive Utah’s demand for housing. Production factors such as the high value of land, higher material costs, and a shortage of construction labor significantly contribute to delays in developing an adequate supply of affordable housing. Unless Utah invests in a more pre -emptive approach to housing policy and plans more effectively for its future needs, its housing shortage will only increase, and the gap in housing afforda bility will continue to widen. An effort has been made throughout to connect people with resources to expand opportunities for decent housing, economic development, and vibrant communities. The Needs Assessment clearly establishes that housing and community development needs have increased while funding to address those needs has diminished. As demonstrated in Figure NA-05.1, Salt Lake City’s annual CDBG award has decreased by $1.5 million over the past 16 years. This represents a 30% decrease in funding to address the critical housing and community development needs within the City. FIGURE NA-05.1 SALT LAKE CITY’S ANNUAL CDBG AWARD, 2003 - 2019 Source: HUD Awards and Allocations, HUD Exchange $2,500,000 $3,000,000 $3,500,000 $4,000,000 $4,500,000 $5,000,000 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015 2017 2019 51 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 A summary of the key data identified in this study, leadin g to the strategies developed, is summarized below. In short, homeless services ranked high in the data researched, as well as in the surveys conducted as part of the public participation process. Affordable housing needs also scored high with both the pub lic and in the evaluation of the data. Within these two overarching concerns, critical needs were also identified for assistance with transportation accessibility and costs (thereby reducing cost burdens on low -income families and special populations), economic development opportunities (such as job training) to increase self -sufficiency, and substantial improvements in the services offered to those with behavioral health concerns. Residents need affordable housing in locations that are near public transp ortation, quality education, healthcare, and other service providers. Those with the ability to work need services to increase overall self - sufficiency. Significant findings are as follows: Homeless  The State of Utah Annual Report on Homelessness 2019 reported that there were 9,367 total homeless persons between October 1, 2017 and September 30, 2018. On average, these individuals spent 70 nights homeless in that same time period.  According to the 2019 Salt Lake County Point-in-Time Count, which is an annual count of all homeless peoples in the county on a single night, there were 1,844 people experiencing homelessness in the County on the night of the count in January 2019.1 Of those experiencing homelessness, 73.2% were White, non-Hispanic, 11% were Bl ack or African American, 5.3% were American Indian or Alaska Natives, 3.5% were Pacific Islander, and 2% were Asian. There were also 21.3% who were Hispanic. There are 193 homeless individuals who are unsheltered.  According to the State of Utah’s 2019 Strategic Plan on Homelessness, which quotes from the 2018 Point-in-Time Count (PIT), one in three individuals experiencing homelessness in Utah is severely mentally ill, and one in four have a substance use disorder.  Specific service gaps for the homeless were identified through stakeholder meetings as follows: o Affordable housing, permanent supportive housing, and emergency beds o Mental health services and substance use disorder treatment o Case management o Prevention, diversion and outreach services o Data systems that capture more of the full story o Available transportation Affordable Housing  Median incomes in Salt Lake City have increased by 52.6% between 2000 and 2018, representing one of the fastest income growth rates in the nation. However, median home valu es have increased by 89.8% over the same time period and contract rents have increased by 81.8%, thereby increasing the gap between wages and housing costs.  39.5% of Salt Lake City renter households and 19.7% of homeowner households are cost -burdened, spending over 30% of their monthly income on housing costs. Over 18.9% of renter households spend over 50% of their monthly income on housing.2 Families who are cost-burdened have limited resources for food, childcare, healthcare, transportation, education, and other basic needs. Despite the 1 2019 Salt Lake County Point-in -Time report 2 U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 2012-2016 CHAS 52 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 community wide efforts to increase housing availability and reduce housing costs, 29.9% households are cost-burdened.  The Housing Authority of Salt Lake City currently administers Housing Choice vouchers for 3,000 households and has 7,053 total households on all of its waiting lists. Countywide there are 15,981 households on the Housing Connect waiting list. A family on the waiting list can expect to wait 6 years before receiving a Housing Choice voucher.3 A large percentage of those on the waiting list are elderly or have a disability.  Rental vacancy rates are at historic lows, further limiting the available stock of housing and pushing prices upwards.  Concerns were identified regarding the “gentrification” of neighbor hoods and the need to put anti- displacement strategies in place, preserving existing affordable housing stock. Demographics  The demographic makeup of Salt Lake City has changed substantially since 2000. While the White, non-Hispanic population has remained relatively flat since 2000, minority groups have increased by over 14,000. White, non-Hispanic has declined from 71% of the population in 2000 to 65% in 2018.  Over the past 5 years, an average of 450 refugees have settled in Salt Lake City annually. 16.4 % of Salt City residents are foreign-born creating a need for services for individuals who do not speak English.  12% of the City’s population is over 65 years old. Residents this age are often living on limited income and can often have more difficulty finding maintaining their homes. This can often lead to the elderly population moving into care facilities or assisted living communities. If care facilities are cheaper outside of the City then elderly residents may end up leaving to other cities in searc h of lower living costs.  There are 20,504 people in Salt Lake City with a disability. 37% of those reporting one or more disabilities are over 65 years old and 21% are over 75 years old. The most common disability for those over the age of 75 is ambulatory difficulty, which is defined as having serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs, followed by hearing and independent difficulty.  About 21% of the City’s population is under the age of 18. The largest age group is under 5 years old with over 31% of the City’s children reportedly falling in that range. Salt Lake City has a child dependency ratio4 of 30.0.  14.7% of Salt Lake City’s children (under 18 years) 5 live below the poverty level as defined by the poverty thresholds determined by the U.S. Government using the Consumer Price Index. The 2019 Utah Intergenerational Welfare Reform Commission Annual Report reaffirms that children growing up in poverty experience challenges to healthy development both in the short and long term, demonstrating impairm ents in cognitive, behavioral, and social development. The younger the child is when his or her family is impoverished the greater the likelihood for poor outcomes.6 3 Housing Authority of Salt Lake City, Housing Connect 4 A measure derived by dividing the population under 18 years by the 18 to 64 years population and multiplying by 100 5 U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey 2014-2018 5-Year Estimates 6 Utah State Department of Workforce Services, Utah Intergenerational Wel fare Reform Commission Annual Report, 2019 53 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024  55.8% of Salt Lake City School District students qualify to receive free school lunch.7 Families qualify for free lunch if they earn 130% or below the federal poverty level, about $33,500 or less per year for a family of four. Many of these households are considered food insecure. The 2019 Utah Intergenerational Welfare Reform Commission Annual Report indicates that there are 135,940 children experiencing food insecurity in Utah and in past reports has stated that these children are ill more frequently, struggle academically, are less likely to graduate from high school and enroll in college; a nd less likely to earn enough income to feed their families when they are adults.  In 2017 there were 152,479 children in Utah under age 6 who needed care, but there were only 41,144 slots available in childcare programs.8 The main reasons families are not able to get adequate childcare is cost (31%) and “lack of open slots” (27%).9 Behavioral Health Needs  In 2018, Salt Lake City’s Downtown area reported in the highest age -adjusted drug deaths in the state at 72.2 deaths per 100,000 population, which is mu ch higher than the state average ratio of 22.4. The Rose Park and Glendale areas also report higher ratios of 33.3 and 30.4 respectively. Of the 15 neighborhoods in Utah experiencing the highest age-adjusted drug deaths, Salt Lake City has three of them.10  A recent study concluded that 1 in 5 Utah adults experience poor mental health and that over half of the adults with mental illness did not receive mental health treatment or counseling.  Another study concluded that Utah ranked 48th in a state-by-state ranking indicating that Utah is amongst the worst states in the nation when handling mental illnesses based on 15 measures used to create the rankings. The ranking indicates higher prevalence of mental illness and lower rates of access to care.11 This is an improvement from 2018, when Utah ranked 51st . Economic and Social Service Needs  15.8% of Salt Lake City’s adults (18 years and over) live below the poverty level.12 A recent report indicated that 39,487 adults experiencing intergenerational poverty are em ployed but unable to meet the needs of their families.13 Families experiencing intergenerational poverty need to be connected to resources that assist them with employment and job training.14  Job training needs were identified as part of the stakeholder meetings and are a critical component of increasing self-sufficiency for individuals. 7 Salt Lake City School District, Fall Low Income Report, 2017 8 ChildCare Aware of America. 2017 State Child Care Facts in the State of: Utah. Retrieved from http://usa.childcareaware.org/ wp - content/uploads /2017207/UT_Facts.pdf 9 Schochet, Leila. “The Child Care Crisis Is Keeping Women Out of the Workforce” Center for American Progress, https://www. americanprogress.org/issues/early -childhood/reports/2019/03/28/467488/child-care-crisis-keeping-women -workforce/. Authors analysis of National Center for Education Statistics, “2016 National Household Education Survey: Early Childhood Program Participation Survey” 10 Utah Department of Health, Public Health Indicator Based Information System: Poisoning: Drug Deaths by Utah Small Area, 2014- 2018, https://ibis.health.utah.gov/ibisph -view/indicator/complete_profile/PoiDth.html 11 Mental Health America, Ranking States, https://www.mhanational.org/issues/ranking-states 12 U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey 2014-2018, 5-Year Estimates 13 International Welfare Reform Commission, Utah’s Eighth Annual Report on Intergenerational Poverty, Welfare Dependency and the Use of Public Assistance, 2019 14 Utah State Department of Workforce Services, Utah Intergenerational Reform Commission Annual Report, 2019 54 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024  The United States Department of Agriculture defines food insecure families as those households that, at times during the year, are uncertain of having, or unable to acquire , enough food to meet the needs of all their members because they have insufficient money or other resources for food. Based on information provided by Utahns Against Hunger, August 2018, 12.5% of households struggle to buy enough food for themselves and their households. According to Feeding America, Map the Meal Gap 2018, 12.2% of households in Salt Lake County are food insecure, with 15.4% of children food insecure in the County.  The 2018 American Community Survey (ACS) 5-year Estimate performed by the United States Census Bureau reported that there were 9,249 households in Salt Lake City that reported no internet access. This represents almost 12% of the City’s households. Internet access has been shown to increase student performance for students and to improve the placement rates for unemployed persons seeking employment.  The Salt Lake City Redevelopment Agency has established 12 project areas, 9 of which are currently collecting tax increment. These project areas have been established for a variety of reasons, including the elimination of blight, development of affordable housing, economic development opportunities, and public works improvements. Geographically, these project areas cover a large portion of the lowest-income areas of the City. A signi ficant amount of tax increment is generated by these project areas, reaching nearly $34 million in 2018, affording the opportunity to leverage HUD funding with tax increment in the future. Public Improvements  Salt Lake City will utilize an $87 million Gen eral Obligation (GO) Bond to limit the cost to City residents while still addressing street reconstruction. Using a GO Bond will allow the City to utilize its AAA bond rating (highest available) to provide road reconstruction in a more affordable and respo nsible way. These funds will only be used for street reconstruction and not street maintenance, which will be funded by sales tax dollars.  Salt Lake City increased its sales tax by.5% in 2018. This sales tax increase, also known as Funding Our Future, will support several critical need areas within the City, including Street maintenance. In addition, Salt Lake City Transportation received a .25% County Sales Tax funding stream which will enable Transportation Division to address some of the critical infrastructure and connectivity needs within the city.  It’s estimated that the annual household transportation cost within the City is $12,524 or about 20% of household income.15 The City may consider increasing the quality of commuting by enhancing bus stops and light rail stations and trains to encourage use of public transportation. This would result in household savings in transportation costs and cleaner air within the City. 15 Center for Neighborhood Technology , Housing + Transportation Index , https://htaindex.cnt.org/ 55 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 NA-10 HOUSING NEEDS ASSESSMENT – 91.205(a, b, c) SUMMARY OF HOUSING NEEDS Affordable housing needs in Salt Lake City are significant and have been increasing over the past several years. A primary reason is that construction costs have been increasing at a far greater rate than wages and thereby placing a greater cost-burden on households. An extremely low vacancy rate of 3.8% in rentals is further exacerbating this problem. The problem is especially severe for those households making less than 50% of the Area Median Income (AMI). A summary of housing needs and conditions is as fo llows:  Between 2000 and 2018, the cost of housing significantly increased for both renters and homeowners . Incomes for both renters and homeowners have increased, but at substantially lower rates as shown in Figure NA-10.1. o The median contract rent increased by 81.8%, but renter incomes only increased by 48.7%; in 2018 the median household income for renter -occupied units was $36,997. o Home values increased by 89.8%, but homeowner incomes only increased by 59.4%. In 2018, the median household income for own er-occupied units was $83,750.16 FIGURE NA-10.1 HOUSING COST INCREASES VS. INCOME INCREASES SINCE 2000  The Affordability Index, which is a calculation of the median home value divided by the median household income, has increased from 4.2 in 2000 to 5.1 in 2018. This is yet another indication that income increases have not kept pace with the increasing home values.  The homeownership rate decreased from 56.9% in 2000 to 48.4% in 2018. In 2000, rental units comprised 48.8% of occupied housing units. In 2018, that percentage increased to 51.6%.17 Therefore, the increasing number of rental units could partially account for the decreasing rate of 16 U.S. Census Bureau, 2014-2018 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates 17 U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Census & 2014-2018 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 2000 2018 Median Contract Rent Renter Incomes Home Values Homeowner Incomes 56 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 homeownership. With increasing housing costs, residents may be hesitant to buy homes and are opting to rent despite increasing rental costs.  Many households in Salt Lake City struggle to make their monthly payments and to find affordable rental housing. Of the 39,000 renter households within Salt Lake City, 39.5% are cost-burdened meaning there are about 15,500 ren ter households who experience difficulty paying their monthly rent. There are also approximately 7,100 homeowners who are cost -burdened and have difficulty meeting their mortgage obligations.  Due to the shortage of units affordable to extremely low -incom e households (<30% AMI), residents who fall into this category are usually forced to rent housing they cannot afford. Very low -income (<50% AMI) households with high housing costs lack resources for basic essentials – most critically food and healthcare. Some residents who fall into this category are forced to live in substandard, unhealthy, unsafe, or overcrowded housing. In some cases, the lack of affordable housing can lead to homelessness for some residents.  Since 2000, Salt Lake City has continued to see population growth with roughly 13,958 new residents and approximately 9,253 new households. That coupled with high housing costs has reduced the supply of units and increased costs. DEMOGRAPHICS Table NA-10.1 shows the total population, number of ho useholds, and median income as reported by the 2000 and 2010 Censuses. It also shows those same demographics from the most recent American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates 2014-2018. The percentage of change between 2000 and 2018 has been calculated and included in the table. TABLE NA-10.1 DEMOGRAPHICS: 2000, 2010, AND 2018 2000 Census 2010 Census 2018 ACS % Change 2000 to 2018 Population 181,743 186,440 195,701 7.68% Households 71,461 74,513 80,714 12.95% Median Income $36,944 $44,223 $56,370 52.58% Source: 2000 & 2010 Census, 2014-2018 ACS, ZPFI Since 2000, Salt Lake City has seen slight increases in population. Median income has grown significantly. More growth has occurred between 2010 and 2018 (9,261 persons total or an average of 1,158 persons per year). However, when considering recent population estimates, it is not unreasonable to assume that the population within the City has surpassed 200,000 since the 2018 ACS.18 Interestingly, the White, non -Hispanic category has seen a net decrease of 373 people since 2000, while minority groups have increased by 14,331 persons. Figure NA-10.2 shows how this growth has changed the population composition within Salt Lake City since 2000. In 2000, minorities made up just over 29% of the population. That nu mber increased to 34.6% in 2018. 18 U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division , Annual Estimates of the Residential Population July 1, 2018 57 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 FIGURE NA-10.2 RACE AND ETHNICITY SHARE OF TOTAL POPULATION Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2014-2018 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates As shown in Figure NA-10.3, approximately 38.9% of the City’s population fa lls in the 20-39 age range. This concentration of young-adults/adults differs from the common demographic makeup of the rest of Salt Lake County where this age range is not as highly represented. The 20-29 age range is particularly concentrated in Salt Lake City where the 20-24 and 25-29 age ranges make up over 20% of the residents. As shown in Figure NA-10.4, the County reports that young adults fitting those same age ranges account for 15.4% of the population. This difference is likely due to the universi ty student population concentrated in Salt Lake City. FIGURE NA-10.3 SALT LAKE CITY AGE STRUCTURE Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2014-2018 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates 128,377 122,325 128,004 53,366 62,163 67,697 - 20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 120,000 140,000 160,000 180,000 200,000 2000 Census 2010 Census 2018 ACS White, non-Hispanic All Minority 15%10%5%5%10%15% Under 5 Years 5 to 9 years 10 to 14 years 15 to 19 years 20 to 24 years 25 to 29 years 30 to 34 years 35 to 39 years 40 to 44 years 45 to 49 years 50 to 54 years 55 to 59 years 60 to 64 years 65 to 69 years 70 to 74 years 75 to 79 years 80 to 84 years 85 years and over % Male % Female 58 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 FIGURE NA-10.4 SALT LAKE COUNTY AGE STRUCTURE Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2014-2018 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS Table NA-10.2 shows the number and types of households by HUD-Adjusted Median Family Income (HAMFI). TABLE NA-10.2 NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS BY HAMFI 0-30% HAMFI 30%-50% HAMFI 50%-80% HAMFI 80%-100% HAMFI > 100% HAMFI Total Households 13,805 11,475 12,995 7,115 30,045 Small Family Households 3,465 3,375 4,315 2,415 13,880 Large Family Households 1,020 1,270 1,055 745 1,735 Household contains at least one person 62-74 years of age 2,385 1,490 1,905 1,020 5,390 Household contains at least one- person age 75 or older 1,455 1,375 1,240 545 1,570 Households with one or more children 6 years old or younger 2,335 2,170 2,045 925 3,945 Source: 2012-2016 Comprehensive Housing Affordab ility Strategy (CHAS) HOUSING NEEDS SUMMARY Table NA-10.3 shows the number of households with housing problems by tenure and HAMFI. 15%10%5%5%10%15% Under 5 years 5 to 9 years 10 to 14 years 15 to 19 years 20 to 24 years 25 to 29 years 30 to 34 years 35 to 39 years 40 to 44 years 45 to 49 years 50 to 54 years 55 to 59 years 60 to 64 years 65 to 69 years 70 to 74 years 75 to 79 years 80 to 84 years 85 years and over % Female % Male 59 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 TABLE NA-10.3 HOUSING PROBLEMS 1: HOUSEHOLDS WITH ONE OF THE LISTED NEEDS Housing Problems (Households with one of th e listed needs) Renter Owner 0-30% HAMFI 30%- 50% HAMFI 50%- 80% HAMFI 80%- 100% HAMFI Total 0-30% HAMFI 30%- 50% HAMFI 50%- 80% HAMFI 80%- 100% HAMFI Total Substandard Housing - lacking complete plumbing/kitchen facilities 155 105 35 4 299 60 15 15 4 94 Severely Overcrowded - with >1.51 people per room (and complete kitchen and plumbing) 240 185 70 15 510 15 30 10 - 55 Overcrowded - with 1.01- 1.5 people per room (and none of the above problems) 575 485 530 250 1,840 110 195 115 60 480 Housing cost-burden greater than 50% of income (and none of the above problems) 5,970 1,230 205 - 7,405 1,150 875 375 120 2,520 Housing cost-burden greater than 30% - 50% of income (and none of the above problems) 1,470 4,125 2,160 210 7,965 505 900 1,440 740 3,585 Zero/negative income (and none of the above problems) 1,505 - - - 1,505 195 - - - 195 Source: 2012-2016 CHAS *The four housing problems are: 1. Lacks complete kitchen facilities ; 2. Lacks complete plumbing facilities; 3. More than one person per room ; and 4. Cost burden greater than 30%. Table NA-10.4 displays the number of households which have no housing problems, one or more housing problems, and negative income by tenure and HAMFI. TABLE NA-10.4 HOUSING PROBLEMS 2: HOUSEHOLDS WITH ONE SEVERE HOUSING PROBLEM Renter Owner 0-30% HAMFI 30%- 50% HAMFI 50%- 80% HAMFI 80%- 100% HAMFI Total 0-30% HAMFI 30%- 50% HAMFI 50%- 80% HAMFI 80%- 100% HAMFI Total Having 1 or more of 4 housing problems 6,925 2,005 510 480 9,920 1,335 1,115 840 925 4,215 Having none of four housing problems 2,935 5,860 6,995 2,960 18,750 910 2,500 4,645 3,695 11,750 Household has negative income, but none of the other housing problems 1,505 - - - 1,505 195 - - - 195 Source: 2012-2016 CHAS *The four severe housing problems are: 1. Lacks complete kitchen facilities; 2. Lacks complete plumbing facilities; 3. More than 1.5 persons per room ; and 4. Cost burden greater than 50% Table NA-10.5 shows cost-burdened households by household type, tenure, and HAMFI. Figure NA-10.5 shows how the current number of households compare to what was reported in the 2015-2019 Consolidated Plan. 60 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 0-30% HAMFI 30%-50% HAMFI 50%-80% HAMFI Owner TABLE NA-10.5 COST-BURDEN > 30% Renter Owner 0-30% HAMFI 30%-50% HAMFI 50%-80% HAMFI Total 0-30% HAMFI 30%-50% HAMFI 50%-80% HAMFI Total Small Related 2,385 2,125 655 5,165 560 530 765 1,855 Large Related 825 505 185 1,515 140 405 155 700 Elderly 1,460 615 235 2,310 725 620 430 1,775 Other 3,590 2,760 1,390 7,740 400 385 480 1,265 Total 8,260 6,005 2,465 16,730 1,825 1,940 1,830 5,595 Source: 2012-2016 CHAS Table NA-10.5 shows that 22,325 households that are under 80% of HAMFI are cost -burdened to the extent that they are paying 30% or more of their income for housing costs. Of these 22,325 households, 16,730 are renter households while 5,595 are homeowner; therefore, nearly 75% of households with greater than a 30% cost-burden are renting. Figure NA-10.5 shows a comparison of how the number of households which are cost -burdened has changed since the 2015-2019 Consolidated Plan. It shows an increase in renter househo lds under 50% of HAMFI and a decrease in renter households in the 50 to 80% threshold. While the recent construction market appears to be serving the needs of 50 to 80% fairly well, it has not met the needs of those under 50% of HAMFI. The unmet needs of those under 50% are increasing. FIGURE NA-10.5 COST-BURDEN > 30% IN 2011 AND 2016 Source: 2007-2011 CHAS, 2012-2016 CHAS Table NA-10.6 shows that 10,700 households that are under 80% of HAMFI are severely cost -burdened because they are paying 50% or more of their income on housing costs. Renters account for 8,130 of these households while 2,570 are homeowners. Severely cost -burdened households are at the greatest risk for homelessness. 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 7,000 8,000 9,000 0-30% HAMFI 30%-50% HAMFI 50%-80% HAMFINumber of HouseholdsRenter 61 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 0-30% HAMFI 30%-50% HAMFI 50%-80% HAMFI Owner TABLE NA-10.6 COST-BURDEN > 50% Renter Owner 0-30% HAMFI 30%-50% HAMFI 50%-80% HAMFI Total 0-30% HAMFI 30%-50% HAMFI 50%-80% HAMFI Total Small Related 1,915 475 30 2,420 510 225 95 830 Large Related 620 30 - 650 105 125 20 250 Elderly 1,045 175 45 1,265 410 335 145 890 Other 3,020 650 125 3,795 280 205 115 600 Total 6,600 1,330 200 8,130 1,305 890 375 2,570 Source: 2012-2016 CHAS Figure NA-10.6 shows a comparison of how the number of households which are severely cost -burdened has changed since the 2015-2019 Consolidated Plan. It shows an increase in househ olds under 30% of HAMFI and a decrease in cost-burdened households in the 30 to 80% threshold. FIGURE NA-10.6 COST-BURDEN > 50% IN 2011 AND 2016 Source: 2007-2011 CHAS, 2012-2016 CHAS 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 7,000 0-30% HAMFI 30%-50% HAMFI 50%-80% HAMFINumber of HouseholdsRenter 62 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Figure NA-10.7 shows a map of the cost-burdened renters within the City by census tract. It shows that most of the cost-burdened renters are located just west of I-15 with more than 50% of renters in the tracts in that area reporting that rental costs constitute more than 30% of their household income. There are also two tracts to the west of Liberty Park and in the 300 West area from 900 South to 2100 South which report more than 50% of renters as cost-burdened. FIGURE NA-10.7 PERCENT OF RENTERS IN CENSUS TRACTS THAT ARE COST-BURDENED Source: U.S. Census Bureau 2013-2017 ACS 5-Year Estimates 63 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Figure NA-10.8 shows a map of the cost-burdened owners with a mortgage within the City by census tract. The percentage of cost-burdened owners is much lower – less than 20%. However, like renters, most of the cost-burdened homeowners are located just west of I-15. These tracts show that 20-30% of owner’s costs are more than 30% of household income. FIGURE NA-10.8 PERCENT OF OWNERS WITH A MORTGAGE IN CENSUS TRACTS THAT ARE COST-BURDENED Source: U.S. Census Bureau 2013-2017 ACS 5-Year Estimates 64 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Figure NA-10.9 shows the market value of single-family residential units in Salt Lake City. Interestingly, areas with the lowest home values have the highest cost -burden. FIGURE NA-10.9 MARKET VALUE OF SINGLE-FAMILY HOMES IN SALT LAKE CITY Source: Salt Lake County Assessor’s Database 2019 Table NA-10.7 shows the number of households considered to be crowded by having more than one person per room. Crowded households are displayed by HAMFI an d household type. There are 2,873 households with crowding in Salt Lake City according to 2012-2016 CHAS (Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy) data. TABLE NA-10.7 CROWDING Renter Owner 0-30% HAMFI 30%- 50% HAMFI 50%- 80% HAMFI 80%- 100% HAMFI Total 0-30% HAMFI 30%- 50% HAMFI 50%- 80% HAMFI 80%- 100% HAMFI Total Single Family Households 685 535 575 205 2,000 110 170 100 30 410 Multiple, Unrelated Family Households 95 60 4 40 199 15 44 25 30 114 65 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Renter Owner 0-30% HAMFI 30%- 50% HAMFI 50%- 80% HAMFI 80%- 100% HAMFI Total 0-30% HAMFI 30%- 50% HAMFI 50%- 80% HAMFI 80%- 100% HAMFI Total Other, Non - Family Households 40 70 25 15 150 - - - - - Total 820 665 604 260 2,349 125 214 125 60 524 Source: 2012-2016 CHAS Table NA-10.8 shows the number of households with children present by having more than one child under the age of 6. There are 7,475 households in Salt Lake City according to 2012-2016 CHAS data. TABLE NA-10.8 HOUSEHOLDS WITH CHILDREN Renter Owner 0-30% HAMFI 30%- 50% HAMFI 50%- 80% HAMFI 80%- 100% HAMFI Total 0-30% HAMFI 30%- 50% HAMFI 50%- 80% HAMFI 80%- 100% HAMFI Total Households with Children Present 1,955 1,505 1,280 415 5,155 380 665 765 510 2,320 Source: 2012-2016 CHAS DESCRIBE THE NUMBER AND TYPE OF SINGLE PERSON HOUSEHOLDS IN NEED OF HOUSING ASSISTANCE: The needs of single-person households located within Salt Lake City can be difficult to calculate due to the large student population attending the University of Utah. In many cases, these students may have little income, and be living in poverty, while they are enrolled in classes. This can inflate the number of single households living in poverty and facing housing challeng es. However, this is a temporary situation for most students as they generally have the ability to grow their incomes after graduation. Of the 78,229 total households (family and nonfamily) in the City, 27,838 were reported as being nonfamily and living alone. According to these numbers, 35.6% of households in Salt Lake City live alone. This is higher than the national average of 34.2%.19 A portion of the 27,838 single-persons households represent young professionals, students, and other individuals that are not in need of housing assistance. The at -risk single person households in need of housing assistance include working residents earning low wages, residents who are unemployed, and residents who are disabled and cannot work. 19 U.S. Census Bureau, 2014-2018 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates 66 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 ESTIMATE THE NUMBER AND TYPE OF FAMILIES IN NEED OF HOUSING ASSISTANCE FOR VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING VIO LENCE, SEXUAL ASSAUL T AND STALKING AND/OR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES: The Utah Domestic Violence Coalition reported that 36 Utahans lost their lives to domestic -violence in 2018 and has also reported 32 deaths as of the end of June 2019. Of these reported fatalities, 19 of these victims in 2018 and 16 of the reported 2019 fatalities have been Salt Lake County residents. 20 In addition, a total of 1,449 men, women, and children were sheltered in the two Utah domestic violence shelters located in Salt Lake City. Individuals who entered the domestic violence shelter system stayed for an average of 45 days in 2019. There are many barriers for survivors of domestic viole nce to overcome including securing permanent and stable housing, coping with trauma, accessing support for health and mental healthcare, and addressing the needs of children. Domestic violence resources currently available in Salt Lake County include shelter services, a children’s justice center, survivor’s assistance programs, and sexual assault programs. The Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA) is Salt Lake City’s primary resource for survivors of domestic violence seeking out emergency shelter services. Emergency and extended shelter facilities are available twenty - four hours a day in a 181-bed facility for women and children fleeing unsafe situations. In addition, the YWCA provides transitional housing for women and dependent children for up to 2 years through a partnership with the Salt Lake City Housing Authority. Eligibility prioritizes women who have experienced intimate partner violence within the last year, qualify under the federal definition of homeless, and are eligible for the services through the Housing Authority. During the 2018-2019 program year, the YWCA provided services for 770 women and children for a total of 37,114 days of service. The Rape Recovery Center provides 24-hour crisis intervention, advocacy, emotional support, and referrals to sexual assault victims, their families, and their friends in 150 languages. The center empowers those victimized by sexual violence through advocacy, crisis intervention, and therapy to educate the community about the cause, impact, and prevention of sexual violence. During the 2018-2019 program year, the Rape Recovery Center served about 268 unduplicated clients in the Salt Lake area living below the poverty level. There was a total of 374 total unduplicated clients served in that same year. The Journey of Hope is a Salt Lake County based organization which provides services to at -risk women in Salt Lake City. It provides support to Utah women whose status puts them at -risk for criminal charges and provides support through mentoring and case man agement. It also provides job training to allow at -risk women to enter the workforce as educated and productive employees. These services are available to women who are survivors of abuse, experiencing homelessness, survivors of trafficking, struggling wit h substance abuse or mental illness, and women who are on parole or probation. The Journey of Hope assisted just over 400 women in the 2018 - 2019 program year. Persons with Disabilities Estimates from the 2014-2018 American Community Survey indicate that 21,828 residents, or 10.9% of the City’s population, is living with a disability. The City’s elderly population is most affected by disability with 37.6% of residents over the age of 65 experiencing at least one disability. The data also shows that 51.2% th e citizens of the City who are 75 years old and older are experiencing at least one disability. The most common disability among the elderly is ambulatory difficulty which is defined by the Census Bureau as “having serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs.”21 20 Utah Domestic Violence Coalition , UTAH Dom estic Violence Related Deaths in 2018 & 2019. 21 “How Disability Data are Collected from the American Community Survey,” United States Census Bureau, Revised October 17, 2017, Retrieved August 7, 2019, https://www.census.gov/topics/health/disability/guidanc e/data-collection -acs.html 67 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Salt Lake City looks to work collaboratively with partners that provide services for persons with disabilities, which include but are not limited to, Alliance House, Disability Law Center, Aging Services, ASSIST, and others. 22 WHAT ARE THE MOST CO MMON HOUSING PROBLEMS? HUD has defined housing problems and severe housing problems as follows:  Housing Problems o Household lacks complete kitchen facilities o Household lacks complete plumbing facilities o Household is overcrowded, with more than one person per room o Household is cost-burdened by paying 30% or more of monthly income on housing costs  Severe Housing Problems o Household lacks complete kitchen facilities and/or complete plumbing facilities, in addition to one of the following:  Household is severely overcrowded, with more than 1.5 persons per room  Household is severely cost-burdened by paying 50% or more of monthly income on housing costs All rental properties in Salt Lake City require a business license. Landlords are required to maintain minimum standard condition of housing, as per Salt Lake City’s Existing Residential Code. The purpose of the Residential Housing Code is to provide for the health, safety, comfort, con venience, and aesthetics of the City. The most common housing problem in Salt Lak e City is cost-burden of monthly housing costs. Cost burden is a problem among all income groups but is most prevalent among low -income renters. According to the 2014-2018 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, 45% of renters are cost-burdened, spending at least 30% of their monthly income on housing costs. Among homeowners, 25.5% of owners with a mortgage and 10% of owners without a mortgage were cost -burdened. FIGURE NA-10.10 PERCENT OF INCOME SPENT ON HOUSING BY TENURE Source: U.S. Census Bureau 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates 13% 41% 23% 22% 26% 48% 18% 8% 72% 18% 5% 5% 0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80% Less than 15% 15 to 29.9% 30 to 49.9% 50% or more Renters Owners with a Mortgage Owners without a Mortgage 68 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 ARE ANY POPULATIONS/HOUSEHOLD TYPES MORE AFFECTED THAN OTHERS BY THESE PROBLEMS? Housing problems, including cost-burden, are more likely to affect households earning 0 to 50% of the area median income (AMI). Households within this income range struggle to find safe, decent, and affordable housing and often spend a high proportion of their income on housing. These households have limited resources for other basic essentials, including food, healthcare, childcare, and transpo rtation. Housing problems also significantly impact households in the 50 to 80% AMI income groups, elderly households, and single - parent households. The high rate of housing cost -burden and other housing problems points to the need to expand affordable housing opportunities throughout Salt Lake City. Healthcare costs have been rising and are projected to do so in the near term.23 This can add significantly to the burden of rising housing costs and reduce a household’s ability to save for retirement, obtain additional education, access good childcare, and even impact such basic needs as good nutrition. DESCRIBE THE CHARACT ERISTICS AND NEEDS O F LOW-INCOME INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN (ESPECIALLY EXTREMELY LOW-INCOME) WHO ARE CURRENTLY HOUSED BUT THREATENED WITH HOMELESSNESS. ALSO DISCUSS THE NEEDS OF FORMERL Y HOMELESS FAMILIES AND INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE RECEIVING RAPID RE-HOUSING ASSISTANCE AND ARE NEARING THE TERMINATION OF THAT ASSISTANCE. In Salt Lake County, the largest group experiencing homelessness is adult-only households. The number of households with both adults and children experiencing homelessness in 2018 decreased by about 36% between 2014 and 2019. The number of unaccompanied youths experiencing homelessness decreased by about 85% over the same time period.24 Those transitioning out of assistance need continued counseling and often financial support to not revert back into homelessness. When they can, area service providers try to offer this support. However, the stakeholder meetings cond ucted as part of this Consolidated Plan revealed that caseloads are too high and that services are spread too thin due to a lack of funds and a shortage of a highly -skilled workforce. This results in lack of sufficient support for counseling, job training and guidance, and assistance with behavioral health issues. It is a critical time period for those transitioning out of assistance and homelessness, when support services are most essential in order to embark upon, and maintain, self -sufficiency. This Plan recognizes a critical need in this area and proposes strategies to strengthen support for vulnerable populations at critical junctures in their lifetimes. IF A JURISDICTION PROVIDES ESTIMATES OF THE AT-RISK POPULATION(S), IT SHOULD ALSO INCLUDE A DESCRIPTION OF THE OPERATIONAL DEFINITION OF TH E AT-RISK GROUP AND THE METHODOLOGY USED TO GENERATE THE ESTIMATES. According to HUD, at risk of homelessness25 is defined as an individual or family who: i. Has an annual income below 30% of median family income for the area; AND 23 Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) 24 2014 and 2019 Salt Lake County Point-in -Time 25 U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, At Risk of Homelessness, https://files. hudexchange.info/resources/documents/AtRiskofHomelessnessDefinition_Criteria.pdf 69 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 ii. Does not have sufficient resources or support networks immediately available to prevent them from moving to an emergency shelter or another place defined in Category 1 of the “homeless” definition; 26 AND iii. Meets ONE of the following conditions: A. Has moved because of economic reasons two or more times during the 60 days immediately preceding the application for assistance; OR B. Is living in the home of another because of economic hardship; OR C. Has been notified that their right to occupy their curr ent housing or living situation will be terminated within 21 days after the date of application for assistance; OR D. Lives in a hotel or motel and the cost is not paid for by charitable organizations or by Federal, State, or local government programs for lo w-income individuals; OR E. Lives in an SRO or efficiency apartment unit in which there reside more than two persons or lives in a larger housing unit in which there reside more than one and a half persons per room; OR F. Is exiting a publicly funded instituti on or system of care; OR G. Otherwise lives in housing that has characteristics associated with instability and an increased risk of homelessness, as identified in the recipient’s approved consolidated plan SPECIFY PARTICULAR H OUSING CHARACTERISTICS THAT HAVE BEEN LINKED WITH INSTABILITY AND AN INCREASED RISK OF HOMELESSNESS The greatest predictor of homelessness risk is severe cost-burden on households. Households paying more than 50% of their income towards housing costs or having incomes at or below 50% o f AMI are at the greatest risk to experience homelessness. DISCUSSION The most prevalent housing problem is cost -burden – especially for those who make less than 50% of AMI. While Salt Lake City has seen a significant shift to smaller apartment units (i.e ., less bedrooms), there is still significant need for all housing types for the severely cost -burdened. Residents who fall into this category are usually forced to secure housing they cannot afford. Very low -income families burdened with high housing costs lack resources for basic essentials – most critically food and healthcare. Some residents who fall into this category are forced to share housing, causing overcrowded housing conditions. The lack of affordable housing can lead to homelessness for our most vulnerable residents. The City, through efforts of the Housing and Neighborhood Development Division, the City’s Redevelopment Agency, and community partners, aim to address housing problems by preserving existing affordable housing, increasing the supply of affordable housing, and improving substandard housing with a focus in neighborhoods with concentrated poverty. These efforts will effectively reduce the incidence of overcrowding and cost -burden. 26 U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Homeless Definition, http://ctagroup.org/wp- content/uploads/2015/10/Homeless-Definition-and-documentation.pdf 70 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 NA-15 DISPROPORTIONATELY GREATER NEED: HOUSING PROBLEMS – 91.205 (b)(2) INTRODUCTION This section provides an assessment of housing problems (not including severe housing problems which are discussed in the following section) by race and ethnicity as compared to level of need as a whole. HUD defines housing problems as the following:  Household lacks complete kitchen facilities  Household lacks complete plumbing facilities  Household is overcrowded, with more than one person per room  Household is cost-burdened by paying 30% or more of monthly income on housin g costs According to HUD, disproportionately greater need exists when the percentage of persons in a category of need who are members of a particular racial or ethnic group is at least 10 percentage points higher than the percentage of persons in the category as a whole. Tables NA-15.1- NA-15.8 show the number of households with housing problems by income, race, and ethnicity. Each table provides data for a different income level. TABLE NA-15.1 HOUSING PROBLEMS: 0%-30% OF AREA MEDIAN INCOME Has one or more of four housing problems* Has none of the four housing problems Household has no/negative income, but none of the other housing problems Share of household with one or more of the four housing problems White 5,860 1,580 885 70% Black/African Americ an 470 10 70 85% Asian 610 49 295 64% American Indian, Alaska Native 240 50 - 83% Pacific Islander 270 - - 100% Hispanic 2,630 180 310 84% Total 10,235 1,870 1,700 74% Source: 2012-2016 CHAS *The four housing problems are: 1. Lacks complete kitchen f acilities; 2. Lacks complete plumbing facilities; 3. More than one person per room ; and 4. Cost burden greater than 30%. While a significant number of households in this income category have one -or more housing problems, this percentage is fairly consistent with the 2015-2019 Consolidated Plan. TABLE NA-15.2 HOUSING PROBLEMS: 0%-30% OF AREA MEDIAN INCOME, 2012 AND 2016 2011 2016 Number of Households Percentage Number of Households Percentage Share of households with one or more of the four housing problems 9,560 76% 10,235 74% Source: 2007-2011 CHAS, 2012-2016 CHAS TABLE NA-15.3 71 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 HOUSING PROBLEMS: 30%-50% OF AREA MEDIAN INCOME Has one or more of four housing problems* Has none of the four housing problems Household has no/negative income, but none of the other housing problems Share of household with one or more of the four housing problems White 4,980 2,475 - 67% Black/African American 335 19 - 95% Asian 340 190 - 64% American Indian, Alaska Native 20 30 - 40% Pacific Islander 135 50 - 73% Hispanic 2,230 525 - 81% Total 8,140 3,335 - 71% Source: 2012-2016 CHAS *The four housing problems are: 1. Lacks complete kitchen facilities ; 2. Lacks complete plumbing facilities; 3. More than one person per room ; and 4. Cost burden greater than 30%. TABLE NA-15.4 HOUSING PROBLEMS: 30%-50% OF AREA MEDIAN INCOME, 2012 AND 2016 2011 2016 Number of Households Percentage Number of Households Percentage Share of households with one or more of the four housing problems 6,720 70% 8,140 71% Source: 2007-2011 CHAS, 2012-2016 CHAS TABLE NA-15.5 HOUSING PROBLEMS: 50%-80% OF AREA MEDIAN INCOME Has one or more of four housing problems* Has none of the four housing problems Household has no/negative income, but none of the other housing problems Share of household with one or more of the four housing problems White 3,245 5,970 - 35% Black/African American 100 114 - 47% Asian 160 360 - 31% American Indian, Alaska Native 130 80 - 62% Pacific Islander 95 80 - 54% Hispanic 1,140 1,225 - 48% Total 4,950 8,045 - 38% Source: 2012-2016 CHAS *The four housing problems are: 1. Lacks complete kitchen facilities; 2. Lacks complete plumbing facilities; 3. More than one person per room ; and 4. Cost burden greater than 30%. 72 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 TABLE NA-15.6 HOUSING PROBLEMS: 50%-80% OF AREA MEDIAN INCOME, 2012 AND 2016 2011 2016 Number of Households Percentage Number of Households Percentage Share of households with one or more of the four housing problems 5,345 37% 4,950 38% Source: 2007-2011 CHAS, 2012-2016 CHAS TABLE NA-15.7 HOUSING PROBLEMS: 80%-100% OF AREA MEDIAN INCOME Has one or more of four housing problems* Has none of the four housing problems Household has no/negative income, but none of the other housing problems Share of household with one or more of the four housing problems White 865 4,515 - 16% Black/African American 10 110 - 8% Asian 34 145 - 19% American Indian, Alaska Native - 20 - 0% Pacific Islander 60 60 - 50% Hispanic 415 785 - 35% Total 1,405 5,710 - 20% Source: 2012-2016 CHAS *The four housing pro blems are: 1. Lacks complete kitchen facilities; 2. Lacks complete plumbing facilities; 3. More than one person per room ; and 4. Cost burden greater than 30%. TABLE NA-15.8 HOUSING PROBLEMS: 80%-100% OF AREA MEDIAN INCOME, 2011 AND 2016 2011 2016 Number of Households Percentage Number of Households Percentage Share of households with one or more of the four housing problems 2,095 24% 1,405 20% Source: 2007-2011 CHAS, 2012-2016 CHAS DISCUSSION The 2012-2016 CHAS data shown in Tables NA 15.1 to NA 15.8 were conducted with a sample size of 45,390 households to analyze housing problems. Out of the total sample 24,730 households or 54.5% had one or more of the four housing problems. An additional 1,700 households or 3.7% showed no/negative income but none of the other housing problems were exhibited. Below is a summary of the analysis of housing problems by income level for each of the income level groups. Note that the sample size for certain ethnic groups is extremely small, thereby producing unreliable results.  0-30% AMI: The 0-30% AMI group included 13,805 households with extremely low -income. This group made up 30.4% of the total households sampled. Of all households in this income group that had one or more of the housing problems, Pacific Islanders s howed the highest disproportionate need with 100% reporting at least one housing problem. 73 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024  30-50% AMI: The 30-50% AMI group included 11,475 households with low -income. This group made up 25.3% of the total households sampled. Of all households in this inc ome group that had one or more of the housing problems, Black/African American households showed the highest disproportionate need with 95% reporting at least one housing problem and the Hispanic households also showed a high disproportionate need with 81% reporting at least one housing problem.  50-80% AMI: The 50-80% AMI group included 12,995 households with moderate income. This group made up 28.6% of the total households sampled. Of all households in this income group that had one or more of the housing problems, American Indian/Alaska Native households showed the highest disproportionate need with 62% reporting at least one housing problem.  80-100% AMI: The 80-100% AMI group included 7,115 households with middle income. This group made up 15.7% of the total households sampled. Of all households in this income group that had one or more of the housing problems, Pacific Islander households showed the highest disproportionate need with 50% reporting at least one housing problem. NA-20 DISPROPORTIONATELY GREATER NEED: SEVERE HOUSING PROBLEMS – 91.205 (b)(2) INTRODUCTION This section provides an assessment of severe housing problems by race and ethnicity as compared to level of need as a whole. HUD defines severe housing problems as a household that lacks co mplete kitchen facilities, lacks complete plumbing facilities, in addition to one of the following:  Household is severely overcrowded, with more than 1.5 persons per room  Household is severely cost-burdened by paying 50% or more of monthly income on housing costs Tables NA-20.1 – 20.4 display the number of households with severe housing problems by income, race and ethnicity. Each table provides data for a different income level. TABLE NA-20.1 SEVERE HOUSING PROBLEMS: 0%-30% OF AREA MEDIAN INCOME Has one or more of four housing problems* Has none of the four housing problems Household has no/negative income, but none of the other housing problems Share of household with one or more of the four housing problems White 4,565 2,870 885 55% Black/African American 405 75 70 74% Asian 545 115 295 57% American Indian, Alaska Native 160 130 - 55% Pacific Islander 265 4 - 99% Hispanic 2,160 650 310 69% Total 8,260 3,845 1,700 60% Source: 2012-2016 CHAS *The four severe housing problems are: 1. Lacks complete kitchen facilities; 2. Lacks complete plumbing facilities; 3. More than 1.5 persons per room ; and 4. Cost burden greater than 50% 74 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 TABLE NA-20.2 SEVERE HOUSING PROBLEMS: 30%-50% OF AREA MEDIAN INCOME Has one or more of four housing problems* Has none of the four housing problems Household has no/negative income, but none of the other housing problems Share of household with one or more of the four housing problems White 1,755 5,705 - 24% Black/African American 195 160 - 55% Asian 165 365 - 31% American Indian, Alaska Native - 50 - 0% Pacific Islander 35 150 - 19% Hispanic 940 1,815 - 34% Total 3,120 8,360 - 27% Source: 2012-2016 CHAS *The four severe housing problems are: 1. Lacks complete kitchen facilities; 2. Lacks complete plumbing facilities; 3. More than 1.5 persons per room ; and 4. Cost burden greater than 50% TABLE NA-20.3 SEVERE HOUSING PROBLEMS: 50%-80% OF AREA MEDIAN INCOME Has one or more of four housing problems* Has none of the four housing problems Household has no/negative income, but none of the other housing problems Share of household with one or more of the four housing problems White 715 8,500 - 8% Black/African American 14 200 - 7% Asian 50 470 - 10% American Indian, Alaska Native 60 155 - 28% Pacific Islander 55 120 - 31% Hispanic 455 1,915 - 19% Total 1,350 11,640 - 10% Source: 2012-2016 CHAS *The four severe housing problems are: 1. Lacks complete kitchen facilities; 2. Lacks complete plumbing facilities; 3. More than 1.5 persons per room ; and 4. Cost burden greater than 50% TABLE NA-20.4 SEVERE HOUSING PROBLEMS: 80%-100% OF AREA MEDIAN INCOME Has one or more of four housing problems* Has none of the four housing problems Household has no/negative income, but none of the other housing problems Share of h ousehold with one or more of the four housing problems White 200 5,185 - 4% Black/African American 10 110 - 8% Asian 15 165 - 8% American Indian, Alaska Native - 20 - 0% Pacific Islander 60 60 - 50% Hispanic 180 1,020 - 15% Total 465 6,655 - 7% Sou rce: 2012-2016 CHAS *The four severe housing problems are: 1. Lacks complete kitchen facilities; 2. Lacks complete plumbing facilities; 3. More than 1.5 persons per room ; and 4. Cost burden greater than 50% 75 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 DISCUSSION The 2012-2016 CHAS data shown in Table s NA 20.1 to NA 20.4 were conducted with a sample size of 45,395 households to analyze severe housing needs. Out of the total sample 13,195 households or 29.1% had one or more of the four severe housing problems. An additional 1,700 households or 3.7% showed no/negative income but none of the other housing problems were exhibited. Below is a summary of the analysis of housing problems by income level for each of the income level groups. Note that the sample size for certain ethnic groups is extremely small, thereby producing unreliable results.  0-30% AMI: The 0-30% AMI group included 13,805 households with extremely low -income. This group made up 30.4% of the total households sampled. Of all households in this income group that had one or more of the housing problems, Pacific Islanders showed the highest disproportionate need with 99% reporting at least one severe housing problem.  30-50% AMI: The 30-50% AMI group included 11,480 households with low -income. This group made up 25.3% of the total households sampled. Of all households in this income group that had one or more of the housing problems, Hispanic households showed the highest disproportionate need with 55% reporting at least one severe housing problem.  50-80% AMI: The 50-80% AMI group included 12,990 households with moderate income. This group made up 28.6% of the total households sampled. Of all households in this income group that had one or more of the housing problems, Pacific Islander households showed the highest disproportionate need with 31% reporting at least one severe housing problem.  80-100% AMI: The 80-100% AMI group included 7,120 households with middle income. This group made up 15.7% of the total households sampled. Of all households in this income group that had one or more of the housing problems, Pacific Islander households showed the highest disproportionate need with 50% reporting at least one housing problem. NA-25 DISPROPORTIONATELY GREATER NEED: HOUSING COST BURDENS – 91.205(b)(2) INTRODUCTION This section provides an assessment of housing cost burdens by race and ethnicity as compared to level of need as a whole. According to HUD, disproportionately greater need exists when the percentage of persons in a category of need who are members of a particular racial or ethnic grou p is at least 10 percentage points higher than the percentage of persons in category as a whole. Table 25.1 shows the number of cost-burdened households by race and ethnicity. Data is broken down by no cost-burden (less than 30%), cost-burden (30-50%), severe cost-burden (50% or more) and no/negative income. 76 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 TABLE NA-25.1 HOUSING COST-BURDEN BY RACE AND ETHNICITY 0 - 30% 30% - 50% >50% No/Negative Income (Not Computed) Number Share of Total Number Share of Total Number Share of Total White 39,765 71% 8,745 16% 6,665 12% 930 Black/African American 545 36% 300 20% 590 39% 70 Asian 2,120 59% 480 13% 680 19% 300 American Indian, Alaska Native 355 52% 170 25% 160 23% - Pacific Islander 430 49% 200 23% 245 28% - Hispanic 5,490 48% 3,160 27% 2,545 22% 310 Total 49,360 65% 13,290 18% 11,045 15% 1,750 Source: 2012-2016 CHAS DISCUSSION Similar to the 2015-2019 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan, cost-burden continues to be the most prevalent housing problem in Salt Lake City. Of the 75,445 household s included in the sample, 32.26% of all households are shown as being cost-burdened. Black/African American, Pacific Islander, and Hispanic households all have a higher prevalence of cost-burden with over 50% of all households that report spending 30% or m ore on housing costs. Renter-occupied households also show a significant cost -burden with 39.5% of all renter occupied units reportedly are cost-burdened. NA-30 DISPROPORTIONATELY GREATER NEED: DISCUSSION – 91.205 (b)(2) ARE THERE ANY INCOME CATEGORIES IN WHICH A RACIAL OR ET HNIC GROUP HAS DISPROPORTIONATELY GREATER NEED THAN THE NEEDS OF THAT INCOME CATEGORY AS A WHOLE? Based on 2012-2016 CHAS data, the following racial and ethnic groups experience disproportionately greater housing needs:  Black/African American  American Indian/Alaskan Native  Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander  Hispanic/Latino Salt Lake City has evaluated disproportionate needs across racial and ethnic populations and household compositions. In general, low -income households, which are disp roportionately comprised of racial and ethnic minorities, are more likely to experience housing needs. Figure NA-30.1 demonstrates the variation in per capita income across racial and ethnic groups in Salt Lake City. 77 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 FIGURE NA-30.1 PER CAPITA INCOME BY RACE AND ETHNICITY Source: U.S. Census Bureau 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates Census data indicates that 13.9% of the City’s White, non-Hispanic population is living below the poverty level, while 28.1% of Hispanics and 32.7% of Black/African American populations are living below the poverty level. Racial and ethnic children are more likely to live in poverty than their White , non-Hispanic counterparts, as many of the City’s racial and ethnic minorities are children. The median age of the City’s White, non-Hispanic population is 35.2 while the median age of the Hispanic population is 26.3.27 IF THEY HAVE NEEDS NOT IDENTIFIED ABOVE, WHAT ARE THOSE NEEDS? Considerable efforts are needed to improve housing opportunity to address the needs of minorities, wi th focus on minorities living in concentrated areas of poverty. Minorities face housing impediments on several fronts, including few rental opportunities for large families, a high risk of predatory lending practices, and a high risk for housing discrimination. Gaps in access to housing opportunity and economic opportunity are likely to widen as the City’s demographics continue to shift. Therefore, Salt Lake City is taking a comprehensive approach to improve housing opportunity and is in the process of developing and implementing a multifaceted strategy to address needs. The City is collaborating with Salt Lake County, local municipalities and community partners to define and address regional issues and priorities. Through outreach, partnership building, wo rkforce training, early childhood education, and other efforts, the City will expand capacity within neighborhoods to take a comprehensive and proactive role in redevelopment efforts. Efforts will focus on two areas: 1) expanding opportunity in concentrated areas of poverty and RDA project investment areas; and 2) diversifying the housing stock throughout the City to expand affordable housing opportunities. ARE ANY OF THOSE RACIAL OR ETHNIC GROUPS LOCATED IN SPECIFIC AREAS OR NEIGHBORHOODS IN YOUR COMMUNIT Y? Figure 30.2 demonstrates that the vast majority of the City’s minority population lives west of Interstate 15 with many of the block groups located in west -side neighborhoods having a minority share above 50%. The City’s overall population growth between 1990 and 2010 can be attributed to minority populations, with 27 U.S. Census Bureau, 2014-2018 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. $40,992 $17,195 $13,709 $29,621 $15,777 $13,585 $18,339 $16,729 $34,711 $- $10,000 $20,000 $30,000 $40,000 $50,000 White Alone, Not Hispanic or Latino Black or African American Alone American Indian and Alaska Native Alone Asian Alone Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander Alone Other Race Alone Two or More Races Hispanic or Latino Jurisdiction as a Whole Per Capita Income 78 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 minorities increasing in share from 17.4% in 1990 to 29.4% in 2000 and then to 33.3% in 2010. The rate of increase in population share has slowed recently, as the minority population only incr eased by 0.8% between 2010 and 2017 to 34.1%. Hispanics/Latinos represent the largest minority group in the City, increasing in share from 9.7% in 1990 to 22.3% in 2010 and decreasing slightly to 21.3% in 2017. In comparing the east and west sides of the City, there are significant differences in socioeconomic status with a gap in opportunity for those generally living on the west side. Both minority renter and minority owner - occupied households are more concentrated west of I-15. Minority populations are more likely than White, non-Hispanic to be low-income renter households, as Citywide minority homeownership rates are 11 percentage points lower than rates for White, non -Hispanic residents. However, the minority share of owner- occupied units is significantly higher west of I-15. A majority of the housing stock affordable to low and moderate-income residents is located on the west side. FIGURE NA- 30.2 PERCENT OF B LOCK GROUP POPULATION THAT IS MINORITY, SALT LAKE CITY 2017 Source: U.S. Census Bureau 2013-2017 ACS 5-Year Estimates 79 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 NA-35 PUBLIC HOUSING – 91.205(b) INTRODUCTION The Housing Authority of Salt Lake City (HASLC) is responsible for managing the public housing inventory, developing new affordable housing units and administering the Housing Choice voucher programs for the City. The Authority strives to provide affordable housing opportunities throughout the community by developing new or rehabilitating existing housing that is safe, decent, and affordable – a place where a person’s income level or background cannot be identified by the neighborhood in which they live. In addition to the development and rehabilitation of units, the HASLC also manages several properties emphasizing safe, decent, and affordable housing that provides an enjoyable living environment that is free from discrimination, efficient to operate, and remains an asset to the community. The HASLC maintains a strong financial portfolio to ensure flexibility, sustainability, and continued access to affordable tax credits, foundations, and grant resources. As an administrator of the City’s Housing Choice voucher programs, the Housing Choice Voucher Program provides rental assistance to low -income families (50% of area median income and below). This program provides rental subsidies to 3,000 low-income families, disabled, elderly, and chronically homeless clients. Other programs under the Housing Choice umbrella include: Housing Choice Moderate Rehabilitation; Housing Choice New Construction; Project Based Vouchers; Multifamily Pr oject Based Vouchers; Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing Vouchers; Housing Opportunities for Persons with HIV/AIDS; and Shelter plus Care Vouchers. Under these other Housing Choice programs, the HASLC provided rental subsidies to additional qualified program participants. TABLE NA-35.1 PUBLIC HOUSING TOTALS IN USE* Program Type Mod- Rehab Public Housing Vouchers Total Project- based Tenant- based Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing Family Unification Program Disabled # of units/vouchers in use 99 369 2,536 279 1,704 133 59 361 Source: Housing Authority of Salt Lake City as of December 2019 80 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 TABLE NA-35.2 CHARACTERISTICS OF RESIDENTS Program Type Mod-Rehab Public Housing Vouchers Total Project- based Tenant- based Special Purpose Vouchers Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing Family Unification Program # Homeless at admission 18 23 381 190 82 108 1 # of Elderly Program Participants (>62) 16 285 628 118 454 54 2 # of Disabled Families 71 162 1,286 221 937 123 5 # of Families requesting accessibility features NA NA NA NA NA NA NA # of HIV/AIDS program participants NA NA NA NA NA NA NA # of DV victims NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Source: Housing Authority of Salt Lake City as of December 2019 TABLE NA-35.3 RACE OF RESIDENTS Race Program Type Mod- Rehab Public Housing Vouchers Total Project- based Tenant- based Special Purpose Vouchers Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing Family Unification Program Disabled White 78 296 1,571 233 920 119 45 254 Black/African American 16 24 295 17 227 15 5 31 Asian 1 25 57 6 45 0 0 6 American Indian, Alaska Native 4 4 53 20 22 5 2 4 Pacific Islander 0 4 33 3 29 1 0 0 Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Source: Housing Authority of Salt Lake City as of December 2019 TABLE NA-35.4 ETHNICITY OF RESIDENTS Ethnicity Program Type Mod- Rehab Public Housing Vouchers Total Project- based Tenant- based Special Purpose Vouchers Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing Family Unification Program Disabled Hispanic 11 59 385 32 218 7 27 101 Not Hispanic 88 310 1,684 247 1,019 126 32 260 Source: Housing Authority of Salt Lake City as of December 2019 81 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 SECTION 504 NEEDS ASSESSMENT: DESCRIBE T HE NEEDS OF PUBLIC HOUSING TENANTS AND APPLICANTS ON THE WAITING LIST FOR ACCESSIBLE UNITS: Administratively the Housing Authority makes every effort to comply with Section 504 requirements on a continual basis. Their self -evaluation resulted in the following summary of measures, administrative actions, motivations, procedures, or adoption of policies in order to comply.  Placing notices of compliance in the legal section of local newspapers.  Maintaining a general mailing list of organizations concerned with and offering assistance to people with disabilities.  Providing assistance to people with disabilities in filling ou t forms and applications, obtaining translators when needed, and having staff available to read or sign if required.  Providing the Equal Housing Opportunity (EHO) statement on housing materials and Equal Employment Opportunities (EEO) statement on employment applications and job announcements.  Conducting 504 compliance orientations for new employees and ongoing training for all staff.  Maintaining a list of all Reasonable Accommodation requests.  Assigning the Compliance Manager as the official person to coor dinate and deal with 504 issues.  Adopting of grievance procedures by their Board of Commissioners. WHAT ARE THE NUMBER AND TYPE OF FAMILIES ON THE WAITING LIST FOR PUBLIC HOUSING AND HOUSING CHOICE (SECTION 8) T ENANT -BASED RENTAL ASSISTANCE? The Housing Authority of Salt Lake City reports that there are currently 1,865 households on the Housing Choice waiting list and 5,188 on the Public Housing waiting list. There is a total of 7,053 households on both lists. Of the households on both lists, 27% are elderly, and 53% have a disability. There are 14% Hispanic, 78% are White, non-Hispanic, 13% are African American, 3% are American Indian or Alaska Native, 3% are Asian, 3% are Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, 4% are Multi -Racial, and 1% are unknown. The waiting list is currently not open. An applicant for voucher funding can expect to be on the wait list for approximately 1 to 6 years. Housing Connect (Salt Lake County Housing Authority) also provided information on the waiting lists for public housing and Housing Choice TBRA. Within Salt Lake County, there are 15,981 households on the waiting list for public housing. Of those households, 2% have a disability, 11% are elderly, 22% have children, and 51% are single. The average annual income is $15,399 and 77% are extremely low -income. The average wait is about 2 years, but it varies depending on bedroom size. In Salt Lake County, there are 447 households on the waiting list for Housing Choice. Of these households, 93 have a disability, 21 are elderly, 233 are single, and 110 have children. The average annual income is $12,954 and 90% are extremely low -income. The average wait time is 6 years. It should be noted that within the County’s data, households on the waiting list are required to self -report a disability and this may have resulted in a lower percentage of disabled households in the data. 82 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 BASED ON THE INFORMATION ABOVE AND ANY O THER INFORMATION AVAILABLE TO THE JURISDICTION, WHAT ARE THE MOST IMMEDIAT E NEEDS OF RESIDENTS OF PUBLIC HOUSING AND HOUSING CHOICE V OUCHER HOLDERS? Residents need affordable housing in locations that are near public transportation, quality education, healthcare, and other service providers. Those with the ability to work need services to increase overall self - sufficiency. HOW DO THESE NEEDS COMPARE TO THE HOUSING NEEDS OF THE POPUL ATION AT LARGE? Salt Lake City is experiencing a high demand for multi -family rental units as evidenced by the overall low vacancy rates in the City. This demand has resulted in an increa se in the number of new market rate units being constructed throughout the City. The need for quality affordable housing scattered throughout the City has become greater as the overall demand for rental housing has grown. Because land and development are m ore expensive on the east side of Salt Lake City, there are fewer naturally occurring affordable housing units on the east side. This leads to additional subsidy and creating affordable housing financing needing to be deployed for developments occurring on the east side of the city. Even with significant public investment to subsidize and stimulate the production of affordable housing, the supply is not meeting demand. DISCUSSION: Salt Lake City will continue to work with the Housing Connect and the Housin g Authority of Salt Lake City to leverage and strategically target resources to address increasing housing needs. The number of households on waiting lists is significant, especially for the elderly and those with disabilities. Further, the short supply of rental units and low vacancy rates has exacerbated the need for additional affordable rental housing. NA-40 HOMELESS NEEDS ASSESSMENT – 91.205(c) INTRODUCTION Salt Lake City representatives participate in the local Continuum of Cares (COC) executive boar d and its prioritization committee to ensure the Continuum of Cares priorities are considered during Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) allocations. Also, the three local ESG funders meet regularly to coordinate ESG and COC activities to make sure services are not being over or under funded and services being funded meet the community’s needs and goals. The Salt Lake Continuum of Care contracts with the State of Utah to administer HMIS. All service agencies in the region and the rest of the State are under a uniform data standard for HUD reporting and local ESG funders. All ESG funded organizations participate in HMIS. Currently, HMIS is supported by Client Track. Salt Lake Continuum of Care conducts an annual Point -in-Time count at the end of January to coun t sheltered (emergency shelter and transitional housing) and unsheltered homeless individuals. Unsheltered homeless individuals are counted by canvassing volunteers. The volunteers use the VI -SPDAT to interview and try to connect unsheltered homeless indiv iduals into services. A number of critical reports define not only the issues facing the homeless but likely solutions to these issues. The most recent report is The State of Utah Strategic Plan on Homelessness September 2019. Priorities of this Plan include:  Fewer days spent in emergency beds or shelters  Fewer persons returning to homelessness 83 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024  Fewer first-time individuals who experience homelessness  More persons successfully retaining housing This study also found that there are service gaps in the foll owing areas:  Affordable housing, permanent supportive housing, and emergency beds  Mental health services and substance abuse disorder treatment  Case management  Prevention, diversion and outreach services  Data systems that capture more of the full story  Available transportation Essential facts about homelessness in Utah include:  As of January 2018, Utah had an estimated 2,876 experiencing homelessness on any given day, as reported by Continuums of Care to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Developmen t (HUD). Of that total, 287 were family households, 239 were Veterans, 191 were unaccompanied young adults (aged 18-24), and 306 were individuals experiencing chronic homelessness.  Per State of Utah Annual Report on homelessness, there were 14,289 persons that experienced homelessness state wide in 2019. 9,387 were located in Salt Lake County.  Public school data reported to the U.S. Department of Education during the 2016 -2017 school year shows that an estimated 15,094 public school students experienced hom elessness over the course of the year. Of that total, 636 students were unsheltered, 994 were in shelters, 459 were in hotels/motels, and 13,005 were doubled up. According to the 2019 Point-in-Time Count, Salt Lake County has 1,844 homeless individuals, representing nearly 66% of homelessness in the State. 193 of these individuals are unsheltered.  .09% of Utah’s population is homeless  29% of our homeless live in family groups of parents and children  Youth between the ages of 18 and 24 comprise 7% of our ho meless population  Domestic violence impacts 22.1% of our homeless population  11% of the homeless population in Utah is experiencing “chronic” homelessness  55% of our homeless population is White 84 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 TABLE NA-40.1 HOMELESS NEEDS ASSESSMENT Population Estimate the # of persons experiencing homelessness on a given night Estimate the # experiencing homelessness each year Estimate the # of incoming homeless each year Estimate the # exiting homelessness each year Estimate the # of days persons experience homelessness Unsheltered Sheltered Persons in Households with Adult(s) and Child(ren) - 526 N/A N/A N/A N/A Persons in Households with Only Children - 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A Persons in Households with Only Adults 193 1,122 N/A N/A N/A N/A Chronically Homeless Individuals 86 281 N/A N/A N/A N/A Chronically Homeless Families - 16 N/A N/A N/A N/A Veterans 12 145 N/A N/A N/A N/A Unaccompanied Youth 19 95 N/A N/A N/A N/A Persons with HIV 1 19 N/A N/A N/A N/A Source: 2019 Salt Lake County Point-in -Time TABLE NA-40.2 HOMELESS NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMPARISON WITH 2014 AND 2019 - UNSHELTERED Population 2014 2019 Persons in Households with Adult(s) and Child(ren) 5 - Persons in Households with Only Children - - Persons in Households with Only Adults 105 193 Chronically Homeless Individuals 25 86 Veterans 15 12 Unaccompanied Youth - 19 Persons with HIV - 1 Source: 2019 Salt Lake County Point-in -Time TABLE NA-40.3 HOMELESS NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMPARISON WITH 2014 AND 2019 - SHELTERED Population 2014 2019 Persons in Households with Adult(s) and Child(ren) 813 526 Persons in Households with Only Children 2 3 Persons in Households with Only Adults 1,178 1,122 Chronically Homeless Individuals 265 281 Veterans 260 145 Unaccompanied Youth 616 95 Persons with HIV 49 13 Source: 2019 Salt Lake County Point-in -Time Homelessness has declined significantly since 2014 for unaccompanied youth. The Salt Lake City & Salt Lake County have made efforts to target this population and these efforts are sh owing positive results. 85 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 TABLE NA-40.4 NATURE AND EXTENT OF HOMELESSNESS Population Unsheltered Sheltered Race White 151 1,198 Black or African American 12 191 Asian 2 35 American Indian or Alaska Native 13 84 Pacific Islander 2 63 Multiple Races 13 80 Ethnicity Hispanic 34 392 Not Hispanic 159 1,259 Source: 2019 Salt Lake County Point-in -Time ESTIMATE THE NUMBER AND TYPE OF FAMILIES IN NEED OF HOUSING ASSISTANCE FOR FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN AND THE FAMILIES OF VETERANS. Salt Lake County has 150 families (526 individuals) and 157 veterans experiencing homelessness, with no known veteran families. The primary tool to help these families is rapid re -housing to reduce the time families experience homelessness to as short as possible. Families traditionally experience homelessness for short periods of time following cataclysmic events. Continuing the rapid re -housing program, coupled with homeless prevention efforts, will help families while they experience these catastrophic times. DESCRIBE THE NATURE AND EXTENT OF HOMELESSNESS BY RACIAL AND ETHNIC GROUP. The majority of individuals experiencing homelessness are White, non -Hispanic (1,349). The second largest group is Hispanic (426), followed by Black/African American (203) a nd American Indian/Alaska Native (97). This is similar to the makeup of Salt Lake City where White, non -Hispanic accounts for 73.7% of the population, Hispanic (21.3%), Black/African American (2.0%), and American Indian/Alaska Native (1.3%). DESCRIBE THE NATURE AND EXTENT OF UNSHELTERED AND SHEL TERED HOMELESSNESS Salt Lake City has 1,651individuals who are sheltered and 193 unsheltered homeless individuals. The Salt Lake homeless services community does a good job sheltering homeless individuals. However, it must continue to work to move people out of emergency shelters and transitional housing and into permanent stable housing. 86 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 NA-45 NON-HOMELESS SPECIAL NEE DS ASSESSMENT – 91.205(b, d) INTRODUCTION This section analyzes the needs of non -homeless special populations to include the elderly, persons with disabilities (including physical, mental, developmental, as well as persons with chronic substance abuse disorders), persons living with HIV/AIDS, survivors of dating/domestic violence, single -parent households, large family households, and immigrants. TABLE NA-45.1 HIV AND HOPWA REPORT: 2013 - 2017 Current HOPWA formula use: 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Cumulative cases of AIDS reported 1,995 2,009 2,037 2,080 2,094 Area incidence of AIDS 34 24 33 32 22 Rate per population 3.2% 2.2% 2.8% 2.7% 1.8% Current HIV Surveillance data: Area Prevalence (PLWH per 100,000 population) 168.5 168.6 160.6 162.2 162.6 Number of new HIV cases reported last year 67 95 74 101 83 Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control HIV Surveillance TABLE NA-45.2 HIV HOUSING NEEDS Type of HOPWA Assistance Estimates of Unmet Need Tenant Based Rental Assistance 57 Short-Term Rent, Mortgage, and Utility 36 Facility Based Housing (Permanent, Short -Term, or Transitional 0 So urce: HOPWA CAPER and HOPWA Beneficiary Verification Worksheet DESCRIBE THE CHARACT ERISTICS OF SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATION IN YOUR COMMUNITY: A description of special needs populations in Salt Lake City is as follows: Elderly Salt Lake City has continued to be home to a younger populace as compared to the population of the rest of the United States. The Census Bureau tracks a metric called the “Old -Age Dependency Ratio” which measures the number of people aged 65 and older to every 100 working age people. In this case, working age is defined as anyone between the ages of 20 and 64. Table NA-45.3 compares the City’s ratio to those in the county, state, and national levels and shows that Salt Lake City has a higher share of working age residents compared to those who are 65 years and older. 87 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 TABLE NA-45.3 2018 OLD-AGE (65+) DEPENDENCY RATIO Senior Dependency Ratio Salt Lake City 15.8 Salt Lake County 16.6 Utah 17.7 United States 24.6 Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates Another factor that will need to be considered is the expected growth in the elderly population. The elderly population has increased by just over 20,000 people between the 2010 Census and the 2014-2018 ACS 5-year estimates. As shown in Table NA-45.4, the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute currently projects the elderly population to increase at a substantially greater rate moving forward. They project that the elderly population will account for 14.5% of Salt Lake County’s population by 2030 with the trend continui ng until almost one in every five residents will be considered elderly. This expected increase will have large impacts on housing demand, transportation, healthcare services and other supportive services. TABLE NA-45.4 2018-2050 POPULATION PROJECTION, SALT LAKE COUNTY SENIOR (65+) Year Total Population Population 65+ 65+ Share 2018 ACS (most recent) 1,120,805 114,930 10.25% 2030 1,306,414 190,082 14.55% 2050 1,531,282 294,113 19.21% Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates: Demographics and Housing Estimates, Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute 88 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 FIGURE NA- 45.1 PERCENT OF B LOCK GROUP RESIDENTS THAT ARE SENIORS, SALT LAKE CITY - 2017 Source: U.S. Census Bureau 2013-2017 ACS 5-Year Estimates Persons with Disabilities Estimates from the 2014-2018 American Community Survey indicate that 10.9% of the City’s population is living with a disability. It is also estimated that 21,828 citizens have a disability. The City’s elderly population is most affected by disability with 37.6% experiencing at least one disability. The data also shows that 51.2% the citizens of the City who are 75 years old and older are experiencing at least one disability. The most common disability among the elderly is ambulatory difficulty which is d efined by the Census Bureau as “having serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs.”28 A complete breakdown of the percentage of citizens aged 65 years old and older who are experiencing these disabilities is shown in Figure NA-45.2. 28 “How Disability Data are Collected from the American Community Survey,” United States Census Bureau, Revised October 17, 2017, Retrieved August 7, 2019, https://www.census.gov/topics/health/disability/guidance/data-collection -acs.html 89 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 FIGURE NA-45.2 SALT LAKE CITY DISABILITY PREVALENCE, 65+ Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates: Disability Characteristics The younger population experiences a much smaller percentage of disability. For residents ranging in age from 18 to 64 years old, only 8.8% of the population has a disability. The most common disability is cognitive difficulty, which effects 4.4% of this age group. Second is ambulatory difficulty effecting 3.4% and independent living difficulty effecting 2.7%. Figure NA-45.3 shows the complete list of disabilities and percentages. FIGURE NA-45.3 SALT LAKE CITY DISABILITY PREVALENCE, 18-64 YEAR-OLDS Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates: Disability Characteristics Female-Headed Households with Children In Salt Lake City, there are 6,743 households headed by single females, with no husband present. Of that group, 3,822 of these households have children under the age of 18 years old present in the home.29 These households frequently face many unique and sign ificant challenges that other populations do not currently face. According to the 2014-2018 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Salt Lake City’s family poverty rate is 10.6%, while the single-mother household poverty rate is 40.7%. Single female-headed households with children often lack the resources necessary to find adequate childcare or job training services. This in turn impacts the woman’s ability to provide stable housing and care for her children. If a mother is able to find work and childc are, the rising cost of childcare further diminishes single mothers’ paychecks. 29 U.S. Census Bureau, 2014-2018 America Community Survey 5-Year Estimates 7.2% 6.7% 9.0% 14.7% 17.6% 21.9% 0.0%5.0%10.0%15.0%20.0%25.0% Self-Care Difficulty Vision Difficulty Cognitive Difficulty Independent Living Difficulty Hearing Difficulty Ambulatory Difficulty 1.2% 1.4% 1.8% 2.7% 3.4% 4.4% 0.0%0.5%1.0%1.5%2.0%2.5%3.0%3.5%4.0%4.5%5.0% Self-Care Difficulty Hearing Difficulty Vision Difficulty Independent Living Difficulty Ambulatory Difficulty Cognitive Difficulty 90 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 There were 151,580 children in Utah under the age of 6 who needed care in 2019, but there were only 41,092 available slots reported in childcare programs. 30 This means there are at least two additional children in need of childcare for every child who is currently in a childcare program. In 2016, the National Household Survey reported that the main reason families had difficulty finding childcare was cost (31%) with the second most common reason being “lack of open slots” (27%). Immigrants and Refugees Salt Lake City’s thriving economy, including strong wage growth, educational opportunities, and availability of services attracts immigrants from around the world. Since opening in 1994, the International Rescue Committee’s Salt Lake City branch has resettled over 11,000 individuals from roughly 26 countries, with an average of about 450 individuals settled each year in the Salt Lake City over the past 5 years. Besides refugee resettlement, Salt Lake City attracts immigrants for job opportunities, university studies, and family connections. According to the 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates, 32,709 (16.7%) of Salt Lake City’s 195,701 residents are foreign born. Victims of Dating and Domestic Violence The Utah Domestic Violence Coalition reported that 36 Utahans lost their lives to domestic violence in 2018 and has also reported 19 deaths as of the end of June 2019. Of these reported fatalities, 19 of these victims in 2018 and 10 of the reported 2019 fatalities have been Salt Lake County residents. 31 In addition, a total of 1,449 men, women, and children were sheltered in the two Utah domestic violence shelters located in Salt Lake City. Individuals who entered the domestic violence sh elter system stayed for an average of 45 days in 2019. There are many barriers for survivors of domestic violence to overcome including securing permanent and stable housing, coping with trauma, accessing support for health and mental healthcare, and addressing the needs of children. Large-Family Households A large family is defined as having five or more members. According to the Salt Lake City Fair Housing Equity Assessment, the number of large-family households receiving public assistance in Salt Lake C ity in 2019 totaled 9,991. The vast majority of large-family households receiving public assistance reside on the City’s west side in zip codes 84104 and 84116, with over 55% of the large-family households receiving public assistance residing in these zip codes.32 Persons with HIV/AIDS A report published by the Utah Department of Health indicates that 3,169 persons were living with HIV/AIDS in the State of Utah in December 2016. For nearly a decade, the number of people newly diagnosed with HIV in Utah declined steadily until 2011. After Utah experienced a large decrease in the number of cases during 2010, HIV infections have increased each year. During 2017, 83 people in the metropolitan statistical area were diagnosed with HIV. The cumulative number of AIDS cases reached 2,094, and the diagnosis rate was 1.8% per 100,000 population.33 Medical and supportive resources for persons with HIV/AIDS are concentrated in Salt Lake City and Salt Lake County. Therefore, the majority of Utah’s population with HIV/AIDS c omes to Salt Lake City for medical treatment and services. This places a burden on local resource delivery systems aimed at providing stable housing, supportive services, and case management for these individuals. 30 ChildCare Aware of America. 2019 State Child Care Facts in the State of: Utah. 31 Utah Domestic Violence Coalition , UTAH Domestic Violence Related Deaths in 2018 & 2019. 32 Utah Department of Workforce Services: Research & Analysis 33 Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control HIV Surveillance 91 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 WHAT ARE THE HOUSING AND SUPPORTIVE SERV ICE NEEDS OF THESE POPULATIONS AND HOW ARE THESE NEEDS DETERMINED? The housing and supportive service needs of special populations was determined through focus groups with public service stakeholders, an evaluation of data derived from organizations who wo rk with these populations, and other local and national data sources. Needs are as follows: Elderly The housing and supportive service needs of Salt Lake City’s elderly population will increase as the baby boomer generation continues to age. Elderly resid ents have a greater need for housing maintenance and rehabilitation assistance than the population as a whole. The areas of the City where elderly populations are concentrated, the East Bench and upper Avenues neighborhoods, contain an older and mostly sin gle-family housing stock. There is a need to retrofit, update, and provide accessibility modifications for housing units occupied by elderly residents to allow them the opportunity to age in place. In addition to housing assistance, elderly populations are in need of in-home medical care, food services, and transportation services. Persons with Disabilities Affordable, stable, long-term housing is the most critical need for persons with mental, physical, and/or development disabilities, as well as persons suffering from addiction. Persons with mental, physical, developmental, and substance abuse disabilities are more likely to experience housing instability and homelessness than the population as a whole. According to the State of Utah’s 2019 Strategic Plan on Homelessness, which quotes from the 2018 Point -in-Time Count (PIT), one in three individuals experiencing homelessness in Utah is severely mentally ill, and one in four have a substance abuse disorder. Additionally, individuals who experience homelessn ess are less likely to access healthcare systems and to suffer from preventable diseases. A large portion of the City’s disabled population deals with ambulatory difficulties. Approximately 44.8% of residents reporting a disability indicate that at least one of their disabilities is ambulatory. Just under one in every 20 residents in Salt Lake City has serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs.34 Accommodations for those experiencing these difficulties will necessitate more accessible units with easier access to buildings. Female-Headed Households with Children More long-term stable housing is needed to address the needs of low -income female-headed households with children, as well as job training, employment placement services, and childcare opportuni ties There were 151,580 children in Utah under the age of 6 who needed care in 2019, but there were only 41,092 available slots reported in childcare programs.35 This means there are at least two additional children in need of childcare for every child who is currently in a childcare program. In 2016, the National Household Survey reported that the main reason families across the nation had difficulty finding childcare was cost (31%) with the second most common reason being “lack of open slots” (27%). This, combined with the State’s childcare discrepancy, indicates that there is an increased need for more affordable and available childcare services to allow female-headed households to provide for their children. Immigrants and Refugees Immigrants and refugees come with many needs, including affordable housing, cultural orientation services, healthcare, legal assistance, and transportation. There are many barriers to affordable housing for this group, including language, lack of credit history, and lack of in come/employment history. As such, immigrants and refugees are at high risk for homelessness and housing discrimination. 34 Source: U.S. Census Bureau 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates 35 ChildCare Aware of America. 2019 State Child Care Facts in the State of: Utah. 92 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Services needed for immigrants and refugees include a path to self -sufficiency. Such services may include language training, employment assistance, and assistance with locating housing and transportation. Resettlement programs, currently provided through the Refugee and Immigration Center - Asian Association of Utah, Catholic Community Services and International Rescue Committee take a co mprehensive approach to the long-term outcomes of resettlement. Survivors of Dating/Domestic Violence Because survivors of domestic violence often reside with their abuser, they are at high risk for homelessness. Many survivors resist leaving abusive situ ations because they do not have the income, training, or resources to acquire their own housing. Emergency and transitional housing is especially important to this group in order to provide them with a place to escape the cycle of abuse while they work to attain self-sufficiency. In addition, many survivors are in need of supportive services to address physical and mental trauma. Large-Family Households The City has seen a decrease in housing stock for large families. In 2013, 8.4% of all rentals had 4 or more bedrooms; this number declined to 6.7% by 2018. The percentage of 2-3 bedroom rental units increased indicating that smaller housing units are being built. Persons with HIV/AIDS Achieving housing stability is often difficult for persons with HIV/AIDS because of problems with substance abuse and physical or mental health issues. These challenges can also make it difficult for these persons to obtain and maintain employment that provides a stable source of income for housing. Salt Lake City’s Housing and Neighborhood Development Division is committed to ensuring HOPWA project sponsors work together in a coordinated, collaborative, and flexible manner to effectively serve HOPWA program participants. This includes supporting efforts for HOPWA -assisted households to access and maintain housing, medical treatment, and sources of income. Project sponsors network with each other to alleviate identified barriers and promote an environment that ensures HOPWA clients are in treatment and have access to safe, decent, and affordable housing. Clients with mental and substance abuse disorders can receive case management services through Utah AIDS Foundation to obtain further access to services. DISCUSS THE SIZE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF T HE POPULATION WITH HIV/AIDS AND THEIR FAMILIES WITHIN THE ELIGIBLE METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREA: Utah has seen a declining rate of individuals diagnosed with HIV who have ever been classified as stage 3 (AIDS). In 2012, there were 3.9 new cases of HIV/AIDS per 100,000 population accor ding to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control HIV Surveillance. According to this same source, in 2017 the rate was 1.8 per 100,000 population. In 2012, 110 individuals were diagnosed with HIV, according to the Utah Department of Health.36 In 2017, 83 new HIV cases were reported.37 Although Utah has seen slightly declining rates in new cases of HIV, there is significant racial disparity in the prevalence of new HIV cases. In 2015, 26.7% of new HIV cases were for Hispanic or Latino individuals who only account for 13.7% of the population in Utah. FIGURE NA-45.4 36 Utah Department of Health, Utah HIV Fact Sheet, 2013. 37 United States Centers for Diseases Control, HIV Surveillance Report 2017 93 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 ESTIMATED ADULTS AND ADOLESCENTS DIAGNOSED WITH HIV BY RACE AND ETHNICITY, UTAH 2015 Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Utah – 2015 State Health Profiles https://www.cdc.gov/nchhstp/stateprofiles/pdf/Utah_profile.pdf FIGURE NA-45.5 PERCENT OF NEW CASES WITH AIDS AT HIV DIAGNOSIS BY RACE AND ETHNICITY, UTAH 2017 Source: Utah Department of Health, Utah HI V Factsheethttp://health.utah.gov/epi/diseases/hivaids/surveillance/HIV_2017_report.pdf The number of individuals newly diagnosed with HIV already progressed to AIDS at the time of diagnosis was significantly skewed to Hispanic and Asian individuals, as d emonstrated in Table NA 45.5. It should be noted that there were only 6 total new HIV diagnoses of Asian individuals in 2017, so 50% indicates 3 individuals were also diagnosed at Stage 3 (AIDS) at their initial diagnosis. Meanwhile, there were 38 individu als of Hispanic ethnicity who were diagnosed with HIV in 2017 and 9 of those individuals were also diagnosed with Stage 3 (AIDS). 24% 0% 50% 8% 0% 11% 0% 0% 0%10%20%30%40%50%60% Hispanic American Indian/ Alaska Native Asian Black Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander White Multi-Race Unknown White, 58.6% Hispanic/Latino, 26.7% Black/African American, 6.9% Asian, 6% American Indian/Alaska Native, 1.7% 94 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 NA-50 NON-HOUSING COMMUNITY DE VELOPMENT NEEDS – 91.215(f) DESCRIBE THE JURISDICTION’S NEED FOR PUBLIC FACILITIES: Police and Fire Because of significant contributions to police and fire infrastructure during the past decade, public safety is not currently considered a top priority community development need. During that time period, Salt Lake City constructed a $125 million Public Safety Building which is shared with the City’s Fire Department and which is meeting the need for future growth -related police officers. Public safety also receives impact fees which will help to offset any future capital facility needs associ ated with new growth in the City. HOW WERE THESE NEEDS DETERMINED? As part of the Consolidated Plan process, an Interdepartmental Technical Advisory Group (ITAG) met three times to discuss needs from the perspective of various department within the City. DESCRIBE THE JURISDICTION’S NEED FOR PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS: Parks and Public Lands In order to maintain the current level of service, Salt Lake City Parks and Public Lands Division plans to invest approximately $38.7 million between 2017 and 2027. These co sts should be offset by impact fees related to new growth. The Salt Lake City Parks and Public Lands Division participated in developing an Impact Fee Facilities Plan (IFFP) that identifies the capital facilities the City will need to build within the nex t ten years (2012-2021) to continue the current level of service and accommodate the service needs of projected growth. Salt Lake City Parks and Public Lands Division currently owns 2,378 park acres with an estimated land value of $210,134,805 and improvements value of $96,351,475. These assets are used to provide the current level of service which equates to an investment of $1,594 per capita. Transportation In order to maintain the current level of service Salt Lake City Streets and Transportation Divi sions plan to invest approximately $303,200,600 in capital facilities over the next ten years, $41,805,960 of which is growth related, and therefore eligible to be paid for with impact fees. The remaining amount is the result of correcting an existing deficiency in available space and investing in improved service levels, and therefore is not impact fee eligible. The remaining amount must be funded with revenue sources other than impact fees. The City has issued an $87 million bond to pay for street improvements. HOW WERE THESE NEEDS DETERMINED? As part of the Consolidated Plan process, an Interdepartmental Technical Advisory Group (ITAG) met three times to discuss needs from the perspective of various department within the City. The Salt Lake City Streets and Transportation Divisions participated in the development of an Impact Fee Facilities Plan (IFFP) in 2016, reflecting growth from 2017 to 2027, and that identified the capital facilities the City will need to build within the 10-year timeframe to continue the current level of service and accommodate the service needs of projected growth. 95 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 The bulk of the transportation improvements will be paid for with an $87 million bond issued by Salt Lake City, supplemented by impact fees. Therefore, street improvements are not considered to be a top priority of this Plan. DESCRIBE THE JURISDICTION’S NEED FOR PUBLIC SERVICES: The major need for public services is for affordable housing and for homeless services. Related to these two overarching needs are transportation needs for low -income households, economic opportunities such as job training to increase self -sufficiency and supportive services for individuals with disabilities and behavioral health challenges. A summary of needs for the homeless and non -homeless populations is as follows: Homeless Public Service Needs  More mental health treatment services, including case management where current caseloads are considerably too high  Supportive housing for the mentally ill  Job training  Permanent supportive service s, co -located with other supportive services  Tenant-based rental assistance  Homelessness prevention services  Access to transportation services (for job seeking, medical visits, etc.)  Life skills training  Substance abuse and opioids counseling Non-Homeless Public Service Needs Housing  Expand housing opportunities in high opportunity areas  Encourage a diversity of housing product in neighborhoods to allow for lifecycle housing  Preserve affordable housing stock  Development of affordable housing units near tr ansit stations  Supportive housing for people with HIV and AIDS Transportation  Access to childcare near transportation hubs and employment centers  Transit passes at low or no cost  Bus stop improvements, especially suited for inclement weather, and focused on transit hubs  Sidewalk improvements and ADA improvements to increase mobility  Partner with UTA and other entities to improve transit access and enhancements in target areas Economic Development  Support employment centers in target areas where connectio ns to transit, transportation corridors, and access to services can minimize transportation costs, influence affordability, improve air quality, and create vibrant, sustainable neighborhoods  Micro loans  Job training  Façade improvements for small business Health, Elderly and Disabilities  Need for supportive services for seniors and persons with disabilities  Improve accessibility of existing housing stock for persons with disabilities  Improved transit opportunities for people in wheelchairs including ADA -accessible wheelchairs  Review signal timing at intersections to ensure adequate time for seniors or those with disabilities 96 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024  More mental health treatment services, including case management where current caseloads are considerably too high  Opioids, substance abuse assistance  Mental health assistance  Dental and medical assistance  Supportive services for persons with HIV and AIDS  Senior assistance with supportive services, including transportation Parks and Public Lands  Improve pub lic safety in existing parks  Park and green space enhancements Management  Coordination with State programs to not overlap or fund the same thing  Asset mapping of all existing programs, agencies, funding sources, etc.  Review Good Landlord and other obstacles to obtaining housing (i.e., credit history, felonies, etc.)  Use innovative technologies such as Apps to better align supply and demand for housing HOW WERE THESE NEEDS DETERMINED? Salt Lake City’s homeless needs are determined through evaluation of the annual Point -in-Time Study as well as the recently released State Strategic Plan on Homelessness. In addition, the public participation portion of this process featured a series of three meetings with stakeholder agencies, including Shelter the Homeless, Volunteers of America-Utah, Salt Lake Valley Habitat for Humanity, and Housing Connect formerly known as the Salt Lake County Housing Authority. This process was a critical factor in determining homeless needs. Finally, a survey was prepared which received over 4,000 responses. The s urvey results indicated that homeless and affordable housing issues should be the top priority for the City. The non-homeless public service needs of Salt Lake City’s low to moderate -income residents and special populations were determined through a Stakeholder Advisory Committee that included representatives from a broad view of public service providers (discussed in more detail in the Citizen Participation section of this Plan), as well as a review of local and national data. 97 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS The Market Analysis provides a clear picture of the environment in which Salt Lake City will administer its federal grant programs over the course of the Consolidated Plan. In conjunction with the Needs Assessment, the Market Analysis provides the basis for the Strategic Plan and the programs and projects to be administered. 98 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 MA-05 OVERVIEW Salt Lake City has transitioned over the years to become one of the most diverse, sustainable, and innovative econom ies in the nation. With unsurpassed outdoor recreation opportunities, internationally acclaimed technology and research facilities, well -respected and competitive higher education institutions, industry - leading healthcare facilities, a modern light rail an d streetcar transit system, an expanding international airport, a growing population, an educated workforce, a multilingual population and diverse cultural opportunities, the City is attracting nationally -recognized businesses. This provides an opportunity to build strong neighborhoods with vibrant businesses, along with diverse housing opportunities. However, with this strong economy, housing prices have increased faster than household incomes, making it more and more difficult for low -income families to find affordable housing. Between 2000 and 2018, rental rates have increased by 81.8%; rental rates have continued to rise to historically high rates, with a 32% increase between 2010 and 2018. Decreases in rental affordability, combined with extremely low vacancy rates, have created a very tight rental market, leading to increased difficulty for low -income households to obtain affordable housing. Individuals displaced from housing will have a more difficult time, given market conditions, of finding suitab le substitute housing. There is a need for preservation of existing housing stock and strategies to combat displacement in housing for vulnerable populations. Such strategies will benefit low -income populations and stabilize neighborhoods. Some key points of the market analysis include: Housing Market Conditions  Between 2000 and 2018 the cost of housing significantly increased for both renters and homeowners. The median rental rates increased by 81.8% and home values increased by 89.8%. During the same time period, the median household income only increased by 52.6%. Since incomes did not keep up with increases in housing costs, it has become more difficult for residents to buy a home as evidenced by a declining homeownership rate (from 56.9% in 2000 to 48.4% in 2018).38  An analysis of Salt Lake City’s homebuyer market demonstrates a reasonable range of low -income households will continue to qualify for mortgage financing assistance:  US Census data, Salt Lake City, 2000-2018: o The median home values increased 89.8%, from $152,400 to $289,200 o The median household income increased by 52.6%, from $36,944 in 2000 to $56,370  HUD, HOME Income Guidelines for 2020, Salt Lake County, 80% AMI for a family of 4: $70,300  US Census data, Salt Lake City, 2014-2018: o The number of households earning $50,000 - $74,999: 13,991 households, 17.9% of total population o The average monthly owner costs with a mortgage, $1,534  UtahRealEstate.com, May 2020, number of Salt Lake City listings between $100,000 -$299,999: 554  Salt Lake County rental rates are at an all-time high, showing a 51% increase between 2010 and 2018. 38 U.S. Census Bureau, 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates 99 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024  In 2018, the apartment vacancy rate in Salt Lake City was the lowest rate in Salt Lake County at 2.7% and the Downtown area had an even lower rate at 1.6%.39 A tight rental market and rising rents create a barrier for households in need of affordable housing.  An analysis of housing gaps has determined that Salt Lake City has a shortage of 6,177 rental units affordable to renters earning less than $20,000 per year. Th is is down from a shortage of 8,240 rental units in 2013.  Specifically, shortages occur for affordable rental housing for extremely and very low -income households making less than 50% AMI; affordable and accessible housing for persons with disabilities; affordable rental housing for large families; and permanent supportive housing for vulnerable populations such as individuals who are chronically homeless, mentally disabled, or physically disabled. Barriers to Affordable Housing  Poor housing conditions c an also be a barrier to suitable, affordable housing. HUD defines poor housing conditions as overcrowding, cost -burdened, a lack of complete plumbing, or kitchen facilities. Based on this definition, about 44.8 % of renters and 20.8% of owners live in a un it with at least one condition. 2012-2016 CHAS data also indicates that there are 570 housing units, vacant and occupied, that lack a complete kitchen or plumbing facilities.  Barriers to affordable housing development include both market and regulatory f actors. These include land costs, construction costs, financing resources, foreclosures, neighborhood market conditions, economic conditions, land use regulations, development assessments, permit processing procedures, a lack of zoning incentives and landl ord-tenant policies.  A contrast of mortgage denials and approvals exists between racial and ethnic populations in Salt Lake County. The mortgage application denial rate for Hispanics (20%) in Salt Lake City is significantly higher than that of non-Hispanics (13%).40  Transportation costs can be a barrier to affordable housing, especially if transportation costs are significant due to distances traveled and time spent during the commute. Nearly half of workers living in the City travel 15 to 29 minutes for work. Housing Services  The Housing Authority of Salt Lake City currently manages 30 properties including Housing Choice Vouchers, Project Based Vouchers, Mod Rehab Vouchers and programs for Veterans, homeless, disabled, and elderly persons. These properties offer over 1,600 units of varying sizes.  A variety of facilities and services are offered to homeless individuals and families, including emergency shelters, transitional housing, safe havens, permanent supportive housing, tenant based rental assistance, outreach and engagement, housing placement, general medical, employment, substance abuse, behavioral health, legal aid, veteran services, public assistance, family crisis, hygiene, and other miscellaneous services. These services are provided by govern ment agencies, faith -based organizations, service-oriented groups, housing authorities, health service organizations, and others. 39 Cushman Wakefield, Apartment Market Report: Greater Salt Lake Area, 2018 40 Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council, Home Mortgage Disclosure Act 100 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024  In addition to supporting housing and homeless services with federal funding, Salt Lake City Corporation spent $2,554,000 on Homelessness Related Services in fiscal year 2018-19. The funding came from General Fund resources and highlights the City’s commitment to providing support for our most vulnerable citizens.  Salt Lake City’s housing and supportive service network addresses the needs of the elderly, persons with disabilities, persons with substance addictions, persons with HIV/AIDS and their families, and public housing residents through a variety of efforts that are designed to be coordinated a case manager and referral format to link residents to services and support opportunities. MA-10 NUMBER OF HOUSING UNITS – 91.120(a)&(b)(2) INTRODUCTION The Census Bureau estimates in the 2014-2018 American Community Survey that there are 84,784 housing units in the City with 92.3% reportedly occupied; 48.4% of those units are owner-occupied. The number of housing units has increased by 4,060 units from the 80,724 units reported in the 2010 U.S. Census. This is an increase of 5%, which is much higher than the national increase of 3.6% in that same period. Salt Lake City is the most populated city in the County and comprises 21.7% of the County’s housing stock. Table MA-10.1 shows a breakdown of the housing inventory located within the City. 1-unit detached structures are the largest property type, accounting for almost half the housing units in Salt Lake City. However, multi - family housing complexes of 20 or more units saw the largest growth since 2013 in terms of percentage and now represents approximately 22% of the properties by ho using type. TABLE MA-10.1 ALL RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES BY NUMBER OF UNITS Property Type 2018 Units % of Total Units 1-unit Detached Structure 40,112 47.3% 1-unit, Attached Structure 2,741 3.2% 2-4 Units 11,785 13.9% 5-19 Units 10,245 12.1% 20 or More Units 19,052 22.5% Mobile Home, Boat, RV, Van. Etc. 849 1.0% Total 84,784 100.00% Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates, Selected Housing Characteristics TABLE MA-10.2 ALL RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES BY NUMBER OF UNITS 2018 Unit Size by Tenure Owners Renters Number Percentage Number Percentage No Bedroom 359 0.9% 3,111 7.7% 1 Bedroom 1,833 4.8% 14,370 35.6% 2 or 3 Bedrooms 21,579 57.0% 20,177 50.0% 4 or More Bedrooms 14,098 37.2% 2,702 6.7% Total 37,869 100.00% 40,360 100.00% Sou rce: U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates, Physical Housing Characteristics for Occupied Housing Units 101 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 DESCRIBE THE NUMBER AND TARGETING (INCOME LEVEL/TYPE OF FAMILY SERVED) OF UNITS ASSISTED WITH FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL PROGRAMS: Salt Lake City’s Housing and Neighborhood Development Division and community partners utilize federal, state, and local funding to expand housing opportunities for low - and moderate-income households, as well as vulnerable and at-risk populations. Sources and financing include low -income housing tax credits, Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME), Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG), HOPWA, Salt Lake City Housing Trust Fund, the Olene Walker Housing Loan Fund, Salt Lake Cit y’s Redevelopment Agency, the City’s General Fund, Funding Our Future, and Housing Connect. The following funding sources are utilized to target specific housing activities: CDBG A portion of Salt Lake City’s CDBG funding is utilized for housing activitie s, including housing rehabilitation, historic preservation, home repair programs, tenant -based rental assistance, homeownership, and down payment assistance. CDBG funding is targeted to households earning 0 to 80% of AMI. ESG Salt Lake City utilizes ESG f unds to provide homelessness prevention assistance to households who would otherwise become homeless and to rapidly re-house persons who are experiencing homelessness. The funds provide for a variety of assistance, including emergency shelter, homeless pre vention, short- or medium -term rental assistance, housing placement, and housing stability case management. ESG funding is targeted to extremely low -income individuals and households that are at or below 30% AMI. HOME Salt Lake City utilizes HOME funds to provide a wide range of activities including building, acquiring, and/or rehabilitating affordable housing for rent or homeownership, as well as providing direct rental assistance to low-income households. HOME funding is targeted to households earning 0 to 80% AMI with rental assistance specifically targeted to a lower AMI. HOPWA Salt Lake City administers the HOPWA program for the Salt Lake Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), which includes Salt Lake, Summit, and Tooele Counties. HOPWA funds are utiliz ed to provide the following housing services to HOPWA eligible persons:  Housing Information Services  Tenant-based Rental Assistance (TBRA)  Project-based Rental Assistance (PBRA)  Short-term Rent, Mortgage, Utility Assistance (STRMU)  Permanent Housing Placement Assistance (PHP)  Housing Supportive Services  Housing Coordination/Resource Identification HOPWA funding targets extremely low - to low-income individuals diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. Local Funds The Salt Lake City Housing Trust Fund provides financial as sistance to support the development and preservation of affordable and special needs housing in Salt Lake City. Eligible Activities include acquisition, new construction, and rehabilitation of both multi -family rental properties and single-family homeownership. Funding is targeted to households earning up to 80% AMI. 102 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Salt Lake City Redevelopment Agency Under Utah Code Title 17C Community Reinvestment Agencies Act, the Salt Lake City Redevelopment Agency is able to contribute up to 20% of tax increment from each project area to fund affordable housing projects throughout the City. Available funds vary from year-to-year, depending on the amount of tax increment generated in the Agency’s various project areas. In the past 50 years, the Redevelopment Agency has created nearly 7,000 housing units of which nearly half are affordable. Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) The Utah Housing Corporation (UHC) Multifamily Finance Department is committed to partnering with developers and investors to utilize State and Federal Tax Credits and bond financing. These resources facilitate the development of new and rehabilitated apartments to provide housing for low -income families, senior citizens, and more. The program increases the availability of rental housing to househ olds earning 60% or less of the area median income. During the 2019 fiscal year, UHC allocated $8.7 million in annual 9% federal tax credits and $1.3 million in annual 4% federal tax credits. The UHC helped over 4,200 families purchase a home with its dow n payment assistance program and helped fund affordable housing development that created nearly 1,000 new rental units across Utah. Much of the development of affordable housing development or preservation that occurs in Salt Lake City requires a funding partnership that includes a combination of LIHTC, State funding via the Olene Walker Housing Loan Fund, and City resources. State Funds The Olene Walker Housing Loan Fund’s (OWHLF) Multi -Family Program provides financial assistance for the acquisition, construction, or rehabilitation of affordable rental households at or below 50% of AMI, and the median income of all households served through the OWHLF is 43.8% of AMI. During fiscal year 2019, the fund supported construction or rehabilitation of 1,281 un its of multi-family housing, as well as 136 single-family units statewide. PROVIDE AN ASSESSMENT OF UNITS EXPECTED TO BE LOST FROM THE AFFORDABLE HOUSING INVENTORY FO R ANY REASON, SUCH AS EXPIRATION OF SECT ION 8 CONTRACTS: TABLE MA-10.3 HOUSING DEVELOPMENTS WITH AT LEAST ONE AFFORDABILITY CONTRACT EXPIRING WITHIN THE NEXT TEN YEARS Project Total Affordable Units Nearest Expiration Art Space II 53 2025 Aspen View 16 2026 Bradley Apartments 6 2024 Calvary Tower 30 2020 Cedar Crest Apartments 12 2023 Country Oaks I 7 2023 Country Oaks II 17 2024 CW Development-Parker 16 2025 Grace Mary Manor 80 2026 Granite Park Condo 9 2021 Harmony Gardens 96 2026 Hidden Oaks II 24 2022 Hidden Oaks IV 36 2021 103 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Project Total Affordable Units Nearest Expiration Hidden Oaks VI 28 2025 Hidden Oaks VII 6 2029 Holladay Hills I 70 2023 Holladay Hills II 60 2024 Huntsman 36 2028 Ivanhoe Apartments 19 2021 Liberty Midtown 65 2023 Lowell Apartments 80 2025 Meredith Apartments 22 2019 Millcreek Meadows 56 2024 New Grand Hotel 80 2020 Ouray Duplex 2 2026 Palladio Apartments 36 2025 Parkway Commons 81 2024 Pauline Downs Apartments 112 2024 Rio Grande Hotel 49 2023 Riverside Cove Apartments 28 2023 Riverview Townhomes 61 2025 Riverwood Cove Apartments 110 2022 Robert A Wiley Apartments 7 2026 Safe Haven I 22 2029 Salt Lake County - Cnsrt 11 2029 Sedona 18 2025 South Salt Lake Crown 4 2026 Aspenview 19 2029 Village Apartments 24 2024 Wandamere Place Apartments 10 2019 Wasatch Commons Crown 5 2029 Source: Salt Lake City Housing and Neighborhood Developm ent DOES THE AVAILABILIT Y OF HOUSING UNITS MEET THE NEEDS OF THE POPULATION? According to an apartment market report completed in the summer of 2018, the Salt Lake City area apartment vacancy rate was at 2.7% with the Downtown area reporting a 1.7% vacanc y rate.41 With rental inventory nearly completely occupied, it is difficult for households at all AMI levels to find adequate rental housing, with increased difficulty for households at lower AMIs. Limitations on housing choice are particularly significant for the low-income elderly, who have the highest levels of disability and tend to live in older housing stock. Housing availability for persons with a disability will become increasingly scarce as the baby -boomer cohort increases in age. 41 Cushman Wakefield, Apartment Market Report: Greater Salt Lake Area, 2018 104 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 DESCRIBE THE NEED FOR SPECIFIC TYPES OF HOUSING: Salt Lake City has evaluated the need for specific housing types in consideration of current housing needs and future population changes. Currently, specific segments of Salt Lake City’s population are not well -served by the housing market, with gaps in the following types of housing:  Affordable rental housing for extremely low -income households  Affordable and accessible housing for persons with disabilities  Affordable rental housing for large families  Permanent supportive housing for vulnerable populations to include individuals who are chronically homeless, mentally disabled, physically disabled and others MA-15 COST OF HOUSING – 91.210(a) INTRODUCTION Between 2000 and 2018, the cost of housing significantly increase d for both renters and homeowners. As demonstrated in Table MA-15.1, the median contract rent increased from $516 in 2000 to $938 in 2018, an 81.8% increase. Median home values increased 89.8%, from $152,400 to $289,200. During the same time period, the median household income only increased by 52.6%, from $36,944 in 2000 to $56,370 in 2018. Since incomes have not kept up with increasing housing costs, it is more difficult for residents to buy or rent a home. Subsequently, homeownership rates have decreased from 56.9% in 2000 to 48.4% in 2018. TABLE MA-15.1 COST OF HOUSING Base Year: 2000 2010 ACS 2018 ACS Percent Change (2000 - 2018) Median Home Value $152,400 $243,200 $289,200 89.8% Median Contract Rent $516 $712 $938 81.8% Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates, Selected Housing Characteristics TABLE MA-15.2 ALL RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES BY NUMBER OF UNITS AND RENT COSTS Gross Rent Number of Units Percentage Less than $500 3,769 9.6% $500-999 18,454 47.1% $1,000-1,499 11,598 29.6% $1,500-1,999 4,234 10.8% $2,000 or More 1,128 2.9% Total 39,183 100.00% No cash rent included in the Less than $500 category Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates, Selected Housing Characteristics 105 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 TABLE MA-15.3 HOUSING AFFORDABILITY Rental Units Units Affordable RHUD: 30% or below 4,775 Affordable VHUD: 50% or below 5,465 Affordable RHUD: 31% - 50% 15,000 Affordable VHUD: 51% - 80% 9,845 Affordable RHUD: 51%-80% 16,700 TOTAL 36,475 TOTAL 15,310 Source: 2012-2016 CHAS TABLE MA-15.4 MONTHLY RENT Market Rent Efficiency (no bedroom) 1 Bedroom 2 Bedroom 3 Bedroom 4 Bedroom Fair Market Rent $708 $870 $1,075 $1,518 $1,727 High HOME Rent $708 $870 $1,075 $1,364 $1,501 Low HOME Rent $708 $775 $931 $1,075 $1,200 Source: HUD FMR and HOME rents FIGURE MA-15.1 2019 MARKET VALUE OF SINGLE-FAMILY HOMES IN SALT LAKE CITY Source: Salt Lake County Assessor’s Database 2019 106 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 IS THERE SUFFICIENT HOUSING FOR HOUSEHOL DS AT ALL INCOME LEV ELS? The low supply of affordable housing can be seen when comparing Salt Lake City’s supply of housing at various price points with the number of households who can afford such housing. The lack of affordable housing is particularly prevalent for extremely low -income households. An analysis of housing gaps has determined that Salt Lake City has a shortage of 6,177 rental units affordable to renters earning less than $20,000 per year. This indicates that the shortage has decreased by 2,063 since 2013 when the reported shortage was 8,240. Some of these renters are university students who will have future earnings increases, but many are low -income families, persons with disabilities,10 and persons who are unemployed. TABLE MA-15.5 SALT LAKE CITY RENTAL MARKET MISMATCH Income Range Maximum Affordable Rent, Including Utilities Renters Rental Units Housing Mismatch Number Percentage Number Percentage Less than $5,000 $125 2,798 6.9% 289 1% (2,509) $5,000 - $9,999 $250 2,523 6.3% 1,235 3% (1,288) $10,000 - $14,999 $375 3,012 7.5% 1,400 3% (1,612) $15,000 - $19,999 $500 2,467 6.1% 1,699 4% (768) $20,000 - $24,999 $625 2,716 6.7% 3,871 9% 1,155 $25,000 - $34,999 $875 5,520 13.7% 13,490 32% 7,970 $35,000 - $49,999 $1,250 6,129 15.2% 11,155 27% 5,026 $50,000 - $74,999 $1,875 7,067 17.5% 6,830 16% (237) $75,000 or more $1,875+ 8,128 20.1% 1,623 4% (6,505) Total/Low-Income Gap 40,360 41,592 100% (6,177) Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates HOW IS AFFORDABILITY OF HOUSING LIKELY TO CHANGE CONSIDERING CHANGES TO HOME VALUES AND/OR RENTS? Housing costs have increased during the past few years in both the rental and ownership markets. As Table MA-15.6 demonstrates, Salt Lake County rental rates are at an all -time high, with a 51% increase between 2010 and 2018. Decreases in rental affordability combined with low vacancy rates have created a very tight rental market, particularly for low -income households. TABLE MA-15.6 CHANGE IN AVERAGE RENTAL BY TYPE OF UNIT: SALT LAKE COUNTY Market Rent 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 % Change: 2010-2018 Studio $480 $515 $538 $586 $603 $638 $705 $745 $827 72.3% One Bedroom $629 $659 $709 $745 $757 $804 $833 $906 $969 54.1% Two Bedroom, One Bath $706 $725 $759 $792 $809 $833 $879 $932 $1,023 44.9% Two Bedroom, Two Bath $816 $862 $943 $969 $983 $1,050 $1,085 $1,158 $1,242 52.2% Three Bedroom, Two Bath $956 $1,025 $1,051 $1,075 $1,085 $1,132 $1,244 $1,275 $1,373 43.6% Overall $720 $754 $814 $850 $865 $907 $949 $1,011 $1,087 51.0% Source: Cushman and Wakefield, 2017 Apartment M arket Report: Greater Salt Lake Area; CBRE, 2018 Greater Salt Lake Area Multifamily Market Report 107 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 As indicated in Table MA-15.7, prices for existing home sales in the Salt Lake City metropolitan area were up between 2018 and 2019 and the number of homes sold saw a small increase. TABLE MA-15.7 NUMBER OF HOMES SOLD AND AVERAGE SALES PRICE: SALT LAKE CITY METROPOLITAN AREA Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, HUD PD&R Regional Reports, 3rd Quarter 2019 HOW DO HOME RENTS/FAIR MARKET RENT COMPARE TO AREA MEDIAN RENT? HOW MIGHT THIS IMPACT YOUR STRATEGY TO PRODUCE OR PRESERVE AFFORDABLE HOUSING? HOME rents and Housing Choice Fair Market Rents are lower than actual rental rates in Salt Lake City. Therefore, it is critical that the existing stock of subsidized housing is preserved and mechanisms are put in place to help address the gap in HOME/Fair Market Rents and t he prevailing rent amounts. Individuals and families displaced from subsidized housing will have a difficult time finding suitable replacement housing affordable at their income level. In the current housing market, rental subsidies are usually required fo r populations that fall below 50% AMI. The City should prioritize the rehabilitation of existing housing stock and anti-displacement strategies to meet the needs of vulnerable populations and stabilize neighborhoods. DISCUSSION Tight market conditions with historically high rents and very low vacancy rates have exacerbated the challenges of low-income households to obtain affordable housing. An analysis of housing gaps has determined that Salt Lake City has a shortage of 6,177 rental units affordable to renters earning less than $20,000 per year. This is a decline of 2,063 units from the shortage of 8,240 rental units in 2013. With rising rents and few units available, this situation is likely to worsen. It is the City’s intent to be proactively involved i n preserving existing affordable housing and facilitating the development of additional affordable housing. This is essential in order to prevent an increase in homelessness from the current extremely tight housing market. The Strategic Plan identifies how Salt Lake City intends to use federal funding to preserve and facilitate affordable housing in our community. MA-20 CONDITION OF HOUSING – 91.210(a) INTRODUCTION HUD defines housing conditions as overcrowding, cost -burdened, a lack of complete plumbing, or kitchen facilities. Based on this definition, about 44.8% of renters and 20.8% of the owners live in a unit with at least one condition. CHAS data also indicates that there are 570 housing units, vacant and occupied, that lack a complete kitchen or plum bing facilities. DESCRIBE THE JURISDICTION’S DEFINITION F OR “SUBSTANDARD COND ITION” AND “SUBSTANDARD CONDITION BUT SUITABLE FOR REHABILITATION:” The City defines substandard housing units as those that are not in compliance with the City’s existing housi ng code. “Substandard condition” is not a term this jurisdiction uses; instead, projects are designed to address items in residential units that do not meet that code. The City also follows the federal register definitions for substandard housing as defined in 24 CFR § 5.425 Federal preference: Substandard housing. For units to be considered in “substandard condition but suitable for rehabilitation,” they must be both economically and Number of Homes Sold Average Price Q3 2018 Q3 2019 % Change Q3 2018 Q3 2019 % Change 18,500 17,750 -4% $357,400 $383,600 7% 108 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 structurally viable. All rental properties in Salt Lake City require a bu siness license. Landlords are required to maintain minimum standard condition of housing, as per Salt Lake City’s Existing Residential Code. The purpose of the Residential Housing Code is to provide for the health, safety, comfort, con venience, and aesthetics of the City. TABLE MA-20.1 CONDITION OF UNITS Owner-Occupied Renter-Occupied Number % Number % With one selected condition 7,595 20.1% 16,508 40.9% With two selected conditions 174 0.5% 1,544 3.8% With three selected conditions 19 0.1% 43 0.1% With four selected conditions 42 0.1% - 0.0% No selected conditions 30,039 79.3% 22,265 55.2% Total 37,869 100.00% 40,360 100.00% Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates, Tenure by Selected Physical and Financial Conditions TABLE MA-20.2 YEAR UNIT BUILT Owner-Occupied Renter-Occupied Number % Number % 2000 or later 2,250 6% 3,710 9% 1980-1999 3,820 11% 7,000 18% 1960-1979 5,490 15% 11,815 30% Before 1960 24,800 68% 16,540 42% Total 36,360 100% 39,065 100% Source: 2012-2016 CHAS TABLE MA-20.3 RISK OF LEAD BASED PAINT HAZARD Owner-Occupied Renter-Occupied Number % Number % Total number of units built before 1980 30,290 83% 28,355 73% Housing units built before 1980 with children present 4,600 13% 4,225 11% Source: 2012-2016 CHAS TABLE MA-20.4 VACANT UNITS Suitable for Rehabilitation Not Suitable for Rehabilitation Total Vacant Units 140 0 140 Abandoned Vacant Units 0 0 0 109 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 REO Properties 0 0 0 Abandoned REO Properties 0 0 0 Source: Salt Lake City Civil Enforcement DESCRIBE THE NEED FO R OWNER AND RENTER REHABILITATION BASED ON THE CONDITION OF THE JURISDICTION’S HOUSING: An indicator commonly used to evaluate the condition of housing stock is the age of the unit. Older homes are more likely to have condition problems and are at higher risk of lead-based paint. Approximately 29% of housing units in Salt Lake City were built prior to 1940.42 Many older homes may be in excellent condition due to revitalization efforts in the area; however, condition issues are still mor e likely to occur in older homes. Many of the block groups with a high percentage of older units tend to be located below 900 South and east of State Street. This can be seen in the figure below: FIGURE MA-20.1 PERCENT OF B LOCK GROUP HOUSING UNITS B UILT BEFORE 1950 Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2013-2017 ACS 5-Year Estimates ESTIMATE THE NUMBER OF HOUSING UNITS WIT HIN THE JURISDICTION THAT ARE OCCUPIED BY LOW- OR MODERATE-INCOME FAMILIES THAT CONTAIN LEAD -BASED PAINT HAZARDS. 91.205 (e), 91.405 The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified that approximately three -quarters of the nation’s housing stock built before 1978 contains some lead -based paint. This means residential units built prior to 1978 42 U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates 110 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 are considered to be most at risk for containin g lead-based paints (LBP) as the use of LBP was prohibited in residential units after 1978. The 2012-2016 CHAS reports that approximately 83% of owner-occupied units and 73% of renter-occupied units were built prior to 1980. This means that up to 77.7% of Salt Lake City’s total housing stock is at risk of exposure to LBP. DISCUSSION Salt Lake City has many older homes which are more likely to contain LBP. Homes built before 1940 have an 87% chance of containing LBP according to the EPA and 29% of the City’s housing supply was built during 1939 or earlier.43 FIGURE MA-20.2 PROBABILITY OF CONTAINING LEAD-BASED PAINT BY YEAR CONSTRUCTED Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, http://www2.epa.gov/lead/protect-your-family Lead is highly toxic and can c ause many serious health problems, especially in young children who have a greater risk of exposure and also a higher level of susceptibility to lead poisoning. Families with children under six may face the risk of the child ingesting paint chips on the wa lls and floors of these older buildings. These highly toxic paint chips, and even lead dust, can cause lead poisoning. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there is no identified safe level of lead exposure in children. Exposure to lead can lead to:  Damage to the brain and nervous system  Slowed growth and development  Learning and behavior problems  Hearing and speech problems Which can cause:  Lower IQ  Decreased ability to pay attention  Underperforming in school44 43 Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, http://www2.epa.gov/lead/protect-your-family 44 Center for Disease Control and Prevention – Health Effect of Lead Exposure. (2019, July 30). Retrieved November 12, 2019, from https://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/prevention/health -effects.htm. 87% 69% 24% 0%20%40%60%80%100% Before 1940 1940 - 1959 1960-1977 111 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Salt Lake City has various programs through the Housing and Neighborhood Development Division and local nonprofits, such as ASSIST and Community Development Corporation of Utah, to remediate lead hazards in residential units. Additionally, the Lead Safe Housing program created by Salt Lake County provides free inspections, dust sampling analysis, blood testing for children under six, window replacement, paint removal on doorjambs and floors, and specialized cleaning.45 The program is aimed at assisting low - or moderate-income households in providing lead-safe homes. MA-25 PUBLIC AND ASSISTED HOUSING – 91.210(b) INTRODUCTION Local housing authorities provide long -term rental housing and rental assistance through Low -Income Public Housing (LIPH), Housing Choice Vouchers (Section 8), and Continuum of Care housing vouchers. In addition, the housing authorities as well as privately owned entities provide additional subsidized housing opportunities through affordable housing and supportive housing programs. TABLE MA-25.1 TOTAL NUMBER OF UNITS Program Type Mod- Rehab Public Housing Vouchers Total Project- based Tenant- based Special Purpose Vouchers Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing Family Unification Program Disabled* Number of units/vouchers available 99 NA 2,894 380 1,876 161 67 410 Number of accessible units NA 24 NA NA NA NA NA NA Source: Housing Authority of Salt Lake City DESCRIBE THE NUMBER AND PHYSICAL CONDITION OF PUBLIC HOUSING UNITS IN THE JURISDICTION, INCLUD ING THOSE THAT ARE PARTICIPATING IN AN APPROVED PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY PLAN: The Housing Authority of Salt Lake City currently manages 30 properties including Housing Choice Vouchers, Project Based Vouchers, Mod Rehab Vouchers and programs for Veterans, homeless, disabled, and elderly persons. These properties offer over 1,800 units of varying sizes. The table below lists each property by name, type, and number of units. TABLE MA-25.2 LIST OF PUBLIC HOUSING PROPERTIES BY TYPE AND UNITS Name Type Units Phillips Plaza Senior Public 1 Bed 99 Romney Plaza Senior Public 1 Bed 70 City Plaza Senior Public 1 Bed 150 Rendon Terrace Senior Public 1-2 Bed 70 45 Salt Lake County, Lead Safe Housing Program, from https://slco.org/lead-safe-housing/qualify-for-free-services/services/ 112 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Name Type Units Cedar Crest LIHTC/VSH/Affordable 1-2 Bed 12 Sunrise Metro LIHTC Homeless 1 Bed 100 Valor Apts. Vet. Homeless 1 Bed 14 Valor House Vet. Homeless 1 Bed 72 Freedom Landing Vet. Homeless 1 Bed 109 Jefferson Circle Section 8 Multi-Family 2 Bed 20 Faultline Family Affordable 1-2 Bed 8 Redwood Road Family Affordable 2-3 Bed 22 330 North Family Affordable 2-3 Bed 25 Pacific Ave Family Affordable 2-5 Bed 25 Pacific Heights Family Affordable 2-5 Bed 22 Central City Family Affordable 2-3 Bed 17 Palmer Court Single/Family Affordable 1-3 Bed 201 Denver NA 12 771 South Family Affordable 2-3 Bed 17 Capitol Homes Low-Income 1-2 Bed 39 Jefferson School I LIHTC Family Mixed 1-2 Bed 84 Jefferson School II LIHTC Family Mixed 1-2 Bed 84 Taylor Springs Senior LIHTC Affordable 1-2 Bed 95 Taylor Gardens Senior LIHTC Affordable 1-2 Bed 112 9th East Lofts LIHTC Family Mixed 1-2 Bed 68 Fairmont Fourplex Family Affordable 1 Bed 4 West Temple Duplexes Family Affordable 3 Bed 4 Riverside Senior Affordable 1-2 Bed 41 Ben Albert Family Affordable 1-2 Bed 68 Canterbury Family Affordable 2-3 Bed 77 Cambridge Cove Family Affordable 2 Bed 71 TOTAL 1,812 Source: Housing Authority of Salt Lake City DESCRIBE THE RESTORATION AND REVITALIZAT ION NEEDS OF PUBLIC HOUSING UNITS IN THE JURISDICTION: All housing authority units are maintained in excellent condition. The Housing Authority of Salt Lake City and Housing Conn ect both conduct and complete an annual property needs assessment in order to maintain the properties in a decent and safe manner. The Housing Authority has maintained its Public Housing properties in the past with the use of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Capital Fund Grants. These grants are tied to Public Housing. The Housing Authority of Salt Lake City has applied for a HUD program, Resident Assistance Demonstration (RAD), which is a voluntary program, seeking to preserve public housing by providi ng housing agencies with access to more stable funding to make needed improvements to properties. 113 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 The RAD program allows PHAs to manage a property using one of two types of HUD funding contracts that are tied to a specific building and replace the operating subsidy and capital funds previously used. Housing Choice project-based voucher (PBV) or Housing Choice project -based rental assistance (PBRA). Both are 15-20 years long and are more stable funding sources. This shift will make it easier for PHAs to bo rrow money and use low- income housing tax credits (LIHTCs) as well as other forms of financing. These private sources of additional money will enable the Housing Authority to make improvements essential for preserving the Public Housing stock. This funding change does not change the amount of rent paid by residents or the clientele served. HASLC has also developed a 30-year replacement and improvement plan and each property has a schedule for improvements that is broken down to one- and five-year plans. DESCRIBE THE PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY’S STRATEGY FOR IMPROVING T HE LIVING ENVIRONMENT OF LOW- AND MODERATE-INCOME FAMILIES RESIDING IN PUBLIC HOUSING: The following are examples of strategies that have been implemented to improve living conditions at City housing complexes: a strengthened application screening process; strict lease enforcement; off -duty Salt Lake City Police Officer conducting security patrols on their properties; improved exterior lighting; added accessibility for those aging in place; implementation of a preventative maintenance program; and upgrades and renovations to properties when possible, as needed. MA-30 HOMELESS FACILITIES AND SERVICES – 91.210(c) INTRODUCTION A variety of facilities and services are offered to homeless individuals and families, including emergency shelters, transitional housing, safe havens, permanent supportive housing, tenant based rental assistance, outreach and engagement, housing placement, general medical, employment, substance abuse, behavioral health, legal aid, veteran services, public assistance, family crisis, hygiene, and other miscellaneous services. These services are provided by government agencies, faith -based organizations, service-oriented groups, housing authorities, health service organizations an d others. TABLE MA-30.1 FACILITIES AND HOUSING TARGETED TO HOMELESS HOUSEHOLDS Population ES: Year-Round Beds ES: Voucher/ Seasonal/ Overflow Beds Transitional Housing Beds Permanent Supportive Housing Beds PSH Beds Under Development Households with Adult(s) and Child(ren) 542 33 143 1,257c 165 Households with Only Adults 814 147 165 1,271d 0 Chronically Homeless Households 0 0 0 1,502e 0 Veterans 0 0 67a 597 75 Unaccompanied Youth 34 20 37b 9 0 Source: Utah Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) aAll 67 Veterans are also counted in the Households with Only Adults bAll 37 Unaccompanied Youth beds are also counted in the Households with Only Adults c150 of the Households with Adult(s) and Child(ren) are also veteran dedicated beds d447 of the Households with Only Adults are also veteran dedicated beds e775 of the Chronically Homeless beds are also counted in Households with Only Adults, 727 are also counted in Households with Adult(s) and Child(ren), and 20 are also veteran dedicated beds. 114 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 DESCRIBE MAINSTREAM SERV ICES, SUCH AS HEALTH, MENTAL HEALTH, AND EMPLOYMENT SERVICES TO THE EXTENT THOSE SERVICES ARE USED TO COMPLEMENT SERVICES TARGETED TO HOMELESS PERSONS. A wide array of mainstream services augments homeless specific services in Salt Lake City. These programs are an important aspect of providing homeless services in the City. Some of these services are:  Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)  Medicare  Medicaid  Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)  Veteran’s Benefits  Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)  Housing Choice Vouchers (Section 8)  Unemployment  Worker’s Compensation  Social Security Disability (SSDI)  Supplemental Security Income (SSI)  Social Security  Other miscellaneous benefits The Salt Lake homeless services community has a strong history of effectively leveraging these mainstream benefits in providing homeless services. LIST AND DESCRIBE SERVICES AND FACILITIES THAT MEET THE NEED S OF HOMELESS PERSONS, PARTICULARL Y CHRONICALLY HOMELE SS INDIVIDUALS AND F AMILIES, FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN, VETERANS AND THEIR FAMILIES, AND UNACCOMPANIED YOUTH. IF THE SERVICES AND FACILITIES ARE LISTED ON SCREEN SP-40 INSTITUTIONAL DEL IVERY STRUCTURE OR SCREEN MA-35 SPECIAL NEEDS FACILITIES AND SERVICES, DESCRIBE HOW THESE FACILITIES AND SERVICES SPECIFICALLY ADDRESS THE NEEDS OF THESE POPULATIONS. Salt Lake City Corporation spent $2,554,000 on Homeless Related Services in fiscal year 2018 -19. The funding came from the General Fund. TABLE MA-30.2 2019-2020 HOMELESS RELATED SERVICES Agency/Program Facility Name Address Description Family Promise Emergency Shelter 814 W. 800 S., Salt Lake City, Utah 84104 Serves families with children Rescue Mission Women’s Center Emergency Shelter 1165 S. State Street, Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 Serves Single Women Rescue Mission Emergency Shelter/Day Center/ 463 S. 400 W., Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Serves Men South Valley Services Emergency Shelter 8400 S., Redwood Rd., West Jordan, Utah 84088 Serves female and male victims of domestic violence and their children 115 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Agency/Program Facility Name Address Description YWCA Shelter Emergency Shelter 322 E. 300 S., Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 Serves female victims of domestic violence and their children Salt Lake County Youth Services Emergency Shelter 377 W. Price Ave., (3610 S.) Salt Lake City, Utah 84115 Serves youth Gale Miller Resource Center Emergency Shelter 242 Paramount Ave., Salt Lake City, Utah, 84115 Serves homeless men and women Geraldine E King Women’s Center Emergency Shelter 131 E. 700 S., Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 Serves homeless women Volunteers of America Youth Resource Center Emergency Shelter/Day Center 888 S. 400 W., Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Serves homeless and at-risk teens ages 15- 22 Men’s Resource Center Emergency Shelter 3380 S. 1000 W., South Salt Lake, Utah 84119 Serves homeless men Volunteers of America Homeless Outreach Program Donation Disbursement/ Case Management 131 E. 700 S, Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 Serves homeless women, men, and youth living on the street Weigand Homeless Resource Center Day Center 437 W. 200 S., Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Serves all homeless residents VA Homeless Program Veteran’s Assistance 2970 S. Main St., South Salt Lake City, Utah 84115 Serves chronically homeless and VA veterans Metro Employment Center Employment/Welfare/ Financial Assistance 720 S. 200 E., Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 Serves all homeless residents Utah Community Action Program Employment/Welfare/ Financial Assistance 764 S. 200 W., Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Serves all homeless residents Eagle Ranch Ministries Prepared Meals & Food Pantries 500 S. 600 E., Salt Lake City, Utah 84102 Serves all homeless residents Good Samaritan Program | The Cathedral of the Madeleine Prepared Meals & Food Pantries 331 E. South Temple, Salt Lake City, Utah 84103 Serves all homeless residents Rescue Mission Prepared Meals & Food Pantries 463 S. 400 W., Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Serves all homeless residents St. Vincent de Paul Dining Hall Prepared Meals & Food Pantries 437 W. 200 S., Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Serves all homeless residents Salt Lake City Mission Prepared Meals & Food Pantries 1151 S. Redwood Rd. #106, Salt Lake City, Utah 84104 Serves all homeless residents Crossroads Urban Center Food Pantries 347 S. 400 E., Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 Serves all homeless residents Eagle Ranch Distribution Center Food Pantries 1899 S. Redwood Rd., Salt Lake City, Utah 84104 Serves all homeless residents Hildegarde’s Pantry Food Pantries 231 E. 100 S., Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 Serves all homeless residents House of Prayer Food Pantries 839 S. 200 W., Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Serves all homeless residents 116 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Agency/Program Facility Name Address Description Volunteers of America Adult Detox Drug/Alcohol Detoxification 252 W. Brooklyn Ave., Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Serves men suffering from addiction VOA Detox Center for Women and Children Drug/Alcohol Detoxification 697 W. 4170 S., Murray, Utah 84123 Serves adult women and children under the age of 10 Wasatch Homeless Healthcare dba 4th Street Clinic Medical Care for Homeless 409 W. 400 S., Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Serves all homeless residents Source: Salt Lake County MA-35 SPECIAL NEEDS FACILITIES AND SERVICES – 91.210(d) INTRODUCTION This section provides an overview of the facilities and services that ensure at -risk and special needs populations, including persons returning from physical and mental health facilities, receive appropriate supportive housing. TABLE MA-35.1 HOPWA ASSISTANCE BASELINE Type of HOPWA Assistance Number of People Receiving Services Tenant-Based Rental Assistance (TBRA) 58 Permanent Housing in Facilities NA Short-Term Rent, Mortgage, Utility Assistance (STRMU) 52 Short Term or Transitional H ousing Facilities NA Permanent H ousing Placement 24 Source: HOPWA CAPER and HOPWA Beneficiary Verification Worksheet, 2018-2019 INCLUDING THE ELDERL Y, FRAIL ELDERLY, PERSO NS WITH DISABILITIES (MENTAL, PHYSICAL, DEVELOPMENTAL), PERSONS WITH ALCOHOL OR OTHER DRUG ADDICTIONS, PERSONS WITH HIV/AIDS AND THEIR F AMILIES, PUBLIC HOUSING RESIDENTS AND ANY OTHER CATEGORIES THE JURISDICTION MAY SPECIFY AND DESCRIBE THEIR SUPPORTIVE HOUSING NEEDS. Salt Lake City’s housing and supportive service network addresses the needs of the elderly, persons with disabilities, persons with substance addictions, persons with HIV/AIDS and their families, and public housing residents through the following efforts. Efforts are typically coordinated through a case management and referral format to link services and opportunities.  Physical healthcare programs  Mental healthcare programs  Emergency daycare services  Youth day centers  Homeless day centers  Emergency food pantries  Tenant-based rental assistance (TBRA) programs  Project-based rental assistance (PBRA) programs  Transitional housing programs 117 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024  Rapid re-housing programs permanent supportive housing programs  Housing accessibility programs homelessness prevention services  Substance addiction treatment programs  Life skills training programs  Employment training programs  Transportation assistance programs  Fair housing advocacy programs Even with the multitude of diverse services available in Salt Lake City, there are still gaps in services. For example, substance addiction treatment centers that serve homeless and low -income individuals, including First Step House, St. Mary’s Center for Recovery, and The Haven, have considerable waiting lis ts. Similarly, programs that provide physical healthcare, rental assistance, homelessness prevention, employment services, and life skills training do not have enough funding to meet demand. DESCRIBE PROGRAMS FOR ENSURING THAT PERSONS RETURNING FROM MENTAL AND PHYSICAL HEALTH INST ITUTIONS RECEIVE APPROPRIATE SUPPORTIVE HOUSING. Programs that provide supportive housing opportunities for persons dealing with mental and physical health recovery are available in Salt Lake City. However, supportive housing oppo rtunities for these populations are in high demand with limited resources available. The Valley Behavioral Health’s Safe Haven program provides homeless individuals with severe mental illness housing and personalized assistance programs. It also provides comprehensive mental health support and treatment for temporary and lifelong issues caused by traumatic life events. The program offers treatments for psychiatric conditions, behavioral issues, autism, addiction, and other health conditions. In addition, Salt Lake City partners with the local housing authorities, Utah Community Action Program, the Salt Lake Continuum of Care, local homeless resource centers, Salt Lake County and the State of Utah to determine the housing and supportive services need of non -homeless population who require these services. SPECIFY THE ACTIVITIES THAT THE JURISDICTION PLANS TO UNDERT AKE DURING THE NEXT YEAR TO ADDRESS THE HOUSING AND SUPPORTIVE SERVICES NEEDS ID ENTIFIED IN ACCORDANCE WITH 91.215(e) WITH RESPECT TO PE RSONS WHO ARE NOT HOMELESS BUT HAVE OTHER SPECIAL NEEDS. LINK TO ONE-YEAR GOALS 91.315(e). Please refer to section AP -20 and AP-35 of the Salt Lake City 2020-21 Annual Action Plan for specific one- year goals to address housing and supportive service needs of non -homeless, special needs populations. FOR ENTITLEMENT/CONSORTIA GRANTEES: SPECIFY THE ACTIVITIES T HAT THE JURISDICTION PLANS T O UNDERTAKE DURING T HE NEXT YEAR TO ADDRESS THE HOUSING AND SUPPORTIVE SERVICES NEEDS IDENTIFIED IN ACCORDANCE WITH 91.215(e) WITH RESPECT TO PERSONS WHO ARE NOT HOMELESS BUT HAVE OTHER SPECIAL NEEDS. LINK TO ONE-YEAR GOALS. (91.220(2)) The City will continue to provide tenant-based rental assistance, project-based rental assistance, short-term rental assistance, housing placement, an d supportive services for persons with HIV/AIDS and other special populations through the HOPWA, HOME, and ESG programs. 118 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 MA-40 BARRIERS TO AFFORDABLE HOUSING – 91.210(e) Various market barriers can limit the preservation, improvement, and development of housing, especially in regard to affordable housing for low and moderate-income residents. Both market and regulatory factors affect the ability to meet current and future housing needs. Barriers have been identified by previous task force groups organized by Salt Lake City’s Housing and Neighborhood Development Division, as well as through extensive interviews with local brokers, developers, housing representatives, planners, etc. Identified barriers to the preservation, improvement and development of h ousing of affordable to low and moderate-income households include the following: Economic Conditions  While incomes have increased significantly in the Salt Lake Valley since 2010, they have not kept pace with increases in construction costs and housing v alues. Consequently, the gap between incomes and housing has increased.  Select neighborhoods in Salt Lake City spend significantly more on transportation costs than others. This results in less income available for housing . Land Regulations and Permitting Process  Salt Lake City’s Zoning Ordinance (similar to other cities) contains regulations that establish standards for residential development including minimum lot size, density, unit size, height, setback, and parking standards. Some of these regulation s can inhibit the ability for affordable housing development feasibility (i.e., profitability), including the following: o Density limitations o Lack of multifamily zoning o Stringent parking requirements (reducing cost feasibility)  The process to waive/reduce i mpact fees for affordable housing is reportedly difficult to navigate for some developers.  Permitting and environmental review processes are often time consuming and reduce possible profits for developers, thereby discouraging development and/or encouragin g development of higher-margin product (i.e., market-rate units). Land Costs  High land costs in certain areas do not allow for adequate profit in the development of lower -income housing product, particularly in desirable neighborhoods that have experience d growth and new construction over the past decade. Most affordable land is located on the west side of Salt Lake City, furthering the concentration of affordable housing in select areas, and inhibiting the dispersal of housing options throughout the City.  Land costs restrict the ability to place affordable housing in closer proximity to necessary services, particularly near transit options and employment centers. Consequently, new housing often is constructed in areas that result in high percentages of inc ome being spent towards transportation. Ultimately, these developments further exacerbate traffic issues. Construction Costs  Construction costs, particularly labor costs, have experienced notable fluctuations in the recent past. This has caused upward pressure on rent and limited what type of product developers are able to provide. Consequently, the profit margin in providing affordable housing is typically limited, or altogether non-existent without the presence of incentives and tax credits.  Rehabilitation of existing product has increased in cost due to overall labor shortages. Furthermore, the gained value of improvements is often not more than the costs of construction, resulting in limited or 119 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 no profit for undertaking such renovation. This limits the desire to undertake such endeavors unless incentives can be provided. Development and Rehabilitation Financing  Affordable housing projects with complex layered finance structures can experience increased land holding costs because of additional due diligence and longer timelines. This is partially alleviated with City incentive programs that reduce some financing pressures.  There is strong competition for local funding tools, such as the State of Utah’s Olene Walker Housing Loan Fund. Neighborhood Market Conditions  Negative public perception and community opposition (“NIMBYism”) can limit affordable housing development when a zoning approval process is required .  Some neighborhoods that have access to transit options do not have the appeal for large -scale housing developments, due primarily to low -quality surrounding improvements, higher crime rates, and limited employment diversity . For a discussion on current and proposed efforts to reduce or barriers to affordable housing, please see section SP -55 Barriers to Affordable Housing in this Plan . MA-45 NON-HOUSING COMMUNITY DE VELOPMENT ASSETS – 91.215(f) INTRODUCTION Salt Lake City is on the pathway to becoming one of the most diverse, sustainable, and innovative economies in the nation. The City links together unsurpassed outdoor recreation opportunities; internationally acclaimed technology and research facilities; competitive higher education institutions; industry -leading healthcare facilities; a light rail and streetcar transit system; an international a irport; and cultural opportunities. Strong economic activity is enhanced by culturally rich neighborhoods that intermix diverse housing opportunities with locally owned businesses. Although Salt Lake City’s economy is strong, economic inequality is escala ting within the community. Between 2000 and 2017, homeowner incomes increased by 52.7% while renter incomes only increased by 40.9%. The individual poverty rate increased between 2000 and 2017 rising from 13.7% to 17.8%. There are high social and economic costs for increasing economic inequality and allowing families to remain in poverty. TABLE MA-45.1 BUSINESS BY SECTOR Business by Sector Number of Workers Number of Jobs Share of Workers Share of Jobs Jobs Less Workers Agriculture, Mining, Oil & Gas Extraction 678 687 1% 0% -1% Art, Entertainment, Accommodations 13,079 23,121 12% 11% -1% Construction 5,115 8,507 5% 4% -1% Education and Health Care Services 28,729 38,374 27% 18% -9% Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate 7,492 17,007 7% 8% 1% 120 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Business by Sector Number of Workers Number of Jobs Share of Workers Share of Jobs Jobs Less Workers Information 2,558 6,896 3% 3% 0% Manufacturing 9,295 24,775 9% 12% 3% Other Services 5,637 6,718 5% 3% -2% Professional, Scientific, Management Services 14,898 19,470 14% 9% -5% Public Administration 3,764 17,111 4% 8% 4% Retail Trade 10,702 17,854 10% 9% -1% Transportation & Warehousing 4,448 16,600 4% 8% 4% Wholesale Trade 2,147 12,071 2% 6% 4% TOTAL 108,542 209,191 U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates, 2017 Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (Jobs) TABLE MA-45.2 LAB OR FORCE Labor Force Total Population in the Civilian Labor Force 113,308 Civilian Employed Population 16+ Years 108,542 Unemployment Rate 4.1% Unemployment Rate for Ages 16-24 N/A Unemployment Rate for Ages 25-65 N/A Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates, Selected Economic Characteristics TABLE MA-45.3 OCCUPATIONS BY SECTOR Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates, Selected Economic Characteristics Tables MA-45.4 and Figure MA-45.1 break down the travel trends and commute distances for Salt Lake City residents. Table MA-45.4 shows that nearly half of the workers living in the City travel 15 to 29 minutes for work. The majority of City residents work relatively close to home with four of every five workers experiencing a daily commute under 30 minutes. Occupations by Sector Number of People Percentage Management, Business, Science, and Arts Occupations 49,312 45.4% Service Occupations 17,568 16.2% Sales and Office Occupation s 21,804 20.1% Natural Resources, Construction, and Maintenance Occupations 6,829 6.3% Production, Transportation, and Material Moving Occupations 13,029 12.0% Total 108,542 100.00% 121 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 TABLE MA-45.4 TRAVEL TIME Travel Time Number of People Percentage < 15 Minutes 36,473 35.1% 15-29 Minutes 47,383 45.6% 30-44 Minutes 14,236 13.7% 45-59 Minutes 2,806 2.7% 60 or More Minutes 3,013 2.9% Mean Travel Time to Work (Minutes) 19.1 Minutes Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates, Means of Transportation to Work by Selec ted Characteristics Figure MA-45.1 shows how the usage rate of public transportation and carpooling decreases as the level of income increases with those making higher incomes electing to drive to work alone. FIGURE MA-45.1 MEANS OF TRANSPORTATION TO WORK BY INCOME LEVEL Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates: Means of Transportation to Work by Selected Characteristics TABLE MA-45.5 BUSINESS BY SECTOR Educational Attainment Civilian Employed Unemployed Not in Labor Force Less Than High School Graduate 9,112 655 3,605 High School Graduate (Includes Equivalency) 12,712 712 4,165 Some College or Associates Degree 21,771 712 5,117 Bachelor's Degree or Higher 42,345 963 6,738 Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates: Educational Attainment by Employment Status for the Population 25 to 64 Years Old Below the Poverty Level 100% to 149% of the Poverty Level At or Above 150% of the Poverty Level 64% 21% 15% 73% 14% 13% 81% 12% 7% Drove Alone Carpooled Public Transportation (Excludes Taxi) 122 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 TABLE NA-45.6 EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT BY AGE Age 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-64 65+ Less than 9th Grade 2546 3,834 3,340 5,543 2,170 9th to 12th Grade, No Diplom a 6,124 6,335 4,403 6,851 4,383 High School Graduate (Includes Equivalency) 13,620 10,994 6,659 9,958 5,652 Some College, No Degree 3,924 21,070 12,228 16,804 8,962 Associates Degree 2546 3,834 3,340 5,543 2,170 Bachelor's Degree 6,124 6,335 4,403 6,851 4,383 Graduate or Professional Degree 13,620 10,994 6,659 9,958 5,652 Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates: Educational Attainment by Employment Status for the Population 18 Years Old TABLE MA-45.7 BUSINESS BY SECTOR Educational Attainment Median Earnings in the Past 12 Months Less than High School Graduate $25,114 High School Graduate (Includes Equivalency) $27,493 Some College or Associate Degree $31,981 Bachelor's Degree $42,626 Graduate or Professional Degree $67,029 Sou rce: U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates: Earnings in the Past 12 Months (In 2018 Inflation -Adjusted Dollars) BASED ON THE BUSINESS ACTIVITY TABLE ABOVE, WHAT ARE THE MAJ OR EMPLOYMENT SECTORS WITHIN YOUR JURISDICTION? Table MA-45.1 shows that the major employment sectors within this jurisdiction are: 1) Education and Health Care Services; 2) Professional, Scientific, Management Services; 3) Arts, Entertainment, Accommodations; and 4) Retail Trade. The largest employers in the County are the University Hospital, Salt Lake County, and the University of Utah. DESCRIBE THE WORKFORCE AND INFRASTRUCTURE NEEDS OF THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY: Salt Lake City has been known as the “Crossroads of the West” for over 150 years. The term originated when the Transcontinental Railroad was completed in 1869 at Promontory, Utah and is still true as the Salt Lake International Airport is one of the busiest airports in the western United States. It facilitated over 330,000 flights in 2018. These flights connect cargo, passengers, and international business opportunities to the area and these factors have played a large role in many businesses choosing to use Salt Lake City as their corporate headquarters. Two major interstates – I-15 and I-80 – intersect in Salt Lake City, thus providing significant distribution accessibility and economic opportunity. The newly -designated Inland Port, located in the northwest quadrant of Salt Lake City, will provide further opportunities for industry and job growth. Due to rapid growth , the City needs better east-west connections between residential development and employment centers. 123 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 DESCRIBE ANY MAJOR CHANGES THAT MAY HAVE AN ECONOMIC IMPACT, SUCH AS PLANNED LOCAL OR REGIONAL PUBLIC OR PRIV ATE SECTOR INVESTMENTS OR INITIATIVES THAT HAVE AFFECTED OR MAY AFFECT JOB AND BUSINESS GROWTH OPPORTUNITIES DURING THE PLANNING PERIOD. DESCRIBE ANY NEEDS FOR WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT, BUSINESS SUPPORT, OR INFRASTRUCTURE THESE CHANGES MAY CREATE. Salt Lake City International Airport Expansion The expansion of the Salt Lake City International Airport is expected to be completely finished by 2025, but it is anticipated that the first phase will open in September of 2020. The expansion focuses on utilizing new and sustainable practices that will increase space, comfort, and convenience for passengers. This includes a complete technological and artistic redesign of the current airport which will allow Utah’s natural outdoor beauty to be displayed to millions of airport visitors each year. A recent economic impact analysis conducted by GSBS Consulting projected that the rebuild will inject $5.5 billion into the local economy and create more than 3,300 jobs.46 Between July 2018 and June 2019, the Salt Lake City International Airport served over 26.2 million passengers and had 341,152 Total Aircraft Ops.47 The airport ranks as the 23rd busiest airport in North America and the 85th busiest in the world with over 340 flights departing daily. It is located about 15 minutes from downtown Salt Lake City and is serviced by a direct light rail line to the downtown area including the Salt Palace Convention Center. The proximity of these create opportunities for training and workforce housing. Inland Port Authority The Inland Port, located in the northwest quadrant of Salt Lake City, covers approximately 16,000 acres, sits at the intersection of two interstate freeways, major national railways and an international airport. This puts the area in high demand for expanding warehouse, distribution and manufacturing facilities. The Inland Port Authority was created to engage with interested organizations and individuals to establish a strategic plan to maximize the economic benefits of the Inland Port. Due to these and other large-scale projects and an overwhelming need for more skilled workforce, Salt Lake City Community College created a brand new, cutting edge campus that focuses primarily on building our skilled labor workforce. This effort and many more will work to help support large scale projects as our community evolves. HOW DO THE SKILLS AND EDUCATION OF THE CURRENT WORKFORCE CORRESPOND TO EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN THE JURISDICTION? The percentage of residents with at least some higher education is higher than the national average with over 71% of residents reporting they’ve received some college education. The national average is 60%. As demonstrated in Table MA-45.8, Salt Lake City also has a much higher percentage of residents with bachelor’s degrees and graduate degrees than the rest of the nation. 46 GSBS Consulting, Salt Lake City International Airport Redevelopment Program: Economic Impact Analysis, https://www.slcairport.com/assets/pdfDocu ments/The-New-SLC/Airport-EIA-Final-Report.pdf 47 Salt Lake City Department of Airports, Elevations, Summer 2019, https://www.slcairport.com/assets/pdfDocuments/ Elevations-Newsletter/Elevations-Summer-Edition -August-2019.pdf 124 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 TABLE MA-45.8 EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT, SALT LAKE CITY AND UNITED STATES Educational Attainment Salt Lake City % of Population United States % of Population Less Than High School Graduate 11.2% 12.4% High School Graduate (Includes Equivalency) 18.1% 27.6% Some College or Associates Degree 30.2% 31.0% Bachelor's Degree or Higher 23.7% 18.4% Graduate or Professional Degree 19.4% 10.6% Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates: Educational Attainment by Employment Status for the Population 25 Years and Over The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates quarterly underemployment through alternative measures of labor utilization. The measure used for underemployment is U -6 which not only measures unemployment, but also includes those who are willing to work and have recently looked for work, as well as those working part -time but who want to work full-time. This means this categorization includes current employees who feel underutilized in their current employment. The national U -6 rate between the fourth quarter of 2018 and the third quarter of 2019 was 7.3. In Utah, this rate was 5.5%.48 DESCRIBE ANY CURRENT WORKFORCE TRAINING INITIATIVE INCLUDING THOSE SUPPORTED BY WORKFORCE INVESTMENT BOARDS, COMMUNIT Y COLLEGES AND OTHER ORGANIZATIONS. DESCRIBE HOW THESE EFFORTS WILL SUPPO RT THE JURISDICTION’S CONSOLIDATED PLAN. The 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan emphasizes providing opportunities to help build healthy neighborhoods. This can be supported by efforts and organization with job training initiatives. Salt Lake City already has several community programs that provide job training. These organizations typically assist clients in learning how to search for jobs, write resumes, and interview in addition to key life skills that are necessary to be successful in the w orkplace. By highlighting these initiatives in the Consolidated Plan, the City can assist these programs in increasing their capacity to provide services. Many of these programs focus on assisting vulnerable populations and a few are listed below:  Advantage Services (non-profit that employs homeless people with disabilities)  Refugee and Immigration Center - Asian Association of Utah (refugees and immigrants)  The Columbus Foundation (individuals with disabilities)  English Skills Learning Center (teaching English as a 2nd language)  Odyssey House (alcohol and drug rehabilitation)  First Step House (substance use disorders and mental health) DOES YOUR JURISDICTION PARTICIPATE IN A COMPREHENSIVE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY? No, Salt Lake City does not partici pate in a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy. 48 U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, https://www.bls.gov/lau/stalt.htm 125 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 IF SO, WHAT ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVES ARE YOU UNDERTAKING THAT MAY BE COORDINATED WITH THE CONSOLIDATED PLAN. IF NOT, DESCRIBE OTHE R LOCAL/REGIONAL PLANS OR INITIATIVES THAT IMPACT ECONOMIC GROWTH. Salt Lake City does not currently have a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy; however, the City does have a variety of local plans and initiatives that impact economic growth. In addition to the job training initiatives listed above, here are a few of the City’s plans and projects designed to stimulate economic development: Economic Development Loan Fund The Economic Development Loan Fund (EDLF) is designed to stimulate business development and expansion, create employment opportunities, encourage private investment, promote economic development, and enhance neighborhood vitality and commercial enterprise in Salt Lake City by making loans available to businesses that meet City objectives. Loans are available for:  Startup and existing businesses  Revenue producing non -profit ventures  A business expanding or relocating to Salt Lake City  Energy-efficient (e2) equipment upgrades and building retrofits  Businesses impacted by construction  Construction/tenant improvement and/or real estate acquisition  Signage, retail presentation, and display work  Fixtures, furnishings, equipment and inventory  Working capital and marketing The EDLF fills a gap in economic development by lending to high -tech and manufacturing businesses that would not otherwise be eligible for a traditional bank loan yet have strong potential for growth. Loans are considered a bridge loan and not meant to be long -term financing. Salt Lake City Emergency Loan Program During the recent COVID-19 crisis, Salt Lake City launched an Emergency Loan Program to assist business with funding to support them through a short -term community crisis. This Program is designed as a bridge to ensure that business can stay afloat including making rent/mortgage payments, keep staff employed, cover utility and ongoing costs during a time of crisis and significantly decreased revenues. While it is not anticipated that this program will continue in this exact form throughout the entire Consolidated Plan, it is important to note that the City has the ability to react quickly and provide additional resources when necessary. Master Plans Salt Lake City’s Master Plans provide an outline of community and economic development goals for specific areas of the City. Planning efforts since 2010 include the planning documen ts:  Central Community o 400 South Livable Communities Project - 2012  Downtown o Downtown Plan – 2016  East Bench o Existing Conditions Report – 2014 o East Bench Master Plan – 2017 o Parley’s Way Corridor – 2017  Northwest Community o North Temple Boulevard Plan - 2010 126 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024  Northwest Quadrant o Northwest Quadrant Master Plan – 2016  Sugar House o Sugar House Streetcar Update to Master Plan – 2016 o Circulation and Streetcar Amenities for Sugar House Business District – 2014 o 21st and 21st Neighborhood Plan – 2017 o Sugar House Circulation Plan – 2013 o Sugar House Phase 2 Alternative Analysis – 2013  Westside Master Plan o Westside Master Plan – 2014 o 9-Line Corridor Master Plan - 2015 Redevelopment Agency Programs The Redevelopment Agency of Salt Lake City (RDA) works to revitalize Salt La ke City’s neighborhoods and business districts to improve livability, spark economic growth, and foster authentic communities, serving as a catalyst for strategic development projects that enhance the City’s housing opportunities, commercial vitality, and public spaces. The RDA accomplishes this through the following tools:  Property acquisition, clearance, re-planning, sale, and redevelopment  Planning, financing, and development of public improvements  Providing management support and tax increment reimburs ement for projects that will revitalize underutilized areas  Gap financing in the form of loans, grants, and equity participation to encourage private investment  Relocation assistance and business retention assistance to businesses. Improved redevelopment areas contribute to the overall health and vitality of the City by reversing the negative effects of blight, while increasing the tax base from which taxing entities draw their funds. In Salt Lake City, Redevelopment Project Areas’ tax bases have historic ally grown at twice the rate of surrounding areas that are not designated as RDA project areas. National Development Corporation Since 1969, the NDC has carried out its mission to create jobs and promote community development opportunities in economically-disadvantaged neighborhoods. NDC raises equity through its Corporate Equity Fund and invests in affordable housing. NDC also creates jobs in underserved areas through its New Markets Tax Credit Program and through its Small Business Lending Program, NDC Grow America Fund. The City uses the expertise and knowledge of NDC to continue to develop, finance, and market community development and affordable housing. Façade Grant Program The Housing and Neighborhood Development Division utilizes federal funding t o support local businesses by offering up to $25,000 in grants to improve their façades. These improvements could include items such as door upgrades, window improvements, paint or stucco updating, installing of garages, security lighting, fascia/soffit work, etc. Increasing the street appeal of small businesses located within the City positively affects the surrounding neighborhoods through increasing the visual appeal of neighboring commercial areas and boosting the economy on a local level. City Transportation Plans In 2020, the City will update its Transportation Plan which was prepared in 1996. As the Plan unfolds, efforts will continue to be made to coordinate and leverage resources in low -income neighborhoods. At the current time, the City’s Transit Master Plan (2017) and the Pedestrian/Bike Master Plan (2015) are the most recent and relevant. 127 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 The City is currently committing $5.3m to improved bus service, $1.1m for capital investments related to bus service (bus stops, transit hubs, first/last mile improvements such as sidewalks and bike lanes), and $800,000 for a pilot on-demand ride hailing service. This provides an opportunity to leverage CDBG funds in disadvantaged neighborhoods to improve access to transportation and facilitate multimodal trans portation options. At the time the Transit Master Plan was completed, 83% of bus stops did not have shelters or benches, effectively discouraging potential riders. The study further found that access to transit in Salt Lake City is challenging because of the large blocks and wide streets, as well as lack of ADA improvements and access to stations. Finally, the Transit Master Plan found that the “cost of transit is particularly burdensome on large families, youth, and transit-dependent populations – low -income, older adults, persons with disabilities, and zero car households.”49 The City’s anticipates spending $1-2m per year in capital improvement projects such as traffic signal upgrades, safety projects, and bike/pedestrian enhancements. Again, there is th e opportunity to provide better access to transportation and leverage funds from several sources. New Market Tax Credits (NMTC) Capital is attracted to eligible communities (where the poverty rate is at least 20% or where the median family income does not exceed 80% of the area’s median income) by providing private investors with a credit on their federal taxes for investments in qualifying areas. NMTC investors receive a tax credit equal to 39% of the Qualified Equity Investment (QEI) made in a Community Development Entity (CDE) over a 7-year period. MA-50 NEEDS AND MARKET ANALYSIS DISCUSSION ARE THERE AREAS WHERE HOUSEHOLDS WITH MULTIPLE HOUSING PROBL EMS ARE CONCENTRATED? Salt Lake City has neighborhoods that are more likely to have housing units with m ultiple housing problems. These neighborhoods generally contain an older housing stock occupied by low -income households. Many of these neighborhoods are located in the Central City, Ballpark, Rose Park, Fairpark, Poplar Grove, and Glendale. ARE THERE ANY AREAS IN THE JURISDICTION WHERE RACIAL OR ETHNIC MINORITIES OR LOW-INCOME FAMILIES ARE CONCENTRATED? In the 2015-2019 Consolidated Plan there were three racially/ethnically concentrated areas of poverty (RCAP/ECAP) in Salt Lake County, two of which were in Salt Lake City. The number of racially/ethnically concentrated areas of poverty in the County has dropped to only one, and this area is located just south of the City’s boundaries. An RCAP/ECAP is defined as a census tract with a family poverty rate gre ater than or equal to 40%, or a family poverty rate greater than or equal to 300% of the metro tract average, and a majority non - white population, measured at greater than 50%. The absence of RCAP/ECAPs does not mean that there aren’t areas where there i s a substantial concentration of minorities with reportedly low incomes. Most census block groups to the west of I -15 reported a population composed of more than 50% minorities. These block groups also report some of the lowest incomes in the City as well. Most of these areas are located in the Glendale and Poplar Grove neighborhoods. 49 Salt Lake City Transit Master Plan 2017 Executive Summary 128 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 WHAT ARE THE CHARACT ERISTICS OF THE MARKET IN THESE AREAS/NE IGHBORHOODS? The City has been experiencing increasing housing costs and wages have failed to increase at the sam e rate which can influence the ability for income mobility. Salt Lake City is focusing efforts to mitigate the negative externalities of poverty by increasing economic opportunities, improving neighborhood infrastructure, expanding services in distressed n eighborhoods, improving the housing stock, and increasing access to public transit and multi-modal transportation options. The City is also making steps to incentivize affordable housing development in opportunity areas in order to expand housing choices t hrough the City. In general, median sales prices and rents are significantly lower in areas of concentrated poverty than in the rest of the C ity. Households located in neighborhoods on the west side of I-15, such as Poplar Grove and Glendale have higher homeownership rates than the C ity average. The Ballpark and Central City neighborhoods have a much higher rental rate than the City average. Other housing market and demographic data points can be found in Table MA-50.1. TABLE MA-50.1 AREAS WITH HIGHER POVERTY LEVELS Neighborhood Census Tract Population Minority Poverty Rate Average Household Size Median Household Income Median Home Value Tenure Cost-Burdened Renters All People Families Under 18 Owner Renter Central City 1019 2,470 23% 34% 24% 50% 1.51 $31,852 $172,500 10% 90% 43% 1020 2,382 22% 21% 23% 16% 1.91 $40,395 $208,500 26% 74% 46% 1023 2,931 33% 24% 8% 17% 1.82 $22,568 $186,100 17% 83% 43% 1021 1,460 21% 27% 14% 31% 1.29 $24,815 $173,100 12% 88% 46% Ballpark 1029 4,514 22% 42% 47% 81% 2.01 $22,203 $147,100 23% 77% 54% Glendale 1028.01 5,319 57% 35% 28% 49% 4 $43,750 $164,700 43% 57% 67% 1028.02 6,704 54% 35% 28% 53% 3.73 $42,891 $142,100 70% 30% 66% Poplar Grove 1026 3,658 51% 28% 26% 44% 2.92 $40,133 $145,900 57% 43% 64% 1027.01 5,209 62% 29% 25% 46% 3.13 $35,465 $133,700 49% 51% 75% 1027.02 4,128 76% 29% 29% 32% 3.56 $33,359 $129,400 31% 69% 51% Salt Lake City All 194,188 26% 18% 11% 22% 2.45 $54,009 $266,800 48% 52% 46% Note: Cost-Burdened Renters spend 30% or more of m onthly income on housing costs. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2013-2017 American Community Survey These 10 Census tracts identified above as having some of the highest poverty levels in the City are generally located within RDA project areas. ARE THERE ANY COMMUNITY ASSETS IN THESE AREAS/NEIGHBORHOODS?  Education Numerous schools are located in the target area, including the Dual Immersion Academy, the City Academy and Salt Lake Arts Academy. The Pete Suazo Business Center is also located in the area.  Health Services 129 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 There are 23 clinical services/programs offered in Glendale/Poplar Grove, provided by a host of clinics including Donated Dental, Friends for Sight, Concentra Urgent Care, the University of Utah Clinic, First Med and the Glendale/Mountain View Community Learning Center, among others. Eight programs providing health education were found in the neighborhood. These programs are offered through Communidades Unidas, Sunday Anderson Senior Center, Mexican Consulate, Glendale Senior Housing, and the B oys and Girls Club. A total of six mental health services were identified in West Salt Lake. Four of the six programs are family and school -based mental health counseling offered through Valley Behavioral Health.  Cultural Arts The Sorenson Unity Center has a theatre and hosts performances within the community. The Utah Cultural Celebration Center has three different opportunities for youth specifically to enjoy ethnic performances as well as Shakespeare performances. Both venues also have art galleries tha t are open to the public.  Community Centers and Gardens The Hartland Partnership Center is located in the Glendale Neighborhood. This center offers resources such as English language instruction, mental health support, citizenship classes, and employment workshops. There are several community gardens in the target area. These gardens provide an opportunity for community interaction and allow for households to grow their own produce. Of special note are the International Peace Gardens which presents gardens and festivals from around the world, as well as a Farmer’s Market and Seed Swap event.  Parks, Recreation and Open Space One of West Salt Lake’s greatest assets is the abundance of parks and open space. Of Glendale and Poplar Grove residents, 83% live within a quarter mile of some form of green space. This is the highest percentage in the City. There are 14 parks, including the notable International Peace Garden, located in these neighborhoods and comprising over 100 acres. All green spaces are managed b y Salt Lake City Parks and Public Lands. The Jordan River Parkway offers outdoor boating opportunities. The Jordan River Parkway and 9 Line trails provide recreational opportunities and connectivity to natural environments. They also provide additional c ommunity connectivity and transportation options.  Fitness The Glendale/Poplar Grove neighborhoods, located within the target area, offer 77 total health and fitness programs. The largest facility is the Sorenson Multicultural Center which offers a wide va riety of youth programs including aquatics. Two fitness centers are targeted for seniors – the Sunday Andersen Senior Center and the Westside Center.  Public Transit The TRAX light rail line runs through the Ballpark and Poplar Grove neighborhoods. The li ght rail also runs within one block of the Central City neighborhood. These transit lines connect these neighborhoods to the rest of the Salt Lake Valley and allow for greater employment opportunities.  Redevelopment Project Areas 130 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Redevelopment project areas cover the entire target area. This means that incremental tax revenues can be used to improve their respective project areas through a wide variety of projects including but not limited to infrastructure improvements (water, sewer, transportation, etc.), beautification, economic development incentives, façade renovation, grant funds, parks development, signage and wayfinding, etc. Specific objectives identified by the RDA for uses of funds within its existing project areas include: o Emphasize transit and connections to multi-modal transportation means o Create high-quality pedestrian environments o Promote infill development o Support high quality, diverse and affordable housing o Support public art in public places o Encourage innovative sustainability practices a nd limit carbon emissions o Promote transit-oriented development at key sites located at TRAX stations o Foster growth of small and new businesses o Participate in streetscape enhancements  Opportunity Zones As shown in the map below, a large percentage of the t arget area is also located in an opportunity zone. Opportunity zones were established under the Investing in Opportunity Act as a way to revitalize economically-distressed communities using private investment. Tax benefits to investors include the deferral and reduction of tax gains, thereby making these zones more attractive to investors and increasing the potential of leveraging private funds with public investment. 131 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 FIGURE MA-50.1 SLC RDA PROJECT AREAS AND OPPORTUNITY ZONES MA-60 BROADBAND NEEDS OF HOUSING OCCUPIED BY LOW- AND MODERATE - INCOME HOUSEHOLDS – 91.210(a)(4), 91.310(a)(2) DESCRIBE THE NEED FO R BRAODBAND WIRING AND CONNECTIONS FOR HOUSHOLDS, INCLUDING LOW- AND MODERATE-INCOME HOUSEHOLDS AND NEIGHBORHOODS. A dependable broadband network provides many benefits. These networks attract businesses, provide social connections, increase educational opportunities, and improve the quality of life for citizens. According to Broadbandnow.com/Utah, 11.6% of Utah residents are underserved by broadband service providers. However, most of these underserved communities are in rural areas of the state and only 0.6% Salt Lake County is reportedly underserved. While service is provided to most households in Salt Lake County, that do esn’t mean all households can afford access to the internet. The 2018 ACS 5-year Estimate reported that there were 9,249 households in Salt Lake City without an internet connection. This represents almost 12% of the City’s households. A household which doesn’t have access to internet services through a broadband connection is at a significant disadvantage economically when seeking new employment and educationally if children or adults in the household are attending school. If these households are also low - or moderate-income households then a lack of internet connection could prove to be one of the largest barriers to economic growth for the household. 132 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 DESCRIBE THE NEED FO R INCREASED COMPETIT ION BY HAVING MORE T HAN ONE BROADBAND INTERNET SERVICE PROVIDER SERVE THE JURISDICTION. Competition is a basic economic principal that states that when there are multiple providers of a service then the prices of that service will be lower as the providers attempt to gain more market share through a more favorable price offered to the consumer. By providing more options, if a consumer feels they are being charged too much for a service then the consumer can look to an alternative provider. This movement in the market encourages providers to produce services at a competiti ve rate and protects consumers from unfair prices. MA-65 HAZARD MITIGATION – 91.210(a)(5), 91.310(a)(2) DESCRIBE THE JURISDICTION’S INCREASED NATURAL HAZARD RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH CLIMATE CHANGE. According to the Salt Lake County Multi-Jurisdictional Multi -Hazard Mitigation Plan the main natural hazards identified and investigated for Salt Lake County include:  Earthquake  Flood  Wildland Fire  Slope Failure  Severe Weather  Dam Failure  Avalanche  Pandemic  Drought  Infestation  Radon  Problem Soils Of these natural hazards, Salt Lake County identified Salt Lake City as being high risk for only earthquakes, floods, and wildfires while being at moderate risk for severe weather. DESCRIBE THE VULNERABILITY TO THESE RISKS OF HOUSING OCCUPIED BY LOW- AND MODERATE-INCOME HOUSEHOLDS BASED ON AN ANALYSIS OF DATA, FINDINGS, AND METHODS. Many low- and moderate-income households would suffer a greater financial impact from these risks than other households as repairs from earthquake, severe weather, flooding, or wildfires could cause serious financial stress. This negative effect could be compounded if these households could not afford additional insurance coverage. The Salt Lake County Multi -Jurisdictional Multi -Hazard Mitigation Plan identifies areas west of I-15 as a potential flood risk due to the Jordan River. In the plan, the area directly surrounding the Jordan River State Parkway is listed as a low - to moderate-risk with flood risk increasing at nearer proximity to the river. There is also low-risk of flooding on the west side of the Rose Park neighborhood. These two flood areas are significant because they are areas with low - and moderate-income households. 133 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 STRATEGIC PLAN The Strategic Plan identifies Salt Lake City’s priority needs and describes strategies that the City will undertake to serve priority needs over a five-year period. The plan focuses on building Neighborhoods of Opportunity to promote capacity in low -income neighborhoods and to support the City’s most vulnerable populations. 134 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 SP-05 OVERVIEW The 2020-2024 Strategic Plan is based on an assessment of community needs as identified in this Consolidated Plan, in City planning documents, and on the ability of federal funds to meet the identified needs. Within this context, the 2020-2024 Strategic Plan focuses on building Neighborhoods of Opportunity to promote capacity in low -income neighborhoods and to support the City’s most vulnerable populations. The five -year plan provides a strategy for maximizing and leveraging the City’s block grant allocations with other funding sources, including the City’s Redevelopment Agency, to build healthy and sustainable communities that connect and expand opportunities for housing, education, transportation, behavioral health services and economic development. Strategic plan goals call for Consolidated Plan funds to focus on the following: Housing To provide expanded housing options for all economic and demographic segments of Salt Lake City’s population while diversifying the housing stock within neighborhoods.  Support housing programs that address the needs of aging housing stock through targeting rehabilitation efforts and diversifying the housing stock within neighborhoods  Expand housing support for aging residents that ensure acce ss to continued stable housing  Support affordable housing development that increases the number and types of units available for income eligible residents  Support programs that provide access to home ownership via down payment assistance, and/or housing subsidy, and/or financing  Support rent assistance programs to emphasize stable housing as a primary strategy to prevent and end homelessness  Support programs that provide connection to permanent housing upon exiting behavioral health programs. Support may include, but is not limited to supporting obtaining housing via deposit and rent assistance and barrier elimination to the extent allowable to regulation  Provide housing and essential services for persons with HIV/AIDS Transportation To promote accessibility and affordability of multimodal transportation options.  Improve bus stop amenities as a way to encourage the accessibility of public transit and enhance the experience of public transit in target areas  Support access to transportation prioritizing very low-income and vulnerable populations  Expand and support the installation of bike racks, stations, and amenities as a way to encourage use of alternative modes of transportation in target areas Build Community Resiliency Build resiliency by providing tools to increase economic and/or housing stability.  Provide job training/vocational training programs targeting low -income and vulnerable populations including, but not limited to; chronically homeless; those exiting treatment centers/programs and/or institutions; and persons with disabilities  Economic Development efforts via supporting the improvement and visibility of small businesses through façade improvement programs  Provide economic development support for microenterprise businesses  Direct financial assistance to for-profit businesses  Expand access to early childhood education to set the stage for academic achievement, social development, and change the cycle of poverty 135 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024  Promote digital inclusion through access to digital communication technologies an d the internet  Provide support for programs that reduce food insecurity for vulnerable population Homeless Services To expand access supportive programs that help ensure that homelessness is rare, brief, and non -recurring.  Expand support for medical and dental care options for those experiencing homelessness  Provide support for homeless services including Homeless Resource Center Operations and Emergency overflow operations  Provide support for programs providing outreach services to address the needs of t hose living an unsheltered life  Expand case management support as a way to connect those experiencing homelessness with permanent housing and supportive services Behavioral Health To provide support for low -income and vulnerable populations experiencing b ehavioral health concerns such as substance abuse disorders and mental health challenges.  Expand treatment options, counseling support, and case management for those experiencing behavioral health crisis The City intends to leverage all potential funding resources to achieve its goals, recognizing the need to maximize participation from a variety of resources. The City has also established specific measurement criteria by which to measure its progress in meeting its goals. SP-10: GEOGRAPHIC PRIORITIES 91.215(a)(1) GEOGRAPHIC AREAS For the 2020-2024 program years, Salt Lake City has designated one local CDBG target area to concentrate and leverage funding to stimulate comprehensive neighborhood revitalization that expands housing opportunities, economic opportunities and neighborhood livability. Our selected target area corresponds with the City’s existing RDA project areas. If the RDA project areas change, the target area will adjust to continue to correspond to the RDA project areas. Throughout the durati on of this Plan, the CDBG target area will represent any RDA project area. The combined RDA project areas were chosen as the target area for the following reasons:  The RDA areas generally overlap the lower-income areas of the City and areas that scored lo wer on the Opportunity Index. The Opportunity Index measures 16 factors including education, health, environment, social, and economic that indicate the relative opportunity in various geographic locations.  Tax increment funds are already being generated i n RDA areas. While some funds are currently committed, there is the potential for additional tax increment revenues as new development occurs in these areas. These funds can then be spent within their respective RDA areas for a wide variety of purposes, including housing, beautification, revolving loan funds, public infrastructure, etc.  Most of the RDA areas were established with a required, designated set -aside (usually 10-20%) for housing. This provides an opportunity to leverage other funds with RDA fund ing.  Some of the redevelopment areas also included a finding of blight which indicates rundown conditions, with poor visual appearance. This is a deterrent to economic development and funding is needed to mitigate these conditions. 136 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024  The RDA areas overlap with designated Opportunity Zones and by design will see an increase in private market investments. FIGURE SP-10.1 WEST SIDE TARGET AREA TABLE SP-10.1 LOCAL TARGET AREAS 1 Area Name CDBG Target Area Area Type West Side Target Area Revital Type Comprehensive Identify the neighborhood boundaries for this target area. Beginning at 2100 South and State Street, the Target Area follows the Salt Lake City Redevelopment Agency’s State Street Project Area’s eastern boundary going north until 900 South. It then continues north along State Street to 600 South. The boundary then continues west on 600 South to 500 West. It then goes north on 500 West to 300 North. The boundary continues west on 300 North to Redwood Road. It then continues south on Redwood Road until 2100 South. The boundary then continues east on 2100 South until it reaches State Street where it ends at the intersection of 2100 South and State Street. 137 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 1 Area Name CDBG Target Area Include specific housing and commercial characteristics of this area 44% owner occupied The neighborhood poverty rate as determined by the ACS information within Census Block Groups within the area ranges from 4 to 38%. The block groups average a poverty level of 27% compared to 17.8% in Salt Lake City. The average household size is 3.02, compared to 2.47 citywide. 36% of the area’s residents identify as Hispanic, compared to 22.3% of Salt Lake City. How did your consultation and citizen participation process help you to identify this neighborhood as a target area? Our Citizen Participation Plan included an online survey and public outreach with over 4,000 responses. Neighborhoods in the RDA areas consistently ranked high in the survey results. As such, Council prioritized the RDA areas in the most vulnerable sections of the City, resulting in the current West Side Target Area. Identify the needs in this target area. Many of the existing housing units are old and rundown. Therefore, rehabilitation of existing housing stock is key for this area. Poverty levels are higher in this area than in other areas of the City. A reduction in poverty levels could be accomplished through the encouragement of mixed - income housing. Improving streetscapes and the visual appearance of the area could also attract more mixed - income development. There is a lack of bus and rail lines in large portions of the target area resulting in higher transportation costs for much of the target area. What are the opportunities for improvement in this target area? Opportunities exist to enhance business districts and neighborhood nodes to promote economic development, job creation, and overall community revitalization. Several arterials cross through the target area with high traffic counts suitable for economic development that could bring jobs to these lower-income areas. Housing rehabilitation and the development of strategic mixed-income housing will promote housing stability and economic diversity within the target area. Are there barriers to improvement in this target area? Many residents do not speak English as their first language. High renter levels often make for a more transitory population with less investment in the community. GENERAL ALLOCATION P RIORITIES Locally-defined target areas provide an opportunity to maximize impact and align HUD funding with existing investment while simultaneously addressing neighborhoods with the most severe needs. According to HUD standards, a Local Target Area is designated to allow for a locally targeted approach to the investment of CDBG and other federal funds. The target area for the 2020-2024 program years has been identified in Figure SP-10.1. CDBG and other federal funding will be concentrated (not limited) to the target area. Neighborhood and community nodes will be identified and targeted to maximize community impact and driv e further neighborhood investment. On an 138 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 annual basis, internal city divisions/departments including the Redevelopment Agency, Salt Lake City Transportation, and Economic Development will strategize if specific areas of the CDBG target area are in need of additional focus/resources as it relates to CDBG eligible projects. This type of flexibility will ensure that the focus within the target area can move around as per the needs of the community. Activities will be coordinated and leveraged, and can include an increase of marketing and outreach for housing programs, transportation improvements, and commercial façade improvements. FIGURE SP-10.2 TARGET AREA AND SLC NEIGHBORHOODS Source: Salt Lake City Redevelopment Agency Target Areas The Target Area was identified through an extensive process that analyzed local poverty rates, low - and moderate-income rates, neighborhood conditions, citizen input, and available resources. A recent fair housing equity assessment (May 2018) completed by the Kem C. Gardne r Policy Institute at the University of Utah states that there is a housing shortage in Utah, with the supply of new homes and existing “for sale” homes falling short of demand. While the impact of higher housing prices is widespread, affecting buyers, sellers, and renters in all income groups, the report concludes that those households below the median income, and particularly low -income households, are disproportionately hurt by higher housing prices. In fact, households with incomes below the median have a 1 in 5 chance of a severe housing cost -burden, paying at 139 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 least 50% of their income toward housing, while households with incomes above the median have a 1 in 130 chance.50 Targeting area resources are necessary to expand opportunity for the West Side Ta rget Area as well as the impacted RDA Project Areas. The following area ways that investments will be realized:  Concentrating resources geographically will provide a way to help stabilize and improve distressed areas in these neighborhoods.  Connectivity between the target area and other areas of the Salt Lake Valley will reduce transportation costs and reduce financial burdens on households.  Neighborhood and/or community nodes will be targeted for commercial façade improvements, public transit enhancements and amenities that support non -motorized modes of transit.  Economic development and transportation projects can be located throughout the target area.  Housing rehabilitation projects can be located throughout the City, with a focus on the target area.  Support to microenterprises and for-profit businesses can be offered to qualified business across the City, however, additional focus and marketing efforts will occur within the target area. In an effort to expand community engagement in the local target area, HAND will reach out to residents, business owners, property owners, community councils, non -profit organizations, and other stakeholders to gather input on housing and community development needs. City departments and divisions will collaborate to leverage resources and efforts within the target area. HAND and the Department of Economic Development will create an inventory of eligible commercial buildings to target for façade improvements and/or interior code deficiencies and will engage property owners and entrepreneurs in outreach efforts. RATIONAL E FOR THE PRIORITIES F OR ALLOCATING INVEST MENTS GEOGRAPHICALLY Salt Lake City’s Housing and Neighborhood Development Division, along with internal and community stakeholders, identified the target area through an extensive process that included data analysis, identification of opportunities/barriers, a citizen survey, and an evaluation of potential resources. Through this process, the RDA neighborhoods were identified as areas where a concentration of resource s would make significant impacts within the community. This approach would also allow for ongoing leveraging of resources and efforts in these areas. Of particular importance is to direct resources to expand opportunity within areas where poverty levels a re higher. According to HUD, neighborhoods of concentrated poverty isolate residents from the resources and networks needed to reach their potential and deprive the larger community of the neighborhood’s human capital. In another study, it was found that there were significant physical health improvements from reducing concentrated areas of poverty.51 Opportunity zones are also located within the target area. This affords an opportunity to further leverage private investment within these economically -distressed areas. Opportunity zones attract private capital because of the ability to defer and reduce taxes associated with capital gains. The tax savings that can be realized are significant. Only 46 geographic areas in Utah have been designated as opportunity zones by the federal government, making these highly attractive sites. Further, other funding resources, such as low -income housing tax credits (LIHTC) and tax increment can also be realized in these zones, making for extremely competitive investment opportunities in areas that were previously overlooked. 50 James Wood, Dejan Eskic and D. J. Benway, Gardner Business Review, What Rapidly Rising Prices Mean for Housing Affordability, May 2018. 51 Third Way, Moving to Opportunity: The Effects of Concentrated Poverty on the Poor, August 2014. 140 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Salt Lake City intends to expand opportunity within the target areas to limit intergenerational poverty, increase access to community assets, facilitate upward mobility, and provide safe, affordable hous ing. SP-25 PRIORITY NEEDS 90.215(a)(2) Salt Lake City has determined the following priority needs after broad stakeholder outreach and analysis of community needs: TABLE SP-25.1 PRIORITY NEEDS 1 Priority Need: Homeless Services Priority Level High Population Extremely low-income Homeless large families Homeless families with children Unaccompanied youth Homeless individuals Elderly Chronic homeless Mentally ill Chronic substance abuse Veterans Persons with HIV/AIDS Persons with disabilities Survivors of domestic violence Geographic Areas Affected Citywide Associated Goals Goal: Expand access to supportive programs that help ensure that homelessness is rare, brief, and non-recurring. Focus Areas:  Expand medical and dental care programs  Increase outreach programs  Support homeless resource centers & emergency overflow operations  Provide essential supportive services including case management for homeless Description Support the operating cost of homeless resource centers, day centers, emergency sheltering systems, and supportive services for the homeless. Increase access to critical health systems such as medical and dental care. Increase case management support for those working directly with homeless populations. Basis for Relative Priority According to the 2019 Point-in-Time Count, Salt Lake County has 1,844 homeless individuals, 193 of whom are unsheltered. Results of the Citizen Online Survey and public outreach with over 4,000 responses listed this as the top priority . 141 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 PRIORITY NEEDS 2 Priority Need: Affordable Housing Priority Level High Population Extremely low-income Low-income Moderate-income Large families Families with children Elderly Public housing residents Released jail inmates Refugees Geographic Areas Affected Citywide Associated Goals Goal: Provide Expanded housing options for all economic and demographic segments of Salt Lake City’s population while diversifying housing stock within neighborhoods. Focus Areas:  Preserve and rehabilitate existing, aging affordable h ousing stock through improving the condition of housing throughout the City  Support anti-displacement strategies, prioritizing the target area identified in the plan. This may include strategies such as supporting Community Land Trust programming, historic preservation and others.  Improve and expand the affordable housing stock including lifecycle housing, including special needs housing, elderly, and ADA accessible housing. As applicable, this should explore the ability to place housing in high opportunity areas and/or within walking distance of transit stations  Increase homeownership opportunities  Provide rent assistance to emphasize stable housing  Provide housing and essential supportive services for persons with HIV/AIDS Description Provide loans, grants, and other financial assistance for the acquisition, preservation and development of affordable rental and homeownership opportunities. Provide financial assistance to stabilize low -income renters and homeowners. Explore and support strategies that ensure long-term affordability. Evaluate the relationship of housing and transit as a way of reducing overall housing costs. Basis for Relative Priority  According to the 2017 ACS data, 45.6% of Salt Lake City renter households and 25.5% of households with a mortgage are cost- burdened, spending over 30% of their monthly income on housing costs. 22.3% of renter households spend over 50% of 142 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 2 Priority Need: Affordable Housing their monthly income on housing.52 Families who are cost- burdened have limited resources for food, childcare, healthcare, transportation, education, and other basic needs.  The Housing Authority of Salt Lake City currently administers Housing Choice (Section 8) vouchers for 3,000 households, with 5,188 households on the waiting list. Countywide there are 15,981 households on a Housing Choice waiting list. A family on the waiting list can expect to wait 6 years before receiving a Housing Choice voucher. Between 2000 and 2018, the cost of housing increased significantly for both renters and homeowners. The median contract rent increased by 81.8% and home values increased 89.8%. During the same time period, the median household income only increased by 52.6%. Since incomes did not keep up with increases in housing costs, it has become more difficult for residents to buy or rent a home. The homeownership rate decreased from 56.9% in 2000 to 48.4% in 2018. Results of the Citizen Online Survey and public outreach with over 4,000 responses listed this as the top priority PRIORITY NEEDS 3 Priority Need: Transportation Priority Level High Population Extremely low-income Low-income Moderate-income Large families Families with children Elderly Persons with disabilities Geographic Areas Affected Citywide (Public Service) & CDBG Target Area (Infrastructure) Associated Goals Goal Promote accessibility and affordability of multimodal transportation options Focus Areas:  Provide increased access to and cost assistance for public transportation services for vulnerable populations  Install bus stop improvements, including coordination with multi- modal transit needs – limited to CDBG Target Area  Improve bus stop shelters and sidewalk access to transit to increase mobility, especially for persons in wheelchairs or with disabilities – limited to CDBG Target Area  Install bike racks and stations in key areas to encourage alternative modes of transportation – limited to CDBG Target Area 52 U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey 2014-2018 5-Year Estimates 143 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 3 Priority Need: Transportation Description Support improvements to transit that will improve affordability and increase access and safety Basis for Relative Priority Transportation serv ices ranked high on the citizen participation survey and public outreach that received more than 4,000 responses. Annual household transportation costs are high in much of the target area. PRIORITY NEEDS 4 Priority Need: Build Community Resiliency Priority Level High Population Extremely low-income Homeless large families Homeless families with children Unaccompanied youth Homeless individuals Elderly Chronic homeless Mentally ill Chronic substance abuse Veterans Persons with HIV/AIDS Survivors of domestic violenc e Geographic Areas Affected Citywide Associated Goals Goals: Provide tools to increase economic and/or housing stability Focus Areas:  Support job training and vocational rehabilitation programs that increase economic mobility  Improve visual and physical appearance of deteriorating commercial buildings - limited to CDBG Target Area  Provide economic development support for microenterprise businesses  Direct financial assistance to for-profit businesses  Expand access to early childhood edu cation to set the stage for academic achievement, social development, and change the cycle of poverty  Promote digital inclusion through access to digital communication technologies and the internet  Provide support for programs that reduce food insecurity f or vulnerable population Description Expand opportunities for individuals and households living in poverty or in the cycle of intergenerational poverty. Activities include services to expand accessibility to employment opportunities, improve and enhance small businesses, promote access to early childhood education, expand the availability of digital technologies, and reduce food insecurities. 144 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 4 Priority Need: Build Community Resiliency Basis for Relative Priority As our community faces challenges that hinder economic mobility, education, access to technology and increase food insecurity. Service providers, industry experts, data analysis, community members, and elected officials all agree that providing support for these efforts will enhance community resiliency as we look to improve access to cr itical services, rebuild from national, state or local emergencies. PRIORITY NEEDS 5 Priority Need: Behavioral Health Services to Expand Opportunity and Self - Sufficiency Priority Level High Population Extremely low-income Homeless large families Hom eless families with children Unaccompanied youth Homeless individuals Elderly Chronic homeless Mentally ill Chronic substance abuse Veterans Persons with HIV/AIDS Victims of domestic violence Refugees Geographic Areas Affected Citywide Associated Goals Goal: Provide support for low -income and vulnerable populations experiencing behavioral health concerns such as substance abuse disorders and mental health challenges. Focus area:  Provide supportive services such as treatment, case management and counseling to expand opportunity and self -sufficiency for vulnerable populations  Support programs that provide connections to permanent housing upon exiting behavioral health programs Description Expand opportunities and counseling services for individuals wi th behavioral health issues. Activities include counseling and treatment services for opioid and other substance abuse and mental health issues. Basis for Relative Priority Stakeholder meetings, City departments and public feedback from an online survey and public outreach with over 4,000 responses prioritized behavioral health issues as there is an apparent link between behavioral health issues, homelessness, and the ability to maintain housing and sustain employment. 145 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 SP-30 INFLUENCES OF MARKET CONDITIONS 91.215 (a)(2) Market Characteristics that will influence the use of funds available for housing type : As the needs assessment and market analysis have demonstrated, just over 22,500 Salt Lake City households are cost-burdened, spending 30% or more of their monthly income on housing (including utility costs) and are in need of housing that is affordable. Of these households, just over 10,000 households are severely cost - burdened, spending more than 50% of their monthly income on housing. These household s are at risk of homelessness. Market conditions influencing the production, rehabilitation, and assistance of affordable housing are as follows: Tenant-Based Rental Assistance (TBRA) Incomes are not keeping up with rising rental costs. The median income rose 52.6% between 2000 and 2018 while rent rates increased by 81.8% over the same time period. Based on CBRE’s Real Estate Market Outlook 2019, vacancy rates are low (4.0%) placing upward pressure on rents. Strong population growth is also projected to continue, placing additional pressure on rents. Salt Lake County average monthly rents have increased from an average of $1,087 per month in 2017 to $1,153 in 2018. Market conditions have increased demand for Housing Choice vouchers, which currently have a gap of approximately 6,177 units for low -income households. Research also indicates that there is a lack of affordable units in close proximity to service providers to assist at - risk populations with housing and other needs. In addition, there is a need f or additional partnerships between affordable housing landlords, property, and social services organizations. TBRA for Non-Homeless Special Needs Low rental vacancy rates and incomes not keeping up with rising rental costs lead to increasing housing cost - burden rates and very high demand for Housing Choice vouchers. There is a gap of approximately 10,000 units for severely cost-burdened households. Funds are also needed for transitioning participants with HOPWA - funded housing to other housing subsidies and affordable housing units in closer proximity to transportation and essential services. There is a need for additional partnerships between affordable housing landlords, property managers, and social service organizations. New Unit Production According to CBRE’s Real Estate Market Outlook 2019, “the market continues to expand at an above-average rate, adding a record 7,467 units along the Wasatch Front during 2018 (a growth rate of 4.6%). Approximately 6,244 units were slated for 2019. As rental rates rise, the question of rental affordability is of top concern. Renters coming from more expensive Tier 1 markets will continue to absorb many of these new units, and many locals will not be accustomed to paying higher rates. Rental rates are pushing upward due to a variety of factors including a construction industry stretched thin due to labor supply issues and rising costs. In addition to increasing construction costs, land costs are also rising, thereby driving up rents even further. This results in increasing cost-burden rates, very high demand for Housing Choice (Section 8) vouchers, and a gap of approximately 10,000 units for severely cost -burdened households. There is a need for additional partnerships between affordable housing developers/providers, prop erty managers and social service organizations. Additional affordable units are needed in high -opportunity neighborhoods as well as units in close proximity to transportation and essential services. Rehabilitation Lower interest rates have somewhat improv ed the cost of construction and home ownership. However, many low-income households are still unable to qualify for loans for home ownership or home improvement 146 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 financing. The share of elderly homeowners is projected to increase as the median age increases in the Salt Lake Valley. Salt Lake City has an older housing stock, with about 30.1% of units built prior to 1940. Older housing stock located in concentrated areas of poverty and RDA project areas are at risk for deterioration. Incomes are not keeping up with rising costs. Affordable units are at risk of being replaced with newer housing stock or that with revitalization the rents will convert to market rate. Stabilization of existing housing in the target area is imperative. Acquisition, Including Preservation According to CBRE’s Real Estate Market Outlook 2019, a robust market performance resulted in a historic $1.4 billion in multifamily sales across the Wasatch Front. Salt Lake City is increasingly viewed as a preferred, Tier 2 market. CAP rates have stayed low, suggesting confidence in the multifamily market outlook. The strong rental market-rate rental market shows the increasing need to preserve affordable rentals, as converting substandard rental housing to market-rate can be very desirable for property owners. SP-35 ANTICIPATED RESOURCE S 91.215(a)(4), 91.220(c)(1,2) INTRODUCTION Salt Lake City’s funding year 2020-2024 CDBG, HOME, ESG, and HOPWA allocations are estimated to be a total of $25,000,000 estimating an average of $5,000,000 per year. In addition, Salt Lake City anticipates receiving program income of $7.5 million during the same time period, with an estimated average of $1.5 million of program income available to spend each year. HUD allocations will be utilized to address the growing h ousing and community development needs within Salt Lake City. However, funding has declined over the past decade, making it more difficult to address needs and overcome barriers. Over the course of the 2020 -2024 Consolidated Plan, Salt Lake City will coord inate and leverage HUD allocations to assist the City’s most vulnerable populations, increase self -sufficiency and address needs in the geographic target area. TABLE SP-35.1 ANTICIPATED RESOURCES Uses of Funding Expected Amount Available – Year 1 Expected Amount Available – Remainder of Con Plan Description Annual Allocation Program Income Prior Year Resources Total CDBG Acquisition $3,509,164 $0 $35,000 $3,544,164 $13,600,000 Prior year resources are unspent funds from previous years. Administration Economic Development Homebuyer Assistance Homeowner Rehabilitation Multifamily Rental Construction Multifamily Public Improvements 147 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Uses of Funding Expected Amount Available – Year 1 Expected Amount Available – Remainder of Con Plan Description Annual Allocation Program Income Prior Year Resources Total Public Services Rental Rehabilitation New Constru ction for Ownership TBRA Historic Rental Rehabilitation New Construction HOME Acquisition $957,501 $300,000 $0 $1,257,501 $4,600,000 Program income is typically generated from housing loan repayments from nonprofit agencies. Administration Homebuyer Assistance Homeowner Rehabilitation Multifamily Rental Construction Multifamily Rental Rehabilitation New Construction for Ownership TBRA ESG Administration $301,734 $0 $2,500 $304,234 $1,160,000 Prior year resources are unspent funds from previous years. Financial Assistance Overnight Shelter Rapid Re-Housing (Rental Assistance) Rental Assistance Services Transitional Housing HOPWA Administration $600,867 $0 $15,000 $615,876 $1,720,000 Prior year resources are unspent funds from previous years. Permanent Housing in Facilities 148 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Uses of Funding Expected Amount Available – Year 1 Expected Amount Available – Remainder of Con Plan Description Annual Allocation Program Income Prior Year Resources Total Permanent Housing Placement STRMU Short-Term or Transitional Housing Facilities Supportive Services TBRA OTHER: HOUSING – TRUST FUND Acquisitions $0 $0 $0 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 The Trust Fund has a budget of $2m and expects to receive a total of approximately $3m in revenue over the next plan period. Administration Conversion and Rehab for Transitional Housing Homebuyer Rehabilitation Housing Multifamily Rental New Construction Multifamily Rental Rehab New Construction for Ownership Permanent Housing in Facilities Rapid Re-Housing Rental Assistance TBRA Transitional Housing OTHER PROGRAM INCOME All CDBG Eligible Activities per Housing Program Rules $0 $1,500,000 $0 $1,500,000 $6,000,000 Salt Lake City Housing Programs – Program Income All HOME Eligible Activities per Housing Program Rules 149 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Uses of Funding Expected Amount Available – Year 1 Expected Amount Available – Remainder of Con Plan Description Annual Allocation Program Income Prior Year Resources Total OTHER ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT LOAN FUND Economic Development $0 $0 $0 $0 $4.000,000 The fund currently has a balance of approximately $4m. EXPLAIN HOW FEDERAL FUNDS WILL LEVERAGE THOSE ADDITIO NAL RESOURCES (PRIVATE, STATE, AND LOCAL FUNDS), INCLUDING A DESCRIPTION OF HOW MATCHING REQUIREMENTS WILL BE SATISFIED: Match Requirements HUD, like many other federal agencies, encourages the recipients of federal monies to demonstrat e that efforts are being made to strategically leverage additional funds in order to achieve greater results. Leverage is also a way to increase project efficiencies and benefit from economies of scale that often come with combining sources of funding for similar or expanded scopes.  HOME Investment Partnership Program – 25% Match Requirement Salt Lake City will ensure that HOME match requirements are met by utilizing the leveraging capacity of its subrecipients. Funding sources used to meet the HOME match requirements include federal, state, and local grants; private contributions; private foundations; United Way; local financial institutions; City General Fund; and unrestricted donations.  Emergency Solutions Grant – 100% Match Requirement Salt Lake City wi ll ensure that ESG match requirements are met by utilizing the leveraging capacity of its subgrantees. Funding sources used to meet the ESG match requirements include federal, state, and local grants; private contributions; private foundations; United Way; Continuum of Care funding; City General Fund; in -kind match and unrestricted donations. Fund Leveraging Leverage, in the context of the City’s four HUD programs, means bringing other local, state, and federal financial resources in order to maximize the reach and impact of the City’s HUD Programs. Resources for leverage include the following:  Housing Choice Section 8 Vouchers 150 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 The Housing Authority of Salt Lake City and Housing Connect currently administer Housing Choice (Section 8) vouchers. The City projects the local housing authorities will receive approximately $173.6 million in funding during the plan period to support public housing units.  Low -Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) Created by the Tax Reform Act of 1986, the LIHTC program gives State and local LIHTC -allocating agencies the equivalent of nearly $8 billion in annual budget authority to issue tax credits for the acquisition, rehabilitation, or new construction of rental housing target ed to lower-income households. Federal 4% and 9% tax credits are a major funding source of capital for the construction and rehabilitation of affordable rental homes. In 2019, the Agency allocated $10,900,317 in Federal and State Housing Credits.53 At the c urrent funding level, approximately $55 million will be available for low-income homebuyer programs to developers to build or renovate affordable apartment housing products over the course of this Plan.  New Market Tax Credits New Market Tax Credits are an additional tool utilized to attract private capital investment in areas in need of job growth and economic development.  RDA Development Funding The RDA has 12 project areas, nine of which are currently collecting tax increment. Tax increment funds are required to be reinvested back into the same “project area” from which funds are generated and to contribute to the overall health and vitality of the City. The purpose of an RDA is to reverse the negative effects of blight, while increasing the tax base fro m which the taxing entities draw their funds. The RDA generated $33,833,404 in tax increment receipts in 2018. The RDA generally uses a 2% annual growth rate for existing project areas. State legislation governing RDAs require that 20% of tax increment rec eipts is set aside for the creation or preservation of affordable housing. A portion of those funds can be used in the CDBG Target Area. In addition, in 2019 the following two additional project areas will commence generating tax increment for the RDA: o Stadler Rail CRA: $180,750 o Northwest Quadrant: $18,873  Salt Lake City Housing Trust Fund (HTF) Salt Lake City’s Housing Trust Fund strives to address the health, safety, and welfare of the City’s citizens by providing assistance for affordable and special needs housing within the City. The Trust Fund has a 2019 budget of $7,400,023.  Salt Lake City Economic Development Loan Fund (EDLF) The City administers the Economic Development Loan Fund which makes loans to small businesses located in the City for the purpose of stimulating economic development and commercial and industrial diversity by enhancing business opportunities, providing employment and promoting neighborhood revitalization. This fund currently has a cash balance of approximately $4.0m and loans outstanding of $5.6m.  Salt Lake City General Fund The City uses excess general funds for homeless services when such funds are available, and opportunities present themselves. The City has allocated $2.5M of resources for homeless services in fiscal year 2020. 53 https://www.novoco.com/sites/default/files/atoms/files/utah_2019_lihtc_awards_2019.pdf 151 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024  Olene Walker Housing Loan Fund Utah State’s Olene Walker Housing Loan Fund is one of the largest affordable housing loan funding tools for affordable housing developers working in Salt Lake City. The loan fund had about $14 million available in fiscal year 2020.  Industrial & Commercial Bank Funding Although it is not possible to estimate how much Community Reinvestment Act funding will be made available locally, there are a large number of industrial and commercial banks that reside in Salt Lake City and that have requirements to invest in low -income areas.  Continuum of Care Funding The Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness (Continuum of Care) provides approximately $7.8 million of annual funding for local homeless housing and service prog rams.  Foundations & Other Philanthropic Partners Charitable establishments and philanthropic partners make up a critical part of the funding stream used in the State of Utah. It is estimated that during the Consolidated Plan period, over $100m will be used to support low - and moderate-income residents, with a considerable amount of the funding being used in Salt Lake City. IF APPROPRIATE, DESCRIBE PUBLICLY-OWNED LAND OR PROPERTY LOCATED WITHIN THE JURISDICTION THAT MAY BE USED TO ADDRESS THE NEEDS IDENTIF IED IN THE PLAN: Salt Lake City intends to expand affordable housing and economic development opportunities through the redevelopment of City -owned land, strategic land acquisitions, parcel assembly, and disposition. As per City ordinance, Housing and Neighborhood Development Division will work collaboratively with other City divisions that oversee or control parcels that are owned by the City to evaluate the appropriateness for affordable housing opportunities. DISCUSSION: Salt Lake City will continue to seek other federal, state, and private funds to leverage entitlement grant funding. The City has already shown its commitment to leveraging funding through the selection of the target area which matches the current RDA areas. In addition, the City will sup port the proposed community development initiatives outlined in this Plan through strategic initiatives, policies, and programs. SP-40: INSTITUTIONAL DE LIVERY STRUCTURE 91-215(k) Explain the institutional structure through which the jurisdiction will carr y out its Consolidated Plan including private industry, non-profit organizations, and public institutions. TABLE SP-40.1 INSTITUTIONAL DELIVERY ORGANIZATIONS Responsible Entity Responsible Entity Type Role Geographic Area Served Advantage Services, Inc. Non -profit organization Non -homeless special needs, Homeless services Region Alliance House Non -profit organization Affordable housing: rental Region 152 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Responsible Entity Responsible Entity Type Role Geographic Area Served Asian Association of Utah Non -profit organization Non -homeless special needs Region ASSIST, Inc. Non -profit organization Affordable housing: ownership Region Big Brothers Big Sisters of Utah Non -profit organization Non -homeless special needs Region Boys and Girls Club of Salt Lake Non -profit organization Non -homeless special needs Region Catholic Communi ty Services Non -profit organization Homelessness, non - homeless special needs Region Community Development Corp of Utah Non -profit organization Affordable housing: ownership State Community Health Centers Non -profit organization Homelessness, non - homeless special needs Region Crossroads Urban Center Non -profit organization Homelessness, non - homeless special needs Region Disability Law Center Non -profit organization Non -homeless special needs Region English Skills Learning Center Non -profit organization Non -homeless special needs Region Family Promise of Salt Lake Non -profit organization Homelessness Region Family Support Center Non -profit organization Homelessness, non - homeless special needs Region First Step House Non -profit organization Homelessness , non - homeless special needs Region Guadalupe School Non -profit organization Non -homeless special needs Region Helping Hands Association dba The Haven Non -profit organization Homelessness, non - homeless special needs Region House of Hope Non -profit organ ization Homelessness, non - homeless special needs Region Housing Authority of Salt Lake City PHA Public housing, affordable housing: rental Jurisdiction Housing Authority of the County of Salt Lake PHA Public housing, affordable housing: rental Region U tah Law Related Education Project Non -profit organization Non -homeless special needs State Legal Aid Society of Salt Lake Non -profit organization Non -homeless special needs Region Literacy Action Center Non -profit organization Non -homeless special needs Region Neighborhood House Non -profit organization Non -homeless special needs Jurisdiction NeighborWorks Salt Lake CHDO Affordable housing: ownership, economic development Region Odyssey House Non -profit organization Homelessness, non - homeless special needs Region 153 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Responsible Entity Responsible Entity Type Role Geographic Area Served People Helping People Non -profit organization Non -homeless special needs Region Rape Recovery Center Non -profit organization Non -homeless special needs Region Road Home Non -profit organization Homelessness Region Salt Lake City Department of Community and Economic Development Departments and agencies Affordable housing, neighborhood improvements Jurisdiction Salt Lake City Department of Public Services Departments and agencies Neighborhood improvements Jurisdiction Salt Lake City Division of Planning Departments and agencies Neighborhood improvements Jurisdiction Salt Lake City Division of Economic Development Departments and agencies Neighborhood improvements Jurisdiction Salt Lake City Division of Engineering Departments and agencies Neighborhood improvements Jurisdiction Salt Lake City Housing and Neighborhood Development Division Departments and agencies Affordable housing, neighborhood improvements Jurisdiction Salt Lake City Division of Parks and Public Lands Departments and agencies Neighborhood improvements Jurisdiction Salt Lake City Division of Streets Departments and agencies Neighborhood improvements Jurisdiction Salt Lake City Division of Transportation Departments and agencies Neighborhood improvements Jurisdiction Salt Lake City Housing Trust Fund Government Affordable housing: homeownership, rental Jurisdiction Salt Lake City RDA Redevelopment authority Affordable housing, neighborhood improvements Jurisdiction Salt Lake City School District Other Non -homeless special needs Jurisdiction Salt Lake Community Action Program Non -profit organization Homelessness, non - homeless special needs Region Salt Lake and Tooele Continuum of Care Continuum of Care Homelessness Region Salt Lake Donated Dental Services Non -profit orga nization Homelessness, non - homeless special needs Region Sarah Draft Home Non -profit organization Affordable housing; home ownership Region Sorenson Unity Center Government Non -homeless special needs Jurisdiction Utah AIDS Foundation Non -profit organiza tion Non -homeless special needs Region Utah Food Bank Non -profit organization Homelessness, non - homeless special needs State Utah Health and Human Rights Non -profit organization Non -homeless special needs State 154 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Responsible Entity Responsible Entity Type Role Geographic Area Served Utah Homeless Management Information System Government Homelessness, non - homeless special needs State Utah Housing Corporation Other Affordable housing homeownership, rental State Utah Non -Profit Housing Corporation Non -profit organization Affordable housing: rental Region Utahns Against Hunger Non -profit organization Homelessness, non - homeless special needs Region Valley Behavioral Health Non -profit organization Non -homeless special needs State Volunteers of America (VOA) Non -profit organization Homelessness, non - homeless special needs Region Wasatch Community Gardens Non -profit organization Neighborhood improvements Region Wasatch Homeless Healthcare – 4th Street Clinic Non -profit organization Homelessness, non - homeless special needs Region Welcome Home Salt Lake City Government Home ownership City YMCA Non -profit organization Non -homeless special needs Region YMCA Non -profit organization Homelessness, non - homeless special needs Region ASSESS STRENGTHS AND GAPS IN THE INSTITUT IONAL DELIVERY SYSTEM Community needs are efficiently and eff ectively addressed through the knowledge, commitment, and resources of a broad range of partners. By working closely with governmental partners and private organizations, Salt Lake City is able to carry out an institutional delivery structure that emphasiz es collaboration and resource leveraging. Public services for Salt Lake City’s homeless and extremely low -income population are delivered through a network of integrated public -private partnerships. Coordination meetings are regularly held to manage servi ce delivery for individuals and families that have multiple and complex problems that require comprehensive services form more than one organization. Coordination meetings are also utilized to streamline services and prevent the duplication of efforts. A significant institutional delivery barrier is that financial resources limit the amount of services provided in the community. Many service providers have long wait lists. Salt Lake City is working with community partners to prioritize and restructure serv ices to utilize funding resources more effectively. TABLE SP-40.2 AVAILABILITY OF SERVICES TARGETED TO HOMELESS PERSONS AND PERSONS WITH HIV Homelessness Prevention Services Available in the Community Targeted to Homeless Targeted to People with HIV Homelessness Prevention Services Counseling/Advocacy X X X Legal Assistance X 155 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Homelessness Prevention Services Available in the Community Targeted to Homeless Targeted to People with HIV Mortgage Assistance X X Rental Assistance X X X Utilities Assistance X X Street Outreach Services Law Enforcement X X X Mobile Clinics X X Other Street Outreach Services X X X Supportive Services Alcohol & Drug Abuse X X Child Care X X Education X X Employment/Employment Training X X Healthcare X X X HIV/AIDS X X X Life Skills X X X Mental Health Counseling X X X Transportation X DESCRIBE T HE EXTENT TO WHICH SERVICES TARGETED TO HOMELESS PERSONS AND PERSONS WITH HIV AND MAINSTREAM SERVICES, SUCH AS HEALTH, MENT AL HEALTH AND EMPLOYMENT SERVICES ARE MADE AVAILABLE T O AND USED BY HOMELESS PERSONS (PARTICULARLY CHRONICALLY HOMELESS INDIV IDUALS AND FAMILIES, FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN, VETERANS AND THEIR FAMILIES, AND UNACCOMPANIED YOUTH) AND PERSONS WITH HIV WITHIN THE JURISDICTION. Fourth Street Clinic, dba Wasatch Homeless Healthcare, is an AAAHC Patient Centered Medical Home that provides coordinated medical, mental health, substance abuse, case management, dental, and pharmacy services. It provides the primary medical services to the homeless community. Other organizations such as Donated Dental provide complimentary services. In 1985, the Utah Department of Health reported a total of 17 persons living with AIDS in Utah. At that time, the state and most citizens were unprepared to address the HIV/AIDS issue. The need for public information and for assistance for persons living with HIV/AIDS forced a community-based response, which ultimately became the Utah AIDS Foundation (UAF). Today, a two -fold approach of direct client services and targeted prevention education still comprises the basis for all UAF programming. UAF works with Clinic 1A to ensu re that those diagnosed with HIV/AIDS are connected to medical case management, housing case management, employment opportunities, and other services. Valley Behavioral Health, formerly known as Valley Mental Health, provides services to all residents in Salt Lake County (including those who are experiencing homelessness) that experience serious mental illnesses, substance use disorders and behavioral problems. Valley Behavioral Health operates Safe Haven and Salt Lake Valley Storefront. Located at 550 W 700 S Salt Lake City, Safe Haven is a permanent supportive housing program for those that meet Valley Behavioral Health’s client criteria. Salt Lake Valley Storefront is a day center at Safe Haven and is solely for those experiencing serious mental illnesse s. The State of Utah’s Department of Workforce Services has an employment center co -located at the Weigand Day Center. This offers those using services on Rio Grande or meals at St. Vincent DePaul’s Dining Hall, a chance to connect with employment withou t traveling. 156 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Founded in 1958, First Step House is a co -occurring capable, behavioral health treatment and housing provider. First Step is a Joint Commission-accredited organization and is a consistent leader in the Salt Lake metro area delivering evidence-based interventions and achieving positive outcomes for individuals, Veterans, and families experiencing substance use disorders, homelessness, mental health conditions, justice system involvement, and primary health concerns. First Step operates two resi dential treatment facilities, two outpatient treatment centers, and six transitional housing facilities in Salt Lake County. The scope of services includes substance use disorder, criminogenic, and mental health assessment and referral, residential and out patient treatment, recovery residence services, transitional housing, case management, employment support, primary health care, peer support services, and long-term recovery management. Odyssey House of Utah focuses on addiction recovery services through both in-patient and out-patient programs. Programs are available for both adults and teens. Other programs serving our community include Volunteers of America Cornerstone, which provides substance use treatment for low -income and homeless individuals. In addition, Volunteers of America has two detox programs including Adult Detox and Center for Women and Children. Both serve low -income, homeless individuals or families. DESCRIBE THE STRENGT HS AND GAPS OF THE SERVICE DELIVERY SYST EM FOR SPECIAL NEEDS POPUL ATION AND PERSONS EX PERIENCING HOMELESSNESS, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE SERV ICES LISTED ABOVE. Homeless services organizations within the Salt Lake and Tooele Counties Continuum of Care work diligently to coordinate services and place people in hou sing. Local organizations participate in HMIS, managed by the State of Utah. Through HMIS, service providers are able to view other services their clients access and coordinate on a client-by-client basis. The local CoC also uses the VI-SPDAT (Vulnerability Index – Service Prioritization Decision Assistance Tool) form in the annual Point -in-Time count. By using the VI-SPDAT at first contact, the clients can be connected to services quicker and receive help sooner. However, there are always improvements that can be made in coordinating activities. Meetings with stakeholders revealed concerns that case management loads were too large and that reductions were necessary for better coordination and provision of services. So, while coordination occurs, there is of ten a high level of demand for services in comparison to the availability of needed treatment and services. PROVIDE A SUMMARY OF THE STRATEGY FOR OVE RCOMING GAPS IN THE INSTITUTIONAL STRUCTURE AND SERVICE DELIVERY SYSTEM FO R CARRYING OUT A STRATEGY TO ADD RESS PRIORITY NEEDS. The Salt Lake and Tooele Counties Continuum of Care continues to implement coordinated access based on the VI-SPADT form. Salt Lake County is leading efforts to coordinate services for the homeless with the end goal of providing homeless services as seamlessly as possible. 157 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 SP-45: GOALS In consideration of priority needs and anticipated resources, Salt Lake City has defined the following five -year goals: TABLE SP-45.1 G OALS, PRIORITY NEEDS AND OUTCOME INDICATORS Sort Order Goal Start Year End Year Category Geograp hic Area Priority Needs Addressed Funding Goal Outcome Indicator 1 - Housing Expand housing options 2020 2024 Affordable Housing Citywide Affordable Housing CDBG $ 6,000,000 ESG $343,750 HOME $2,500,000 HOPWA $1,940,000 5075 Households assisted 2 – Transportation Improve access to transportation 2020 2024 Transportation Target Areas/Cit y Wide Transportation CDBG $4,000,000 100,300 Households assisted 3 – Community Resiliency Increase economic and/or housing stability 2020 2024 Economic Development/Pu blic Services Target Areas/Cit y Wide Community Resiliency CDBG $1,250,000 325 Individuals or businesses assisted 4 – Homeless Services Ensure that homelessness is brief, rare, and non-recurring 2020 2024 Public Services/Homele ss Services Citywide Homeless Services CDBG $1,000,000 ESG $825,000 2050 Persons assisted 5 – Behavioral Health Support vulnerable populations experiencing substance abuse and mental health challenges 2020 2024 Public Services/Behavio ral Health C itywide Behavioral Health CDBG $500,000 400 households assisted 6 – Administration Administration 2020 2024 Administration Citywide Administration CDBG $3,200,000 ESG $103,125 HOME HOPWA $60,000 N/A TABLE SP-45.2 G OAL DESCRIPTIONS Goal Name Goal Description 1 Housing To provide expanded housing options for all economic and demographic segments of Salt Lake City’s population while diversifying the housing stock within neighborhoods.  Support housing programs that address the needs of aging housing stock through targeted rehabilitation efforts and diversifying the housing stock within the neighborhoods  Support affordable housing development that increases the number and types of units available for qualified residents  Support programs that provide access to home ownership  Support rent assistance programs to emphasize stable housing as a primary strategy to prevent and/or end homelessness  Support programs that provide connection to permanent housing upon exiting behavioral health programs  Provide housing and essential supportive services to persons with HIV/AIDS 2 Transportation To promote accessibility and affordability of multimodal transportation options. 158 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Goal Name Goal Description  Within eligible target areas, improve bus stop amenities as a way to encourage the accessibility o f public transit and enhance the experience of public transit  Within eligible target areas, expand and support the installation of bike racks, stations, and amenities as a way to encourage use of alternative modes of transportation  Support access to transp ortation, prioritizing very low -income and vulnerable populations 3 Community Resiliency Provide tools to increase economic and/or housing stability  Support job training and vocational rehabilitation programs that increase economic mobility  Improve visual and physical appearance of deteriorating commercial buildings - limited to CDBG Target Area  Provide economic development support for microenterprise businesses  Direct financial assistance to for -profit businesses  Expand access to early childhood education to set the stage for academic achievement, social development, and change the cycle of poverty  Promote digital inclusion through access to digital communication technologies and the internet  Provide support for programs that reduce food insecurity for vulnerable population 4 Homeless Services To expand access to supportive programs that help ensure that homelessness is rare, brief, and non -recurring  Expand support for medical and dental care options for those experiencing homelessness  Provide support for homeless services including Homeless Resource Center Operations and Emergency Overflow Operations  Provide support for programs undertaking outreach services to address the needs of those living an unsheltered life  Expand case management support as a way t o connect those experiencing homelessness with permanent housing and supportive services 5 Behavioral Health To provide support for low -income and vulnerable populations experiencing behavioral health concerns such as substance abuse disorders and mental health challenges.  Expand treatment options, counseling support, and case management for those experiencing behavioral health crisis 6 Administration To support the administration, coordination and management of Salt Lake City’s CDBG, ESG, HOME, and HOPWA programs. ESTIMATE THE NUMBER OF EXTREMELY LOW-INCOME, LOW-INCOME, AND MODERATE - INCOME FAMILIES TO WHOM THE JURISDICTION WILL PROVIDE AFFORDABLE HOUSING AS DEFINED BY HOME 91.315(B)(2): Over the course of the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan, the City antici pates that CDBG, ESG, HOME and HOPWA funds will provide affordable housing and housing subsidy assistance as follows:  Housing Rehabilitation: 1,000 Households 159 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024  Direct Financial Assistance to Home Buyers: 100 Households  Tenant-Based Rental Assistance/Rapid Re-housing: 2,800 Households  Homeless Prevention: 500 Persons SP-50: PUBLIC HOUSING ACCESSIBILITY AND INVOLVEMENT 91.215(c) NEED TO INCREASE THE NUMBER OF ACCESSIBLE UNITS (IF REQUIRED BY A SECTION 504 VOLUNTARY COMPLIANCE AGREEMENT) The local housing authorities are in compliance with the Section 504 Voluntary Compliance agreement. Activities to Increase Resident Involvement:  Monthly tenant meetings  Tenant association meetings with both City and County tenants  Salt Lake County Aging Services has a center located on site at high rise  HACSL has a Resident Advisory Board that has representatives from public housing (including the high - rise), Section 8, and special needs programs. A member of the Resident Advisory Board is appointed to the Housing Authority’s Board of Commissioners. IS THE PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY DESIGNATED AS TROUBLED UNDER 24 CFR PART 902? No. The Housing Authority of the County of Salt Lake and the Housing Authority of Salt Lake City are both designated as high performers. SP-55: STRATEGIC PLAN BARRIERS TO AFFORDABLE HOUSING 91.215(h) As discussed in detail in section MA -40, the most critical public policy barriers (direct and indirect) to the production and preservation of affordable housing include the following: Economic Conditions  Housing costs have risen more quickly than incomes over the past 10 years  Transportation costs are significantly higher in some neighborhoods than others due to a disparity in the availability of transit and distance from employment centers Land Regulations and Permitting Process  Salt Lake City’s Zoning Ordinance (similar to other cities) contains regulations that establish standards for residential development including minimum lot size, density, unit size, height, setback, and parking standards. Some of these regulations can inhibit the ability for affordable housing development feasibility (i.e., profitability), including the following: o Density limitations o Lack of multifamily zoning o Stringent parking requirements (reducing cost feasibility)  The process to waive/reduce impact fees for affordable housing is reportedly difficult to navigate for some developers  Permitting and environmental review processes are often time consuming and reduce possible profits for developers, thereby discouraging development and/or encouraging development of higher-margin product (i.e., market-rate units) 160 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Land Costs  High land costs in certain areas do not allow for adequate profit in the development of lower -income housing product, particularly in desirable neighborhoods that have experienced growth and new construction over the past decade. Most affordable land is located on the west side of Salt Lake City, furthering the concentration of affordable housing in select areas, and inhibiting the dispersal of housing options throughou t the city  Land costs restrict the ability to place affordable housing in closer proximity to necessary services, particularly near transit options and employment centers. Consequently, new housing often is constructed in areas that result in high percentages of income being spent towards transportation. Ultimately, these developments further increase traffic issues Construction Costs  Construction costs, particularly labor costs, have experienced notable fluctuations in the recent past. This has caused upw ard pressure on rents, and limited what type of product developers are able to provide. Consequently, the profit margin in providing affordable housing is typically limited, or altogether non-existent without the presence of incentives and tax credits  Rehabilitation of existing product has increased in cost due to overall labor shortages. Furthermore, the gained value of improvements is often not more than the costs of construction, resulting in limited or no profit for undertaking such renovation. This lim its the desire to undertake such endeavors unless incentives can be provided Development and Rehabilitation Financing  Affordable housing projects with complex layered finance structures can experience increased land holding costs because of additional due diligence and longer timelines. This is partially alleviated with City incentive programs that reduce some financing pressures  There is strong competition for local funding tools, such as the State of Utah’s Olene Walker Housing Loan Fund Neighborhood Ma rket Conditions  Negative public perception and community opposition (“NIMBYism”) can limit affordable housing development when a zoning approval process is required  Some neighborhoods that have access to transit options do not have the appeal for large -scale housing developments, due primarily to low -quality surrounding improvements, higher crime rates, and limited employment diversity The City’s recently completed Growing Salt Lake City: A Five -Year Housing Plan 2018-2022 provides the following goals to remove barriers to affordable housing: Goal 1: Reform City practices to promote a responsive, affordable, high -opportunity housing market  Includes reforming City practices, such as land use and zoning regulations, as well as impediments in City processes Goal 2: Increase housing opportunities for cost-burdened households  Prioritizes stabilizing very low -income renters, the development of more affordable units and increased home ownership opportunities Goal 3: Build a more equitable city 161 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024  Eliminate incidences of housing discrimination and promote a diversity of housing throughout all areas of the City Other strategies employed by the City include the following: Homeless Strategies Coordinating with local service providers, municipalities, State of Utah, Continuum of Care, and others through the Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness in an effort to create a system by which resources, services, data collection, and analysis results in coordination among all stakeholders. Growing SLC: A Five-Year Plan The City has formally adopted a new housing plan that will begin to address many of the barriers listed above and catalyze partners in the city and region to focus on the current housing crisis. The plan provides an assessment of citywide housing needs, with emphasis on the availability and affordability of housing, housing needs for changing demographics, and neighborhood -specific needs. The updated plan will serve as a five -year policy guide to address housing needs across the economic and demographi c spectrum of Salt Lake City’s current and future residents. Affordable Housing Initiative The City is committed to providing a comprehensive housing initiative to address Salt Lake City’s lack of housing options affordable to low -wage workers and moderate-income families, persons with disabilities and those on fixed incomes. By utilizing the Salt Lake City Housing Trust Fund and other community resources, the City will support the preservation, development, and rental assistance of housing units over the time period of the Consolidated Plan. The initiative will target these forms of assistance to extremely low -income renter households as well as expanding homeownership and housing opportunities for low - to middle-income families and individuals. Community Land Trust Salt Lake City has launched a Community Land Trust (CLT) that will allow donated and trusted land to maintain perpetual affordability while ensuring the structure on the land, the home, is purchased, owned, and sold over time to income-qualifying households, just as any other home would be. This provision is intended to ensure a fair return on investment for the homeowner if a sale occurs during the period of affordability. By holding the land itself in the trust, the land effectively receives a write down each time the home is sold, insulating the property for growing land costs but still allowing equity to be built by the homeowner. Blue Ribbon Commission This commission was tasked with identifying how the City can fund and produce 1,000 units of affordable housing throughout Salt Lake City. This commission has since been sun -setted, but the efforts of creating affordable housing through the mechanisms identified continue to move forward. Welcome Home Salt Lake City Salt Lake City initiated a new homeownership program, Welcome Home SLC, which is aimed at increasing housing options for low - and moderate-income households. It will help stabilize communities, provide incentive for neighborhood investments, and allow families to build wealth. Leverage Public Land Promote affordable housing development by leveraging public resources with private investments. Potential tools include the following:  Development of affordable housing on publicly -owned land  Utilize proceeds form development of publicly -owned land to fund affordable housing  Create a policy for prioritizing affordable housing uses when disposing of public land. 162 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Impact Fee Exemption The City’s recently completed Growing SLC: A Five-Year Housing Plan, 2018-2022 recommends that impact fees c ould be reduced by a decision-making body that reviews project transactions and that could only be accessed by developers who commit to a percentage of units at a specific level of affordability. Funding Our Future In 2018, the City Council approved a 0.5% sales tax increase to address several important issues within the City including transportation, housing, infrastructure, and public safety. This is estimated to provide an estimated $5 million additional sales tax revenues to support housing needs each year. Revenues may be shared between development efforts and supporting affordable housing program efforts. Redevelopment Agency Salt Lake City’s Redevelopment Agency committed $17 million to address affordable housing efforts, with a third of that targeted to areas where the City has experienced high land costs. SLC Housing Trust Fund The Salt Lake City Housing Trust Fund was created in 2000 to provide financial assistance to support the development and preservation of affordable and special needs hous ing in Salt Lake City. Eligible activities include acquisition, new construction, and rehabilitation of both multifamily rental properties and single -family homeownership. Additional assistance relating to housing for eligible households also may include p roject or tenant-based rental assistance, down payment assistance and technical assistance. Applications for funding can be accepted year-round and are approved through a citizen’s advisory board, the Mayor and the City Council. Funding Targeting The Housing and Neighborhood Development Division continually evaluates ways to coordinate and target affordable housing subsidies more effectively, including:  Coordinate local funding sources – Olene Walker, SLC Housing Trust Fund, County partnerships  Target soft money to housing units affordable to households with lower AMIs  Target soft money with low or no interest loans. Policies Salt Lake City will work to remove or ameliorate public policies that serve as barriers to affordable housing through the following efforts:  Affordable Housing Development Incentives: Zoning and fee waiver incentives will be implemented and/or strengthened, including the following:  Refine the Impact Fee Exemption Ordinance to improve user friendliness and refine the range of application.  Evaluate the accessory dwelling unit ordinance for a broader range of application.  Evaluate the transit station area zoning district regulations for a broader range of affordability requirements and potentially expand the use of that zone.  Evaluate the feasibility of density bonuses and other development incentives for affordable housing development and preservation, specifically in Historic Landmark Districts where it is particularly difficult to add housing.  Review the City’s Fee Schedule to eliminate added fees for developers of affordable housing.  Review the City’s Housing Loss Mitigation ordinance to ensure that the city’s stock of inexpensive housing isn’t rapidly being replaced by more expensive units.  Leverage Public Resources for Affordable H ousing Development: Public resources, including C ity- owned land, will be leveraged with private resources for affordable housing development. · Funding Targeting: The Housing and Neighborhood Development Division is evaluating ways to coordinate and target affordable housing subsidies more effectively, to include the coordination of 163 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 local funding sources (Olene Walker Housing Loan Fund, Salt Lake City Housing Trust Fund, Salt Lake County funding, etc).  Utilize the Salt Lake City Housing Trust Fund: Funding is focused on acquisition, new construction, and rehabilitation of both multifamily rental properties and single-family homeownership. Additional assistance relating to housing for eligible househol ds also may include project or tenant based rental assistance, down payment assistance and technical assistance. The City has been very successful in spending down the Trust’s funds over FY17-18 and is resulting in an increased number of affordable units being built in the city. Applications for funding can be accepted year -round and are approved through a citizen’s advisory board, the Mayor and the City Council.  Implement Fair Housing Action Items: Salt Lake City will work to remove and/or ameliorate housing impediments for protected classes through action items as identified in the City’s 2015- 2019 Fair Housing Action Plan.  Utilize Federal Funding to Expand Affordable Housing Opportunities: Utilize CDBG, ESG, HOME, and HOPWA funding to expand housing opportunity through homeowner rehabilitation, emergency home repair, acquisition/rehabilitation, direct financial assistance, tenant -based rental assistance, project- based rental assistance, and rapid re-housing. In addition to the Action Items listed above, the City aims to tackle some of the larger problems behind the lack of affordable housing – mainly the lack of a living wage. One way the City is addressi ng this issue is through strategic targeting of its CDBG funds to programs that provide job training for vulnerable populations or to organizations that create economic development opportunities. SP-60: HOMELESS STRATEGY 91.215(h) REACHING OUT TO HOME LESS PERSONS (ESPECIALLY UNSHELTERED PERSONS) AND ASSESSING THEIR INDIVIDUAL NEEDS. Salt Lake City’s primary homeless services goal is to help homeless individuals and families get off the street and eventually into permanent housing. In the short term, Salt L ake City will continue to provide collaborative services to the homeless population. Salt Lake City recognizes that not every homeless individual is alike and because of that, there is no one size fits all solution. There are groups of chronic homeless i ndividuals, veterans, families, women with children, youth, and homeless-by-choice in the greater community. Each of these groups has different needs and each stage of homelessness must also be considered. The four stages of homelessness are prevention (ke eping people from dropping into homelessness with jobs and affordable housing), homelessness (helping with daily needs – lockers, showers, etc.), transcending homelessness (finding housing, employment), preventing recurrence (offering supportive services to housing). If the four stages are not considered for each group, efforts will eventually be unsuccessful. Personalized one-on-one outreach to homeless individuals providing information about the specific services that individual needs (e.g., housing, men tal health treatment, a hot meal) is the most effective outreach approach. Salt Lake City works regularly with various community partners that provide outreach and assessment of individuals experiencing homelessness including Catholic Community Services; V olunteers of America, Utah; the Department of Veterans Affairs; The Road Home and others. In 2016, Salt Lake City opened the Community Connection Center (CCC) located in the primary homeless services area of the City. The CCC operates as a drop - in center and employs social workers that assess individuals’ needs and help connect people with available housing and supportive services. The CCC has been successful in filling the need for additional homeless outreach and case management services in the City. The Salt Lake City Police Department (SLCPD) is also beginning a new pilot program. When available, while responding on a call with a person experiencing 164 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 homelessness, SLCPD will bring with them a social worker to engage with the client and help assess their service needs and connect them to services. ADDRESSING THE EMERGENCY SHELTER AND TRANSITIONAL HOUSING NEEDS OF HOMELESS PERSONS. Starting with the State of Utah’s Ten -Year Plan to End Chronic Homelessness, most efforts to deal with homelessness in Utah rely on the Housing First model. Although the ten - year plan has sunset, the programs and direction are still being implemented throughout the State. The premise of Housing First is that once homeless individuals have housing, they are more likely to seek and continue receiving services and can search for employment. The Housing First model has been effective in Salt Lake City, though meeting the varied housing needs of this population can be challenging. The homeless housing market needs more permanent supportive housing, housing vouchers, affordable non -supportive housing, and housing located near transit and services. Salt Lake City is working towards new solutions in these areas as outlined in the City’s newly - adopted housing plan, Growing SLC. There is a continued need for day services to meet the basic needs of persons experiencing homelessness. Needed daytime services include bathrooms, laundry, safe storage for their life’s belongings, mail receipt, and an indoor area to “hang out.” Salt Lake City addresses these issues by supporting shelters, day services, and providing a free storage program. Furthermore, Salt Lake City has constructed two new homeless resource centers that will provide emergency shelter and housing -focused supportive services. This shift in how homeless services are provided will help the community realize our goal that homelessness is rare, brief, and non-recurring. Moving forward, Salt Lake City will aim to assist homeless persons make the transition to permanent housing, including shortening the period of time that individuals and families experience homelessness, facilitating access for homeless individuals and families to affordable housing units, and preventing individuals and families who were recently homeless from becoming h omeless again. The City plays an important role by providing strategic funding for the valuable efforts undertaken by other stakeholders and, at times, filling in gaps in essential services. The City can also lend its voice and political weight to lobby for changes in policy, regulation, and statutes as needed to facilitate a comprehensive and effective approach to addressing homelessness and related issues. Salt Lake City’s newly adopted housing plan, Growing SLC, includes efforts to provide affordable housing options along the spectrum of housing including permanent supportive housing, transition in place, tenant based rental assistance, and affordable non -supportive housing. Shelter the Homeless, Collective Impact to End Homelessness Steering Committ ee, and the Salt Lake City Continuum of Care voted in support of merging these two entities into a new homeless system structure called the Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness. This Coalition’s primary goals are to prevent and end homelessness in the Salt Lake Valley through a system -wide commitment of resources, services, data collection, analysis and coordination among all stakeholders. Salt Lake City staff play a key role in assisting this effort as it moves forward. HELPING HOMELESS PERSONS (ESPECIALLY CHRONICALLY HOMELESS INDIVID UALS AND FAMILIES, FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN, VETERANS AND THEIR FAMILIES, AND UNACCOMPANIED YOUTH) MAKE THE TRANSITION TO PERMANENT HOUSING AND INDEPENDENT LIVING, INCLUDING SHORTENING THE PERIOD OF TIME T HAT INDIVIDUALS 165 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 AND FAMILIES EXPERIE NCE HOMELESSNESS, FACILITATING ACCESS FO R HOMELESS INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES TO AFFORDABLE H OUSING UNITS, AND PREVENTING INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES WHO WERE RECENT LY HOMELESS FROM BEC OMING HOMELESS AGAIN. Salt Lake City and its service partners work with homeless individuals to help them successfully transition from living on the streets or shelters and into permanent housing or independent living. The Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness’s primary goals are to prevent and end homelessness in Salt Lake Valley through a system -wide commitment of resources, services, data collection, analysis, and coordination among all stakeholders. Salt Lake City staff play a key role in assisting this effort as it moves forward. The City’s recently completed Growing Salt Lake City: A Five -Year Housing Plan 2018-2022 provides the following goals to remove barriers to affordable housing: Goal 1: Reform City practices to promote a responsive, affordable, high -opportunity housing market  Includes reforming City practices, such as land use and zoning regulations, as well as impediments in City processes Goal 2: Increase housing opportunities for cost -burdened households  Prioritizes stabilizing very low -income renters, the development of more af fordable units and increased home ownership opportunities Goal 3: Build a more equitable city  Eliminate incidences of housing discrimination and promote a diversity of housing throughout all areas of the City Coupling along with Growing Salt Lake City, in 2018 City Council and the Mayor increased the sales tax by .5% in an effort to create funding streams to address several critical needs within the City. Once such need is affordable housing. Through this mechanism, it is anticipated that over $2m of fund ing will be available each year to support low -income individuals and families access to affordable housing. Among other housing needs, funds will be used to support access of permanent housing opportunities for those that are exiting homelessness or at risk of becoming homeless. HELPING LOW-INCOME INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES AVOID BE COMING HOMELESS, ESPECIALLY EXTREMELY LOW-INCOME INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES AND THOSE WHO ARE: BEING DISCHARGED FROM PUBLICLY FUNDED INSTITUTIONS AND SYSTE MS OF CARE (SUCH AS HEALTH CARE FACILITIES, MENTAL HEALTH FACILIT IES, FOSTER CARE AND OTHER YOUTH FACILITIES, AND CORRECTIONS PROGRAMS AND INSTITUTIONS); OR, RECEIVING ASSISTANCE FROM PUBL IC OR PRIVATE AGENCIES THAT ADDRESS HOUSING, HEALTH, SOCIAL SERVICES, EMPLOYMENT, EDUCATION, OR YOUTH NEEDS The City’s recently completed Growing Salt Lake City: A Five -Year Housing Plan 2018-2022 provides the following goals to remove barriers to affordable housing: Goal 1: Reform City practices to promote a responsive, affordable, high -opportunity housing market  Includes reforming City practices, such as land use and zoning regulations, as well as impediments in City processes 166 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Goal 2: Increase housing opportunities for cost -burdened households  Prioritizes stabilizing very low -income renters, the development of more affordable units and increased home ownership opportunities Goal 3: Build a more equitable city  Eliminate incidences of housing discrimination and promote a diversity of housing throughout all areas of the City Coupling along with Growing Salt Lake City, in 2018 City Council and the Mayor increased the sales tax by .5% in an effort to create funding streams to address several critical needs within the City. Once such need is affordable housing. Through this mechanism, it is antici pated that over $2m of funding through Funding Our Future will be available each year to support low -income individuals and families access affordable housing. Among other needs, funds will be used to identify and support households that are at risk of los ing housing due to a variety of reason, including but not limited to eviction for non -payment, those that are precariously housed, those that are in fact at risk of becoming homeless, but do not meet HUD’s definition of homeless, or that are in a judicial process in which mitigation and resolution is possible. Salt Lake City, along with other organizations in the Salt Lake Continuum of Care, work to prevent and divert individuals and families from experiencing homelessness. Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County and the State of Utah all provide funding to Utah Community Action for short -term rental assistance to families at risk of falling into homelessness. Salt Lake City is reducing and ending homelessness in the community through strong collaborations with partner organizations throughout the Salt Lake Continuum of Care. Salt Lake City works closely with Salt Lake County, the State of Utah and service providers to stop families from dropping into homelessness, reduce the length of time individuals and famili es experience homelessness, help individuals and families successfully transition out of homelessness, and keep individuals and families from rescinding back into homelessness. The Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness’s primary goals are to preve nt and end homelessness in Salt Lake Valley through a system -wide commitment of resources, services, data collection, analysis and coordination among all stakeholders. Salt Lake City staff play a key role in assisting this effort as it moves forward. SP-65: LEAD-BASED PAINT HAZARDS 91.215(i) Because a high percentage of the housing units in Salt Lake City were built before 1978, outreach and education efforts about lead-based paint must continue. As such, the City has implemented a plan to address lead issues in our residential rehabilitation projects. The City’s Housing Rehabilitation Program is in compliance with HUD’s rules concerning identification and treatment of lead hazards. During the 2018 -2019 program year, Salt Lake City worked in conjunction wit h our partners on the state and county levels to educate the public on the dangers posed by lead based paint, including the following:  Undertake outreach efforts through direct mailings, the Salt Lake City website, various fairs and public events, and the local community councils.  Provide materials in Spanish to increase lead -based paint hazard awareness in minority communities.  Partner with Salt Lake County’s Lead Safe Salt Lake program to treat lead hazards in the homes of children identified as having elevated blood levels.  Emphasize lead hazards in our initial contacts with homeowners needing rehabilitation.  Work with community partners to encourage local contractors to obtain worker certifications for their employees and sub-contractors. 167 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 HOW ARE THE ACTIONS LISTED ABOVE RELATED TO THE EXTENT OF LEAD POISONING AND HAZARDS? Our efforts over the last five years have resulted in a significant increase in the number of children being tested for elevated blood-lead levels. This has been made possible through improvements in testing technology which has allowed the City to better detect and protect children and their family members who might be living in a hazardous environment. The percentage of children testing positive has continued to remain below 1% despi te the action level for blood-lead levels has been reduced from 10 mcg/dl to 5 mcg/dl. Through our rehabilitation and outreach efforts, we hope to continue to maintain these low testing levels and continue to protect our children from dangerous living conditions. HOW ARE THE ACTIONS LISTED ABOVE INTEGRATED INTO HOUSING POL ICIES AND PROCEDURES? The abatement of lead in Salt Lake City’s existing housing stock is an important component of addressing fair housing impediments for low -income families with children. It is a policy of Salt Lake City’s Housing Rehabilitation program, as well as other housing programs funded through the City’s federal entitlement block grants, to employ safe work practices when working to identify and abate lead -based paint in househ olds. SP-70: ANTI-POVERTY STRATEGY 91.215(j) JURISDICTION GOALS, PROGRAMS, AND POLICIES FOR REDUCING THE NUMBER OF POVERTY-LEVEL FAMILIES Similar to cities across the country, Salt Lake City is faced with growing income inequality and must address poverty in our community. The limited incomes of many Salt Lake City residents have left them with insufficient means to meet an adequate standard of living – especially in light of the massive increase in housing, transportation, health care, and many other critical need costs. In a strategic effort to reduce the number of households living in poverty and prevent households from falling into poverty, Salt Lake City is focusing on a multi-pronged approach: 1. Identify strategic opportunities to build capacity, p revent displacement, and expand resources within the target area that align with other large-scale community investment. 2. Support the City’s most vulnerable populations, including the chronically homeless, homeless individuals and families, those faci ng behavioral health concerns, persons living with HIV/AIDS, disabled, and the low -income elderly. The City’s anti-poverty strategy aims to close the gap in a number of socioeconomic indicators, such as improving housing affordability, stabilizing househ olds that may be at risk of losing their housing, deploy anti - displacement strategies, increase employment skills of at -risk adults, access to transportation for low -income households, and support behavioral health programs. Efforts will focus on the follo wing objectives:  Assist low -income individuals to maximize their incomes.  Expand housing opportunities.  Ensure that vulnerable populations have access to supportive services.  Evaluate the use of anti -displacement strategies and access to high opportunity areas.  Increase access to public transit systems for vulnerable populations. Federal entitlement funds allocated through this Consolidated Plan will support the City’s anti -poverty strategy through the following: 168 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024  Provide job/vocational training for vulnerable populations.  Provide essential supportive services for vulnerable populations.  Provide housing rehabilitation for low -income homeowners.  Expand affordable housing opportunities.  Improve neighborhood/commercial infrastructure in target areas.  Provide transportation amenities that support multi-modal transportation.  Increase access to public transit systems for vulnerable populations. HOW ARE THE JURISDICTION’S POVERTY REDUCING GOALS, PROGRAMS, AND POLICIES COORDINATED WITH THIS AFFORDABLE HOUSING PLAN: Anti-poverty efforts outlined in this plan will be leveraged with other City plans, programs, initiatives and resources to undertake a comprehensive approach to reduce the occurrence of poverty within Salt Lake City. City programs and initiatives that su pport anti-poverty efforts include, but are not limited to, the following:  Growing SLC : A Five-Year Housing Plan 2018-2022  Affordable Housing Rehabilitation and Development  Rental Assistance Programs  Direct Financial Assistance Programs  Economic Development Loan Fund SP-80: MONITORING 91.230 DESCRIBE THE STANDARDS AND PROCEDURES TH AT THE JURISDICTION WILL USE TO MONITOR ACTIVITIES CARRIED OUT IN FURTHE RANCE OF THE PLAN AND WILL USE TO ENSURE LONG-TERM COMPLIANCE WITH REQUIREMENTS OF THE PROGRAMS INVOLVED, INCLUDING MINORITY BUSINESS OUTREACH AND THE COMPREHENSIVE PL ANNING REQUIREMENTS. To ensure compliance from the start of a project or program, the Housing and Neighborhood Development (HAND) Division uses the application process to start the monitoring pr ocess of all agencies. Each application must go through an extensive review process that includes a risk analysis of proposed activities and ensures that each applicant meets a national objective and that the organizational goals are aligned with the goals identified in the City’s Consolidated Plan. Once the applications pass the initial review, each application is taken through an extensive public process, with the final funding decisions being made by our City Council. At that time, contracts are drawn up that identify governing regulations, scope of work, budgets and any other Federal requirements and local requirements of the grant. Once fully executed contracts are in place, HAND’s Capital Planning staff are responsible for monitoring the agencies through the life of the contract. The agencies are monitored for compliance with the program regulations as well as the content found in the City contracts. To ensure sub-grantees are aware of program requirements, each agency that was awarded funds receive d an invitation to attend a mandatory grant training seminar. This seminar allows HAND staff to reiterate Federal regulations, provide guidance on changes for the upcoming grant year, identify Federal funding concerns, and review expectations of the agenci es. The City requires that at least one attendee from each agency come to the training. Each person attending the training seminar receives a handbook that contains important information including contacts, website links, timelines, and a list of documents that are required to be submitted to the 169 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 City annually. Agencies that were unable to attend do have the ability to receive training documents if they contact the City. The City operates all CDBG, ESG, HOME and HOPWA grants on a reimbursement basis. This ensures that desk reviews, an important part of monitoring, can be completed before federal funds are utilized for any program or project. A desk review was completed for every reimbursement request. This allowed HAND staff to ensure that all requirements of the contract and federal regulations were actively being met prior to disbursing any funds or drawing funds from HUD’s Integrated Disbursement and Information System (IDIS). The IDIS system also helps to assist with program/project eligibility requirem ents, track spending rates and report performance measurements. During the program year, the HAND staff works together with sub -grantees to ensure Federal regulations are followed. This ensures consistent communication between staff and agencies and redu ces confusion. Through the use of a Risk Analysis, coupled with reporting mechanisms, the Division Director and HAND staff are able to determine which agencies would benefit from a technical training session, and which agencies need to have an on-site monitoring visit. The agencies that score highest typically have a monitoring visit during the following program year. As per Federal regulations, select agencies from each program (CDBG, ESG, HOME & HOPWA) are monitored on an annual basis. Because it is a HAND policy that each reimbursement request receives a desk review prior to funds being disbursed, it is a straightforward process to monitor compliance throughout the term of the contract. In addition to desk reviews, tailored guidance is given throughout t he year via telephone and email conversations. Many of the agencies receiving funding were for programs that have received grant funds over a long period of time and had no substantial changes to their programs. As such, the City focused its efforts on new agencies needing technical assistance, and on working with veteran agencies and their performance measurements to ensure better data quality for outcomes. Agencies receiving Tenant Based Rental Assistance funding are highly encouraged to place clients in multifamily units that meet the City Housing standards. It is the City’s requirement that all residential rental units must have a current City business license. These units are regularly inspected as per City Ordinance. However, it is also our understanding that some clients may not be housed in multifamily units for one reason or another. In an effort to ensure safe, decent housing, a process exists whereby a Landlord may self -certify that the unit meets City Housing Code. Outside of the City’s incorpora ted boundaries, agencies must follow local housing ordinances. In these instances, a Housing Quality Standard Inspection form must be in the client’s file. All inspections and housing standards must be met prior to the clients moving into their units. HAND staff provides year-round technical assistance via phone, email and when needed, in person. This technical assistance provides the agencies with an opportunity to evaluate programs, policies and practices in a low stress environment. Continued technical assistance ensures compliance with federal regulations. Technical assistance and monitoring visits reveal that, in general, our agencies have well documented processes and are quick to contact the City when questions arise. If deficiencies are identifie d and agencies will work quickly to adjust processes as necessary and move forward with stronger programs. The City encourages citizens to become active in their communities, providing feedback to the City about how their neighborhoods could be improved, how funding should be prioritized, and address safety concerns. 170 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 169 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 APPENDIX A: 2020-2024 FAIR HOUSING ACTION PLAN Salt Lake City is dedicated to affirmatively furthering the purposes of the Fair Housing Act to ensure equal access to rental and homeownership opportunities for all residents. Through the efforts identified in the 2020- 2024 Fair Housing Action Plan, Salt Lake City will continue to collaborate with our partners to enforce federal, state, and local laws that prohibit housing discrimination based on a person’s race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, source of income, age, parental status, or marital status. In addition, the City will address practices and policies that have the effect of limiting housing choice for protected classes. As part of a larger network of fair housing stakeholders, Salt Lake City will work toward a future where everyone has an equitable and affordable place to call home. ANALYSIS OF IMPEDIMENTS In 2014, the Bureau of Economic and Business Research at the University of Utah completed a comprehensive analysis of fair housing on both a regional and city level with a grant from HUD. Salt Lake City continues to use the 2014 data due to the fact that there are no significant changes to the data, nor significant changes to the methods to address the impediments identified. However, the City will continue to work collaboratively with community members, data experts, and local municipalities if additional data comes forward. The Regional Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice Salt Lake County and Salt Lake City Fair Housing Equity Assessment provide an analysis of the following:  Patterns of segregation  Racial and ethnic concentrated areas of poverty  Disparities by race, color, religion, sex, familial status, national origin, and disability in access to housing and community assets, including education, transit, and employment This Analysis of Impediments builds on that prior study and focuses on current areas of impediments. Between 2013 and 2018, The Fair Housing Program of the Disability Law Center (DLC) of Utah conducted fair housing testing for the purpose of uncovering rental housing discrimination directed towards protected classes. This program serves Salt Lake City and all areas of Utah to ensure that an individual’s housing rights are upheld and that micro or systematic discrimination is not present. ACTION PLAN Salt Lake City has utilized the regional analysis of impediments, fair housing equity assessment, and data gathered through the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan planning process to identify impediments to fair housing choice that disproportionately affect members of protected classes. The following Action Plan provides an overview of fair housing impediments and provides action items to remove or ameliorate each impediment. Impediments can be direct or indirect, created by both public sector and private sector actions, and have been divided into the following categories: 1. Discrimination in Housing 2. Mobility and Access to Opportunity 3. Availability of Affordable and Suitable Housing 4. Zoning, Land Use Regulations and Redevelopment Policies 5. Fair Housing Coordination and Knowledge 1. Discrimination in Housing As a HUD-funded recipient Salt Lake City does not discriminate in housing or services on the basis of race, color, national origin, disability, familial status, religion, or sex, as well as protected classes covered under state 170 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 and local regulations. The City works to eliminate discriminatory practices and ensure equal housing opportunities for all. Even with the City’s efforts to eliminate discriminatory practices, fair housing equity assessments have, on occasion, found discriminatory practices. Impediment: Unfair Lending Practices A contrast of mortgage denials and approvals exists between racial and ethnic populations in Salt Lake County. The mortgage application denial rate for Hispanics (20%) in Salt Lake City is higher than that of non-Hispanics (13%).1 Actions to Eliminate or Ameliorate Impediment: I. Expand homeownership opportunities by continuing to target the City’s Low and Moderate-Income Homebuyer program, as well as other direct financial assistance programs funded through CDBG and HOME, to racial and ethnic minorities, persons with disabilities, single-parent households, and large families. II. Collaborate with community partners, including community development organizations, religious institutions, employment centers, and housing counseling agencies to support education programs on bank products and services, financial management, and homebuyer counseling. Programs should be offered in English and Spanish, as well as other languages as needed. III. Work with local lenders, financial institutions, and real estate institutions to build awareness on fair housing laws and practices. IV. Support the Disability Law Center’s fair housing testing efforts directed at private market real estate practices Impediment: Rental Discrimination The Fair Housing Program at Utah’s Disability Law Center serves people from all protected classes (race, color, ethnicity, sex/gender, religion, disability, familial status) and not just people with disabilities. Utah law also protects against discrimination based on source of income, sexual orientation and gender identity. The program serves Salt Lake City and is intended to ensure that an individual’s housing rights are upheld and that micro or systematic discrimination is not present. The Disability Law Center helps ensure that people who belong to protected classes have equal access and opportunity to rent or own homes and apartments in their communities. This work includes, but is not limited to, the following:  Ensuring that landlords and property owners do not discriminate in renting or selling property  Making sure that housing is accessible to people with disabilities to the extent required by law  Advocating to increase the amount of accessible, affordable, and integrated housing  Providing fair housing trainings for providers, landlords, and consumers of housing  Conducting fair housing testing to ensure that landlords are complying with fair housing laws  Enforcing fair housing laws through administrative and judicial complaint processes The Disability Law Center has uncovered rental housing discrimination directed toward protected classes. The Center conducts tests with matched pairs of individuals, couples, or families. Testers are matched on rental eligibility characteristics so that the only significant difference between them is the factor being tested. 1 Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council, Home Mortgage Disclosure Act 171 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024  On average, approximately 300 calls a year to the Disability Law Center originate from Salt Lake City residents.  Data on fair housing testing from the Disability Law Center, the most common rental housing discrimination in Salt Lake City are primarily based on disability status, national origin, and race.  Data collected from 2013 to 2018 showed 97 cases of confirmed disparate treatment and signs of disparate treatment, regarding housing discrimination in Salt Lake City. During this period there were a total of 1,078 reports of people who felt they had been discriminated against. Of those, 456 total required short-term assistance and instructions on how to advocate for what they need on their own or required referrals to other legal agencies.  In 2019 Approximately 40 of the total calls were elevated to case level. Of those, the Disability Law Center successfully mediated directly with landlords on behalf of tenants.  Approximately 150 fair housing tests per year are completed by the Disability Law Center, with about 25% of the total having some sort of housing discrimination red flag. Examples of the incidents around rental housing discrimination, all of which are illegal, verified by the Disability Law Center testing are:  Landlords requesting tenants to waive HIPAA rights to verify their disabilities.  Requiring extra deposit fees for service animals.  Landlords wanting to visibly identify a person’s severity of disability to determine if they should rent to them.  When an Arabic sounding name was given to a landlord, the landlord wanted to see the potential tenant before deciding to rent to them.  Potential tenants of color being told to pay higher deposits and higher monthly rents compared to white potential tenants.  Potential renters of color being told there are no apartments available when white potential renters are told there are several available to them that day.  Different move in specials given to white applicants over applicants of color. Such as free parking spaces, or being offered apartments closer to amenities. Actions to Eliminate or Ameliorate Impediment: I. Utilize the Good Landlord program to educate landlords and property managers on fair housing laws and requirements; II. In partnership with the Utah Antidiscrimination and Labor Division and the Disability Law Center, the Apartment Association, utilize the Mayor’s Office of Diversity and Human rights to provide educational programming on tenant rights and fair housing; III. Refer victims of housing discrimination to the Utah Antidiscrimination and Labor Division and the Disability Law Center to process fair housing complaints. 2. MOBILITY AND ACCESS TO OPPORTUNITY Fair housing choice provides that members of protected classes are able to choose a residence that offers access to opportunity including essential services, transit, quality schools, job opportunities, and healthy communities. As the map below demonstrates, there are differences in access to transit based on neighborhood. The Center for Neighborhood Technology tracks an overall transit score for municipalities based on trips per week and number of jobs accessible by transit. The central parts of the City score highly by this standard but, as shown in Figure 1, some areas with lower incomes, such as the Glendale, Poplar Grove, and Rose Park neighborhoods, score lower in the transit scores as transit lines are not as accessible in these neighborhoods. 172 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 FIGURE 1 Source: The Center for Neighborhood Technology, AllTransit, 2019 It is Salt Lake city’s goal to expand housing opportunity within neighborhoods by increasing economic diversity and addressing spatial disparities and impediments. Mobility and opportunity impediments are as follows: Impediment: Racial and Ethnic Segregation Figure 2 shows a breakdown of the City’s census tracts by their reported poverty level as it pertains to the reported minority population within the tracts. It shows that the tracts directly west of I-15 have some of the highest concentrations of minorities who are also living below the poverty level. FIGURE 2 173 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2013-2017 ACS 5-Year Estimates Racial and ethnic segregation in Salt Lake City developed due to a multitude of factors, including the housing market, neighborhood preferences, land use policies including zoning, demographics, and economic conditions. Action to Eliminate or Ameliorate Impediment: I. Expand affordable housing opportunities throughout the City to increase housing choice for protected classes. Housing opportunities should include rental and homeownership, with a focus on housing to accommodate large families. Salt Lake City will support mixed-income opportunities through the following efforts: a. Utilize funding resources, including HOME Investment Partnership Program funding, Housing Trust Fund, and other funding sources to provide financial assistance for the development of housing that economically diversifies neighborhoods. b. Support zoning and land use policies that allow and/or incentivize affordable housing development in areas with high opportunity. c. Build public-private partnerships to leverage public resources with private capital to support housing development in areas with high opportunity. 174 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Impediment: Access to Opportunity As Figure 3 demonstrates, the opportunity index is considerably higher on the east side of Salt Lake City as compared to the west side of the City and the area surrounding I-15. FIGURE 3 High opportunity areas are geographical locations within the city that provide conditions that expand a person’s likelihood for social mobility. These areas have been identified through an analysis of quality-of life indicators, homeownership rate, poverty, cost-burdened households, educational proficiency, unemployment rate, and labor force participation. With these multiple indicators, a single composite, or standardized, score is calculated for each census tract. Scores may range from 1 to 10, with 1 indicating low opportunity and 10 indicating high opportunity. A census tract with a standardized score above that of the citywide average shall be designated as an Area of Opportunity. Salt Lake City contracted with the University of Utah’s Kem C. Gardner Institute to develop and annually update the city’s Areas of Opportunity data. FIGURE 4 175 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Action to Eliminate or Ameliorate Impediment: I. Expand access to opportunity in RDA project areas by demographically and geographically targeting CDBG funding to support economic development, transportation improvements, anti-displacement strategies, and other anti-poverty programs. II. Improve housing stability in RDA Project Areas by increasing outreach and education regarding the availability and use of CDBG and HOME funding for housing rehabilitation. III. Utilize federal and local funding in distressed and at-risk neighborhoods for strategic housing development to catalyze private investment, improve housing quality, and promote occupancy at a range of household incomes. 176 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 3. AVAILABILITY OF AFFORDABLE AND SUITABLE HOUSING A regional lack of affordable housing disproportionately impacts protected classes. Protected classes are especially impacted by a lack of rental housing affordable to households at 50% AMI and below, large family households, and disabled person households. Housing stock impediments are as follows: Impediment: Rental housing affordable to households at 50% of AMI and below A housing gap analysis found a citywide shortage of 6,177 affordable rental units for households earning less than $20,000 per year. About 37 percent of the City’s renter households earned less than $20,000 in 2018, with only 11 percent of the rentals in the city in their affordability range. The limited availability of housing affordable to households at 50% AMI and below have disproportionally impacted racial and ethnic minorities, persons with disabilities, and large families. Action to Eliminate or Ameliorate Impediment: I. Promote development of housing units, including permanent supportive housing units, affordable to households earning 50% AMI and below by leveraging public and private investments. City-owned land can be used to leverage private investment for affordable and supportive housing development. II. Utilize the Salt Lake City Housing Trust Fund/Housing Trust Development Fund, and HOME Development Fund to develop housing affordable to households targeted to households at 50% AMI or below. The Salt Lake City Housing Trust Fund was created by the Mayor and City Council in 2000 to provide financial assistance to support the development and preservation of affordable and special needs housing in Salt Lake City. Eligible activities include acquisition, new construction, and rehabilitation of both multi-family rental properties and single-family homeownership. Additional assistance relating to housing for eligible households may include project or tenant-based rental assistance, down payment assistance and technical assistance. The HOME Development Fund was created as a reaction to the increasing housing costs and difficulty in deploying HOME funds. It’s uses align with federal regulations and are targeted to acquisition, new construction, rehabilitation, and homeownership opportunities. The funds may be used for single family units as well as multi-family units. III. Strengthen incentives for the development of affordable housing. Incentives might include inclusionary zoning, density bonuses, fee reductions, fee waivers, land subsidies, and limited property tax exemptions. Strategies may also include disposition of city-owned land for the use of affordable housing development, interest rate discounts, and below market sales. IV. Salt Lake City has several affordable housing projects currently planned which are expected to add 476 affordable units in the near future. These projects are listed in the table below. TABLE 1: FUTURE AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROJECTS Project Address Affordable Units AMI Expected Completion Exchange A 340 East 400 South 104 50% 2020 Centro Civico, Casa Milagro 145 South 600 West 49 50% 2020 Bookcliffs Lodge 1159 South West Temple 43 50% TBD First Step House, Phase II / 5th East Apts. 434 South 500 East 75 30% 2020 177 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Impediment: Rental housing for large families With an increasing share of minorities, particularly Hispanic and refugee/New American families who on average have larger household sizes, there is a higher demand for the low supply of rental options with enough bedrooms to accommodate large families. However, the supply of rental units with 4 or more bedrooms has been diminishing, while the supply of units with 2-3 bedrooms has been increasing. TABLE 2: PERCENT OF RENTAL UNITS BY SIZE Unit Size 2013 2018 No Bedroom 5% 8% 1 Bedroom 38% 36% 2 or 3 Bedrooms 36% 50% 4 or More Bedrooms 21% 6% Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2014-2018 ACS 5-Year Estimates, Physical Housing Characteristics for Occupied Housing Units Actions to Eliminate or Ameliorate Impediment: I. Utilize Salt Lake City Housing Trust Fund, Housing Trust Development Fund, CDBG, and HOME funding to prioritize the development and preservation of affordable large units (three or more bedrooms). II. Encourage the geographical dispersal of affordable large bedroom units throughout the City to expand housing choice. Prioritize affordable housing development for families in neighborhoods that provide access to opportunities, including jobs, public transportation, education, and public amenities. Impediment: Housing for Disabled Persons More long-term, stable housing is necessary to address the needs of disabled populations. Disabled populations can experience several barriers in accessing housing and supportive services, including housing discrimination, cognitive abilities, lack of documentation, coordination of resources, substance abuse, and instability. As such, accessibility modifications, behavioral and medical services, and other supportive services are necessary to address the needs of disabled populations. In addition, more residential and transitional housing opportunities are required to address the needs of extremely low-income persons with chronic alcohol and substance addictions. Actions to Eliminate or Ameliorate Impediment: I. Prioritize CDBG funding for housing programs that provide accessibility modifications to low-income homeowners. Pamela’s Place / Ribbon Properties 525 South 500 West 100 30% 2020 First Step House, Phase III / 426 Apts. 426 South 500 East 40 30% 2021 Magnolia 175 South 300 East 65 30% TBD Total 476 178 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 II. Prioritize the development and preservation of affordable housing units that meet fair housing accessibility guidelines, with focus on rental housing affordable to households at 50% AMI and below. II. Prioritize CDBG funding for supportive housing programs targeted to disabled populations. 4. ZONING, LAND USE REGULATIONS, AND REDEVELOPMENT POLICIES Land use regulations can prevent the development of affordable housing and an equitable distribution of housing types throughout all areas of the City. Impediment: Zoning and land use regulations can restrict possibilities for affordable housing, thereby limiting housing choice for protected classes. As a large rental city, Salt Lake City has a considerable amount of multifamily zoning. As such, Salt Lake City provides a broad range of housing types for households with a wide range of incomes. However, many of the City’s neighborhoods are zoned for single-family use and prohibit multi-family housing. These neighborhoods are often considered to be high opportunity by offering quality schools, low crime rates, public amenities, and economic opportunities. As housing affordability continues to decline in Salt Lake City, the inadequate supply of affordable housing will increasingly impact protected classes. Such disparities will compound if zoning limits affordable housing development through the following:  Limitations on the siting of group homes  Limitations on the siting of accessory dwelling units  Minimum single-family lot sizes  A lack of multifamily zoning in census tracts with low poverty rates Actions to Eliminate or Ameliorate Impediment: I. Provide zoning incentives to encourage affordable housing development throughout the City; II. Revise zoning to more broadly allow mixed-income, multi-family, and affordable residential uses; III. Broaden the range of explicitly permitted residential uses for vulnerable populations, especially for supportive housing, group homes, and others; 5. FAIR HOUSING COORDINATION AND KNOWLEDGE Salt Lake City is committed to promoting fair housing through education and coordination. Producers, consumers, and providers of housing need to have adequate fair housing knowledge to promote best practices. In addition, coordination needs to occur between local municipalities to effectively ameliorate fair housing impediments at the regional level. Impediment: Lack of reginal fair housing coordination between municipalities, service providers, and other fair housing stakeholders. Several impediments to fair housing choice are shared across municipalities in Salt Lake County. The most effective mitigation to these common impediments is a coordinated approach by all of the jurisdictions in the region. Action to Eliminate or Ameliorate Impediment: 179 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 I. Salt Lake City will continue to participate in the Utah Fair Housing forum which includes representatives from HUD’s Regional Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity, the Disability Law Center, the Utah Antidiscrimination and Labor division, representatives from various Utah entitlement cities, and fair housing advocacy groups. II. Salt Lake City will participate and promote with community partners all regional Fair Housing training, conferences, and Fair Housing Design and Construction training. Impediment: Fair housing knowledge does not reach all producers, consumers, and providers of housing, which results in a lack of understanding, misconceptions, and violations of fair housing laws. Fair housing cannot become a high priority for our community without increased awareness on fair housing rights and responsibilities. Increased awareness needs to occur for all fair housing stakeholders, from producers to consumers of housing. Actions to Eliminate or Ameliorate Impediment: I. Promote fair housing rights and responsibilities through Salt Lake city’s annual workshop for CDBG, ESG, HOME, and HOPWA subgrantees. II. Distribute fair housing literature in multiple languages through various outreach events and through the City’s website. III. Utilize the good Landlord program to educate landlords and property managers on fair housing laws and requirements. IV. In partnership with the Utah Antidiscrimination and Labor Division and the Disability Law Center, utilize the Mayor’s Office of Diversity and Human Rights to provide educational programming on tenant rights and fair housing. V. Collaborate with community partners, including community development organizations, religious institutions, employment centers and housing counseling agencies to support education programs on bank products and services, financial management, and homebuyer counseling. Programs should be offered in English and Spanish, as well as other languages as applicable. Impediment: Language barriers faced by recent immigrants, refugees, New Americans, deaf, hard-of- hearing, deaf-blind, or speech disabled individuals create a challenge to access available housing opportunities and obtain fair housing knowledge and resources. Persons with limited English proficiency (LEP) are those whose proficiency in speaking, reading, writing, or understanding English is such that it denies or limits their ability to have meaningful access to programs and services if language assistance is not provided. According to the 2014-2018 American Community Survey (ACS), over 16.4 percent of Salt Lake City’s population is foreign-born. Salt Lake City is committed to providing language assistance for LEP persons to ensure equal access to all programs, resources, and opportunities for public engagement. Actions to Eliminate or Ameliorate Impediment: I. Salt Lake City and its subgrantees will identify populations served that have limited English proficiency (LEP) and develop reasonable steps to ensure meaningful access 180 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 to LEP persons. Each agency/program will develop and implement a language access plan (LAP) to prevent discrimination and foster an environment of inclusiveness. II. Salt Lake City will continue to make its Housing Rehabilitation and Low and Moderate-Income Homebuyer programs available to all eligible individuals including those for whom English is not their primary language and who have a limited ability to read, write, speak or understand English. The Division of Housing and Neighborhood Development’s LAP outlines steps to ensure meaningful access to its housing programs and activities by LEP persons. III. Salt Lake City will utilize and advertise communication resources and options for deaf, hard-of-hearing, deaf-blind, or speech disabled individuals who can use a Text Telephone (TTY) service. The City will also coordinate with the Mayor’s Americans with Disability Act (ADA) community liaison for additional communication resources and options. IMPLEMENTATION Salt Lake City is taking a comprehensive approach to affirmatively furthering fair housing by promoting fair housing enforcement and education, as well as expanding housing choice and availability. The City intends to further develop the action steps included in this plan and report on progress through the City’s annual Action Plan and Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Reports (CAPERs). Implementation of these actions will require coordination of efforts from multiple stakeholders inside and outside of City government, including subgrantees, housing, and community development partners, various committees, and City staff. 181 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 APPENDIX B: SUMMARY OF PUBLIC COMMENT AND CITIZEN PARTICIPATION Citizen participation is key to ensure goals and priorities in the Consolidated plan are defined in the context of community needs and preferences. It also provides an opportunity to educate the community about the City’s federal grant programs. To this end, Salt Lake City solicited involvement from a diverse group of stake holders and community members during the development of the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan. Public engagement efforts included a citywide survey, public hearings, public meetings, stakeholder committee meetings, internal technical committee meetings, and a public comment period. The City received input and buy-in from residents, homeless service providers, low-income service providers, food banks, housing advocates, housing developers, housing authorities, anti-poverty advocates, healthcare providers, transit authority planners, City divisions and departments, among others. Citizen participation opportunities included the following:  Housing and Neighborhood Development Needs Survey  Stakeholder Advisory Committee Meetings  Consolidated Plan Interdepartmental Technical  Consolidated Plan Public Hearing  Consolidated Plan Comment Period  General Needs Hearing  Various Community Fairs  Salt Lake County Needs Survey  Input from Various State & Public Agencies  Salt Lake City Planning Commission Presentation  Salt Lake City Planning Open House  Email blasts, Website postings INTERDEPARTMENTAL TECHNICAL ADVISORY GROUP MEETING #1 On July 29, 2019, the Interdepartmental Technical Advisory Group (ITAG) conducted their first meeting. The ITAG members responded to real-time interactive polling using the same questions as the resident survey to ensure consistency and compare results. The top priorities were housing and transportation with an emphasis on insufficient housing stock to meet the needs of a growing population. This concern about stock and growth was focused mostly on low-income individual and families, seniors, and persons with disabilities. Another key takeaway from the meeting was that ITAG members felt that their role in relates to the Consolidated Plan was to assist the City Council with implementation and to be a liaison to the public and City officials. STAKEHOLDER MEETING #1 On July 30, 2019, the Housing and Neighborhood Development Division of Salt Lake City held a public meeting with nonprofit providers of housing and supportive services. The purpose of the meeting was to gain input and discuss which needs of low- and moderate-income residents were the greatest. This input helped form the Consolidated Plan’s goals and priorities. The meeting agenda was as follows:  10:30 a.m. - 10:40 a.m. – Introductions 182 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024  10:40 a.m. - 10:50 a.m. – What is the Consolidated Plan? o Importance of the meeting o Citizen Participation Timeline/Process  10:50 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. – Existing Conditions & Trends  11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m. – Survey  10:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. – Stakeholder Priorities  12:15 p.m. - 12:30 p.m. – Wrap-up As outlined in the agenda, the meeting set aside time to help the attendees understand the importance of their feedback in the Consolidated Plan’s goal-setting process and then immediately consulted with them to gain insight into their perception of existing conditions and trends. This was followed by a survey which helped the attendees specify priorities moving forward. The survey results indicated housing services were the highest priority. Homeless services, mental health services, healthcare services, and childhood education programs were the next top priorities respectively. 183 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 CONSOLIDATED PLAN SURVEY - (AUG – SEPT. 2019) The survey fielding began in mid-August and ran through September with 2,068 total respondents. The survey’s purpose was to collect feedback from residents regarding their priorities for the provision of housing, public services, and economic development. The survey was available in both English and Spanish versions with additional translation services available upon request. Respondents ranked homeless and transportation services as their top priorities for City services. Street improvements, job creation, and rental assistance were the top priorities for community, economic development, and housing investments respectively. 184 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 185 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 186 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 187 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 188 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 189 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 190 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 191 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 192 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 193 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 194 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 195 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 SALT LAKE COUNTY 2019 COMMUNITY NEEDS SURVEY Salt Lake County also conducted a survey to collect public input on community needs in regard to economic development, as well as housing and community development. 243 respondents reported living in Salt Lake City and indicated that air quality, housing affordability, and homeless services. The survey results also showed that over78% of respondents either disagreed or strongly disagreed with the notion that Salt Lake County’s available housing units meet the need of the growing population. Survey results were as follows: 196 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 197 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 198 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 199 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 200 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 201 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 202 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 203 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 204 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 205 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 206 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 207 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 208 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE September 26, 2019 Contact: Jennifer Schumann 801-535-7276 City Now Accepting Applications for CDBG, ESG, HOME and HOPWA Federal Grant Programs SALT LAKE CITY – Applications are currently being accepted for the following U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) programs:  Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) The CDBG program’s primary objective is to promote the development of viable urban communities by providing affordable housing, suitable living environments, and economic opportunities for persons of low and moderate income.  Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) The ESG program’s primary objective is to assist individuals and families regain housing stability after experiencing a housing or homelessness crisis.  HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME) The HOME program’s primary objective is to create affordable housing opportunities for low-income households.  Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) The HOPWA program’s primary objective is to provide housing assistance and related supportive services to persons living with HIV/AIDS and their families. Interested entities are invited to submit applications for activities that support local and national program requirements. An application resource guide is available online at www.slc.gov/hand. Optional training sessions will be held on October 17, 2019 at 9:00 a.m. and October 24, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. for potential applicants in Room 126 of the City and County Building at 451 South State Street. Applications must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, November 3, 2019. Late applications will not be accepted. For questions about Salt Lake City’s federal grant programs, contact Jennifer Schumann at 801-535-7276 or email jennifer.schumann@slcgov.com EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM Reasonable accommodations for individuals with disabilities or those in need of language interpretation services can be provided if four working days’ notice is given by calling 801-535-7777. Hearing impaired who wish to attend these meetings should contact our TDD service number, 801-535-6021,four days in advance so an interpreter can be provided. Physical access entrance and parking are located on the east side of the building. SALT LAKE CITY CORPORATION 451 SOUTH STATE STREET, ROOM 306 P.O. BOX 145474, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84114- 5474 WWW.SLCGOV.COM TEL 801-535-7704 FAX 801-535-6331 209 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 JACQUELINE M. BISKUPSKI DEPARTMENT of COMMUNITY Mayor and NEIGHBORHOODS HOUSING and NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT NOTICE of 2020-2021 GRANT APPLICATIONS CDBG, ESG, HOME AND HOPWA PROGRAMS Salt Lake City will make available applications for the following U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) programs:  Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)  Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG)  HOME Investment Partnership (HOME)  Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) Applications will be available Monday, October 7, 2019 with a closing date of Sunday, November 3, 2019 at 11:59 pm. Applications will be accepted via ZoomGrants™, an online grant management system. Please go to www.slc.gov/hand for directions on how to apply. To assist applicants, Salt Lake City will be hosting two in-person training sessions and will make available training session materials at www.slc.gov/hand. Participation in a training session is highly encouraged. They are as follows:  In-person trainings: October 17, 2019 at 9:00 a.m. October 24, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. In-person training sessions will be held at the City and County Building in Room 126. Potential applicants must RSVP to Baylee White at Baylee.White@slcgov.com. To assist potential applicants, resources have been made available at Salt Lake City’s Division of Housing and Neighborhood Development website at www.slc.gov/hand. Completed applications must be submitted via ZoomGrants by 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, November 3, 2019. Late applications will not be accepted. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM Reasonable accommodations for individuals with disabilities or those in need of language interpretation services can be provided if four working days’ notice is given by calling 801-535-7777. Hearing impaired who wish to attend these meetings should contact our TDD service number, 801-535-6021,four days in advance so an interpreter can be provided. Physical access entrance and parking are located on the east side of the building. 210 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 INTERDEPARTMENTAL TECHNICAL ADVISORY GROUP MEETING #2 On September 23, 2019, a second ITAG meeting was held to ensure feedback from City staff would be meaningfully considered in the development of Consolidated Plan goals, the City asked ITAG members to prioritize the unmet, unfunded/underfunded needs that they had identified at the initial ITAG meeting in July. Housing, transportation and the provision of needed services ranked as the highest priorities. STAKEHOLDER MEETING #2 On September 24, 2019, the Housing and Neighborhood Development Division of Salt Lake City held a public meeting with nonprofit providers of housing and supportive services. The purpose of the meeting was to gain input and discuss which strategies that would help achieve the priorities identified in the first stakeholder meeting on July 30, 2019. This input helped form the Consolidated Plan’s strategies which would ultimately aid in achieving the overall goals of the plan. The meeting began with a review of the survey results from the stakeholder meeting held on July 30, 2019 and reaffirmed that the main priorities which had been outlined were housing services and transportation. There was then a review of the data analysis which had been conducted so far with key demographic data points highlighted such as population, housing costs increases, cost burdened households by area, homeless statistics, and others. The stakeholders then worked together to outline a number of suggested funding strategies that the City and nonprofit service providers might consider employing. These strategies included, but are not limited to:  Provide ‘aging in place’ programs  Offer affordable housing voucher programs  Provide client centered community-based case management  Eliminate housing barriers  Integrate transportation and land use considerations to facilitate affordable housing along transit corridors  Improve regional collaboration with public and private-sector partners to improve efficiencies in the allocation of resources and to reduce redundancies  Leverage innovative technologies to improve access to information regarding affordable housing demand and supply  Offer free fare or reduced transit options  Expand transit service in underserved communities  Subsidize rideshare options 211 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 GENRAL NEEDS HEARING PRESS RELEASE OFFICE of the MAYOR | JACQUELINE BISKUPSKI FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE October 21, 2019 Contact: Elaine Wiseman 801-535-6035 GENERAL NEEDS HEARING - Residents Invited to Submit Comments on Community Development Needs SALT LAKE CITY – The Salt Lake City Housing and Neighborhood Development Division (HAND) invites residents to participate in a General Needs Hearing to gather public comments on overall housing and community development needs as they relate to low and moderate-income Salt Lake City residents . Each year Salt Lake City receives Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG), HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME) and Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) grant funds. For the 2020-21 program year HAND anticipates receiving approximately $6 million that may be used to support programs and projects throughout the city. Information gathered at this public hearing and other community engagement events will be used to prioritize funding to address eligible community needs during the 2020-21 program year. Community needs may include projects such as: Homeless Services Health Services Youth Services Adult Services Infrastructure Economic Development Housing – Rental Services Housing – Owner Occupied Hearing from you is vital to ensuring that we are able to prioritize these funds in a way that supports the needs of our community and creates lasting impact. We invite you to participate in the upcoming public hearing or submit comments via email. Public hearing details are as follows: DATE: Thursday, October 24, 2019 TIME: 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. LOCATION: Salt Lake City and County Building 451 South State Street, Room 126 212 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 If you are unable to attend the public hearing, written comments may be submitted to Dillon Hase, Housing and Neighborhood Development, 451 South State Street, P.O. Box 145488, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84114, or emailed to dillon.hase@slcgov.com. Comments must be received by November 1, 2019. Please limit your comments to the benefit of the general needs of our citizens/neighborhoods. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodation no later than 48 hours in advance in order to attend this public meeting. Accommodations may include alternate formats, interpreters, and other auxiliary aids. This is an accessible facility. Salt Lake City’s TDD number is 535-6220. In order to access Salt Lake City’s TDD line you must be calling from a TDD line. To request ADA accommodations contact Joshua Rebollo by email at joshua.rebollo@slcgov.com or by phone at 801.535.7976. Please provide 48 hours advanced notice. ADA accommodations can including alternate formats, interpreters and other auxiliary aids. SALT LAKE CITY CORPORATION 451 SOUTH STATE STREET, ROOM 306 P.O. BOX 145474, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84114- 5474 WWW.SLCGOV.COM TEL 801-535-7704 FAX 801-535-6331 213 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 SALT LAKE CITY CORPORATION DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AND NEIGHBORHOODS HOUSING and NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT DIVISION GENERAL NEEDS HEARING on FEDERALLY FUNDED PROJECTS Community Feedback Needed! WHAT: The Salt Lake City Division of Housing and Neighborhood Development seeks public comment on community need for the development of 5 year Consolidated Plan WHEN: Thursday, October 24, from 5:30 - 6:30 PM WHERE: Room 126, Salt Lake City & County Building, 451 South State Street, Salt Lake City Come let Salt Lake City know what issues are important to your neighborhoods and communities! We want to hear from residents about what issues they are facing and hear suggestions on how we can improve things. We want to hear from you! Community needs may include projects such as: Homeless Services Health Services Youth Services Adult Services Infrastructure Economic Development Housing – Rental Services Housing – Owner Occupied The Division of Housing and Neighborhood Development considers community need in the development of the new 5 year Consolidated Plan. The Consolidated Plan helps determine funding decisions for our federal grant projects. Community feedback is vital to this process! Written comments will be accepted by Dillon Hase, Housing and Neighborhood Development, 451 South State Street, P.O. Box 145488, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84114, or emailed to dillon.hase@slcgov.com until November 1, 2019. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodation no later than 48 hours in advance in order to attend this public meeting. Accommodations may include alternate formats, interpreters, and other auxiliary aids. This is an accessible facility. Salt Lake City’s TDD number is 535-6220. In order to access Salt Lake City’s TDD line you must be calling from a TDD line. To request ADA accommodations contact Joshua Rebollo by email at joshua.rebollo @slcgov.com or by phone at 801.535.7976. Please provide 48 hours advanced notice. ADA accommodations can including alternate formats, interpreters and other auxiliary aids SALT LAKE CITY CORPORATION DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AND NEIGHBORHOODS HOUSING and NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT DIVISION 214 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 SALT LAKE CITY CORPORATION DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AND NEIGHBORHOODS HOUSING and NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT DIVISION AUDIENCIA DE NECESIDADES GENERALES SOBRE PROYECTOS FINANCIADOS CON FONDOS FEDERALES Se Necesitan Comentarios de la Comunidad Que: El ayuntamiento de la ciudad de Salt Lake busca comentarios del publico acerca de las necesidades de la comunidad para el desarrollo del Plan Consolidado a 5 anos. Cuándo: Jueves, 24 de octubre de 5:30 a 6:30. Donde: Sala 126, Edificio del municipio y Condado, 451 S State Street, Salt Lake City Venga y deje saber a la Cuidad de Salt Lake que problemas son importantes en sus vecindarios y comunidades! Queremos escuchar a los residentes sobre los problemas que enfrentan y escuchar sugerencias sobre como podemos mejorar las cosas. Queremos escuchar de ti! Las necesidades de la comunidad pueden incluir proyectos como: Servicios Para Personas sin Hogar Servicios de Salud Servicios Juveniles Servicios para Adultos Infraestrctura Desarrollo Economico Vivienda – Servicios de Alquiler Vivienda – Ocupada por el Propietario La Oficina de Vivienda y Desarrollo de Vecindarios considera las necesidades de la comunidad en el desarrollo del nuevo Plan Consolidado de 5 anos. El Plan Consolidado ayuda determinar decisiones de financiamiento para nuestros proyectos que serán financiados con dólares federales. Los comentarios de la comunidad son vitales para este proceso. Los comentarios por escrito serán aceptados por la Oficina de Vivienda y Desarrollo de Vecindarios en 451 South State Street, Sala 445, PO Box 145488, Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 o por correo electrónico a dillon.hase@slcgov.com hasta el 1 de noviembre de 2019. Programa de igualdad de oportunidades Las personas con discapacidades pueden solicitar un ajuste razonable con 48 horas de anticipación para asistir a esta reunión pública. Las adaptaciones pueden incluir formatos alternativos, intérpretes y otras ayudas auxiliares. Esta es una facilidad accesible. El número de Salt Lake City’s TDD es 801 535-6220. Para acceder a la línea TDD de Salt Lake City, debe llamar desde una línea TDD. Para solicitar alojamiento de ADA, comuníquese con Joshua Rebollo por correo electrónico a joshua.rebollo@slcgov.com o por teléfono al 801.535.7976. Las adaptaciones de ADA pueden incluir formatos alternativos, intérpretes y otras ayudas auxiliares. SALT LAKE CITY CORPORATION DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AND NEIGHBORHOODS HOUSING and NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT DIVISION 215 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 General Needs Hearing NextDoor Invitation Come let Salt Lake City know what issues are important to your neighborhoods and communities! We want to hear from residents about what issues they are facing and hear suggestions on how we can improve things. We want to hear from you! Salt Lake City Housing and Neighborhood Development will be hosting a General Needs Hearing on Thursday, October 24, from 5:30 to 6:30pm in Room 126 of the City and County Building at 451 South State Street. We hope you can join us! If you are not able to attend the public hearing, written comments may be emailed to dillon.hase@slcgov.com. Comments can be sent now through November 1, 2019. 216 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 SALT LAKE CITY CORPORATION COMMUNITY and ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT HOUSING and NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT DIVISION 2019 General Needs Hearing: Public Comment Summary Source: Email Date Submitted: 10/22/19 Contacted Through: NextDoor Key Points: Streets/Police Thanks for asking about what are issues are. Think the city should concentrate on the things the city is supposed to accomplish. These things, as I see it, are the main responsibilities of the city Police and Fire protection Courts Water and sewer, trash pickup, street lighting, flood control Streets (repair, traffic flow) Parks, including golf courses and disc golf courses I think that the city does a pretty good job on most of these items but, we probably could get better on streets and police. On the west side the streets are in disrepair and have been for what seems like a long time. The main east/west streets, 10th north, 6th north and North temple all have some problems. 10th and 6th are beat to death and North Temple has poor semaphore usage. I think you are working on a plan for 6th north. If not, you should be. The same needs to be done for 10th North. On North temple, the Tracks line mid block cross walks (sometimes not at mid block) need to activate only one half of the road at a time. Pedestrians should have to push a button to get from side A to the train island and then push a button to get from the island to side B since most of the people are crossing just to get on the train. Secondly those lights should all be of the new type for pedestrians where passing the button stops traffic and then after a few seconds flashes to make traffic stop, look and go. As far as police go, I think they do a great job but are somewhat undermanned. I hear and see people speeding or racing on Redwood road far too often. I think if police pull people over once in a while, at random intervals, it would act as a traffic calming action. 217 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Shooting occurs too often. Perhaps a “seen” police presence would help eliminated that. I actually feel safe in my area but I see more city employees on Segways checking the garbage for contraband than I see police in the area. That doesn’t seem right. I also see FAR TOO MANY people texting while driving. I think that if we shower our texters with tickets the streets would be safer. I don’t think that the media campaign is useless but there would be more impact if more people got ticketed. That’s my 2 cents for now. If I think of anything else, I will add it. If you have any questions or need clarification, please contact me. Thanks for reading, Source: Email Date Submitted: 10/24/19 Contacted Through: NextDoor Key Points: Air BnB, Private Streets, Community Garden Dear Dillon, I have some general concerns to share with you. 1) Short term rentals in residential neighborhoods. I live on the 400 South block of Elizabeth Street, 84102. It's a tiny, private street, and yet there are TWO people operating AirBNB on our block. We have contacted Civil Enforcement often and there is reluctance to do anything. Why isn't the City interested in enforcing existing codes? 2) Private streets are another concern. There are many of these in our city, holdovers, from developments many years ago. Now it is a situation where it is no longer clear that anyone is in charge. Our block of Elizabeth Street is one such example. If you look at the plat map, the street doesn't look like it belongs to anyone. It is in disrepair, but there is no clear way for it to be fixed. 3) The LDS church is apparently planning to change the space that has been a community garden behind the 33rd Ward (453 S 1100E, 84102) into a parking lot. This is of great concern to me, both as a member of the garden and a neighbor of the plot. It is in a historic district, and based on the zoning it seems inappropriate. Thanks for the opportunity to comment. Happy to follow up with you 218 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 COMMUNITY EVENTS Beginning in May and running through November of 2019, the City performed a grassroots citizen participation effort where City staff attended community events to gather public input through existing forums where opportunities existed to reach hundreds of people at a single event. Some of the events included:  The Rose Park Festival  The Sorenson CommUNITY Fair  Partners in the Park  Groove in the Grove  The Monster Block Party  And dozens more City staff managed information booths and solicited input from residents in the form of interactive materials. It is estimated that over 1,322 residents participated resulting in the following outcome: 219 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 STAKEHOLDER AND ITAG COMBINED #3 On December 11, 2019, the final stakeholder meeting was held in collaboration with members if the City’s (ITAG to ensure collaboration between nonprofit service providers and City departments. The meeting focused on the following objectives:  Homeless Services  Housing Services  Transportation  Economic Development  Behavioral Health: Mental Health & Substance Abuse Stakeholders and City staff voted on strategies which could be used to directly address the objectives of the Consolidated Plan. It was indicated that client centered community-based case management, treatment services for mental health and substance abuse, as well as the provision of housing, transit passes, and job training to income-eligible residents were their top priorities to meet these five objectives. 220 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 SALT LAKE CITY PLANNING COMMISION MEETING 221 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Recognized Organization Input Notification US Department of Housing & Urban Development: Salt Lake City’s 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan TO: Registered Recognized Community Organizations FROM: Jennifer Schumann, Deputy Director, Salt Lake City Housing & Neighborhood Development (jennifer.schumann@slcgov.com or 801-535-7276); John Anderson, Planning Manager, Salt Lake City Planning Division (john.anderson@slcgov.com or 801-535-7214) DATE: February 7, 2020 RE: Proposed Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan Since May of 2019, Salt Lake City’s Housing & Neighborhood Development Division has been working on creating the City’s 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan, as required by the US Department of Housing & Urban Development. Part of the Plan’s development has included engaging over 4,000 interested parties at community events, focus groups, and an online survey. A draft of the plan is now ready for review and consideration by the Planning Commission. We are formally requesting input from the Recognized Community Councils within the City on the draft before we preset it to the Planning Commission. Request Description: The 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan is the City’s guiding document for expenditure of the following U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) entitlement funds: Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG), Home Investment Partnership Program (HOME), and Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA). These funds are intended to address disparities that exist in our community impacting low income residents and/or low-income areas of the City. Through an extensive process, the City has collaborated with over 4,000 interested parties in the development of the draft Plan. This includes constituents, community partners, city experts, elected officials, state departments, and local municipalities. Together, we have identified highest priority needs; service and funding gaps; actionable goals and strategies; performance measurements and desired outcomes; and specific geographic areas of the city to focus infrastructure improvements. Over the US Department of Housing & Urban Development Program years of 2020 through 2024, Salt Lake City Housing & Neighborhood Development will accept applications from non-profit partners, city divisions, and other agencies that address the specific goals and strategies outlined in the plan. All projects/programs must adhere to the applicable grant regulations, the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan, and city policies. Those interested in learning more about the Plan may visit https://www.slc.gov/hand/consolidated-plan/. Housing & Neighborhood Development respectfully requests that all comments be submitted via the following email address: consolidatedplan@slcgov.com. Request for Input from Your Recognized Organization As part of this process, the applicant is required to solicit comments from Recognized Organizations. The purpose of the Recognized Organization review is to inform the community of the project and solicit comments/concerns they have with the project. The Recognized Organization may also take a vote to determine whether there is support for the project, but this is not required. 222 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 In general, the plan details specific ways in which CDBG, ESG, HOME, & HOPWA funding may be used to address a wide variety of community needs. This includes goals and strategies around Affordable housing, Transportation, Economic Development, Homeless Services, and Behavioral Health. Per City Code 2.60.050 - The recognized community organization chair(s) have forty five (45) days to provide comments, from the date the notice was sent. A public hearing will not be held, nor will a final decision be made about the project within the forty five (45) day notice period. This notice period ends on the following day: March 23, 2020 Open House The Planning Division will be holding an Open House to solicit comments on this project. Housing & Neighborhood Development Division staff will be on hand to review and discuss the draft plan. The Open House will be held on Thursday, February 20, 2020 from 5:00-7:00 PM in the 4th floor conference room of the SLC Main Library located at 210 E. 400 S. Comment Guidance Public comments will be received up to the date of the Planning Commission public hearing. However, you should submit your organization’s comments within 45 days of receiving this notice in order for those comments to be included in the staff report. Questions and issues that you might want to consider: For your reference, the following are topics that the Planning Commission may want to hear about. 1. What are the community development and social service needs in your neighborhood that could be addressed with the listed, eligible federal funded priorities & activities? 2. What are the community development and social service needs in your neighborhood that are not addressed in this plan? Note that any needs must be eligible for CDBG, ESG, HOME, and/or HOPWA funding, and must rise to a community highest priority need. Comment Submission Address You may submit your written comments via e-mail to consolidatedplan@slcgov.com or mail them to: ATTN Jennifer Schumann Salt Lake City Housing & Neighborhood Development Division 451 S State St Rm 445 PO Box 145487 Salt Lake City UT 84114-5487 If you have any questions, please call me at (801) 535-7276 or contact me via e-mail at Jennifer.schumann@slcgov.com. 223 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 CONSTANT CONTACT 224 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 PUBLIC HEARING #1 SALT LAKE CITY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING March 24, 2020 at 7:00 p.m. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVENT THAT ON Tuesday, March 24, 2020 at 7:00 p.m. a public hearing will be held in Room 315, Council Chambers, City County Building, 451 South State, Salt Lake City, Utah, before the Salt Lake City Council to accept public comment on proposed projects and activities to be undertaken with 2020-2021 federal funds under the following U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) programs: - Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) CDBG funds may be used for the development of viable urban communities by providing decent housing and suitable living environments for persons of low and moderate-income. - Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) ESG funds may be used to assist individuals and families regain housing stability after experiencing a housing or homelessness crisis. - HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME) HOME funds may be used to create affordable housing opportunities for low-income households. - Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) HOPWA funds may be used to provide housing assistance and related supportive services to persons living with HIV/AIDS and their families. Prior to making funding decisions on the 2020-2021 program year, the Salt Lake City Council will consider and review all public comments, as well as funding recommendations provided by Mayor Mendenhall and resident advisory boards. Information about funding recommendations can be found on Salt Lake City’s Housing and Neighborhood Development (HAND) website at www.slcgov.com/HAND. If you are unable to attend the hearing and want your voice to be heard, written comments may be submitted to Tony.Milner@slcgov.com. Comments will also be accepted by the Salt Lake City Council office at 451 South State Street, Room 304, PO Box 145476, Salt Lake City, Utah 84111, or emailed to council.comments@slcgov.com. Additionally, messages may be left on the Council comment telephone number; 801-535-7654. Comments must be submitted by April 7, 2020. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodation no later than 48 hours in advance in order to attend this public meeting. Accommodations may include alternate formats, interpreters, and other auxiliary aids. This is an accessible facility. Salt Lake City Corporation is committed to ensuring we are accessible to all members of the public. To request ADA accommodations contact Sarah Benj by email at sarah.benj@slcgov.com or by phone at 801.535.7697. 225 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 SALT LAKE CITY CORPORATION COMMUNITY and ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT HOUSING and NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT DIVISION PUBLIC HEARING on FEDERALLY FUNDED PROJECTS CDBG, ESG, HOME AND HOPWA PROGRAMS WHAT: The Salt Lake City Council seeks public comment on proposed 2020-2021 projects to be funded with federal dollars WHEN: Tuesday, March 24th, 2020 at 7:00 PM WHERE: City Council Chambers, Room 315, Salt Lake City & County Building, 451 South State Street A public hearing will be held before the Salt Lake City Council to accept comment on proposed projects and activities to be undertaken with 2020-2021 federal funds under the following U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) programs:  Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)  Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG)  HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME)  Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA) Prior to making funding decisions on the 2020-2021 program year, the Salt Lake City Council will consider and review all public comments, as well as funding recommendations provided by Mayor Mendenhall and resident advisory boards. Information about funding recommendations can be found on Salt Lake City’s Housing and Neighborhood Development (HAND) website at www.slcgov.com/HAND. If you are unable to attend the hearing and want your voice to be heard, written comments may be submitted to Tony.Milner@slcgov.com. Comments will also be accepted by the Salt Lake City Council office at 451 South State Street, Room 304, PO Box 145476, Salt Lake City, Utah 84111, or emailed to council.comments@slcgov.com. Additionally, messages may be left on the Council comment telephone number; 801-535-7654. Comments must be submitted by April 7, 2020. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodation no later than 48 hours in advance in order to attend this public meeting. Accommodations may include alternate formats, interpreters, and other auxiliary aids. This is an accessible facility. Salt Lake City Corporation is committed to ensuring we are accessible to all members of the public. To request ADA accommodations contact Sarah Benj by email at sarah.benj@slcgov.com or by phone at 801.535.7697. 226 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 SALT LAKE CITY CORPORATION COMMUNITY and ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT HOUSING and NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT DIVISION Audiencia Pública sobre proyectos con fondos federales Programas CDBG, ESG, HOME AND HOPWA Que: El Ayuntamiento de la Ciudad de Salt Lake requiere el comentario público acerca de proyectos propuestos para el 2020-2021 que serán financiados con dólares federales Cuándo: Martes, 24 de marzo 2020 a las 7:00 de la noche Donde: Cámara de Ayuntamiento de la Ciudad, Cuarto 315, Edificio del Condado y Municipal, 451 South State Street Se llevara a cabo una audiencia pública ante el Ayuntamiento de Salt Lake en búsqueda de comentarios en proyectos y actividades propuestos que se realizaran con fondos federales en el 2020-2021 bajo los siguientes programas del Departamento de Vivienda y Desarrollo Urbano de los EE.UU. (HUD).  Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)  Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG)  HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME)  Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) El Ayuntamiento de la Ciudad de Salt Lake examinará y revisará todos los comentarios recibidos durante la audiencia pública, así como recomendaciones de financiamiento previstas por el Alcalde Mendenhall y los asesora de residentes. Información sobre la financiación de recomendaciones se puede encontrar en el sitio web la Desarrollo de Viviendas y Vecindarios (Housing and Neighborhood Development) de Salt Lake City a www.slcgov.com/HAND. Si no puede asistir a la audiencia y quiere que su voz sea escuchada, comentarios por escrito podrán ser presentadas a Tony.Milner@slcgov.com. Comentarios en referencia a la propuesta de financiamiento serán aceptadas por las oficinas del ayuntamiento de Salt Lake City en la 451 South State Street, Room 304, PO Box 145476, Salt Lake City, Utah 84111, o por correo electrónico a council.comments@slcgov.com. También puede dejar mensajes en el teléfono de comentarios del ayuntamiento marcando el número, 801.535.7654. Comentarios deben ser presentadas antes de abril 7, 2020. Programa de Igualdad de Oportunidades Las personas con discapacidades pueden solicita acomodación razonable a más tardar con 48 horas de anticipación para asistir a esta reunión pública. Las adaptaciones pueden incluir formatos alternativos, intérpretes y otras ayudas auxiliares. Esta es una instalación accesible. Salt Lake City Corporation se compromete a garantizar que todos los miembros del público puedan acceder la. Para solicitar alojamiento de ADA, comuníquese con Sarah Benj por correo electrónico a sarah.benj@slcgov.com o por teléfono al 801.535.7697. 227 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 PUBLIC HEARING #2 SALT LAKE CITY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING April 7, 2020 at 7:00 p.m. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVENT THAT ON Tuesday, April 7, 2020 at 7:00 p.m. a remote public hearing will be held before the Salt Lake City Council to accept public comment on proposed projects and activities to be undertaken with 2020-2021 federal funds under the following U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) programs: - Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) CDBG funds may be used for the development of viable urban communities by providing decent housing and suitable living environments for persons of low and moderate-income. - Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) ESG funds may be used to assist individuals and families regain housing stability after experiencing a housing or homelessness crisis. - HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME) HOME funds may be used to create affordable housing opportunities for low-income households. - Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA) HOPWA funds may be used to provide housing assistance and related supportive services to persons living With HIV/AIDS and their families. This Council Meeting will NOT have a physical location. All participants will connect remotely. (This public hearing is an additional public hearing opportunity in addition to the public hearing held March 24, 2020.) Prior to making funding decisions on the 2020-2021 program year, the Salt Lake City Council will consider and review all public comments, as well as funding recommendations provided by Mayor Mendenhall and resident advisory boards. Information about funding recommendations can be found on Salt Lake City’s Housing and Neighborhood Development (HAND) website at www.slcgov.com/HAND. To send comments directly to the Council, email council.comments@slcgov.com, leave a message on the 24-hour comment line 801-535-7654, mail comments to the Salt Lake City Council office at 451 South State Street, Room 304, PO Box 145476, Salt Lake City, Utah 84111, or see Webex Instructions to learn how to participate live, https://www.slc.gov/council/news/featured-news/virtually-attend-city-council- meetings/. All comments received through any source are shared with the Council and added to the public record. Written comments may also be submitted to HAND, tony.milner@slcgov.com, which will be provided to the Council. 228 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodation no later than 48 hours in advance in order to attend this public meeting. Accommodations may include alternate formats, interpreters, and other auxiliary aids. This is an accessible facility. Salt Lake City Corporation is committed to ensuring we are accessible to all members of the public. To request ADA accommodations contact Sarah Benj by email at sarah.benj@slcgov.com or by phone at 801-535-7697. 229 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 SALT LAKE CITY AVISO DE AUDIENCIA PÚBLICA abril 7, 2020 at 7:00 p.m. POR MEDIO DE LA PRESENTE SE NOTIFICA QUE EL martes 7 de abril de 2020 a las 7:00 p.m. se llevará a cabo una audiencia pública remota ante el Consejo de la Ciudad de Salt Lake para aceptar comentarios públicos sobre los proyectos y actividades propuestas que se llevarán a cabo con 2020-2021 fondos federales bajo los siguientes programas del Departamento de Vivienda y Desarrollo Urbano de los Estados Unidos (HUD): - Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Los fondos CDBG pueden utilizarse para el desarrollo de comunidades urbanas viables al proporcionar viviendas dignas y entornos de vida adecuados para personas de ingresos bajos y moderados. - Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) Los fondos ESG pueden usarse para ayudar a las personas y familias a recuperar la estabilidad de la vivienda después de experimentar una crisis de vivienda o falta de vivienda. - HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME) Los fondos de HOME pueden utilizarse para crear oportunidades de vivienda asequible para nucleos familiares de bajos ingresos. - Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) Los fondos de HOPWA se pueden utilizarse para proporcionar asistencia de vivienda y servicios de apoyo relacionados a personas que viven con VIH / SIDA y sus familias. Esta reunión del consejo NO se efectuara físicamente. Todos los participantes se conectarán de forma remota. (Esta audiencia pública es una oportunidad de audiencia pública adicional además de la audiencia pública celebrada el 24 de marzo de 2020). El Ayuntamiento de la Ciudad de Salt Lake examinará y revisará todos los comentarios recibidos durante la audiencia pública, así como recomendaciones de financiamiento previstas por el Alcalde Mendenhall y los asesora de residentes. Información sobre la financiación de recomendaciones se puede encontrar en el sitio web la Desarrollo de Viviendas y Vecindarios (Housing and Neighborhood Development) de Salt Lake City a www.slcgov.com/HAND. Para enviar comentarios directamente al Consejo, envíe un correo electrónico a council.comments@slcgov.com, deje un mensaje en la línea de comentarios de 24 horas 801-535- 7654, envíe comentarios a la oficina del Consejo de Salt Lake City en 451 South State Street, Room 304 , PO Box 145476, Salt Lake City, Utah 84111, o vea las Instrucciones de Webex para aprender cómo participar en vivo, https://www.slc.gov/council/news/featured-news/virtually-attend-city-council- meetings/. Todos los comentarios recibidos a través de cualquier fuente se comparten con el Consejo y se agregan al registro público. Los comentarios por escrito también se pueden enviar a HAND, tony.milner@slcgov.com, que se proporcionará al Consejo. 230 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Programa de Igualdad de Oportunidades Las personas con discapacidades pueden solicitar acomodación razonable a más tardar con 48 horas de anticipación para asistir a esta reunión pública. Las adaptaciones pueden incluir formatos alternativos, intérpretes y otras ayudas auxiliares. Esta es una instalación accesible. Salt Lake City Corporation se compromete a garantizar que todos los miembros del público puedan acceder la. Para solicitar alojamiento de ADA, comuníquese con Sarah Benj por correo electrónico a sarah.benj@slcgov.com o por teléfono al 801-535-7697. 231 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 PUBLIC COMMENTS RECEIVED FROM PUBLIC HEARING #1 AND #2 Salt Lake City Council. Public Hearing, March 24, 2020, 7pm, via WebEx, Facebook, and YouTube. Public Comments. Source: WebEx Digital Service Date Submitted: 3/24/20 7:12 pm Executive Director of Journey of Hope. CDBG – Public Services Applicant. Agency: Journey of Hope. Project: Advocacy and Case Management Services. Comments: Retired from law enforcement after 20 years of services. She set up programs for women getting out of jail and prison, did as much work inside the system as she could. She started Journey of Hope, and they’ve served 2,000 women in five years, with only 17% recidivism. Overall, their services have saved millions of dollars to the State. Their second try for SLC CDBG funds for case management services to expand services to girls who are aging out of the juvenile justice system. These girls have been sexually exploited and trafficked. These girls turning to the Youth Resource Center as they have no family, where there are boys and gang members who traffic girls. Had one young lady who was drugged and woke up in Las Vegas. One of the few non-profits standing in the gap for girls/women leaving the justice system. They were not chosen for CDBG, they’re the “little guys” and are new, they would like to be re-considered for CDBG funding. Source: WebEx Digital Service Date Submitted: 3/24/20 7:24pm. He worked with International Rescue Commission. He recommended how great the agency is and how hard they work. He wants funding for digital equity, as not everyone has internet or access to computers. Source: WebEx Digital Service Date Submitted: 3/24/20 7:26pm. She Executive Director of The INN Between. Applied for CDBG – Public Services, wasn’t recommended by the CDCIP Board or the Mayor for funding. Hospice and Medical Respite for-Homeless. Comments: Asked the Council to reconsider the non-recommendation for funding. Strong partnership with the City. Before the agency existed, many homeless individuals were dying on the street without access to hospice care, that cannot be delivered in shelters, campsites, or motels. They offer wrap around services and save the area money. The Inn Between serves 40 individuals a night and is projected serve 30 more. They serve homeless and non-homeless, those near medical bankruptcy. End of life care without having to go into shelter or hospital. The Inn Between is a critical part of homeless services. They have the infrastructure, licensing and professional staff in place. The new Homeless Resource Centers don’t have medical beds, and they’re able to fill that need. The homeless resource centers are also at capacity. The Homeless Resource Center’s don’t have the ability to care for people getting cancer treatment. Asking for only one half of 1% of total budget to serve the homeless, 60% of the clients come from Salt Lake City. Source: WebEx Digital Service Date Submitted: 3/24/20 7:34pm. Executive Director of the International Rescue Committee Applied for CDBG – Public Services. Program: International Rescue Committee Getting Up to Speed: Expanding Digital Services for Refugees and Asylees in 232 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Salt Lake City. Not recommended for funding. Comments: Appreciates the consideration of their digital inclusion application. She identified how the program serves those vulnerable in the community. Source: WebEx Digital Service Date Submitted: 3/24/20 7:37 pm. Grants Manager, International Rescue Committee. CDBG – Public Services. Getting Up to Speed: Expanding Digital Services for Refugees and Asylees in Salt Lake City. Not recommended for funding. Comments: Thank you to the Mayor and City council and Housing and Neighborhood Staff for continued support for CDBG funding, and for past funding. Highlights the connection for digital inclusion and refugees. Aligned to digital connection to Housing Plan, stabilizing renters and increasing self-sufficient, employment and financial stability. A renewal would help increase refugee household overall stability who are hampered by language and cultural skills. Project complimented through cross agency interaction. Digital inclusion program is integral for clients accessing employment when they enter the U.S. She identified that the program stabilizes low income renters by helping them obtain employment, which in turn helps with stable housing. Emails Regrading Federal Funds Between City Council Meetings Source: Email to City Council Staff Date Submitted: 3/27/20 Salt Lake City Council Members, Volunteers of America, Utah is grateful for the partnership we have had with the City government over many years. We appreciate the time that the CDCIP Board, Mayor Mendenhall and her staff have spent reviewing all applications that were submitted. Volunteers of America, Utah has submitted three applications for funding for next fiscal year 2020-2021. Community Development Block Grant – CDBG Public Services Program Request CDCIP Board Recommendation Mayors Recommendation Geraldine E. King Women’s Resource Center $105,797 $89,000 100,281 We are grateful for both recommendations and encourage the support of Mayor Mendenhall’s recommendation of $100,281. Emergency Solutions Grant – Shelter Operations Program Request CDCIP Board Recommendation Mayors Recommendation Geraldine E. King Women’s Resource Center $40,000 $38,000 $38,000 233 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Youth Resource Center $60,000 $46,000 $46,000 We appreciate the CDCIP Board and the Mayors funding recommendation for both emergency solutions grant applications. We value the support of our programs that provide shelter and services for both homeless youth and homeless women. We thank you for the opportunity to submit a written document at this time given the Stay Home. Stay Safe. Order endorsed by the Mayor to decrease public gatherings. Comments Received by Email regarding Federal Grant Dollars Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. This is not the time to cut support services for the homeless. They are, along with the undocumented, the ones least likely to get adequate medical care during this pandemic. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Hello, I am a Salt Lake City resident and a neighbor of The Inn Between. I am writing to urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. The Inn Between plays a key role to our homeless and their need for hospice care, and we need to support them so they can continue to serve our community. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Dear Council Members: I just got word that the Mayor and Salt Lake City Council will be cutting off funding for The Inn Between – this is being sent as my plea that you carefully reconsider this decision. The Inn Between is a wonderful organization that provides much needed, and otherwise lacking, services to the homeless community. Its funding is limited, and this decision by the City Council and Mayor will have a significantly detrimental impact on its ability to provide these services – which will in turn only contribute to our homeless challenges. I plead with you to reconsider and continue the funding that is so needed to help sustain this important organization. In these challenging times, it is even more important that organizations like The Inn Between – and the mission it serves – receive our support. Thank you. 234 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Regards, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Hello, I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. During a crisis like the one we are in, cutting funding to organizations like the INN Between seems shortsighted and unnecessary. Thanks Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Dear Council member, The Inn Between has provided a place for terminally ill homeless patients to receive comfort care in their final days. It is a much need service provider in this community. They have previously received $46,000 in Block Grant Funds to help them provide their services. Please reconsider your funding discussions and allow them the money to continue their important work. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Dear Salt Lake City Council Members, I am a Salt Lake City resident and actually a neighbor of the Inn Between. I am also a member of The Inn Between Board of Directors. Every month at our board meetings we hear a “mission moment” when a member of the staff shares a story of an event at The Inn Between since we last met. Sometime it is about a reunification with a resident and their extended family, sometimes it is about a residents last days and passing, always the stories reflect the mission of The Inn Between to enhance the dignity of each resident wherever they are in their life journey. In this time of uncertainty, anxiety and fear, and human and economic crises, there are hard choices to be made. While previous levels of funding may not be possible, I urge you to reconsider your funding decision regarding the CDBG dollars. Any amount you can fund would be of great assistance in sustaining the vital work of The Inn Between. The efforts of the staff of The Inn Between have been nothing less than heroic in protecting the residents from contracting Covid-19. Continuing some level of funding assures them their efforts are not in vain and that you too understand the importance of not forcing our residents to have to access services from already overwhelmed medical services in our community or even worse, die in the streets. Your consideration of this plea is much appreciated. Source: Email 235 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Dear Council Members, I have been a volunteer with the Inn Between for 4 years and have seen first hand the good this nonprofit has done for the vulnerable homeless in our city. PLEASE, please reconsider giving any amount possible to this facility. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 To whom it may concern, I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. "I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program." Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Dear Council members, I am the Volunteer Coordinator at The INN Between and have been since the beginning. I have watched our resident population expand from 16 to 40 with the move to our new location. I am asking that you please reconsider your CDBG funding decision for the support of our residents. Our historical amount of about $46,000 represents only 3% of our annual budget, and yet about 80% of the people we serve are from salt Lake City. The need is great among homeless service providers and funding is understandably limited. However, TIB will be significantly impacted by this funding cut. We would appreciate your funding at any level. Please consider your CDBG funding decision. Which of our 40 residents would you deny? Thank you and my best to you all. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Greetings, I understand that The Inn Between is not being recommended for CDBG Funding at this time. I would like to strongly encourage you to restore CDBG funding to this important asset in our community. As some of you may know, I work to support students experiencing homelessness within the educational system. I have become more acutely aware of the needs of all individuals experiencing homelessness. Compound that with a terminal illness, or a need to be in a rehabilitation program for a long term condition, and the odds are not good. As a community, we need to do better by our homeless friends. The Inn between provides a vital service to our entire community. It allows those with no limited options, a place to die with dignity. 236 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 I was fortunate to become acquainted with The Inn Between when it was across the street from my house. I volunteered to be part of the Neighborhood Advisory Committee, and heled address concerns neighbors had with the program. I found the staff to be willing to work with community members to address concerns, and make sure they were being good neighbors. I am sure that is still the same today in their new neighborhood. Please restore the funding request to the Inn Between, so they can continue the work on behalf of our truly less fortunate community members in Salt Lake City. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 PLEASE - As a Salt Lake City resident, and I implore you to reconsider decision to cut CDBG funding for The INN Between. I realize this is a difficult time but this is a group that has done so much with so little as it is and this is a great humanitarian need. Please continue to help them with any amount that you can to sustain their program. Thank you. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Dear Council Members, I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between for 2020-2021. They provide critical medical respite housing services for medically frail and terminally ill clients, and are an integral part of the homeless services continuum in Salt Lake City. However, they do not receive adequate funding from the state or other sources because they are not designated as a "shelter," which means that they must raise funding from other sources to provide this medical housing service to the community. Any amount of funding that you grant will help the sustainability of the program. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. It is shameful for you to cut their funding. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Dear SLC Council, 237 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 As an Avenues resident of Salt Lake City, I am writing to urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. This facility provides a desperately-needed service, providing hospice care for the homeless of SLC. Any amount that you can fund will help them provide dignity at the end of life. Thanks for your consideration. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Dear City Council, I am a Salt Lake City resident and I urge you to reconsider your funding for the Inn Between. I understand that there is an urgent need to help the homeless in Salt Lake City, but the Inn Between needs funding to remain open and provide their care for the very ill and dying among the homeless. We must care for the poor, sick and/or dying members of our community. It is not only a moral and humane obligation but a public health issue as well. Before the Inn Between existed, my husband and I stood in the the cold in winter with fellow church members holding a candles to protest the fact that we had Salt Lake City residents dying in our streets. Please don't let us go back to those dark days. The Inn Between has my support and I hope you will make sure they have the funding to help them maintain their service. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 I am very concerned about the proposal to reduce funding for the homeless in Salt Lake - in particular the federal HUD funds distributed by the SLC Community Development Block Grant program for the INN Between. They - and the homeless - especially need these funds now during this exceptional crisis. I ask you to please reconsider this decision. Thank you for your attention, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Hello Salt Lake City Council, I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Your funding is invaluable to the sustainability of this wonderful program. Thank you, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 238 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 As a resident of Salt Lake City, I believe The INN Between is an appropriate expenditure for CDBG funding. Please do not cut that appropriation at this precipitous time for the most vulnerable. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Dear Salt Lake City Council Members: As a resident of Salt Lake City and a board member of The Inn Between, I write to urge your reconsideration of The INN Between’s request for CDBG funds to help insure our homeless population receives hospice, respite care and shelter. I am sure that requests for funding far outweigh what is available, but I would be grateful for any support you could provide. Thank you for your service and consideration. Kind regards, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Dear City Council Members: I am a Salt Lake City resident, as well as a volunteer at The Inn Between. I am aware of how tight budgets are this year. However, I urge you to consider funding The INN Between at any level possible. This facility is of vital importance to our community. Thank you. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Dear Council: I am a resident of Salt Lake City, and an advocate for the ethical treatment of vulnerable populations, the homeless being one. I ask that you reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program, and give the population they serve a safe place to live the remainder of their lives, and access to the treatment they deserve. Thank you, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 239 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 I am reaching out and asking that you consider helping with any funding possible for the folks at the Inn Between I know these are crazy times but please help these folks provide some little bit of help to the dying Thank you Mike Evans SLC Resident Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Dear Salt Lake City Council Members, I am a resident of Salt Lake City and am very concerned that The INN Between receive proper funding from the city. Please reconsider the funding for The INN Between. The services they provide are critical to those at the end of life and ultimately, to our community at large. We simply cannot turn our back on such a vulnerable population. At the least, we should fund at previous levels if not beyond, given the difficult time that we’re in. Logic would lead one to anticipate the population served by The INN Between is going to be more vulnerable to COVID19 and thus in need of their services. And, God forbid, should the infection result in more people dying before they need to be admitted to The INN Between, there will still be people who will be in need of hospice care for other reasons. This facility is desperately needed by the community much less by those whom it serves. The dignity conveyed upon the dying is shared by those who exhibit such compassion. The city funds a small but critical amount of the facility’s needs, but it’s probably that many corporate and personal contributions will be less this year than in the past. Thank you for your consideration of this. I could argue that this facility is needed even more than Allen Park. Please prove to me that my community cares more for people than for birds. (I love birds and agree that we deserve to have them in our midst, but not at the expense of caring for a human being as they die). Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 I understand that funds from the Community Development Block Grant will not be allocated to The Inn Between. These are difficult times for the city I know, but this is an excellent organization deserving of a second look at funding. The Inn Between fulfills a very heartbreaking mission. We hear much now about patients dying in hospitals due to Covid-19, separated from loved ones. Imagine dying alone, homeless, without friends or family. Any amount of funding would help The Inn Between achieve its mission. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 240 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. I have seen the good that this facility does. Please do not cut fubding, ESPECIALLY now. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Dear Council members, I know the city is dealing with major shortfalls, but just want to plead for maintaining funding for the INN Between - this program provides an incredibly valuable service to hospice patients who do not have a home. Please re-consider and try to maintain their funding. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. I feel this is especially important in this time of COVID-19. Thank you, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. Best, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Dear City Council Members, I have recently learned that the latest budget effort does not include funding for the homeless hospice, and I ask you to reconsider. I know that you care and that all the choices you must make are hard. However, their funding is only in the tens of thousands and every dollar is well spent to keep homeless people from dying by emergency room visits. We will wind up having to pay for their medical expenses anyway, and the Inn Between is a MUCH more efficient use of those relatively modest funds. 241 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Also, in addition to the obvious need for care these people experience, the rest of us are affected by seeing them uncared for on the streets, which affects morale at this difficult time. Please reconsider, and fund the Inn Between for our most desperate and voiceless citizens. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Salt Lake City Council As a resident of Salt Lake City, I am asking you to please reconsider the much needed funding for the Inn Between. The important part they play in giving a safe place for those that would otherwise die on the streets is so valuable, and allows them to at least die with dignity in a safe place. When my late husband passed away in 2015 we were among the lucky ones, as the job he had held for only 6 months placed him on long term disability which gave us an income which allowed is to continue living in a safe place, with the care he needed. Otherwise we would probably have landed on the street somewhere and he wouldn't have had the care he received up until the end. I do what little I can to support the Inn Between, and I am reaching out to you and asking that you do your part to help them keep helping those that need it the most. Thank you Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 To whom it may concern, "I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their valuable program. Thank you very much, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Dear Ladies & Gentlemen, I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I ask you to please reconsider funding the CDBG (in any amount) for The Inn Between. Thank you so much. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 242 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Please continue funding the Inn Between they do wonderful work.. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Dear Salt Lake City Council Members – Everyone seems to talk a lot about what they’ll do for the homeless, but actions speak so much louder than those words. I just discovered that CDBG funding for The INN Between is at risk. The funding received by The INN Between in the past is a small fraction of available CDBG funding and makes a tremendous difference in the sustainability of its program. This is all about dignity and compassion for dying homeless people. If the funding is going to be eliminated, please provide me and the rest of the community with your reasoning. I know there are a lot of competing claims for CDBG funding. For the eight years I served as Mayor, I went through the grueling process of considering all requests and making the tough decisions for CDBG funding recommendations. I was also aware that the priorities of City government were reflected in the funding decisions recommended by the Mayor and ultimately made by the City Council. Please count dying with dignity as a value supported by the City Council. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 City Council: As a Salt Lake City resident and supporter of The INN Between I am writing to ask you to please reconsider your CDBG funding decision you made in regards to this important organization. I believe that they provide a vital and compassionate service for the least among us. Thank you for your service and reconsideration. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 To whom it may concern: I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. I have volunteered for years with the group and they do amazing things for the homeless and critically ill patients. Thank you, 243 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Council Members, I am the resident of township but familiar with the INN and their mission. They provide a major social return for a very small amount of public funding. It is not easy to put a price on death with dignity but in this health crisis death on the streets should be a public concern. Thank you for your consideration in renewing their funding. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Dear City Council Members, I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program Thank you for your consideration. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 I live in Salt Lake City and I volunteer at the Inn Between. It provides needed medical service for our citizens who have limited access to medical care. I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/6/2020 Hello, City Council I'm a neighbor of The Inn Between, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between, especially during this time of crisis. The Inn Between performs a vital service on behalf our community's most vulnerable people, and they need your help. Thank You and Kind Regards, Source: Email 244 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Council, I am writing this to urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. This money is critical for the sustainability of their program. As a volunteer for the Inn, a resident of Salt Lake City, and a Firefighter I see the the incredible work that the INN Between does for our most vulnerable population. Please don't turn your back on this fine organization. Thank you, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Dear Council Members, Please Support the CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. I support The INN Between, by being a good neighbor 1 block south, by small personal donations of money, food, and clothes, and through supporting the efforts of my wife Mary Beth Vogel-Ferguson Ph. D, who is on the board of directors. As a former RN I've had experience in hospice settings, witnessed death with dignity, and I know the positive impact The Inn Between has on our people in need. Please support their request for the CABG funding. We must ensure that The INN Between can continue to serve the poor and afflicted members of our community as they face a medical crisis or the end of life. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 I am pleading to have continued funding for The Inn Between in this upcoming year; I speak as a family member of Patricia Rice who died there Nov. 7, 2019. She was diagnosed with cirrhosis from Hepatitis C in 2007, continued to work at a SLC company until her disability prevented her from doing acceptable work, @ 2013 when she went to full time disability through her employer and applied for Medicaid. She received a waiver through Salt Lake County Aging Services and was able to live pretty independently that way at Wasatch Manor with HUD funds until Sept. 2019 when too many falls made it impossible for her to live alone. Her hospice agency and SLCounty Aging services expedited her move to The Inn Between the first week of Sept 2019 and she was able to live there with some level of dignity and safety until her death. She was care for very tenderly and I have the greatest respect for all the staff and volunteers whose efforts let her die in dignity and peace. The population of poor and ill are the most voiceless in our community and I know we must speak for them when their care and protection are threatened. They are not receiving luxuries, they are offered a clean place to live in their dying days; some have shared rooms, there are clothes available from donations, arts/crafts supplies are donated, classes are given by volunteers. This is a remarkable example of public/private/volunteer collaboration to support these least of us in their times of need. If anyone would like me to speak directly to the time my sister spent at The Inn Between, I am sheltering at home (I live in the Liberty Wells section of SLCity) during this time of Coved19. My telephone number is 801-674-0721, this is my email and I can use ZOOM. I can’t imagine the impact of Coved 19 on the poor and homeless population of SLCity and that The Inn Between may be the last option for more people next year than this year. This is not the time to cut their funds. Please reconsider. Very truly, 245 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Dear Council members, I'm writing to advocate for the INN-between. This is a first class organization that is taking a huge burden off of the city of Salt Lake. Over three-quarters of the hospice patients taken in by the INN are from Salt Lake City.. I run a Resort property on North Temple and we've been supporting the INN with dollars as well as supplies, for years. Their work deserves to be encouraged and supported. I hope you will put a line item in the budget equivalent to the $46,000 from last year or at least very very close to that. They're doing the work for us all and taking the financial burden of those folks away from Salt Lake City government! Proven track record spanning years ~ Regards, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Hello, I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Dear Members of the City Council, I am a resident of Salt Lake City and a supporter of the Inn Between. I am asking you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. The INN Between provides an important service as a medical respite facility for homeless individuals, 80% of whom are from Salt Lake City. I understand that there are many, many competing needs for funding at this time. However, having a safe place for medically-fragile people to recover is still important, even more important, during this challenging time. Please consider restoring their funding for this year. Thank you. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 246 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 I am a volunteer hairdresser for The Inbetween as well as a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. I first hand, have seen the impact of this program for the staff, patients and community. These beautiful people would be lost or have died a lonely death without this service. As a community we must look out for each other, provide a better future for each other and build each other up. This is how you can help. As in life you meet the good the bad and the ugly. These people are good that want good, want a chance and want comfort in their final days or the support to make a new future. In all the conversations I have had with people at the Innbetween I have realized, this could be you, your mentors, your family members, your neighbors or your friends. What would you do if they needed your help in their final days? I hope you continue the support for such a great cause. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 I am a palliative and hospice care social worker. The InnBetween is vital. We cannot return to the homeless dying on our streets. We are better than this. I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program! We vote! Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Hello, I am sincerely asking you to not cut funding for the INN Between. This organization performs such important work in serving the dying within the homeless population. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Dear Council Members: I am writing this letter on behalf of the Inn Between. I was shocked and surprised that the funding was cut for support of this very important and necessary service to provide a place for homeless citizens to die with dignity. I was a volunteer in the very beginning of the Inn Between and have been an advocate ever since. I have been so impressed with the loving care that is provided for the very sick and the end of life care that is provided for the homeless and less privileged in our city. Please continue your support. Salt Lake City has been a model for other states to provide the same kind of service. Thank you for reconsidering your decisions and I pray for your continued support. Best Regards, 247 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Please DO NOT cut funding for The Inn Between Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Dear Council members, I will keep this note short, as I realize this is and intense time for the world and our community. I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program Thank you for your consideration. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Council Members: I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I am writing this to urge you to reconsider your Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of this program. I am aware that our city and the country are facing more than difficult times, but this program is so important for our homeless who require hospice or respite care. Yours, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Dear city council members, Please reconsider your position on funding the Inn Between. This organization is the only one of its kind serving the clients they help: homeless individuals who are dying and others who cannot get hospice or respite care any other way. They desperately need funding support, so please reconsider the cut and fund them fully. Thank you, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 248 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 SLC shelters the homeless who are living. The Inn Between shelters the homeless who are dying. Please do not massively cut their funding. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Dear Members of the SLC council, I will keep this note brief as I realize this is and incredibly intense and scary time in our community and our world. As a resident of Salt Lake City and the Sugarhouse/Yalecrest neighborhood, I am asking you to please, please reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. The Inn provides a critical service in our community and any amount that you can fund will help sustain this very important program. Thank you for your consideration. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 The Inn Between has emailed their supporters and asked them to send letters of support for funding. As many of you know, I do not support funding The Inn Between. If the genesis/funding/operations of organizations like this is typical, - then it will not stand out for you. Incompetence and grift should never be the norm and I will speak out against it at every opportunity. I have already been attacked and opined upon by SLT and Gehrke so I have nothing to hide from. I don't have to tell you that the decision being made, based on models of a virus, are going to have devastating effects on the economy as a whole. Places like The Inn Between will now stand out as the repellent example of waste that they are. 1. The State granted them a license as an assisted living (AL). In order to be legal in zoning. They have between 5-10 on the AL side. 2. The City granted them a license under eleemosynary and then housed the chronically homeless with NO criteria for entry. 3. This is not a hospice and never has been! They have since rebranded and covered most of the signage that indicates they are a hospice. 4. The appropriations committee gave them 1M dollars to buy a building that was sound and needed no work. The attached pictures shows the current work taking place which includes a new roof/electrical/elevator/HVAC to just name a few! This was possible from a federal grand that someone in this state gave them. I will be researching more on that. 5. Within 5 months of opening they were over budget by $700,000. 6. They were over budget because they did not hire the required medical staff per AL licensing. They were operating for 5 months without MA's. And guess what? Everyone was just fine. They operated for several years at Goshen street without MA's. Why? Because they were not needed. So basically we are paying for medical staff so that they can be legal in zoning they should not be in. 7. Drug deals, residents sneaking out at night, assaults, suicides all go on within this facility. 8. 911 calls from WITHIN this facility are significant and consistent. 9. Our City Council, Erin Mendenhall told us at a town hall that she would hold TIB accountable. Many on the street, as well as myself, reached out to her with our concerns and proof of misdeeds. We never got a response. 249 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 The only way any improvements have been made at TIB is because myself and several others have held them accountable. This is the project of those that want to put homeless shelters in neighborhoods because somehow it will fix the ills of these people. Senator Escamilla made that exact claim. While I am glad that people have a roof over their head, it should not be at the expense of what was once a functioning street. The residents of Sherman Ave. who could and understood the implications of housing the mentally ill and addicted, sold or moved and got out of the neighborhood. Stop rewarding incompetence. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Dear council members and Mayor Mendenhall, I am writing to request that you reinstate funding for the hospice center The Inn Between. Without this service, the most vulnerable among us the homeless who are facing death will again die on our streets. Certainly we can find the funds to provide hospice care to our brothers and sisters in need. I trust that you will find it in your hearts to continue helping those who help others. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Dear Council Members: I am a volunteer with the Inn Between and live in District 7. I understand that you are cutting the CBDG funds allotted to the program. I urge you to reconsider directing those funds to support the facility. They operate under a bare-bones budget and do whatever they can to minimize costs yet maintain the quality of service they provide to this most needy population. Through my observations at the facility I can assure you that the funds are well spent. I appreciate your time and hope you will reconsider funding this most needed program. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 I am a Salt Lake City resident, and have been for 20 years. My house is one block from the INN Between. I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. This is not the time to reduce funding for the critical programs provided by this important institution. If it puts the homeless terminally ill back on the streets, you will be responsible for having made our current health care 250 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 crisis worse. More city residents will die, and not just those at the INN Between. I ask that you reconsider this decision. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 I can’t believe you red lined the whole budget for the INN Between. It’s a treasure for those who need it most. The people who are the most vulnerable are the ones we need to tend too. As a society, we are judged by the thoughts and actions of those who can give, and the homeless are the ones who need a voice, they need the kind and giving support of people who are fortunate to have the means to give back. You, as a City Council have those means of giving dignity, and relief to people that have no where else to turn. Please, I beg, return the funding to a project that truly helps people who are suffering. Kim has worked so hard, put in so many hours to bring this idea to life. Don’t bring it down now. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 It has come to our attention that the City Council has cut funding to The INN Between. We are Salt Lake City residents and believe that this facility provides an invaluable service to members of our community who are otherwise unable to care for themselves. I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will benefit the sustainability of their program. The people who are served there are primarily from Salt Lake City, and, we believe, deserve to have end of life services provided when they have nowhere else to turn. Please do reconsider your decision. We live in the general neighborhood (1900 E & 900 S), an area filled with medical care facilities. This one is providing a service like no other. Please do not let such a facility fold for lack of funds or for lack of consideration by those who may indeed have a say in its viability! Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 To whom ever it may concern and City Counsel Members, I am a Salt Lake City resident who has volunteered for years at The Inn Between and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. Though it is only 3% is a small percentage of our absolutely necessary funding to keep the INN functioning for the many Salt Lake Residence that we provide safe, clean residence for. Most of our residence are, in fact, from Salt Lake City. We are able to supply a caring and supportive environment for our residence from a deeply committed staff and volunteers. 251 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 This is an underserved community and your support deeply matters. Please come by and visit us at you convenience. Thank you warmly, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 To whom it may concern: I am a Salt Lake County resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. It is clear that the homeless will be disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 crisis. Cutting any funding to their care at this point could be especially catastrophic to them, as well as our community as a whole! Respectfully, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Hi, I'm a SLC resident, and I heard that that the Council has cut all CDBG funding to The INN Between, which continues to serve our local homeless population at a time of great need. Can you explain why this was done? Where are those funds being redirected? I hope you will reconsider your decision, and perhaps find additional resources that can help The INN Between continue their important mission. My heart aches when I try to imagine the suffering to come for those who have nothing. I beg you to feel the same compassion. Thank you for you work, as well. I hope that you'll reply to this email. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Greetings Salt Lake City Council, I just found out that tomorrow (April 7th) is the last time to send in a comment on the next city budget. I would like to personally advocate for restoring funding to The INN Between (TIB). I know you have very difficult decisions to make as to allocation of the CDBG money, and there is not enough to spread as far as desired. However, I have been following TIB closely (live near them) and am so impressed with their mission and the compassion and professionalism they bring to fulfilling it. Any amount of restoration of funding will be very 252 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 much appreciated and frugally utilized. I stand with my friends experiencing homelessness in our community, particularly as they face end of life and medical rehab needs. I know you care as well and thank you for your consideration of this matter. Thanks, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 I am employed by Rocky Mountain Community Reinvestment Corporation (RMCRC). In 2019 RMCRC provided most of the financing for the acquisition and rehab of the current Inn Between facility. Through its involvement RMCRC became uniquely aware of the cost savings to the City of Salt Lake and emergency services and local hospital emergency rooms because of the Inn Between. RMCRC has since been rapaid on its loan and funding of the INN Between will have no impact on it financially. The relatively few dollars allocated to the Inn Between if withdrawn will substantially impact the City of Salt Lake’s expenditures for emergency care and transit for this vulnerable and costly segment of the homeless population in the City. We strongly urge you to support the INN Between by continuing your funding. It is pennies on the dollar savings to the City of Salt Lake. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Hi, As someone who has volunteered at INN Between and lived at the Young Men’s Transition Home, I have seen first hand the benefit that these programs provide for people. I have consistently seen young men make it out of homelessness thanks to this transition home program; and countless old folks have died with a smile on their face instead of a grieving frown. Let us value this as highly as it deserves to be. And let us know that our community’s tax dollars are going to a good cause thanks to these programs. We would all rather fund these programs with our tax dollars than something else. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Dear Members of the Salt Lake City Council, We are volunteers and financial supporters of The INN Between and witness the impact which this non profit clinic has on many Salt Lake City residents in need. We're asking you to reconsider the decision to cut CDBG funding for this facility. This grant is vital in ensuring that the clinic can continue to serve the poorest and most distressed members of our community. Please remember that The INN Between provides shelter to homeless individuals facing medical crisis as well as safety and comfort to those at the end of life. If you'd like to contact us, we'd be happy to provide you with more information about the mission of The INN Between and their success stories. Sincerely, 253 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 To whom it may concern, Please accept this letter of support for The INN Between. The INN Between is a wonderful organization that we have worked with several times in the past as a private foundation. They make such an important impact in our community and I would urge that you reconsider your CDBG funding decision. Any amount funded can help this program remain sustainable. Kind regards, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Greetings Salt Lake City Councel Members, I am a Salt Lake City resident and volunteer at the Inn Between, and I strongly urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of the program. 80% of the people we serve are from Salt Lake City and they would take the hit if we stop receiving this grant. Thank you, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Council Members, I would urge you to reconsider cutting funding for one of the most vulnerable populations in Utah. The INN Between is a wonderful place that brings homeless patients comfort and hospice care during their last days on earth. Every human deserves palliative care and to be surrounded by those who show them love. I know that they have taken multiple patients from the Fourth Street Clinic before they became terminally ill. I appreciate you all working towards a solution towards the housing and healthcare crises and for fighting the idea that humanity is conditional. Sincerely, 254 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Hello, I've been a Salt Lake City resident for almost 3 years now and one of the things that impressed me the most was your care for the less fortunate. Having a hospice for the homeless demonstrates that care. My parents and two siblings, indeed, my whole family, benefited from the care they received through hospice at the end of their lives. I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. Thank you for your reconsideration, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 I am a Salt Lake City resident and I am writing this email today to plead that you reconsider cutting the funding for this. Especially in the current situation we are in as a nation. We need to band together and help those in need as much as possible. Our homeless population are still people and deserve to have a place to go and die with some dignity and care. Life is hard enough for everyone, we need to show some basic human compassion and not have them suffering and miserable in their last bit of life left to die on the streets. Again, I ask to please reconsider cutting funding this would be such a sad shame. Any type of funding you can allot for this organization would be greatly appreciated! Thank you in advance for taking the time to read this email, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Dear Council Members, I am concerned about the proposed complete cut to funding for The INN Between from Salt Lake City's Community Development Block Grant program. I am a Salt Lake City resident who cares deeply about this compassionate resource that does so much with so little, receives significant volunteer support, and is surely deserving of ongoing recognition and support from our city. Please reconsider your decision and return funding to The INN Between at any amount, to show the city’s support of this vital, meaningful service in our community. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 I just found out that the funding has been stop for places like the Inn Between. This place is essential for a lot of people waiting for surgery or getting treatment for Cancer and other medical needs. Hospice for the homeless for those who would having a worse time at a bad time in their life. I hope that you reconsider what you’re doing. I am a registered voter and my voice counts! 255 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. I understand that funding will be tight with everything going on but this program has minimal funding to begin with. Please reconsider. Thank you! Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Hello, I received an email from a friend with concerns about SLC cutting their funding for the Inn Between. While it represents a low percentage of the Inn’s funding, any more cuts at this time would appear rather devastating because of funding cuts from other private groups. Is there any rationale for cuts to those who would appear to be in dire need of medical and hospice care? I assume patients at the Inn are sheltered in place and there must be restrictions on who may come and go. If not, there should be enforcement of appropriate safe guards. I lost my husband to terminal cancer 2.5 yrs ago after enduring 4.5 yrs of a lot of pain and suffering through treatments and the devastation of this disease. I can’t imagine what lack of care and home comforts would be like for those at the end of their lives no matter the illness. That goes for those who would need skilled nursing and medical care as well. We were so fortunate to have excellent care and medical insurance. I live withint 4-5 miles S of the Inn and am a SLCo resident. Certainly homelessness affects anyone in this area. A shelter was already closed. The homeless disperse throughout the valley and areas near the City and end up in homes or on other streets. It affects many areas and I applaud city and county efforts to address homelessness issues. I’m merely expressing my concerns and have questions. Thank you, and stay healthy. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 I urge you to reconsider funding for the INN Between. They offer vital services to the homeless population that no other provider offers. We have been supporting The INN Between for many years and urge the county to do the same. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE HELP THEM!!!! They’re doing some of the greatest work!!!! Homeless that are dying need a place to die with dignity, love, care and compassion. We need someone to FIGHT for them!!!!!! They need us!!!!!!!!!!!! HELP THEM!!!!!! Thank you!!!!!!!! Source: Email 256 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Please do not cut funding for the Inn Between. Other than people who are on ventilators in hospitals right now, I can’t think of any group of people more in need of support than those who are both homeless and ill, some of the terminally. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 A critical component in this community of so many homeless. The INN Between is a functioning resource and will continue with active funding from Salt City and other organizations. The need for funding is now...now. Please. Kim Correa and other staff members are dedicated of course, and the hours and commitment they provide is...well...unreal. A perfect time for CDBG ) funding. Thank you . Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 To whom it may concern: I’m reaching out to you as a Service Provider in this community who has benefited from having had a wonderful organization like the Inn Between available to take in and care for Sick Homeless clients. They have been cut enormously over this last few years and I am very much afraid especially having 255 fewer Shelter beds still than we logistically need. I really feel like cutting funding and not increasing it during the Covid-19 crisis would be a bad look. Our Homeless and unsheltered community bear the brunt of our lack of investment in vital community programs when we invest in a continually over-developed city and we don’t even have enough shelter beds even with the Sugarhouse shelter, it feels uncaring and that is not who we are as a community. Please reconsider your decision to cut the CDBG Grant Please consider offering more help to an agency that shows up for our very sick, and dying homeless population. Thanks for taking the time to read this. Thank You, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Dear City Council- I know there are a lot of competing priorities out there right now. As a 40 year resident of Utah (the Avenues) I’ve supported many organizations. The Inn Between fulfills a unique niche within our community and their public funding is essential to them fulfilling their mission. I hope you will consider funding them to the extent that you can and know the people they support need it now more than ever. Thank you, 257 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. I am a hospice music therapist and have had the privilege of serving patients at this facility, and know how valuable it is to the wellbeing of those it serves. Thank you for your consideration. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 I am a resident of SLC and ask they you consider the continuation of funding for the Innbetween, this is a much needed organization and we as the people should help in whatever manner we can. CDBG funding is necessary please reconsider. Thank you, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Seems like a bad time to cut funding to a homeless shelter that serves unhoused persons with serious health issues! Janine Sheldon Neighbor Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Hello council members, I’m a resident of SLC and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision regarding The Inn Between (TIB). TIB provides an essential service to those experiencing homelessness and significant and/or terminal illnesses. Any amount of money that could be allocated to TIB would we put important use. Thank you, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Dear Salt Lake County Council Members: I am writing on behalf of the organization Inn Between which provides much needed hospice care for homeless individuals that have nowhere to go. Please do not cut funding which would mean the individuals being helped would have no other means for services. I know you have to budget funding. I know you have to make hard 258 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 decisions. At a time when everyone has so much to lose, this loss would seem astronomical to the individuals receiving care. Every life is valuable and worthy of dignity facing end of life. We as a people have to do a better job of helping people feel their self -worth. Thank you, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Dear Salt Lake City Council, I sincerely hope you and your loved ones are safe and healthy during these uncertain times. I am a Salt Lake City resident, living a couple blocks away from The INN Between. What they do for those underserved in our community is remarkable. This organization is doing the work no one else wants to do. We should be honoring them, thanking them, and funding them with whatever we can. Any amount makes a difference to them - please do not cut their funding. You must reconsider your CDBG funding decision for their facility. Do the right thing. Thank you, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 We , as a community need to support the marvelous work done by In Between. Please reconsider your decision for funding this fine organization. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Please continue your support for The Inn Between!! It plays such a vital role in this community and is a model of compassion. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Dear Council Members. I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. Thank you for your consideration. Sincerely, 259 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Mayor Mendenhall and Salt Lake City Council Members, I am a Salt Lake City resident. I’ve watched the various ‘assistance programs’ that have existed for individuals experiencing homelessness over the last 12 years that I’ve lived here. Every administration, and even different council members, has had a different impact on the population of individuals that need help. Has all the help had the intended outcome? No. Are we getting there? Perhaps. I realize that there is a lot going on right now. I find myself disappointed to hear with everything that is going on, that you have cut CBDG funding to The Inn Between. I am writing to urge you to reconsider. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their unique program. Thank you, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Dear City Council Members, I am the founder and current Nurse Supervisor of The INN Between and am really grateful for all of the support you have provided for this vital agency in the past. Historically we have received about $46,000 from the Community Development Block Grant program. This represents only about 3% of our annual budget yet about 80% of our residents come from the Salt Lake City community. The need is great for all homeless service providers, however, even the small percentage of a cut in our budget represents a significant impact on what we can do to serve this community. I would urge you to reconsider the elimination of funding for The INN Between and know that we will appreciate funding at any level. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 To SL City Council Members, I am a resident of salt lake city. In the past you have supported the INN Between. Pleas, please help again by granting money to the INN Between via the block grant program. Thank You! Source: Email 260 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Hello Council Members, I'm writing you to plead with you to continue supporting The Inn Between. The services they provide are truly nonexistent anywhere else. Our low-income, homeless, and formerly homeless neighbors NEED this service. To deprive this population of the option of having a place to die with dignity would be so cruel. As both a social worker and a resident of Ssalt Lake City, I urge you to continue your support. The alternative for many of these folks is to die alone and without the proper care that you or I would be able to receive. Any help you can continue to give them would be truly appreciated. These people are among our most vulnerable. Thanks so much for your consideration, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 To whom it may concern, I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. Please have empathy and compassion for our homeless community. They have a right to pass away with dignity and as comfortably as possible. Thank you, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Dear Council members, We have been Salt Lake City residents for more than three decades. For the past two years we have been weekly volunteers at The Inn Between, which, as you know, is the nation's first hospice for terminally-ill homeless people, something SLC can be most proud of. It's likely that the COVID pandemic will increase the number of such people, yet the City plans to actually eliminate its financial support for The Inn Between. We can well imagine the financial constraints the City must be laboring under during this economic/healthcare crisis. Still, if you have any discretionary funds available, we hope you will continue supporting The Inn Between. Sincerely, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Hi, I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I live just 2 blocks from the Inn Between and support the work they are engaged with. I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. Respectfully, 261 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 I am a resident of Salt Lake City, residing at 923 S 1500 E writing to urge you to reconsider CDBG for the Inn Between. Thank you, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Hello Council: I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. As a former volunteer and public relations coordinator for the INN Between, I witnessed the achievement of this small group of people firsthand. I count as friends the residents who passed through those doors. Their colorful and tragic way of living left an indelible imprint that remains as part of the very fiber of my being. The thought of a funding loss for such a worthy program is painfully disheartening and for want of a better word, ludicrous. Given the COVID outbreak, so many homeless are helplessly forced into death even earlier. Denied services by hospitals all across the united states, they face horrendous conditions without help. The INN Between is one of only TWO such facilities in the entire United States able to provide services to those who are terminally ill and homeless. In and of itself, this is shameful. I am at a loss trying to fathom why you would cut funding. Kim Correa and her incredible staff are tirelessly devoted to ensuring quality care for each and every patient in this facility. For so many of us navigating the waters of COVID and staying alive is actually an ever-present goal. Up to three months ago, it wasn't even a thought. For the residents of the INN Between and all the homeless struggling to stay alive, this is the ever-present reality of daily living. Why would you want to participate in any effort to undermine this herculean effort and support for the downtrodden? Thank you for funding the INN Between, please keep doing so. Save lives instead of taking them away. Truly, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Dear members of the City Council, I am a Salt Lake City resident who also serves as a volunteer (board member) at The Inn Between. I write to strongly encourage continued City assistance to The Inn Between, particularly at this critical time for the homeless in our City. Respectfully, 262 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 I am a constituent of SLC and I support funding for the Inn Between. Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 I am a Salt Lake City resident, and I urge you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount that you can fund will help the sustainability of their program. Thanks, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 As a Salt Lake City resident who is concerned about the welfare of people experiencing homelessness, I respectfully ask you to reconsider your CDBG funding decision for The INN Between. Any amount you can fund will help the sustainability of their program, particularly at a time when public health is a concern for all, with vulnerable populations at even greater risk. Thank you for your consideration, Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Dear Salt Lake City Council, My name is ___________, a student at the University of Utah and proud resident of Salt Lake City. I am writing to you at this time as an advocate for The INN Between, a remarkable organization that I also volunteer for. The INN Between is an incredibly charitable organization that provides invaluable services to many marginalized residents of Salt Lake City. The INN Between provides a beacon of hope for numerous individuals suffering from homelessness and provides an opportunity for them to get back on their feet and become valuable members of the community. In my volunteer efforts, I have seen firsthand the benevolent services that are provided to the occupants at The INN Between who deeply appreciate the care that they receive. I would ask that you please consider renewing the public funds that are granted to the The INN Between via Salt Lake City's Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program as this will drastically assist in helping provide vital services for some of the most vulnerable populations of this great city. Thank you for your great leadership for the residents of Salt Lake City during these extraordinary times. Best, 263 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Dear Council and Mayor - I urge you to please find a way to fund the CDBG request for The INN Between. They do so much with so little, and I can’t imagine a better use of a small portion of my taxes than toward this essential service. The INN Between provides critical care to individuals who are homeless, largely due to terminal health conditions. Please support allowing them to live out their remaining days in dignity, and for those few who recover in their care, be a part of working miracles. Yours in hope and gratitude - Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Sent: Tuesday, April 7, 2020 6:02 PM To: Council Comments <Comments.Council@slcgov.com> Subject: (EXTERNAL) Bridge to Backman Greeting City Council- Thank you for considering the additional funding for the Bridge to Backman. I want to echo James Rodgers’ comments regarding the importance to funding the whole project. If not funded or only partially funded, this would still leave a big empty eyesore in the Westside community. The empty lot we are wanting to improve serves as a message to our community about the investment the city is willing to make in us. 900 South, on the Eastside, gets ANOTHER facelift and Rose Park fails to be properly invested in. With the 600N/700N plan underway, this is a great way to beautify and enhance the corridor. Please consider the importance of the project on a school and community and needs and deserves beautiful spaces to enjoy. Best, Salt Lake City Council. Public Hearing, April 7th, 2020, 7pm, via WebEx, Facebook, and YouTube. Public Comments. Source: WebEx Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Comments: She felt she could help women better outside of the criminal justice system than inside, wanted to address women through a trauma informed lens. Journey of Hope offers services to women with high ACE scores, institutionalized, homeless, evicted, victims of sexual violence and/or trafficking. They have served over 2,000 women in their program. Most will not recidivate if they have supportive services. 17% of their clients do not return to incarceration. They offer mentorship for up to 18 months, and most don’t return to homelessness after their treatment. 200 of their clients haven’t returned to homeless, after receiving their services. Their agency needs the funding to serve people, please reconsider, there are many women and girls aging-out of foster care/Juvenile Justice Services or slated to go to homeless shelters who are getting out of jail. She fears those girls/women going to shelter will be exposed to trafficking or drugs. 264 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Source: WebEx Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Comments: Survivor of sexual and physical abuse, she got her first job out of incarceration at Journey of Hope. Journey of Hope could do so much more in the state, they could flip the recidivism rate, which Utah is the highest in the country. It’s difficult to pull people out of poverty if they don’t’ have enough staff support. They’re the only agency that will go into all settings to serve women in the criminal justice system. Their Executive Director understands the issues these girls/women face. Journey of Hope hires survivors to serve other survivors. Please reconsider funding recommendations. Source: WebEx Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 Comments: SVS is a domestic violence shelter that serves people affected by physical or sexual violence, located in West Jordan. Though they serve residents of Salt Lake City through the Salt Lake City Library and the Geraldine King Women’s Resource Center. This allows flexibility to meet survivors at places they’re at instead of their agency. They serve over 400 domestic violence survivors a year. This improves their quality of life. Thank you for recommendation for funding to provide case management in various SLC locations and the support for South Valley Services. Source: WebEx Date Submitted: 4/7/2020 7:43 pm. With Journey of Hope. Wants to inform you of how her experience working with Journey of Hope has improved her life. With the agency she’s had the opportunity to work with women like her, who are getting out of prison, to get sober and get custody of their children. She’s had the chance to work with domestic violence and rape survivors and women coming out homelessness. She’s been able to turn her adverse childhood experiences and turn it into hope for other women. Journey of Hope has empowered her to move forward and help others find their voice and hope. She hopes the Council will consider them for their funding. Without the funding they cannot help as many women. She wants to thank them for hearing her, and for all that they do. Additional Comments Received After the Public Meeting Source: Email Date Submitted: 4/8/2020 Sent: Wednesday, April 8, 2020 12:16 AM To: Council Comments <Comments.Council@slcgov.com> Subject: (EXTERNAL) CDBG Funding Recommendations Dear Council Members, I am the Executive Director of Utah Health and Human Rights. We have provided wrap- around services for refugee, immigrant, and asylee survivors of torture for 17 years. I recognize that all the recommended CDBG projects focus on homeless services. I attended all the consolidated plan stakeholder meetings and am disheartened to see that programs that work tirelessly to prevent homelessness have been overlooked such as 265 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 ours. 99% of our clients have income less than 50% of the MFI. Our clients have overcome the unimaginable in their home countries and continue to face obstacles with mental health, poverty, language and cultural barriers, physical health, and ongoing trauma. We are the only refugee service provider in Utah who provides services without time limits. Survivors can access our services no matter how long that have been in the U.S. and they can actively receive services for as long as they need, whether that is 8 months, or 8 years. Without our services many of our clients would face homelessness, generational poverty and trauma, and chronic physical health needs. I hope that you will consider funding our program as an essential service keeping Salt Lake City families from entering homelessness. Thank you, 266 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 SALT LAKE CITY COUNCIL and REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY of SALT LAKE CITY and LOCAL BUILDING AUTHORITY of SALT LAKE CITY FORMAL MEETING AGENDA April 21, 2020 Tuesday 7:00 PM This meeting will be an electronic meeting pursuant to the Salt Lake City Emergency Proclamation. SLCCouncil.com CITY COUNCIL MEMBERS: Chris Wharton, Chair District 3 Andrew Johnston, Vice Chair District 2 James Rogers District 1 Ana Valdemoros District 4 Darin Mano District 5 Dan Dugan District 6 Amy Fowler District 7 Generated: 4/21/2020 4:33:58 PM This meeting will be an electronic meeting pursuant to the Salt Lake City Emergency Proclamation. This Council Meeting will not have a physical location at the City and County Building for this meeting. All attendees will connect remotely. Members of the public are encouraged to participate in meetings. We want to make sure everyone interested in the City Council meetings can still access the meetings how they feel most comfortable. If you are interested in watching the City Council meetings, they are available on the following platforms:  Facebook Live: www.facebook.com/slcCouncil/  YouTube: www.youtube.com/slclivemeetings  Web Agenda: www.slc.gov/council/agendas/  SLCtv Channel 17 Live: www.slctv.com/livestream/SLCtv-Live/2 267 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024  If you are interested in participating during the Formal Meeting for the Public Hearings or general comment period, please visit our website or call us at 801- 535-7600 to learn how you can share your comments live during the meetings.  As always, if you would like to provide feedback or comment, please call us or send us an email:  24-Hour comment line: 801-535-7654  council.comments@slcgov.com More info and resources can be found at: www.slc.gov/council/contact-us/ Upcoming meetings and meeting information can be found here: www.slc.gov/council/agendas/ We welcome and encourage your comments! We have Council staff monitoring inboxes and voicemail, as always, to receive and share your comments with Council Members. All agenda related comments received through any source are shared with the Council and added to the public meeting record. View comments submitted during the virtual Council meetings. The standard order of the Formal Meeting Agenda will be adjusted to accommodate the electronic meeting. General Comment and Public Hearings will be heard as one item. Speakers may speak for up to two minutes per public hearing item or for a two- minute public comment. We ask speakers to conclude their comment prior to beginning to speak to the next. Please note: Dates not identified in the FYI - Project Timeline are either not applicable or not yet determined. WELCOME AND PUBLIC MEETING RULES A. OPENING CEREMONY: 1. Council Member Chris Wharton will conduct the meeting. 2. Pledge of Allegiance. 3. Welcome and Public Meeting Rules. 268 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 4. The Council will approve the work session meeting minutes of Tuesday, March 17, 2020 and Tuesday, March 24, 2020 as well as formal meeting minutes of Tuesday, March 24, 2020. B. PUBLIC HEARINGS: Public Hearings and General Comments will be heard as one item. 1. Resolution: Update and Timeline for the City’s 2020-24 Consolidated Plan Guiding Use of U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Funds The Council will continue to accept public comment and consider adopting a resolution that would update and approve the timeline for the City’s 2020-24 Consolidated Plan as required by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The Consolidated Plan details the City’s goals and objectives to build healthy and sustainable communities through four federal grants: Community Development Block Grants (CDBG), Emergency Solutions Grants (ESG), Home Investment Partnerships, and Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA). FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing - Tuesday, October 8, 2019; Tuesday, February 4, 2020; Tuesday, April 7, 2020; Tuesday, April 14, 2020; and Tuesday, April 21, 2020 Set Public Hearing Date - Tuesday, March 3, 2020 Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, March 24, 2020 and Tuesday April 7, 2020 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action - Tuesday, April 21, 2020 Staff Recommendation - Refer to motion sheet(s). 2. Grant Application: U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) COPS Office Fiscal Year 2020 Hiring Grant The Council will accept public comment for a grant application request that would fund the salary and benefits of ten (10) new police officer positions. The new officers would be assigned to the Patrol Division, and the Police Department would assign ten experienced officers to newly created Intelligence-led policing squads which would focus on addressing emerging violent crime issues and repeat violent crime offenders in Salt Lake City. FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) 269 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Briefing - Set Public Hearing Date - Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, April 21, 2020 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action - Staff Recommendation - Close and refer to future consent agenda. 3. Grant Application: 2020 Grants to Improving Criminal Justice Responses to Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking The Council will accept public comment for a grant application request that would fund the salary and benefits for one full-time Victim Advocate position at the YWCA Utah. This new position would replace a current part-time, grant-funded advocate position. This advocate will be co-located at the YWCA Family Justice Center (FJC) and will serve as a liaison to support victims, ensure they receive appropriate services, and are informed about the criminal justice process. If awarded, the grant would also fund police overtime efforts to increase arrests for protection order violation warrants and warrants in domestic violence cases. FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing - Set Public Hearing Date - Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, April 21, 2020 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action - Staff Recommendation - Close and refer to future consent agenda. 4. Grant Application: Assistance to Firefighters Grant The Council will accept public comment for a grant application request that would fund eight battery-powered ventilation fans to replace old gas-powered fans for the Salt Lake City Fire Department. The new fans are more compact, can be safely carried by one firefighter, and do not emit fumes. In addition, the grant funding would be used to purchase eight battery-operated, vehicle-mounted extrication units which will replace older equipment to ensure successful heavy rescue extrication on metals used in newer vehicles. FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing - Set Public Hearing Date - Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, April 21, 2020 at 7 p.m. 270 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 TENTATIVE Council Action - Staff Recommendation - Close and refer to future consent agenda. 5. Grant Application: 2020 Parks as Community Nutrition Hubs: Expanding Access to Healthy Foods The Council will accept public comment for a grant application request that would be used to construct a 1,000 square foot outdoor classroom at the Sorenson Unity Center. The classroom will become a community nutrition hub for hosting nutrition and gardening education events, a farmers market, and health and wellness activities for Glendale and Poplar Grove residents. FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing - Set Public Hearing Date - Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, April 21, 2020 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action - Staff Recommendation - Close and refer to future consent agenda. 6. Grant Application: U.S. Department of Justice Department (DOJ) COPS Office Fiscal Year 2020 Community Police Development Grant The Council will accept public comment for a grant application request that would fund the salary and benefits of three new part-time Gang Outreach Advocate positions to ass ist with the Promising Youth Project, a gang intervention and prevention program. FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing - Set Public Hearing Date - Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, April 21, 2020 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action - Staff Recommendation - Close and refer to future consent agenda. 271 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 C. COMMENTS: 1. Comments to the City Council. (Comments are taken on any item not scheduled for a public hearing, as well as on any other City business. Comments are limited to two minutes.) 2. Questions to the Mayor from the City Council. D. POTENTIAL ACTION ITEMS: 1. One-year Action Plan for Community Development Block Grant & Other Federal Grants for Fiscal Year 2020-21 The Council will consider a resolution adopting the Mayor’s funding recommendations and an appropriations resolution adopting the One-Year Annual Action Plan that includes Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding, HOME Investment Partnership Program funding, Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) funding, Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) funding, for Fiscal Year 2020-21 and approving an Interlocal Cooperation Agreement between Salt Lake City and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing - Tuesday, April 7, 2020; Tuesday, April 14, 2020; and Tuesday, April 21, 2020 Set Public Hearing Date - Tuesday, March 3, 2020 Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, March 24, 2020 and Tuesday, April 7, 2020 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action - Tuesday, April 21, 2020 Staff Recommendation - Refer to motion sheet(s). 272 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 SALT LAKE CITY COUNCIL and REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY of SALT LAKE CITY and LOCAL BUILDING AUTHORITY of SALT LAKE CITY FORMAL MEETING AGENDAS May 5, 2020 Tuesday 7:00 PM This meeting will be an electronic meeting pursuant to the Salt Lake City Emergency Proclamation. SLCCouncil.com CITY COUNCIL/BOARD MEMBERS: Chris Wharton, Chair District 3 Andrew Johnston, Vice Chair District 2 James Rogers District 1 Ana Valdemoros District 4 Darin Mano District 5 Dan Dugan District 6 Amy Fowler District 7 Generated: 5/4/2020 5:11:05 PM This meeting will be an electronic meeting pursuant to the Salt Lake City Emergency Proclamation. This Council Meeting will not have a physical location at the City and County Building for this meeting. All attendees will connect remotely. Members of the public are encouraged to participate in meetings. We want to make sure everyone interested in the City Council meetings can still access the meetings how they feel most comfortable. If you are interested in watching the City Council meetings, they are available on the following platforms:  Facebook Live: www.facebook.com/slcCouncil/  YouTube: www.youtube.com/slclivemeetings  Web Agenda: www.slc.gov/council/agendas/  SLCtv Channel 17 Live: www.slctv.com/livestream/SLCtv-Live/2 273 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 If you are interested in participating during the Formal Meeting for the Public Hearings or general comment period, please visit our website or call us at 801-535-7600 to learn how you can share your comments live during the meetings. As always, if you would like to provide feedback or comment, please call us or send us an email:  24-Hour comment line: 801-535-7654  council.comments@slcgov.com More info and resources can be found at: www.slc.gov/council/contact-us/ Upcoming meetings and meeting information can be found here: www.slc.gov/council/agendas/ We welcome and encourage your comments! We have Council staff monitoring inboxes and voicemail, as always, to receive and share your comments with Council Members. All agenda related comments received through any source are shared with the Council and added to the public meeting record. View comments submitted during the virtual Council meetings. The standard order of the Formal Meeting Agenda will be adjusted to accommodate the electronic meeting. General Comment and Public Hearings will be heard as one item. Speakers may speak for up to two minutes per public hearing item or for a two- minute public comment. We ask speakers to conclude their comment prior to beginning to speak to the next. LOCAL BUILDING AUTHORITY of SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH MEETING Please note: Dates not identified in the FYI - Project Timeline are either not applicable or not yet determined. WELCOME AND PUBLIC MEETING RULES A. OPENING CEREMONY: 1. Council/Board Member Chris Wharton will conduct the formal meetings. 2. Pledge of Allegiance. 3. Welcome and Public Meeting Rules. 274 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 B. UNFINISHED BUSINESS: 1. Resolution: Tentative Budget for the Capital Projects Fund of the Local Building Authority for Fiscal Year 2020-21 The Board will consider approving a resolution adopting the tentative budget for the Capital Projects Fund of the Local Building Authority of Salt Lake City, Utah for Fiscal Year 2020-21. FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing - Set Public Hearing Date - Tuesday, April 21, 2020 Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, May 19, 2020 and Tuesday, June 2, 2020 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action - Tuesday, June 9, 2020 Staff Recommendation - Refer to motion sheet(s). C. CONSENT: 1. Resolution: Budget for the Capital Projects Fund of the Local Building Authority for Fiscal Year 2020-21 The Board will confirm the dates of Tuesday, May 19, 2020 and Tuesday, June 2, 2020 at 7 p.m. to accept public comment and consider approving a resolution adopting the final budget for the Capital Projects Fund of the Local Building Authority of Salt Lake City, Utah for Fiscal Year 2020-21. FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing - Set Public Hearing Date - Tuesday, April 21, 2020 and Tuesday, May 5, 2020 Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, May 21, 2019 and Tuesday, June 4, 2019 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action - Staff Recommendation - Confirm the Public Hearing dates D. ADJOURNMENT: REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY of SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH MEETING Please note: Dates not identified in the FYI - Project Timeline are either not applicable or not yet determined. E. UNFINISHED BUSINESS: 275 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 1. Resolution: Tentative Budget for the Redevelopment Agency of Salt Lake City for Fiscal Year 2020-21 The Board will consider approving a resolution adopting the tentative budget for the Redevelopment Agency of Salt Lake City for Fiscal Year 2020-21. FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing - Set Public Hearing Date - Tuesday, April 14, 2020 and Tuesday, May 5, 2020 Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, May 19, 2020 and Tuesday, June 2, 2020 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action - Tuesday, June 9, 2020 Staff Recommendation - Refer to motion sheet(s). F. CONSENT: 1. Resolution: Budget for the Redevelopment Agency of Salt Lake City for Fiscal Year 2020-21 The Board will confirm the dates of Tuesday, May 19, 2020 and Tuesday, June 2, 2020 at 7 p.m. to accept public comment and consider approving a resolution adopting the final budget for the Redevelopment Agency of Salt Lake City, Utah for Fiscal Year 2020-21. FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing - Set Public Hearing Date - Tuesday, April 21, 2020 and Tuesday, May 5, 2020 Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, May 19, 2020 and Tuesday, June 2, 2020 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action - Tuesday, June 9, 2020 Staff Recommendation - Confirm the Public Hearing dates G. ADJOURNMENT: SALT LAKE CITY COUNCIL MEETING Please note: Dates not identified in the FYI - Project Timeline are either not applicable or not yet determined. H. OPENING CEREMONY: 1. The Council will approve the formal meeting minutes of Tuesday, April 14, 2020. 2. Mayor Mendenhall will present the proposed Salt Lake City budget, including the Library Fund, for Fiscal Year 2020-21. I. PUBLIC HEARINGS: Public Hearings and General Comments will be heard as one item. 276 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 1. Ordinance: 1172 East Chandler Drive Rezone The Council will accept public comment and consider adopting an ordinance that would rezone a parcel at approximately 1172 East Chandler Drive from Open Space District (OS) to Foothills Residential District (FR- 3/12,000). The intent of the rezone is to match the zoning of the property to the east, which is under the same ownership, to allow residential accessory uses on the property after the two lots are combined. Consideration may be given to rezoning the property to another zoning district with similar characteristics. Petition No.: PLNPCM2019-00795 FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing - Tuesday, April 14, 2020 Set Public Hearing Date - Tuesday, April 7, 2020 Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, May 5, 2020 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action - Tuesday, May 19, 2020 Staff Recommendation - Refer to motion sheet(s). 2. Ordinance: 2064 North and 2066 North 2200 West Zoning Map Amendment The Council will continue to accept public comment and consider adopting an ordinance that would rezone property at 2064 North and 2066 North 2200 West from AG-2 (Agricultural) to M-1 (Light Manufacturing). The applicant is requesting the rezone to accommodate future development of the property and implement the area master plan zoning. No site development proposal has been submitted at this time. Although the applicant has requested that the property be rezoned to M-1, consideration may be given to rezoning the property to another zoning district with similar characteristics. Petition No. PLNPCM-2019-00431. FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing - Tuesday, March 3, 2020 Set Public Hearing Date - Tuesday, March 3, 2020 and Tuesday, April 21, 2020 Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, April 7, 2020 and Tuesday, May 5, 2020 TENTATIVE Council Action - Tuesday, May 5, 2020 Staff Recommendation - Refer to motion sheet(s). 3. Ordinance: Washington Street Alley Vacation The Council will continue to accept public comment and consider adopting an ordinance that would close a City-owned alley located at approximately 1040 South Washington Street. The alley is 15 feet wide and approximately 253 feet long. It runs west of Washington Street toward an abandoned Utah Transit Authority (UTA) railroad line, where it becomes a dead end before reaching 300 West Street. The proposal would allow the petitioner to incorporate it into the seven of eight adjacent properties they own. FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing - Tuesday, March 3, 2020 Set Public Hearing Date - Tuesday, March 3, 2020 Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, April 7, 2020 and Tuesday, May 5, 2020 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action - Tuesday, May 5, 2020 Staff Recommendation - Refer to motion sheet(s). 4. Ordinance: Cleveland Court Master Plan Amendment and Rezone (1430 South 400 East) The Council will continue to accept public comment and consider adopting an ordinance that would amend the Central Community Master Plan Future Land Use Map and the zoning map pertaining to a property at 1430 South 400 East. The rezone and amendments would allow the applicant to build a seven-unit development. The proposal would change the Central Community Master Plan Future Land Use Map from Low Density Residential to Medium Density Residential and rezone the property from RMF-35 (Moderate Density Multi- Family Residential District) to FB-UN1 (Form Based Urban Neighborhood District). Although the applicant has 277 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 requested that the property be rezoned to the FB-UN1 district, consideration may be given to rezoning the property to another zoning district with similar characteristics. Petition Nos.: PLNPCM2019-00189 & PLNPCM2019-00190 FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing - Tuesday, March 17, 2020 Set Public Hearing Date - Tuesday, March 24, 2020 Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, April 7, 2020 and Tuesday, May 5, 2020 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action - Tuesday, May 5, 2020 Staff Recommendation - Refer to motion sheet(s). 5. Ordinance: RECM Investments, LLC Zoning Map Amendment at 347, 353 and 359 North 700 West The Council will continue to accept public comment and consider adopting an ordinance that would amend the zoning map pertaining to three parcels of property located at 347, 353 and 359 North 700 West to rezone the parcels from SR-1 Special Development Pattern Residential to RMF-35 Moderate Density Multi-family Residential. The request is in anticipation of a multi-family project being constructed at the site. Consideration may be given to rezoning the property to another zoning district with similar characteristics. Petition No. PLNPCM2019-00638. FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing - Tuesday, February 18, 2020 Set Public Hearing Date - Tuesday, February 18, 2020 Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, March 24, 2020 and Tuesday, May 5, 2020 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action - Tuesday,May 5, 2020 Staff Recommendation - Refer to motion sheet(s). 6. Ordinance: Zoning Map Amendment 480 E 6th Avenue The Council will continue to accept public comment and consider adopting an ordinance that would amend the zoning map for the property at 480 East 6th Avenue from Special Development Pattern Residential District (SR-1A) to Small Neighborhood Business District (SNB). The proposed rezone is to make the current legal nonconforming commercial use in the 6th Avenue structure conforming and allow for a commercial use in the historically residential structure facing G Street. Consideration may be given to rezoning the property to another zoning district with similar characteristics. Petition No. PLNPCM2018-00813. FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing - Tuesday, February 18, 2020 Set Public Hearing Date - Tuesday, February 18, 2020 Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, March 24, 2020 and Tuesday, May 5, 2020 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action - Tuesday, May 5, 2020 Staff Recommendation - Refer to motion sheet(s). 7. Grant Application: 2021 Distracted Driving Prevention Program Grant The Council will accept public comment for a grant application request from the Salt Lake City Police Department that would fund enforcement/education overtime shifts for the Distracted Driving Prevention program. FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing - Set Public Hearing Date - Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, May 5, 2020 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action - 278 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Staff Recommendation - Close and refer to future consent agenda. 8. Grant Application: 2021 Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Program Grant The Council will accept public comment for a grant application request from the Salt Lake City Police Department that would fund crosswalk enforcement/education overtime as well as youth bicycle rodeo overtime. FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing - Set Public Hearing Date - Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, May 5, 2020 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action - Staff Recommendation - Close and refer to future consent agenda. J. COMMENTS: 1. Comments to the City Council. (Comments are taken on any item not scheduled for a public hearing, as well as on any other City business. Comments are limited to two minutes.) 2. Questions to the Mayor from the City Council. K. POTENTIAL ACTION ITEMS: 1. Resolution: Update and Timeline for the City’s 2020-24 Consolidated Plan Guiding Use of U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Funds The Council will consider adopting a resolution that would update and approve the timeline for the City’s 2020- 24 Consolidated Plan as required by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The Consolidated Plan details the City’s goals and objectives to build healthy and sustainable communities through four federal grants: Community Development Block Grants (CDBG), Emergency Solutions Grants (ESG), Home Investment Partnerships, and Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA). FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing - Tuesday, October 8, 2019; Tuesday, February 4, 2020; Tuesday, April 7, 2020; Tuesday, April 14, 2020; and Tuesday, April 21, 2020 Set Public Hearing Date - Tuesday, March 3, 2020 Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, March 24, 2020; Tuesday April 7, 2020; and Tuesday April 21, 2020 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action - Tuesday, May 5, 2020 Staff Recommendation - Refer to motion sheet(s). 2. One-year Action Plan for Community Development Block Grant & Other Federal Grants for Fiscal Year 2020-21 The Council will consider a resolution adopting the Mayor’s funding recommendations and an appropriations resolution adopting the One-Year Annual Action Plan that includes Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding, HOME Investment Partnership Program funding, Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) funding, Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) funding, for Fiscal Year 2020-21 and approving an Interlocal Cooperation Agreement between Salt Lake City and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). FYI – Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) 279 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Briefing - Tuesday, April 7, 2020; Tuesday, April 14, 2020; and Tuesday, April 21, 2020 Set Public Hearing Date - Tuesday, March 3, 2020 Hold hearing to accept public comment - Tuesday, March 24, 2020 and Tuesday, April 7, 2020 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action - Tuesday, May 5, 2020 Staff Recommendation - Refer to motion sheet(s). 280 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 281 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 APPENDIX C: 2020 – 2024 CITIZEN PARTICIPATION PLAN INTRODUCTION The Citizen Participation Plan specifies the policies and procedures that encourage participation by Salt Lake City residents in the planning, implementation, and ongoing evaluation of the City’s Consolidated Plan as required by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The Citizen Participation Plan encourages participation from citizens in neighborhoods that receive significant federal funding and from citizens living throughout the City. The Consolidated Plan articulates how HUD funding will be used for the following programs: ● Community Development Block Grant (CDBG); ● Emergency Solutions Grant Program (ESG); ● Home Investment Partnership Program (HOME); and ● Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA). Citizen participation in planning and implementing housing, public services, infrastructure, and economic development activities is an essential step in creating vibrant, livable and sustainable cities that are responsive to resident’s needs. A robust citizen participation process provides residents with an opportunity to improve their environment and equips local elected officials with information regarding their constituent’s desires and priorities. If residents are involved in designing programs that will improve their communities, it is more likely that projects and strategies will meet their needs. Interested groups and individuals are encouraged to provide input into all aspects of the City’s consolidated planning activities, including but not limited to assessing needs, setting priorities, and evaluating performance. This Citizen Participation Plan offers numerous opportunities for citizens to contribute feedback regarding ways to provide decent housing, establish and maintain a suitable living environment, invest in infrastructure, and expand economic opportunities, particularly for low-and moderate-income (LMI) persons. Salt Lake City’s Housing and Neighborhood Development Division (HAND) will be responsible for overseeing the development and implementation of the applicable plans. The Citizen Participation Plan applies to the following: ● The five-year Consolidated Plan; ● The Annual Action Plan (AAP); ● The Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER); ● Any substantial amendments to the five-year Consolidated Plan and/or annual Action Plan; and ● Amendments to the Citizen Participation Plan. The City’s fiscal year begins July 1 of each year and ends June 30 of the following year. Each area of planning has its own schedule and must be maintained to ensure compliance with HUD regulations and eligibility for future funding. In all areas, the City will look to include the use of electronic communication, meetings, training, noticing, outreach, etc. where appropriate so long as it is clearly communicated for participation by the general public. HUD PROGRAMS Salt Lake City receives four entitlement grants from HUD to help address th e City’s affordable housing, community, and economic development needs. The four grant programs are described below: 1. Community Development Block Grant Program (CDBG): Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 created the CDBG program. It was reauthorized in 1990 as part of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act. The primary objective of the CDBG program is to develop viable urban communities by providing decent housing and a suitable living environment and by expanding economic development opportunities for persons of low and moderate income. The City develops locally defined programs and funding priorities for CDBG, but activities must address one or more of the national objectives of the CDBG program. The three national objectives are: (1) to benefit low- and moderate- income persons; (2) to aid in the prevention or elimination of slums or blight; and/or (3) to meet other urgent community development needs. The City’s CDBG program emphasizes activities that directly benef it low and moderate-income persons. 282 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 2. Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG): The ESG Program is authorized by the Steward B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act of 1987 and was amended by the Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing (HEARTH) Act of 2009. The ESG Interim Rule took effect on January 4, 2012. The change in the program’s name, from Emergency Shelter Grants to Emergency Solutions Grants, reflects the change in the program’s focus from addressing the needs of homeless people in emergency or transitional shelters to assisting people to quickly regain stability in permanent housing after experiencing a housing crisis and/or homelessness. The ESG program provides funding to address five program components: street outreach, emergency shelt er, homelessness prevention, rapid re-housing assistance, and HMIS; as well as administrative activities. 3. HOME Investment Partnerships Program (HOME): HOME was introduced in the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act of 1990 and provides funding for housing rehabilitation, new housing construction, acquisition of affordable housing, and tenant -based rental assistance. A portion of the funds (15 percent) must be set aside for Community Housing Development Organizations (CHDO) certified by t he City. 4. Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA): HOPWA funds may be used to assist housing designed to meet the needs of persons with HIV/AIDS, including the prevention of homelessness. Supportive services may also be included. HOPWA grants are allocated to Eligible Metropolitan Statistical Areas (EMSAs) with a high incidence of HIV/AIDS. The City receives HOPWA funds that can be utilized in Salt Lake County, Tooele County and Summit County. CITIZEN ADVISORY BOARDS The City uses advisory boards to assist in the recommendation of funding for these grant programs. CDBG & ESG applications are reviewed by the Community Development and Capital Improvements Program Advisory Board (CDCIP). The HOME & HOPWA applications are reviewed by the Housing Tru st Fund Advisory Board (HTFAB). These advisory boards are made up of a diverse resident base that allows for additional community input. The recommendation of the board is used by the Mayor and City Council as final funding allocations are determined. If a member of the public is interested in serving on the CDCIP or HTF Advisory Boards, please contact Housing and Neighborhood Development to learn how you can help direct the efforts of the city at www.slcgov.com/hand. The City encourages diversity among its boards and encourage constituents from a wide variety of backgrounds, and experiences to apply for volunteerism on this and other city boards. During the development of the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan, the City consulted with businesses, developers, and nonprofit organizations, as well as philanthropic, community, and faith -based organizations. Representatives from these various entities served on a Stakeholder Advisory Committee and provided valuable input r egarding suggested priorities for unmet, unfunded needs. In addition, these stakeholders provided direction regarding the strategies the City could employ to help address those needs with the federal funding available through the Consolidated Plan. This in put is reflected in the Consolidated Plan and will help to guide how the funding is used over the five-year period. Salt Lake City will continue to use advisory boards as a way to receive community input and encourage citizens to play an active role in decision making processes. The advisory boards will provide recommendation for funding to the Mayor & City Council for consideration. The Mayor may elect to change which advisory board(s) responsible for review and recommendation of these grant sources, wit hout further impact to this Plan or associated Plans. PUBLIC HOUSING AGENC Y (PHA) The City will provide information about consolidated plan activities to the Housing Authority of Salt Lake City (HASLC) and the Salt Lake County Housing Authority, “Housing Connect.” This will allow HASLC and Housing Connect to make this information available at the annual public hearing required for the Public Housing Authority (PHA) Plan. MEASURING SUCCESS The City will explore alternative public involvement techniques and quantitative approaches to measuring the success of efforts related to the Consolidated Plan. These techniques could include various online engagement tools such as online surveys, discussion forums, GIS-based interactive maps with public comment layers, social media analytics, and/or other quantitative approaches. 283 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 DISPLACEMENT OF PERS ONS SLC will adhere to and uphold all requirements under the Federal Uniform Relocation Assistance Real P roperty Acquisition Act of 1970. The City will continue to explore other methods to ensure that displacement is minimized where applicable. PUBLIC NOTICE The City will provide advanced public notice once when a planning activity subject to the Citizen Pa rticipation Plan occurs. When appropriate, public notices, announcements, draft documents, and final documents may be provided as follows: 1. Press Releases issued by the Office of the Mayor; 2. Written Public Notices, provided in both English and Spanish; 3. Post ing of written Public Notices on the State’s Public Notice website; 4. Email to HAND’s comprehensive contact list consisting of residents, past and present grant applicants, government officials, Council liaisons, interested parties, Community Councils, local neighborhood groups, and City departments; 5. Post announcements, information, and documents to the City’s Housing and Neighborhood Development website; 6. Information released via the City’s social media accounts; 7. Follow the City’s Public Engagement Guide; 8. The City will use electronic means wherever applicable to reduce the requirement for in person noticing or engagement. To be added to HAND’s email/mailing lists for the purpose of automatically being informed about the federal grant activities and processes, please contact Housing and Neighborhood Development at www.slcgov.com/hand. SALT LAKE CITY PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT GUIDE In September 2019, Salt Lake City updated the Salt Lake City Public Engagement Guide. The document has been accepted by the legislative body (though not officially adopted by the City Council), and serves as a framework for use by all Departments, Divisions, and employees as they engage the public in City decisions. The Salt Lake City Public Engagement Guide was developed in conjunction with the Open Government Initiative and principles of the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2). The Salt Lake City Public Engagement Guide is a tool designed to assist city employees in determining the scope and appropriate level of public engagement necessary for a successful process. Issues of culture, language, income and protected classes come into play when the specific and/or unique stakeholders are identified, based on the characteris tics and intent of a particular plan, program or process being discussed. This guide will be used in the programming and implementation of gaining the greatest level of meaningful participation with the citizens of Salt Lake City. PLANNING ACTIVITIES SUBJ ECT TO THE CITIZEN PARTICIPATION PLAN General Needs Hearing Each year, during the grant application period, the City will host a General Needs Hearing. The public is invited to attend the hearing and provide input on the general needs within their communit y. This may include gaps in services, housing opportunities, neighborhood improvements, the provision of public service, and other needs. Information gathered at the General Needs Hearing will be used to prioritize funding to address community needs. To reach a wide variety of residents, Housing and Neighborhood Development may outreach to the public using the following forums: 1. Public Notice that meets State public noticing requirements in advance to HAND’s comprehensive email/mailing list in both English and Spanish; 2. Press Release, released through the Mayor’s Office 3. Details will be posted on Housing and Neighborhood Development’s website; 284 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 4. Request that non-profit organizations and business partners post the English and Spanish notice in a public space in their place of business; 5. Post details of the hearing on the State’s Public Notice website; 6. Additional outreach may include utilizing the Mayor’s social media platforms and other applicable forms of electronic communication, meetings, training, and noticin g. Grant Application Availability The City will attempt to alert eligible applicants of the application process, training opportunities, and application deadlines when grant applications are available. Outreach may be repeated as often as necessary to ensure outreach is successful. To reach current and potential partners, HAND will provide outreach as follows: 1. Public Notice to HAND’s comprehensive email/mailing list; 2. Press Release, released through the Mayor’s Office; 3. Details will be posted on Housing and Neighborhood Development’s website; 4. Additional outreach may include utilizing the Mayor’s social media platforms and other applicable forms of electronic communication, meetings, training, and noticing. Advisory Board Meetings The public is invited to attend and observe all Advisory Board meetings. Per State requirements, all CDCIP & HTF Advisory Board meetings are posted on the State’s Public Notice website. These public meetings may occur in person or electronically, following the State of Utah Open Meetings Act requirements. This includes and is not limited to hosting remote meetings as necessary. During time of emergency declaration, these meetings will continue to follow the State of Utah Open Meetings Act requirements as advised by and under the input of the City Attorney. This includes and is not limited to hosting remote meetings as necessary. Community Input/Public Engagement On an annual basis before the Advisory Boards make funding recommendations for the CDBG, ESG, HOME, or HOPWA funding, the City will conduct a widespread effort to ensure that a wide variety of community members have the ability to provide input into funding priorities. The method of this effort may change from year to year, however, it is always the goal of the City to s pecifically outreach to community members that are more likely to use the services and programs supported by these funding sources. Each year the efforts will enhance and improve the outreach to vulnerable populations, communities of color, disadvantaged p opulations, and will always include outreach within CDBG eligible areas and/or areas of high poverty. Consolidated Plan U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development requirements dictate that the City must have a Consolidated Plan. This is a five-year strategic plan that identifies community development and housing needs within the community. This document must specify short -term and long-term objectives that provide for decent housing, a suitable living environment, and expanded economic opportunity primarily for persons of low and moderate income. Salt Lake City's 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan is a strategic plan focused on increasing opportunity in neighborhoods with concentrated poverty and supporting the City's most vulnerable populations. The five-y ear plan provides a strategy for maximizing and leveraging the City's block grant allocations to build healthy and sustainable communities that connect and expand opportunities for residents. Many steps were taken to determine the community needs and solicit feedback from the community, interested parties, stakeholders and government partners. Below is a list of events, activities and reports that were completed: The public was invited to comment on the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan draft document before adoption by the City Council. Printed copies of the Consolidated Plan Executive Summary were made available for public review and comment for 30 calendar days. The copies were located at Salt Lake City Corporation, 451 South State Street, in the Office of Community Affairs (Room 345), Housing and Neighborhood Development (Room 445), the Salt Lake City Public Library, Main Branch, located at 210 East 400 South in Salt Lake City. An electronic version of the draft 285 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan was posted on the City’s official website during the same period. The final adopted Consolidated Plan will be made available on the City’s official website. Any comments made by the public were reviewed and analyzed by Housing and Neighborhood Development. Comments and may be incorporated into the final Plan document. Substantial Amendments to the Consolidated Plan The Citizen Participation Plan defines a substantial amendment as: 1. A proposed use of funds that does not address a goal or underlying strategy identified in the governing Consolidated Plan or Annual Action Plan; or 2. Increasing funding levels for a given project by 100% or more of the previously adopted amount; or 3. Decreasing funding levels for a given project by 100% AND pivoting impacted funds to another approved u se during an action plan period; or 4. A change to a regulatory requirement or additional allocated funding from the US Department of Housing & Urban Development that defines that a substantial amendment must be completed. The above list represents the City’s criteria for determining what constitutes a substantial amendment and are subject to the City’s citizen participation process. The public is invited to comment on any Substantial Amendments to the Consolidated Plan before adoption by City Council. Announcements of a Substantial Amendment may be communicated by the following way(s): 1. Public Notice to HAND’s comprehensive email/mailing list; or 2. Press Release, released through the Mayor’s Office; or 3. Details will be posted on Housing and Neighborhood Development’s website; or 4. Additional outreach may include utilizing the Mayor’s social media platforms and other applicable forms of electronic communication, meetings, training, and noticing. Printed and electronic draft documents of Substantial Amendmen ts to the Consolidated Plan will be made available for public review and comment. Where allowable, the City will follow the required noticing of 30 calendar days, except for when US Department of Housing & Urban Development allows for a lesser amount of no ticing days. If accessible, printed copies will be located at Salt Lake City Corporation, 451 South State Street, in the Office of Community Affairs (Room 345), Housing and Neighborhood Development (Room 445), and the Salt Lake City Public Library, Main Branch, located at 210 East 400 South in Salt Lake City. An electronic version of any Substantial Amendments to the Consolidated Plan will be posted on the City’s official web site during the same period. Any comments made by the public will be reviewed and analyzed by Housing and Neighborhood Development. Comments may be incorporated into the final Consolidated Plan document. A summary of these comments or views, and a summary of any comments or views not accepted and the reasons therefor, shall be attached to the substantial amendment of the consolidated plan. Annual Action Plan City Council Public Hearing Each year, the Salt Lake City Council will host a public hearing to allow public input on projects proposed for funding. This is one of the two public hearings during the planning process as noted in the General Requirements section of the Citizen Participation Plan. To engage citizens, outreach will be conducted as follows: 1. Public Notice, provided at least 14 calendar days in advance to HAND’s compr ehensive email/mailing list in both English and Spanish; 2. Press Release, released through the Mayor’s Office. 3. Details will be posted on Housing and Neighborhood Development’s website. 4. Request that non-profit organizations and business partners post the English and Spanish notice in a public space in their place of business; 5. Post details of the hearing on the State’s Public Notice website; 6. Additional outreach may include utilizing the Mayor’s social media platforms and other applicable forms of electronic communication, meetings, training, and noticing. 286 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 The City Council will accept public input from those who attended the public hearing to express their views, either by verbally addressing the Council or providing written comments. Written comments are also allowed by those unable to attend in person, but who wanted to provide their input on the projects requesting funding. The draft AAP will be available for public comment for 14 calendar days. Any comments made by the public will be reviewed and analyzed by Housing and Neighborhood Development. Comments may be incorporated into the final Plan document. Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER) Every year, the City must submit to HUD the Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER) within 90 calendar days of the close of the program year. The CAPER describes how funds were spent and the extent to which funds were used for activities that benefit low - and moderate- income residents. The City will provide reasonable not ice that the draft CAPER is available so that residents will have an opportunity to review and comment. The draft CAPER will be available for public comment for 15 calendar days. To engage citizens, outreach will be as follows: 1. Public Notice to HAND’s comprehensive email/mailing list; 2. Details will be posted on Housing and Neighborhood Development’s website; 3. Additional outreach may include utilizing the Mayor’s social media platforms and other applicable forms of electronic communication, meetings, training, and noticing. Any comments made by the public will be reviewed by Housing and Neighborhood Development. The City will consider any comments or views of citizens received in writing, in preparing the performance report. A summary of these comments or views shall be attached to the performance report. Amendments to the Citizen Participation Plan An “Amendment” to the Citizen Participation Plan is defined as: If HUD has new citizen participation plan requirements, that will be considered amendment. I f the City finds that this Citizen Participation Plan no longer meets the needs of the community and decision makers, an adjustment to this Plan will be considered an amendment. This Citizen Participation Plan can be amended only after the public has been notified of the City’s intent to modify it, and only after the public has had a reasonable chance to review and comment on proposed substantial changes. The draft Amendment to the Citizen Participation Plan will be available for public comment for 15 calendar days. To engage citizens, outreach will be as follows: 1. Public Notice to HAND’s comprehensive email/mailing list; 2. Details will be posted on Housing and Neighborhood Development’s website; 3. Additional outreach may include utilizing the Mayor’s social media platforms and other applicable forms of electronic communication, meetings, training, and noticing. Any comments made by the public will be reviewed and analyzed by Housing and Neighborhood Development. Comments may be reflected in the final amendment to the Citizen Participation Plan. A summary of these comments or views, and a summary of any comments or views not accepted and the reasons therefor, shall be attached to the substantial amendment of the consolidated plan. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Public Hearings There will be a minimum of two public hearings during the planning stages of any formal Plan required by HUD. Notices of all Public Hearings will be communicated within 14 calendar days of the Hearing. Public Hearings will also be identified on Ut ah’s Public Notice website. Public hearings may occur in person, electronically, or by written comment. People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodation no later than 48 hours in advance in order to attend this public meeting. Accommodations may include alternate formats, interpreters, and other auxiliary aids. This is 287 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 an accessible facility. Salt Lake City Corporation is committed to ensuring we are accessible to all members of the public. To request ADA accommodations contact Sarah Benj by email at sarah.benj@slcgov.com or by phone at 801.535.7697. Please provide 48 hours advanced notice. ADA accommodations can including alternate formats, interpreters and other auxiliary aids. Public Meetings Public meetings may occur throughout the grant application and administration process. Any public meeting that is being held to discuss a matter of the federal grants discussed herein, will be communicated at a minimum of 2 calendar days in ad vance of said meeting. Notices of all public meetings will also be identified on Utah’s Public Notice website. People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodation no later than 48 hours in advance in order to attend this public meeting. Accommodations may include alternate formats, interpreters, and other auxiliary aids. This is an accessible facility. Salt Lake City Corporation is committed to ensuring we are accessible to all members of the public. To request ADA accommodations contact Sarah Benj by email at sarah.benj@slcgov.com or by phone at 801.535.7697. Please provide 48 hours advanced notice. ADA accommodations can including alternate formats, interpreters and other auxiliary aids. Non-English speaking In the case of public hearings where a significant number of non-English speaking residents can reasonably be expected to participate, the City will meet the needs of non-English speaking residents by providing translation services and interpreters, upon request. People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodation no later than 48 hours in advance in order to attend this public meeting. Accommodations may include alternate formats, interpreters, and other auxilia ry aids. This is an accessible facility. Salt Lake City Corporation is committed to ensuring we are accessible to all members of the public. To request ADA accommodations contact Sarah Benj by email at sarah.benj@slcgov.com or by phone at 801.535.7697. Please provide 48 hours advanced notice. ADA accommodations can including alternate formats, interpreters and other auxiliary aids. Individuals with Disabilities People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodation no later than 48 hours in advance in order to attend this public meeting. Accommodations may include alternate formats, interpreters, and other auxiliary aids. This is an accessible facility. Salt Lake City Corporation is committed to ensuring we are accessible to all members of the public. To request ADA accommodations contact Sarah Benj by email at sarah.benj@slcgov.com or by phone at 801.535.7697. Please provide 48 hours advanced notice. ADA accommodations can including alternate formats, interpreters and other auxiliary aids. Document Access Copies of all final planning documents including the following federal reports will be made available on the City’s website: ● Citizen Participation Plan ● Five Year Consolidated Plan ● Annual Action Plan Funding Allocations ● Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report Printed copies of these documents are available to the public upon request. Additional reasonable accommodations will be made for individuals with disabilities, upon request. Access to Records The City will provide citizens, public agencies, and other in terested parties reasonable and timely access to information and records relating to the Citizen Participation Plan, Five Year Consolidated Plan, annual Action Plan, and CAPER, and the City’s use of assistance under the four entitlement grant programs. Technical Assistance The City will provide technical assistance upon request and to the extent resources are available to groups or individuals that need assistance in preparing funding proposals, provided that the level of technical assistance does not cons titute a violation of federal or local rules or regulations. The provision of technical assistance does not involve reassignment of 288 Salt Lake City Consolidated Plan 2020-2024 City staff to the proposed project or group, or the use of City equipment, nor does technical assistance guarantee an award of funds. Contact information for City staff is as follows: Salt Lake City Housing & Neighborhood Development 451 South State Street PO BOX 145488 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-5488 801-535-7712 www.slcgov.com/hand CITIZENS’ COMPLAINTS Written complaints related to Salt Lake City’s programs and activities funded through entitlement grant funding may be directed to SLC’s Housing and Neighborhood Development Division (HAND). A timely, written and substantive response to the complainant will be prepared within 15 calendar days of receipt of the complaint by HAND. Salt Lake City Housing & Neighborhood Development will work to determine the appropriate course of action, including but not limited to, involving other City divisions, any State or Federal community level resources to help address the complaint to the fullest extent reasonably possible based upon the nature of the complaint. Written complaints must include the complainant’s name, address, and zip code and must be signed by the perso n(s) filing the formal complaint. A daytime telephone number and/or email address should also be included in the event further information or clarification is needed. Complaints should be addressed as follows: Salt Lake City Housing & Neighborhood Develop ment Attn: Director 451 South State Street PO BOX 145488 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-5488 Exhibit 2 2020-2021 Action Plan Final SALT LAKE CITY 2020-2021 ACTION PLAN MAYOR ERIN MENDENHALL CITY COUNCIL DISTRICT 1: JAMES ROGERS DISTRICT 2 & VICE CHAIR: ANDREW JOHNSTON DISTRICT 3 & CHAIR: CHRIS WHARTON DISTRICT 4: ANALIA VALDEMOROS DISTRICT 5: DARIN MANO DISTRICT 6: DAN DUGAN DISTRICT 7: AMY FOWLER SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 2 | P a g e Prepared by S A L T L A K E C I T Y HOUSING and NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT DIVISION COMMUNITY and NEIGHBORHOODS DEPARTMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS I. FIRST YEAR ACTION PLAN AP-05 E XECUTIVE SUMMARY .................................................................................................04 AP-05 LEAD & RESPONSIBLE AGENCIES ................................................................................12 AP-10 CONSULTATION ...........................................................................................................13 AP-12 PARTICIPATION ............................................................................................................27 AP-15 EXPECTED RESOURCES.................................................................................................33 AP-20 ANNUAL GOALS AND OBJECTIVES ..............................................................................38 AP-35 PROJECTS ......................................................................................................................41 AP-38 PROJECT SUMMARY.....................................................................................................44 AP-50 GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION...................................................................................53 AP-55 AFF ORDABLE HOUSING ...............................................................................................56 AP-60 PUBLIC HOUSING .........................................................................................................57 AP-65 HOMELESS AND OTHER SPECIAL NEEDS ACTIVITIES .................................................59 AP-70 HOPWA GOALS ............................................................................................................64 AP-75 BARRIERS TO AFFORDABLE HOUSING ........................................................................64 AP-85 OTHER ACTIONS ...........................................................................................................68 AP-90 PROGRAM SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS..........................................................................74 SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 3 | P a g e FIRST YEAR ACTION PLAN The First Year Action Plan outlines the activities and funding priorities for the first year of the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan, covering July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021 SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 4 | P a g e EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AP-05 Executive Summary 24 CFR 91.200(c), 91.220(b) 1. Introduction Salt Lake City’s 2020-2021 Action Plan is the product of a collaborative, strategic process that spans community partners, service providers, non-profit/for-profit housing developers, housing authorities, internal divisions/departments, and the in put of our citizens. Housing and Neighborhood Development (HAND) has worked extensively to identify community development needs and establish goals that align funding streams, community priorities and city initiatives. This plan highlights many of the effo rts to maximize and leverage the City’s block grant allocations with other resources to build healthy and sustainable communities. The 2020-2021 Action Plan identifies how the City intends to leverage the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG), HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME), and Housing Opportunities for Persons With Aids (HOPWA) funding. These four resources will provide for over $5.4 million in support for low to moderate income households or areas of the city. Similar to cities across the country, Salt Lake City is faced with growing income inequality, increasing poverty levels, decreasing housing affordability and diminishing federal resources. We are also grappling with the immediate, mid-term and long-term impacts of the Coronavirus, wh ich is sure to have lasting impacts on our community. This Action Plan works to address concerns within each of these needs by continuing to develop and refine new and collaborative strategies. The following highlights a few of the initiatives and efforts that the City is excited about:  Salt Lake City has gone through a robust community engagement process in the development of the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan (Con Plan) and the 2020-2021 Action Plan. These planning efforts have provided the City with a clear vision of the needs in the community and a framework for strategic and targeted deployment of funding. The Con solidated Plan will serve as the foundation and guide as the City implements block grant funding over the next five years. Each program identified in the 2020-2021 Action Plan meets one of the five goals as outlined in the Con solidated Plan and below. Additionally, the programs will serve as the catalyst to implement the strategies tied to each of the five goals. o Housing – Provide expanded housing options for all economic and demographic segments of Salt Lake City’s population will diversifying the housing stock within neighborhoods. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 5 | P a g e o Transportation – Promote accessibility and affordability of multimodal transport ation options. o Build Community Resiliency – Build resiliency by providing tools to increase economic and/or housing stability. o Homeless Services – Expand access to supportive programs that help ensure that homelessness is rare, brief, and non -recurring. o Behavioral Health – Provide support for low -income and vulnerable populations experiencing behavioral health concerns such as substance abuse disorders and mental health challenges.  In January 2020 Erin Mendenhall was sworn in as the 36th Mayor of Salt Lake City. Mayor Mendenhall’s Administration is focused on breaking down equity barriers within Salt Lake City and providing opportunities for upward mobility for residents regardless of race, income, age or ability. Ensuring a diverse and equitable community is at the foundation of the City’s guiding principles. The City strives to understand the needs of underrepresented residents and will be embarking on a gentrification and equity study in the coming year to help shape future policy and program decisio ns.  Salt Lake City in partnership with Salt Lake County, the State, and community -based organizations is working to rapidly respond to the community impact from the Coronavirus (aka COVID-19) and a 5.7 magnitude earthquake that occurred on March 18, 2020. These tragic events have further emphasized the need for affordable housing in our community and the need for resources has never been greater. The City has applied for PY 19/20 waivers for service providers to provide flexibility and deployment of resources. Additionally, the City is working on a substantial amendment to the PY 19/20 Action Plan, Consolidated Plan, and Citizen Participation Plan in anticipation of the CARES Act funding award. Salt Lake City will have an accelerated, but competitive appli cation process for our community partners to address the immediate and pressing needs as they are responding to the COVID-19 crisis.  Salt Lake City conducted a survey in which 37 community partners responded to help the City understand how community and organization needs have shifted during the pandemic. These survey results have helped to identify the need in the community and organizational capacity to implement programs in response to COVID-19. Additionally, the City hosted an “Ask Me Anything” on Fa cebook that provided residents with an opportunity to ask housing related questions. Additionally, numerous outreach materials have been created and distributed to guide residents to services.  The City has been a constant leader in the Salt Lake Valley C oalition to End Homelessness (Coalition) which is a coordinated coalition of stakeholders working collaboratively to end homelessness in Salt SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 6 | P a g e Lake County. In the fall of 2019, the Coalition transitioned homeless shelters to a Homeless Resource Center (HRC) model. The HRC’s provide residents housing stability and case management services to assist clients in overcoming barriers to self -sufficiency. The HRC’s provide a multitude of services include housing navigation, job training, employment services, life s kills, and connection to community resources. The HRC’s will continue to be an important and critical service in our community and will lift our most vulnerable residents out of homelessness.  Salt Lake City supports the Housing First model , that housing is a right not a privilege. This view shapes housing policy and program implementation. Salt Lake City is working closely with community partners to provide opportunities for permanent supportive housing. This model provides the City’s vulnerable residents with critical services to find stability, self -sufficiency, and upward mobility.  Small community businesses serve as the life blood of Salt Lake City. They not only provide opportunities for employment but also build the fabric of diversity within the C ity. Salt Lake City will continue to support our small, locally owned businesses by providing economic development loan funding through City resources. The COVID-19 crisis has impacted small, local businesses at a devastating level. The City is committed t o ensuring that small, local businesses are able to open safely, and survive this economic crisis. While this is just a sampling of many of the exciting efforts the city is undertaking to address the needs in our community, it is fair to say that while f ederal funding plays an important role in our ability to leverage and maximize long term impact, it is – and will continue to be a struggle as funding continues to be constantly challenged. As a city we look to other communities, best practices, etc. to fi nd the most effective methods of deploying these limited resources. In an effort to engage and leverage best practices across the nation, HAND participates in training opportunities, attends national conferences, contributes to regional planning conversat ions, and looks for opportunities to advocate not only for affordable housing, but also for addressing the gaps of funding or services that exist in our community. 2. Summarize the Goals and Strategies identified in the Plan This Year-1 Action Plan establishes and addressed several Goals and Strategies as outlined in the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan. These goals are briefly outlined below. Greater detail is provided in section AP -20. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 7 | P a g e 1) Housing: Provide expanded housing options for all economic and demograph ic segments of Salt Lake City’s population while diversifying the housing stock within neighborhoods. Strategies:  Support housing programs that address the needs of aging housing stock through targeting rehabilitation efforts and diversifying the housing stock within neighborhoods  Expand housing support for aging residents that ensure access to continued stable housing  Support affordable housing development that increases the number and types of units available for income eligible residents  Support programs that provide access to home ownership via down payment assistance, and/or housing subsidy, and/or financing  Support rent assistance programs to emphasize stable housing as a primary strategy to prevent and end homelessness  Support programs that provide connection to permanent housing upon exiting behavioral health programs. Support may include, but is not limited to supporting obtaining housing via deposit and rent assistance and barrier elimination to the extent allowable to regulation  Provide housing and essential services for persons with HIV/AIDS 2) Transportation: Promote accessibility and affordability of multimodal transportation options. Strategies:  Improve bus stop amenities as a way to encourage the accessibility of public transit and enhance the experience of public transit in target areas  Support access to transportation prioritizing very low -income and vulnerable populations  Expand and support the installation of bike racks, stations, and amenities as a way to encourage use of alternative modes of transportation in target areas 3) Build Community Resiliency: Build resiliency by providing tools to increase economic and/or housing stability. Strategies:  Provide job training/vocational training programs targeting low -income and vulnerable populations including, but not limited to; chronically homeless; those exiting treatment centers/programs and/or institutions; and persons with disabilities  Economic Development efforts via supporting the improvement and visibility of small businesses through façade improvement programs  Provide economic development support for microenterprise businesses  Direct financial assistance to for-profit businesses  Expand access to early childhood education to set the stage for academic achievement, social development, and change the cycle of poverty  Promote digital inclusion through access to digital communication technologies and the internet  Provide support for programs that reduce food insecurity for vulnerable population s SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 8 | P a g e 4) Homeless Services: Expand access to supportive programs that help ensure that homelessness is rare, brief, and non-recurring. Strategies:  Expand support for medical and dental care options for those experiencing homelessness  Provide support for homeless services including Homeless Resource Center Opera tions and Emergency overflow operations  Provide support for programs providing outreach services to address the needs of those living an unsheltered life  Expand case management support as a way to connect those experiencing homelessness with permanent housing and supportive services 5) Behavioral Health: Provide support for low -income and vulnerable populations experiencing behavioral health concerns such as substance abuse disorders and mental health challenges. Strategies:  Expand treatment options, counseli ng support, and case management for those experiencing behavioral health crisis 6) Administration -- To support the administration, coordination, and management of Salt Lake City’s CDBG, ESG HOME, and HOPWA programs. Salt Lake City's strategy for most-effec tively utilizing HUD funding is heavily influenced by the City's housing market study, the City’s Five Year Housing Plan , the annual Utah Comprehensive Report on Homelessness, and the adopted Salt Lake City Master Plans that highlight strategic neighborhoo d investment opportunities. 3. Evaluation of past performance Salt Lake City deliberately monitors the process of advancing the strategic goals outlined in the newly adopted 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan. This plan , like the previous 2015-2019 Consolidated Plan was developed with input from many stakeholders, and it is our responsibility to report back to US Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD), the residents, community and decision makers the impact of these funds. As we complete the time period associated with the 2015-2019 Consolidated Plan, here is an evaluation of progress during that time period In preparation for development of the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan and 2020-2021 Action Plan, Salt Lake City’s Housing and Neighborhood Developmen t Division reviewed Consolidated Annual Performance Reports (CAPERs) submitted to HUD under the 2015-2019 Consolidated Plan. The CAPERs provide an evaluation of past performance and accomplishments in relation to established goals and priorities. The City’s previous Action Plans and CAPERs can be viewed at www.hudexchange.info/programs/consolidated-plan/con-plans-aaps- capers/. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 9 | P a g e During the course of the 2015-2019 Consolidated Plan, the City has been able to meet the vast majority of established goals and priorities. In addition, the City was able to comply with statutes and regulations set by HUD. SALT LAKE CITY 2015-2019 CONSOLIDATED PLAN ACCOMPLISHMENTS Goal Description Estimated Projected 1 Improve and Expand the Affordable Housing Stock 1,325 1,430 2 Expand Homeownership Opportunities 110 70 3 Provide Housing & Related Services to Persons with HIV/AIDS 725 925 4 Provide Housing for Homeless & At -Risk of Homel ess Individuals and Families 965 3,217 5 Provide Day-to-Day Services for Homeless Individuals & Families 15,000 7,380 6 Provide Public Services to Expand Opportunity & Self -Sufficiency for At -Risk Populations 35,000 24,385 7 Revitalize Business Nodes in Target Areas 75 50 8 Improve the Quality of Public Facilities 1,093 1,344 9 Improve Infrastructure in Distressed Neighborhoods & Target Areas 100,000 139,112 All the goals surrounding homeownership continued to be a struggle as the city experiences a sustained, rapid increase in housing prices and land values. This created challenges on two fronts, one being finding an eligible household that can afford the housing units long term. The other is finding units available to purchase to utilize for affordable housing. Often , single family homes are on the market mere moments before very competitive offers come in. Unfortunately, municipalities are not set up to quickly react as housing becomes available. That often means that the city ends up paying more fo r a unit that requires a lot of rehabilitation to bring it up to city code. These increased costs must be carefully weighed as housing can easily out price available federal subsidies and regulatory limitations. In 2016, the City launched a new economic development program to address the façade of businesses within the geographic target area of the 2015-2019 Consolidated Plan. The reception of the program and impact has been terrific, even though our initial projections proved to be overly optimistic for an entirely new program. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 10 | P a g e Over the past several years, the City has taken a different approach to homeless services. This includes making a city commitment of over $2 million from general fund sources. As homelessness continues to be an issue that needs to be addressed, the city took the approach of shifting many of the service providers from this competitive annual process to the general fund. Additionally, Salt Lake City has further invested general fund dollars into homeless services through the Funding Our Future sales tax increase initiative. This shift allowed the city to invest significantly more f unding, provide local direction, closely monitor performance measurements, and provide flexibility that makes sense for the local challenges we face. It is important to reiterate that the city continues to be committed to providing and expanding services for the homeless population. This also means that federal resources are being diverted to address other Plan goals, while the city is taking the opportunity to leverage local resources. Providing public services to our community fell short. Over the past few years, the City modified its strategy for spending in this category, providing more services to a smaller group of people that are in greatest need. Thi s has been a successful strategy thus far, though it does mean the City is serving a smaller total number of individuals. Salt Lake City will soon be receivin g final reports regarding 19-20 funding. This data will drive future decisions about funding allocation. This data will also be fully reflected in the upcoming Consolidated Annual Performance Evaluation and Report (CAPER). 4. Summary of Citizen Participation Process and consultation process Citizen participation is an integral part of the Consolidated Plan & Action Plan planning process, as it ensures goals and priorities are defined in the context of the community needs and preferences. In addition, th e citizen participation process provides a format to educate the community about the City’s federal grant programs. To this end, Salt Lake City solicited involvement from a diverse group of stakeholders and community members during the development of the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan and 2020-2021 Action Plan. A comprehensive public engagement process included a citywide survey (including 2,000+ respondents), public hearings, public meetings, one-on-one meetings, stakeholder committee meetings, task force meetings, Salt Lake City internal technical committee meetings, and a public comment period. In total, over 4,000 residents participated in providing input into this plan. The City received input and buy -in from residents, homeless service providers. Low -income service providers, anti-poverty advocates, healthcare providers, housing advocates, housing devel opers, housing authorities, community development organizations, educational institutions, transit authority planners, City divisions and departments, among others. For more information on the citizen participation efforts, refer to the AP-10 Consultation . SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 11 | P a g e The City held three public hearings at different points in the process. The General Needs Hearing is an event open to the public to comment on community needs. HAND accepts all comments and looks to understand how federal funding can address these concer ns. The concerns that are not within the prevue of the federal funding is passed along to the appropriate City Department. The City Council Public Hearing is an opportunity for the public and non-profit partners to comment on how federal funding may impact their neighborhoods or the services being provided. This year, City Council held-over the initial public hearing for a second public hearing two weeks later. This is because the City had just entered into an electronic meeting space due to COVID-19 and Council wanted to ensure that constituents had as much opportunity for input into the process. More detail about these events is available in the AP-12 Participation section. 5. Summary of public comments A summary of the public comments can be found in th e appendix of the finalized 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan. All comments were received and considered while creating this 2020-2021 Action Plan. In general, the comments submitted through both the General Needs Hearing and the City Council Public Hearing s were very positive. The comments received during the City Council Hearing typically related to the support of funding a specific agency. Topics included homelessness, housing, social service programs, youth advocacy, youth protections, health services, and addressing the special needs of populations such as refugees, aging or disabled residents. While most comments did advocate for a specific organization, many comments were based on sound evidence to make a point about service delivery creating powerful nar ratives that advanced the issue being addressed beyond a simple funding request. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 12 | P a g e AP-05 Lead & Responsible Agencies 91.200(b) 1. Agency/entity responsible for preparing/administering the Consolidated Plan Describe the agency/entity responsible for preparing the Consolidated Plan and those responsible for administration of each grant program and funding source. Agency Role Name Department/Agency CDBG Administrator SALT LAKE CITY Housing and Neighborhood Development Division HOPWA Administrator SALT LAKE CITY Housing and Neighborhood Development Division HOME Administrator SALT LAKE CITY Housing and Neighborhood Development Division ESG Administrator SALT LAKE CITY Housing and Neighborhood Development Division Narrative (optional) Salt Lake City was the sole agency responsible for developing the Consolidated Plan and is solely responsible for the subsequent Action Plans. Salt Lake City administers each of the HUD grant programs and the funding sources. Consolidated Plan Public Contact Information - L ani Eggertsen-Goff, Director of Housing and Neighborhood Development, Lani.Eggertsen- Goff@slcgov.com or 801-535-6240. - Jennifer Schumann, Deputy Director, Jennifer.Schumann@slcgov.com or 801-535-7276. - Tony Milner, Policy & Program Manager, Tony.Milner@slcgov.com or 801-535-6168. Salt Lake City Housing and Neighborhood Development 451 South State Street, Room 445 P.O. Box 145488 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-5488 SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 13 | P a g e AP-10 Consultation 91.100, 91.200(b), 91.215(l) Introduction The City engaged in an in -depth and collaborative effort to consult with City departments, representatives of low -income neighborhoods, non -profit and for-profit housing developers, service providers, social service agencies, homeless sh elter and service providers, supportive housing and service providers, community stakeholders, community partners, and beneficiaries of entitlement programs to inform and develop the priorities and strategies contained within the Consolidated Plan. Salt Lake City continues to engage these critical partners regularly as we look to maximize our potential impact on an annual basis. Provide a concise summary of the jurisdiction's activities to enhance coordination between public and assisted housing providers and private and governmental health, mental health and service agencies (91.215(l)) The Salt Lake City Mayor and key staff worked this year with the State legislature on a bill that has increased access to Medicaid for the most vulnerable members of our c ommunity. Proposition 3 and SB96 have expanded Medicaid access to an estimated 70,000 – 90,000 people across the state. Recently, the City has also passed a city -wide sales tax increase which has allotted over $5 million for housing programs across the cit y. This funding source has increased funding for programs that provide housing for the chronically homeless, homeless, mentally ill, children, developers, and people on the verge of becoming homeless, amongst others. The City is also a key participant in Salt Lake County's Collective Impact process which is responsible for coordinating a new homeless care model. This effort is driven by improving service delivery to all individuals who may enter homelessness for any period of time. Lastly, the City is v ery active in working with State Legislators at crafting legislation that can positively impact housing. Recently this has include working on bills such as SB34, SB39, and SB3006. Each of these bills are critical at supporting affordable housing in the State. Describe coordination with the Continuum of Care and efforts to address the needs of homeless persons (particularly chronically homeless individuals and families, families with children, veterans, and unaccompanied youth) and persons at risk of homele ssness Salt Lake City representatives actively participated in the Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness (SLVCEH), the entity responsible for oversight of the Continuum of Care (CoC). SLVCEH’s primary goal is to end homelessness in Salt Lake Valley through a system -wide commitment of resources, services, data collection, analysis and coordination among all stakeholders. The Coalition gathers community consensus to create and fulfill established outcomes. Using these goals, the SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 14 | P a g e Coalition partners with key stakeholders to fill the needs of the Salt Lake County Valley community. City representatives served on the SLVCEH Steering Committee and actively participated in meetings and efforts. Salt Lake City representatives participate in the local Continu um of Care's (CoC) executive board and its prioritization committee specifically, so the Continuum of Care's priorities are considered during Emergency Solutions Grant allocations. Also, the three local Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) funders meet regularl y to coordinate ESG and CoC activities to make sure service are not being over or under funded and services being funded meet the community's needs and goals. Describe consultation with the Continuum(s) of Care that serves the jurisdiction's area in deter mining how to allocate ESG funds, develop performance standards for and evaluate outcomes of projects and activities assisted by ESG funds, and develop funding, policies and procedures for the operation and administration of HMIS Allocate ESG Funds Salt Lake City representatives participate in the local Continuum of Care's executive board and its prioritization committee specifically, so the Continuum of Care's priorities are considered during Emergency Solutions Grant allocations. Also, the three local ESG funders meet regularly to coordinate ESG and CoC activities to make sure service are not being over or under funded and services being funded meet the community's needs and goals. Develop Performance Standards and Evaluate Outcomes The Salt Lake Continuu m of Care and the three ESG funders share common measures to evaluate service providers. The three entities also share monitoring results of subrecipients. Develop Funding, Policies and Procedures for the Administration of HMIS The Salt Lake Continuum of Care contracts with the State of Utah to administer the Homeless Management Information System (HMIS). All service agencies in the state are under a uniform data standard for HUD reporting and local ESG funders. All ESG funded organizations participate in HMIS. TABLE: CONSULTATION AND PUBLIC PARTICIPATION PARTICIPANTS STAKEHOLDER ADVISORY COMMITTEE 1 Agency/Group/Organization Refugee and Immigration Center - Asian Association of Utah Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Refugees What section o f the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non -Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted i n identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 15 | P a g e was able to determine the overarching priorities an d goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 2 Agency/Group/Organization ASSIST Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Persons with Disabilities, Housing What secti on of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Housing Needs Assessment, Non -Homeless Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organi zation that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the ove rarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 3 Agency/Group/Organization Columbus Community Center Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Employment, Persons with Disabilities What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non -Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordinat ion? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 4 Agency/Group/Organization Community Development Corporation, Utah Agency/G roup/Organization Type Services - Housing What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Housing Needs Assessment How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 5 Agency/Group/Organization Community Health Center of Utah Agency/G roup/Organization Type Services - Health What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non -Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 16 | P a g e outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 6 Agency/Group/Organization Disability Law Center Agency/Group/Orga nization Type Services - Law, Persons with Disabilities What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non -Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or area s for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From the se efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 7 Agency/Group/Organization Donated Dental Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Health What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Homeless Needs - Families with Children, Non -Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those w e are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 8 Agency/Group/Organization F irst Step House Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Housing, Persons with Disabilities, Homeless, Health What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Housing Need Assessment, Homeless Needs - Chronically Homeless, Homeless Needs - Veterans, Homeless Strategy, Non -Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying ser vice gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Pl an, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 9 Agency/Group/Organization Habitat for Humanity Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Housing What section of the Plan was addressed b y consultation? Housing Need Assessment SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 17 | P a g e How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps wi thin the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, includin g specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 10 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake County Housing Authority DBA Housing Connect Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Housing, Homeless What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Housing Need Assessment, Homeless Strategy How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Orga nization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the o verarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 11 Agency/Group/Organization Intermountain Healthcare Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Health, Impact Investment What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non -Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to d etermine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 12 Agency/Group/Organization Maliheh Free Clinic Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Health, Refuge es What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non -Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to d etermine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 13 Agency/Group/Organization NeighborWorks Salt Lake Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Housing SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 18 | P a g e What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Housing Needs Assessment How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Servi ce Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determin e the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 14 Agency/Group/Organization Optum Health Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Health What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non -Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization t hat assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 15 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Housing Authority Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Housin g, Homeless What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Housing Needs Assessment, Homeless Strategy How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination ? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was ab le to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 16 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake County Aging and Adult Services Agency/G roup/Organization Type Services - Seniors, Aging Services What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non -Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or ar eas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From t hese efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 17 Agency/Group/Organization Shelter the Homeless SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 19 | P a g e Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Homeless What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Housing Needs Assessment, Homeless Strategy, Homeless Needs - Chronically Homeless How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are t he anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 18 Agency/Group/Organization South Valley Services Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Domestic Violence What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non -Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies th at are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 19 Agency/Group/Organization Utah Community Action Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Housing, Food Bank, Early Education What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Housing Needs Assessment, Homeless Strategy, Anti -Poverty Strategy How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative ef fort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas wh ere funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 20 Agency/Group/Organization Utah Department of Workforce Services Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Medicaid, Food, Employment What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Homeless Strategy, Economic Development, Anti -Poverty Strategy, Non -Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organ ization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 20 | P a g e 21 Agency/Group/Organization Utah Health and Human Rights Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Mental Health What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non -Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 22 Agency/Group/Organization Utah Transit Authority Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Transit, Transportation What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Non -Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 23 Agency/Group/Organization Volunteers of America - Utah Agency/Group/Organization T ype Services - Housing, Persons with Disabilities, Homeless, Health What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Housing Needs Assessment, Homeless Needs - Chronically Homeless, Homeless Needs - Families with Children, Homeless Needs - Veteran s, Homeless Needs - Unaccompanied Youth, Homeless Strategy, Anti -Poverty Strategy How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? Public Service Organization th at assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from the agencies that are the closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged community wide. 24 Agency/Group/Organization Young Women's Christian Association Agency/Group/Organization Type Services - Housing, Children, Victims of Domestic Violence, Homeless, Victims What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Homeless Needs - Families with Children, Homeless Strategy, Non -Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulte d and what are the anticipated Public Service Organization that assisted in identifying service gaps within the community. The collaborative effort allowed for discussion and feedback from th e agencies that are the SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 21 | P a g e outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? closest to those we are assisting. From these efforts, the City was able to determine the overarching priorities and goals of the Plan, including specific public service focus areas where funding will be targeted and leveraged commu nity wide. INTERDEPARTMENTAL TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE GROUP 25 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Community and Neighborhoods Department Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental - Local, Planning Organization What section of the Plan wa s addressed by consultation? City Infrastructure, Community Needs, Community Safety, Economic Development, Homeless Services, Housing Needs Assessment, Market Analysis, Non -Homeless Special Needs, Planning/Zoning/Land Use, Public Services How was the Age ncy/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The City assembled an Interdepartmental Technical Committee to discuss the necessity of leveraging federal and non -federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts and discuss other funding tools that may be available. The group committed to working collaboratively to maximize resources. Collaborations will cont inue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically focused area. 26 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Council Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental - Local, Planning Organization What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? City Infrastructure, City Policy, Community Needs, Community Safety, Economic Development, Homeless Services, Housing Needs Assessment, Market Analysis, Non -Homeless Special Needs, Planni ng/Zoning/Land Use, Public Services How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The City assembled an Interdepartmental Technical Committee to discuss the n ecessity of leveraging federal and non -federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts and discuss other funding tools that may be available. The group committed to working collaboratively to maximize resources. Collaborations will continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically focused area. 27 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Division of Economic Develo pment Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental - Local, Planning Organization What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? City Infrastructure, Community Needs, Community Safety, Economic Development, Homeless Services, Housing Nee ds Assessment, Market Analysis, Non -Homeless Special Needs, Planning/Zoning/Land Use, Public Services How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated The City a ssembled an Interdepartmental Technical Committee to discuss the necessity of leveraging federal and SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 22 | P a g e outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? non -federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts and discuss other funding tool s that may be available. The group committed to working collaboratively to maximize resources. Collaborations will continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically focused area. 28 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Engineering Division Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental - Local, Planning Organization What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? City Infrastructure, Community Needs, Community Safety, Economic Development, Homeless Services, Housing Needs Assessment, Market Analysis, Non -Homeless Special Needs, Planning/Zoning/Land Use, Public Services How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consu ltation or areas for improved coordination? The City assembled an Interdepartmental Technical Committee to discuss the necessity of leveraging federal and non -federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts and discuss other funding tools that may be available. The group committed to working collaboratively to maximize resources. Collaborations will continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation effo rts that are in a geographically focused area. 29 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Parks & Public Lands Division Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental - Local, Planning Organization What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? City Infrastructure, Community Needs, Community Safety, Economic Development, Homeless Services, Housing Needs Assessment, Market Analysis, Non -Homeless Special Needs, Planning/Zoning/Land Use, Public Services How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The City assembled an Interdepartmental Technical Committee to discuss the necessity of leveraging federal and non -federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts and discuss other funding tools that may be available. The group committed to working collaboratively to maximize resources. Collaborations will continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically focused area. 30 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Redevelopment Agency Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental - Local, Planning Organizati on What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? City Infrastructure, Community Needs, Community Safety, Economic Development, Homeless Services, Housing Needs Assessment, Market Analysis, Non -Homeless Special Needs, Planning/Zoning/Land Use, Public Services How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated The City assembled an Interdepartmental Technical Committee to discuss the necessity of leveragin g federal and SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 23 | P a g e outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? non -federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts and discuss other funding tools that may be available. The group committed to working collaboratively to maximize res ources. Collaborations will continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically focused area. 31 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Transportation Division Agency/Group/Organizat ion Type Other Governmental - Local, Planning Organization What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? City Infrastructure, Community Needs, Community Safety, Economic Development, Homeless Services, Housing Needs Assessment, Market Analysis, Non -Homeless Special Needs, Planning/Zoning/Land Use, Public Services How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The City assembled an Interdepartmental T echnical Committee to discuss the necessity of leveraging federal and non -federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts and discuss other funding tools that may be available. The group committed to working collaboratively to maximize resources. Collaborations will continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically focused area. 32 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Civic Engagement Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental – Local, Planning Organization What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? City Infrastructure, Community Needs, Community Safety, Economic Development, Homeless Ser vices, Housing Needs Assessment, Market Analysis, Non -Homeless Special Needs, Planning/Zoning/Land Use, Public Services How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordi nation? The City assembled an Interdepartmental Technical Committee to discuss the necessity of leveraging federal and non -federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts and discuss other funding tools that may be available. The group committed to working collaboratively to maximize resources. Collaborations will continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically foc used area. 33 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Police Department Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental - Local What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? Community Safety, Homeless Services, Non -Homeless Special Needs How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The City assembled an Interdepartmental Technical Committee to discuss the necessity of leveraging federal and non -federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 24 | P a g e and discuss other funding tools that may be available. The group committed to working collaboratively to maximize resources. Collab orations will continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically focused area. 34 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Sustainability Division Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental - Local Planning Organization What section of the Plan was addressed by consultation? City Infrastructure, Community Needs, Community Safety, Economic Development, Homeless Services, Housing Needs Assessment, Market Analysis, Non -Homeless Special Needs, Planning/Zoning/Land Use, Public Services How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The City assembled an Interdepartmental Technical Commit tee to discuss the necessity of leveraging federal and non -federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts and discuss other funding tools that may be available. The group committed t o working collaboratively to maximize resources. Collaborations will continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically focused area. 35 Agency/Group/Organization Salt Lake City Planning Division Agency/Group/Organization Type Other Governmental – Local Planning Organization What sections of the Plan was addressed by consultation? City Infrastructure, Community Needs, Community Safety, Economic Development, Homeless Services, Housing Needs Assessment, Market Analysis, Non -Homeless Special Needs, Planning/Zoning/Land Use, Public Services How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination? The City assembled an Interdepartmental Technical Committee to discuss the necessity of leveraging federal and non -federal funding opportunities. The Committee assisted in creating target areas to geographically focus city-wide efforts and discuss other funding t ools that may be available. The group committed to working collaboratively to maximize resources. Collaborations will continue to occur on City infrastructure, economic development, and transportation efforts that are in a geographically focused area. Identify any Agency Types not consulted and provide rationale for not consulting: All agency types were invited to participate in the process. Other local/regional/state/federal planning efforts considered when preparing the Plan TABLE: PLAN CONSULTATION COMMUNITY PLAN CONSULTATIONS SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 25 | P a g e 1 Name of Plan 10-Year Plan to End Chronic Homelessness Lead Organization State of Utah How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan? Created in 2004, updated in 2013, this plan highlights i nitiatives centered on using the Housing First Model to end chronic homelessness. This plan places minimal restriction on persons to place them into safe housing. Housing goals include promoting the construction of safe, decent, and affordable homes for al l income levels and to put specific emphasis on housing homeless persons. 2 Name of Plan Annual Point-in -Time Count Lead Organization State of Utah How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan? This plan highlights an in itiative to find homeless persons living on the streets and gather information in order to connect them with available services. By doing so, this will help policymakers and program administrators set benchmarks to measure progress toward the goal of ending homelessness, help plan services and programs to appropriately address local needs, identify strengths and gaps in a community’s current homelessness assistance system, inform public opinion, increase public awareness, attract resources, and create the most reliable estimate of people experiencing homelessness throughout Utah. 3 Name of Plan Growing SLC Lead Organization Salt Lake City How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan? Policy solutions over the five year per iod of this plan will focus on: 1) updates to zoning code, 2) preservation of long -term affordable housing, 3) establishment of a significant funding source, 4)stabilizing low -income tenants, 5) innovation in design, 6) partnerships and collaboration in ho using, and 7) equitability and fair housing. 4 Name of Plan Salt Lake City Master Plans Lead Organization Salt Lake City How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan? Salt Lake City's master plans provide vision and goal s for future development in the City. The plans guide the development and use of land, as well as provide recommendations for particular places within the City. HAND utilized the City's master plans to align policies, goals, and priorities. 5 Name of Pla n Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness Lead Organization Salt Lake County How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan? This plan emphasizes the promotion of a community‐wide commitment to the goal of ending homelessness, provide funding for efforts to quickly re‐house individuals and families who are homeless, which minimizes the trauma and dislocation caused by homelessness, promote access to and effective use of mainstream programs, optimize self‐sufficiency a mong individuals and families experiencing homelessness 6 Name of Plan State of Utah Strategic Plan on Homelessness Lead Organization State of Utah How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan? The strategic plan establi shes statewide goals and benchmarks on which to measure progress toward these goals. The plan recognizes that every community in Utah is different in their challenges, resources available, and needs of those who experience homelessness. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 26 | P a g e 7 Name of Plan Strategic Economic Development Plan Lead Organization Salt Lake City Economic Development How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan? The Strategic Plan establishes an assessment of existing economic conditions of Salt La ke City through analysis of quantitative and qualitative data. This information guided a strategic framework that builds on existing strengths and seeks to overcome identified challenges to ensure the City’s fiscal health, enhance its business climate, and promote economic growth. 8 Name of Plan Housing Gap Coalition Report Lead Organization Salt Lake Chamber How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan? Initiative that seeks to safeguard Utah's economic prosperity by ens uring home ownership is attainable and housing affordability is a priority, protecting Utahns quality of life and expanding opportunities for all. 9 Name of Plan Housing Affordability Crisis Lead Organization Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan? Policy brief regarding the current and projected state of rising housing prices in Utah and recommendations regarding what to do about it. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 27 | P a g e AP-12 Participation 91.105, 91.200(c) 1. Summary of citizen participation process/Efforts made to broaden citizen participation Summarize citizen participation process and how it impacted goal-setting The City seeks to develop and enhance livable, healthy, and sustainable neighborhoods through r obust planning and actions that reflect the needs and values of the local community. The City has stayed true to its values of inclusiveness and innovation by embracing opportunities to provide equitable services, offer funding, and create housing opportun ities that improve lives for individuals and families in underserved and under - resourced communities. The City recognizes that citizen participation is critical for the development of a Consolidated Plan that reflects the needs of affected persons and residents. In accordance with 24 CFR 91.105, the City solicited robust citizen participation over the course of an entire year. Between May 2019 and May 2020, over 4,000 residents, stakeholders, agency partners, and City officials participated through proacti ve, community-based outreach, facilitated stakeholder engagement, and online surveys. The City involved affected persons and residents through stakeholder consultation, a community survey, community events, public meetings, public hearings, public comment periods, and one-on-one consultations. The following provides a synopsis of these efforts. The City created a survey to solicit feedback from residents regarding their priorities for the provision of housing, economic development, and public services in the most underserved and under-resourced areas of the community. The survey and all accompanying materials were translated into Spanish, with additional language translation services available upon request. The survey was posted on the City website and so cial media platforms, third-party digital applications like Nextdoor and was distributed to thousands of residents through the City’s email listserv. In addition, digital flyers with Quick Response (QR) codes were created and distributed to stakeholder adv isory and interdepartmental working group members. Members of these groups were asked to distribute the flyer to their respective constituencies. The survey fielding occurred from August 15 through September 30, 2019 with a total of 2,068 respondents completing it. Respondents ranked homeless and transportation services as their top priorities for City services. Street improvements, job creation and rental assistance were the top priorities for community, economic development, and housing investments, resp ectively. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 28 | P a g e Respondents identified Poplar Grove, Fairpark, and Ballpark as areas of the City with the most unmet needs for underserved individuals and families. The overwhelming majority of residents did not feel that the current housing stock was sufficien t to meet the needs of a growing City, particularly for low -income populations, seniors, and individuals with disabilities. Since the survey was open to anyone who wanted to take it, results may have included self -selection bias. To supplement these results with a more representative understanding of resident sentiment, the City also compared them with the recently completed annual resident survey results. Both surveys showed that residents wanted more housing and transportation investments for underserved areas of the community. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 29 | P a g e TABLE: CITIZEN PARTICIPATION OUTREACH SUMMARY CHART Mode of Outreach Effort Target of Outreach Summary of Response/Att endance Summary of Comments Received Summary of Comments not Accepted & Reasons Internet Outreach Survey Minorities; Non -English Speaking; Spanish; Persons with Disabilities; Non - Targeted/Broa d community; residents of Public and Assisted Housing 2,068 Respondents Respondents ranked homeless and transportation services as their top priorities for City services. Street improvements, job creation, and rental assistance were the top priorities for community, economic development, and housing investments respectively. All comments were accepted and taken into consideration as the Consolidated Plan developed. O ther: City Collaboration Interdepartmental Technical Advisory Committee Other: City Departments/ Divisions On average, approximately 30-40 City staff attended multiple meetings to discuss targeted approach to utilizing federal funding sources. Discussions focused on identifying where the City could collaborate to better leverage federal funding, city priorities, and local efforts. Topics included all areas of City infrastructure, services, and investment. All comments were accepted and taken into consideration as the Consolidated Plan developed. Focus Group Stakeholder Advisory Committee Minorities; Non -English Speaking; Spanish; Persons with Disabilities; Non - Targeted/Broa d community; residents of On average, approximately 40-50 representatives from non - profit service providers and government entities attended Discussions focused on identifying where the City could collaborate to better leverage federal funding, city priorities, and All comments were accepted and taken into consideration as the Consolidated Plan developed. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 30 | P a g e Mode of Outreach Effort Target of Outreach Summary of Response/Att endance Summary of Comments Received Summary of Comments not Accepted & Reasons Public and Assisted Housing multiple meetings to discuss targeted approach to utilizing federal funding sources. local efforts. Topics included all areas of City infrastructure, services, and investment. Public Meeting Presentation to City Council Minorities; Non -English Speaking; Spanish; Persons with Disabilities; Non - Targeted/Broa d community; residents of Public and Assisted Housing Approximately 30 members of the public attended this meeting. Discussions focused on how the City could better leverage federal funding, city priorities, and local efforts. Topics included all areas of City infrastructure, services, and investment. All comments were accepted and taken into consideration as the Consolidated Plan developed. Public Meeting Presentation to Planning Commission Minorities; Non -English Speaking; Spanish; Persons with Disabilities; Non - Targeted/Broa d community; residents of Public and Assisted Housing Approximately 30 members of the public attended this meeting. Discussions focused on how the City could better leverage federal funding, city priorities, and local efforts. Topics included all areas of City infrastructure, services, and investment. All comments were accepted and taken into consideration as the Consolidated Pla n developed. Public Hearing General Needs Hearing Minorities; Non -English Speaking; Spanish; Persons with Disabilities; Non - Targeted/Broa d community; residents of 1 resident attended the hearing and 2 residents emailed public comments Discussions focused on how the City could better leverage federal funding, city priorities, and local efforts. Topics All comments were accepted and taken into consideration as the Consolidated Plan developed. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 31 | P a g e Mode of Outreach Effort Target of Outreach Summary of Response/Att endance Summary of Comments Received Summary of Comments not Accepted & Reasons Public and Assisted Housing included all areas of City infrastructure, services, and investment. Public Hearing Consolidated Plan & Annual Action Plan (AAP) Hearing Planning Commissioner s, City staff, Minorities; Non -English Speaking; Spanish; Persons with Disabilities; Non - Targeted/Broa d community; residents of Public and Assisted Housing All comments were accepted and taken into consideration as the Consolidated Plan developed. Public Hearing Consolidated Plan Hearing City Councilmembe rs, City staff, Minorities; Non -English Speaking; Spanish; Persons with Disabilities; Non - Targeted/Broa d community; residents of Public and Assisted Housing All comments were accepted and taken into consideration as the Consolidated Plan developed. Other: Community Events Community Events Minorities; Non -English Speaking; Spanish; Persons with Disabilities; Non - Targeted/Broa d community; residents of Public and Over 1,322 respondents Staff attended dozens of community events over the course of the Consolidated Plan development process. Respondents ranked All comments were accepted and taken into consideration as the Consolidated Plan developed. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 32 | P a g e Mode of Outreach Effort Target of Outreach Summary of Response/Att endance Summary of Comments Received Summary of Comments not Accepted & Reasons Assisted Housing homeless ness, substance abuse & mental health, and transportation services as their top priorities for the City. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 33 | P a g e AP-15 EXPECTED RESOURCES - 91.220(c)(1,2) Introduction TABLE: EXPECTED RESOURCES Uses of Funding Expected Amount Available – Year 1 Expected Amount Available – Remainder of Con Plan Description Annual Allocation Program Income Prior Year Resources Total CDBG Acquisition $3,509,164 $0 $35,000 $3,544,164 $13,600,000 Prior year resources are unspent funds from previous years. Administration Economic Development Homebuyer Assistance Homeowner Rehabilitation Multifamily Rental Construction Multifamily Public Improvements Public Services Rental Rehabilitation New Construction for Ownership TBRA Historic Rental Rehabilitation New Construction HOME Acquisition $957,501 $300,000 $0 $1,257,501 $4,600,000 Program income is typically generated from housing loan repayments from nonprofit agencies. Administration Homebuyer Assistance Homeowner Rehabilitation Multifamily Rental SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 34 | P a g e Uses of Funding Expected Amount Available – Year 1 Expected Amount Available – Remainder of Con Plan Description Annual Allocation Program Income Prior Year Resources Total Construction Multifamily Rental Rehabil itation New Construction for Ownership TBRA ESG Administration $301,734 $0 $2,500 $304,234 $1,160,000 Prior year resources are unspent funds from previous years. Financial Assistance Overnight Shelter Rapid Re - Housi ng (Rental Assistance) Rental Assistance Services Transitional Housing HOPWA Administration $600,867 $0 $15,000 $615,876 $1,720,000 Prior year resources are unspent funds from previous years. Permanent Housing in Facilities Permanent Housing Placement STRMU Short-Term or Transitional Housing Facilities Supportive Services TBRA OTHER: HOUSING – TRUST FUND Acquisitions $0 $0 $2,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 The Trust Fund has a Administration SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 35 | P a g e Uses of Funding Expected Amount Available – Year 1 Expected Amount Available – Remainder of Con Plan Description Annual Allocation Program Income Prior Year Resources Total Conversion and Rehab for Transitional Housing budget of $2m and expects to receive a total of approximately $3m in revenue over the next plan period. Homebuyer Rehabilitation Housing Multifamily Rental New Construction Multifamily Rental Rehab New Construction for Ownership Permanent Housing in Facilities Rapid Re - Housing Rental Assistance TBRA Transitional Housing OTHER PROGRAM INCOME All CDBG Eligible Activities per Housing Program Rules $0 $1,500,000 $0 $1,500,000 $6,000,000 Salt Lake City Housing Programs – Program Income All HOME Eligible Activities per Housing Program Rules SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 36 | P a g e Uses of Funding Expected Amount Available – Year 1 Expected Amount Available – Remainder of Con Plan Description Annual Allocation Program Income Prior Year Resources Total OTHER ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT LOAN FUND Economic Development $0 $0 $0 $0 $4.000,000 The fund currently has a balance of approximately $4m. Source: Salt Lake City Division of Housing and Neighborhood Development Explain how federal funds will leverage those additional resources (private, state and local funds), including a description of how matching requirements will be satisfied HUD, like many other federal agencies, encourages the recipients of federal monies to demonstrate that efforts are being made to strategically leverage additional funds in order to achieve greater re sults. Matches require subrecipients to produce a specific amount of funding that will “match” the amount of program funds available. In a US Dept of Housing & Urban Development memo from John Gibbs, Acting Assistant Secretary for Community Planning and Development (D), dated April 10, 2020, re: Availability of Waivers and Suspensions of the HOME Program Requirements in Response to COVID-19 Pandemic, Salt Lake City intends to maximize the waiver and suspension of HOME match requirements.  HOME Investment Partnership Program – 25% Match Requirement As per #4 of the above mentioned memo, Matching Contribution Requirements, given the urgent housing and economic needs created by COVID -19, and substantial financial impact the Participating Jurisdiction (PJ) will face in addressing those needs, wavier of these regulations (24 CFR 92.218 and 92.222(b)) will relieve the PJ from the need to identify ad provide matching contr ibutions to HOME projects.  Emergency Solutions Grant – 100% Match Requirement Salt Lake Cit y will ensure that ESG match requirements are met by utilizing the leveraging capacity of its subgrantees. Funding sources used to meet the ESG match requirements include federal, state and local SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 37 | P a g e grants; private contributions; private foundations; United Way; Continuum of Care funding; City General Fund; in -kind match and unrestricted donations. Fund Leveraging Leverage, in the context of the City’s four HUD Programs, means bringing other local, state, and federal financial resources in order to maximize the reach and impact of the City’s HUD Programs. Resources for leverage include the following:  Housing Choice Section 8 Vouchers  Low Income Housing Tax Credits  New Market Tax Credits  RDA Development Funding  Salt Lake City Housing Trust Fund (HTF)  Salt Lake City Economic Development Loan Fund (EDLF)  Salt Lake City General Fund  Olene Walker Housing Loan Fund  Industrial & Commercial Bank Funding  Continuum of Care Funding  Foundations & Other Philanthropic Partners If appropriate, describe publicly owned land or property located within the jurisdiction that may be used to address the needs identified in the plan Salt Lake City intends to expand affordable housing and economic development opportunities through the redevelopment of C ity-owned land, strategic land acquisitions, expansion of the Community Land Trust for affordable housing, parcel assembly, and disposition. The Housing and Neighborhood Development Division will work collaboratively with other City Divisions that oversee or control parcels that are own ed by the City to evaluate the appropriateness for affordable housing opportunities. Discussion: Salt Lake City will continue to seek other federal, state and private funds to leverage entitlement grant funding. In addition, the City will support the pro posed community development initiatives outlined in this Plan through strategic initiatives, policies, and programs. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 38 | P a g e AP-20 ANNUAL GOALS AND STRATEGIES TABLE: G OALS, PRIORITY NEEDS AND OUTCOME INDICATORS Sort Order Goal Start Year End Year Category Geogra phic Area Priority Needs Addressed Funding Goal Outcome Indicator 1 - Housing Expand housing options 2020 2021 Affordable Housing Citywide Affordable Housing CDBG $1,855,073, ESG $135,104, HOME $1,536,677, HOPWA $702,841, 1149 Household s assisted 2 – Transportati on Improve access to transportation 2020 2021 Transportati on City Wide Transportat ion CDBG $45,000 271 Household s assisted 3 – Community Resiliency Increase economic and/or housing stability 2020 2021 Economic Developmen t/Public Services Target Areas/Ci ty Wide Community Resiliency CDBG $530,692 126 Individuals or businesses assisted 4 – Homeless Services Ensure that homelessness is brief, rare, and non -recurring 2020 2021 Public Services/Ho meless Services Citywide Homeless Services CDBG $279,566, ESG $174,000, 630 Persons assisted 5 – Behavioral Health Support vulnerable populations experiencing substance abuse and mental health challenges 2020 2021 Public Services/Beh avioral Health Citywide Behavioral Health CDBG $97,000 299 household s assisted 6 – Administrati on Administration 2020 2021 Administrati on Citywide Administrat ion CDBG $701,833 ESG $22,630 HOME $95,750 HOPWA $18,026 N/A Goal Descriptions TABLE GOAL DESCRIPTIONS 0 Goal Name Goal Description 1 Housing To provide expanded housing options for all economic and demographic segments of Salt Lake City’s population while diversifying the housing stock within neighborhoods. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 39 | P a g e Goal Name Goal Description  Support housing programs that address the needs of aging housing stock through targeted rehabilitation effor ts and diversifying the housing stock within the neighborhoods  Support affordable housing development that increases the number and types of units available for qualified residents  Support programs that provide access to home ownership  Support rent assist ance programs to emphasize stable housing as a primary strategy to prevent and/or end homelessness  Support programs that provide connection to permanent housing upon exiting behavioral health programs  Provide housing and essential supportive services to pe rsons with HIV/AIDS 2 Transportation To promote accessibility and affordability of multimodal transportation options.  Within eligible target areas, improve bus stop amenities as a way to encourage the accessibility of public transit and enhance the experi ence of public transit  Within eligible target areas, expand and support the installation of bike racks, stations, and amenities as a way to encourage use of alternative modes of transportation  Support access to transportation, prioritizing very low -income and vulnerable populations 3 Community Resiliency Provide tools to increase economic and/or housing stability  Support job training and vocational rehabilitation programs that increase economic mobility  Improve visual and physical appearance of deteriorati ng commercial buildings - limited to CDBG Target Area  Provide economic development support for microenterprise businesses  Direct financial assistance to for -profit businesses  Expand access to early childhood education to set the stage for academic achievement, social development, and change the cycle of poverty  Promote digital inclusion through access to digital communication technologies and the internet  Provide support for programs that reduce food insecurity for vulnerable population 4 Homeless Services To expand access to supportive programs that help ensure that homelessness is rare, brief, and non -recurring  Expand support for medical and dental care options for those experiencing homelessness  Provide support for homeless services including Homeless R esource Center Operations and Emergency Overflow Operations  Provide support for programs undertaking outreach services to address the needs of those living an unsheltered life  Expand case management support as a way to connect those experiencing homelessne ss with permanent housing and supportive services 5 Behavioral Health To provide support for low -income and vulnerable populations experiencing behavioral health concerns such as substance abuse disorders and mental health challenges. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 40 | P a g e Goal Name Goal Description  Expand treatment opt ions, counseling support, and case management for those experiencing behavioral health crisis 6 Administration 5 SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 41 | P a g e AP-35 PROJECTS – 91.220(d) Introduction The goals and strategies outlined in Salt Lake City's 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan serve as the foundation for program year 2020-2021 projects and activities. The Consolidated Plan encourages building resiliency in low income areas by investing in economic development, and transportation infrastructure. These two categories of projects/activities will be limited to the West Side CDBG Target Area. The Consolidated Plan also addresses the need to utilize federal funding to further support housing, transportation, building community resiliency, homeless services, and behavioral health. The Consolidated Plan goals will be supported through the following 2019-2020 efforts: This Year-1 Action Plan establishes and addressed several Goals and Strategies as outlined in the 2020 -2024 Consolidated Plan. It is recognized that not every strategy will be accessed eac h year, however, each year there will be projects that move forward each of the goals identified . Housing: Provide expanded housing options for all economic and demographic segments of Salt Lake City’s population while diversifying the housing stock within neighborhoods. Strategies:  Support housing programs that address the needs of aging housing stock through targeting rehabilitation efforts and diversifying the housing stock within neighborhoods  Expand housing support for aging residents that ensure acc ess to continued stable housing  Support affordable housing development that increases the number and types of units available for income eligible residents  Support programs that provide access to home ownership via down payment assistance, and/or housing subsidy, and/or financing  Support rent assistance programs to emphasize stable housing as a primary strategy to prevent and end homelessness  Support programs that provide connection to permanent housing upon exiting behavioral health programs. Support may include, but is not limited to supporting obtaining housing via deposit and rent assistance and barrier elimination to the extent allowable to regulation  Provide housing and essential services for persons with HIV/AIDS Transportation: Promote accessibility and affordability of multimodal transportation options. Strategies:  Improve bus stop amenities as a way to encourage the accessibility of public transit and enhance the experience of public transit in target areas  Support access to transportation priori tizing very low -income and vulnerable populations  Expand and support the installation of bike racks, stations, and amenities as a way to encourage use of alternative modes of transportation in target areas SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 42 | P a g e Build Community Resiliency: Build resiliency by providing tools to increase economic and/or housing stability. Strategies:  Provide job training/vocational training programs targeting low -income and vulnerable populations including, but not limited to; chronically homeless; those exiting treatment center s/programs and/or institutions; and persons with disabilities  Economic Development efforts via supporting the improvement and visibility of small businesses through façade improvement programs  Provide economic development support for microenterprise busin esses  Direct financial assistance to for-profit businesses  Expand access to early childhood education to set the stage for academic achievement, social development, and change the cycle of poverty  Promote digital inclusion through access to digital communi cation technologies and the internet  Provide support for programs that reduce food insecurity for vulnerable population Homeless Services: Expand access supportive programs that help ensure that homelessness is rare, brief, and non-recurring. Strategies:  Expand support for medical and dental care options for those experiencing homelessness  Provide support for homeless services including Homeless Resource Center Operations and Emergency overflow operations  Provide support for programs providing outreach ser vices to address the needs of those living an unsheltered life  Expand case management support as a way to connect those experiencing homelessness with permanent housing and supportive services Behavioral Health: Provide support for low -income and vulnerable populations experiencing behavioral health concerns such as substance abuse disorders and mental health challenges. Strategies:  Expand treatment options, counseling support, and case management for those experiencing behavioral health crisis Administration -- To support the administration, coordination, and management of Salt Lake City’s CDBG, ESG HOME, and HOPWA programs. TABLE: PROJECT NAME # Project Name 1 CDBG: Public Services: Homeless Service Programs 2 CDBG: Public Services: Build Community R esiliency - Job Training Programs 3 CDBG: Public Services: Behavioral Health 4 CDBG: Housing 5 CDBG: Build Community Resiliency - Economic Development 6 CDBG: Public Services: Transportation 7 CDBG: Administration 8 ESG20: Salt Lake City SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 43 | P a g e 9 HOME: Ten ant Based Rental Assistance 10 HOME: Down Payment Assistance 11 HOME: Salt Lake City Home Development Fund 12 HOME: Administration 13 HOPWA20: Salt Lake City SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 44 | P a g e AP-38 PROJECTS TABLE: PROJECT SUMMARY INFORMATION 1 Project Name CDBG Public Services: Homeless Service Programs Target Area Citywide Goals Supported Homeless Services Needs Addressed Homeless: Mitigation, Prevention, Public Services Funding CDBG: $279,566 Description Funding for eligible actives that support homeless resource centers, emergency shelters and other supportive service programs directed to individuals and families experiencing homelessness. Funding allocations are coordinated with local CoC and ESG efforts. Target Date Matrix Code 03T National Objective LMC Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities 158 homeless individuals including chronically homeless, victims of domestic violence, persons with disabilities and other vulnerable populations are expected to benef it from proposed activities. Location Description Citywide Planned Activities Activities will provide essential day-to-day services for the city's most vulnerable populations. Funding will be targeted, in accordance with meeting a national objective, t o support the chronically homeless, homeless families, and victims of domestic violence. Funding is projected to be allocated as follows: Catholic Community Services, Weigand Homeless Resource Center, $47,000 Volunteers of America, Utah, Geraldine King Resource Center, $100,281 Salt Lake Donated Dental Services, Community Dental Project, $44,000 YWCA of Utah, Women in Jeopardy, $58,285 South Valley Services, Domestic Violence Victim Advocate, $30,000 2 Project Name CDBG Public Services: Build Community Resiliency - Job Training Programs Target Area Citywide Goals Supported Build Community Resiliency Needs Addressed Build community resiliency SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 45 | P a g e Funding CDBG: $104,809 Description Funding for eligible activities that enhance, expand, an d improve job training programs as a way to build resiliency and self sufficiency. Target Date Matrix Code 05H National Objective LMC Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities 96 adults are expected to benefit from proposed activities. This includes low income residents that are working with existing job training programs for those that are homeless, exiting homelessness or low income residents. Location Description Citywide with a focus on assisti ng residents in racial and ethnic concentrated areas of poverty and local target areas. Planned Activities Activities will provide a cost -effective intervention in increasing self -sufficiency for households for those that are low income and/or living in poverty. Many adults experiencing intergenerational poverty are employed but unable to meet the needs of their families. Adults and teenagers experiencing intergenerational poverty will be connected to resources that assist them with employment and job tra ining. Funding is projected to be allocated as follows: Advantage Services, Provisional Support Employment Program: $64,809 Catholic Community Services of Utah, St. Vincent Kitchen Academy, $40,000 3 Project Name CDBG Public Services: Behavioral Hea lth Target Area Citywide Goals Supported Behavioral Health Needs Addressed Public Services: Expand Opportunity/Self-Sufficiency Funding CDBG: $97,000 Description Public Service activities that provide a behavioral health component for the City. Target Date Matrix Code 05M National Objective LMC Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities 299 adults living at or near the poverty level are expected to benefit from proposed activities. This inclu des refugees, recent immigrants, homeless individuals, persons with a disability, victims of domestic violence and other vulnerable adults. Location Description Citywide with a focus on assisting residents in behavioral health programming. Planned Acti vities Activities will provide access to behavioral health programs, with an added benefit of connection to stable housing opportunities and building self resiliency. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 46 | P a g e First Step House, Employment Preparation and Employment, $47,000 First Step House, Peer Support Services, $50,000 4 Project Name CDBG: Housing Target Area Citywide West Side Target Area Goals Supported Housing Needs Addressed Affordable Housing Development & Preservation Funding CDBG: $1,855,073 Description Funding for eligible activities that provide housing rehabilitation, emergency home repair, and accessibility modifications for eligible households. Target Date Matrix Code 14A National Objective LMH Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities 369 low and moderate -income households are expected to benefit from proposed activities. Funding will be targeted to elderly, disabled, low-income, racial/ethnic minorities, single -parent, and large-family households. This m ay include, but is not limited to, multi-family housing or single -family housing. Location Description Citywide with a focus on assisting residents in racial and ethnic concentrated areas of poverty and local target areas. Planned Activities Activities will provide essential housing rehabilitation, emergency repair, and accessibility modifications to address health/safety/welfare issues for eligible homeowners. Assistance will be provided as grants or low -interest loans. Funding is projected to be allocated as follows: ASSIST Inc. –Community Design Center, Emergency Home Repair; Accessibility and Community Design, $391,373 Community Development Corp. of Utah, Affordable Housing and Revitalization: $68,100 NeighborWorks Salt Lake, Rebuild and Revitalize Blight (RRB), $100,000 SLC Housing and Neighborhood Development, Community Land Trust, $250,000 SLC Housing and Neighborhood Development, Housing Rehabilitation and Homebuyer Program, $485,600 SLC Housing and Neighborhood Development, Targeted Repairs Program, $500,000 SLC Housing and Neighborhood Development, Small Repair Program, $60,000 SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 47 | P a g e 5 Project Name CDBG: Build Community Resiliency - Economic Development Target Area West Side Target Area Goals Supported Build Community Re siliency Needs Addressed Support access to building community resiliency by providing opportunities for small businesses to thrive Funding CDBG: $425,883 Description Funding for eligible activities that provide commercial rehabilitation in local targ et areas. Target Date Matrix Code 14E National Objective LMA Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities 30 businesses Location Description Targeted outreach in West Side Target Area Planned Activities Activities will include grants and forgivable loans/grants for businesses located in the West Side target areas to make exterior façade improvements and to correct code violations. Eligible costs include labor, materials, supplies, and soft costs re lating to the commercial rehabilitation. Planned activities are as follows: Salt Lake City Housing and Neighborhood Development: $425,883 6 Project Name CDBG: Public Services: Transportation Target Area Citywide Goals Supported Transportation Needs Addressed Support access to transportation prioritizing very low-income and vulnerable populations, by offering reduced -fare transit passes to individuals experiencing homelessness. . Funding CDBG: $45,000 Description Funding will be utilized to promote accessibility and affordability of multimodal transportation options. Target Date Matrix Code 05E National Objective LMC Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities 271 individuals SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 48 | P a g e Location Description Citywide. Planned Activities Support access to transportation prioritizing very low-income and vulnerable populations, by offering reduced -fare transit passes to individuals experiencing homelessness. . Salt Lake City Transportation, HIVE Pass Will Call, $45,000 7 Project Name CDBG: Administration Target Area N/A Goals Supported Administration Needs Addressed Funding CDBG: $701,833 Description Funding will be utilized for general management, oversight and coordination of Salt Lake City's CDBG program. Target Date Matrix Code 21A National Objective Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities Location Description Planned Activities Activities will include program administration and overall program management, coordination, monitoring, reporting and evaluation. 8 Project Name ESG20 Salt Lake City Target Area County-wide Goals Supported Homeless Services Needs Addressed Homeless: Mitigation, Prevention, Pu blic Services Funding ESG: $301,734 Description Funding will be utilized for homeless prevention to prevent individuals and families from moving into homelessness, and for rapid re -housing to move families out of homelessness. In addition, funding will be utilized for emergency shelter, shelter diversion, outreach and other essential services for homeless individuals and families. Target Date Matrix Code 03T SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 49 | P a g e National Objective LMC Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit fro m the proposed activities Proposed activities will prevent individuals and families from moving into homelessness; provide rapid rehousing to quickly move families out of homelessness; and provide day -to-day services for individuals and families experienci ng homelessness as follows Part 1 ESG: Shelter Operations, Outreach, Day -to -Day Services: 97 individuals Part 2 ESG: Prevention, Rapid Rehousing, Diversion: 481 individuals Location Description County-wide Planned Activities 1. Activities will prevent household from moving into homelessness and move homeless families quickly into permanent, stable housing through the following eligible costs: utilities, rental application fees, security/utility deposits, rental fees, housing placement fees, housing stability case management, and other eligible costs. Funding is projected to be allocated as follows: The Road Home, Rapid Rehousing Program, $40,765 Utah Community Action, Rapid Rehousing Program, $30,000 Utah Community Action, Diversion Program, $30,000 Housing Authority of Salt Lake City, Homeless Prevention Program, $34,339 2. Activities will provide emergency shelter and other essential services for individuals and families experiencing homelessness. Services include outpatient health services, homeless resource centers, and transitional housing. Funding is projected to be allocated as follows: First Step House, Homeless Resource Center Behavioral Health Treatment Services, $60,000 Volunteers of America, Utah, Geraldine King Women’s Resource Center, $38,000 Volunteers of America, Utah, Homeless Youth Resource Center, $46,000 3. In addition, $22,630 will be utilized for program administration for general management, oversight and coordination of the City's ESG program. 9 Project Name HOME: Tenant Based Rental Assistance Target Area Citywide Goals Supported Housing Needs Addressed Access to affordable housing Funding HOME: $270,000 Description Funding will be utilized to provide tenant -based rental assistance housing to homeless and at -risk of homeless individuals and families. Target Date Estimate the number and type of families 112 families will benefit from the proposed activities. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 50 | P a g e that will benefit from the proposed activities Location Description Citywide Planned Activities Activities will provide tenant -based rental assistance to homeless, disabled persons and other vulnerable populations. Funding is projected to be allocated as follows: Utah Community Action Program, TBRA: $70,000 The Road Home, TBRA: $200,000 10 Project Name HOME: Down Payment and Deposit Assistance Target Area Citywide Goals Supported Housing Needs Addressed Affordable Housing Development & Preservation Funding HOME: $200,000 Description Funding will be utilized to provide low-interest loans and/or grants for down payment assistance and/or closing costs to eligible homebuyers. Target Date Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities 13 households will benefit from proposed activities. Location Description Citywide Planned Activities Direct financial assistance to eligible homebuyers in the form of down payment low -interest loans and/or grants. Funding is p rojected to be allocated as follows: Community Development Corp. of Utah, Down Payment Assistance: $200,000 11 Project Name HOME: Salt Lake City Home Development Fund Target Area Citywide Goals Supported Housing Needs Addressed Afford able Housing Development & Preservation Funding HOME: $1,066,677 Description Funds will be used for development activities including acquisition, new construction, and rehabilitation of existing housing. Target Date SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 51 | P a g e Estimate the number and type o f families that will benefit from the proposed activities At least 7 households are to benefit from proposed activities. Location Description Citywide Planned Activities Funds will be used for development activities including acquisition, new construc tion, and rehabilitation of multi- family properties and single family homes. SLC Housing and Neighborhood Dev, HOME Development Fund: $1,066,677 12 Project Name HOME: Administration Target Area Citywide Goals Supported Administration N eeds Addressed Funding HOME: $97,750 Description Funding will be utilized for general management, oversight and coordination of Salt Lake City's HOME program. Target Date Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities Location Description Planned Activities Activities will include program administration and overall program management, coordination, monitoring, reporting and evaluation. 13 Project Name HOPWA20 Salt Lake City Target Area Metrop olitan Statistical Area Goals Supported Housing Needs Addressed Access to affordable housing Funding HOPWA: $600,867 Description Funding will be utilized to provide housing and related services to persons with HIV/AIDS and their families. Activities include, TBRA, Housing Information Services, Permanent Housing Placement, STRMU, and supportive services. Target Date SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 52 | P a g e Estimate the number and type of families that will benefit from the proposed activities Persons living with HIV/AIDS and their families are expected to benefit from the proposed activities as follows: Supportive Services: 36 households STRMU/PHP/Supportive Services: 65 households TBRA: 66 households Location Description Salt Lake City Metropolitan Statistical Area Planned Activities Activities will include project-based rental assistance, tenant -based rental assistance, short -term rental/mortgage/utility assistance, housing information services, permanent housing placement, and supportive services for persons living with HIV/AIDS and their families. Funding is projected to be allocated as follows: Housing Authority of the County of Salt Lake, TBRA, $510,797 Utah Community Action Program, STRMU, PHP, Supportive Services, $162,044 Utah AIDS Foundation, Supportive Services, $30,000 In addition, Salt Lake City will utilize $18,026 in program administration for general management, oversight and coordination of the Salt Lake City MSA HOPWA program. Describe the reasons for allocation priorities and any obstacles to addressing underserved needs As entitlement funding decreased considerably over the past decade, the city is taking a strategic approach to directing funding. Priorities include expanding affordable housing opportunit ies throughout the city, providing critical services for the city’s most vulnerable residents, expanding self -sufficiency for at-risk populations, and improving neighborhood conditions in concentrated areas of poverty. The City and partners are unable to fully address needs due to a lack of funding and resources. To address the lack of resources, the City will continue to engage with community development organizations, housing providers, housing developers, service providers, community councils, City depa rtments, local businesses, residents, and other stakeholders to develop strategies for increasing impacts and meeting gaps in services. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 53 | P a g e AP-50 GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION – 91.220(f) Description of the geographic areas of the entitlement (including areas of low-income and minority concentration) where assistance will be directed Locally-defined target areas provide an opportunity to maximize impact and align HUD funding with existing investment while simultaneously addressing neighb orhoods with the most severe needs. According to HUD standards, a Local Target Area is designed to allow for a locally targeted approach to the investment of CDBG and other federal funds. The target area for the entirety of the associated Consolidated Plan period, will be ident ified as, “West Side Target Area”, as shown on the map below. CDBG and other federal funding will be concentrated, but not necessarily limited to, the target area. Neighborhood and community nodes will be identified and targeted to maximized community impact and drive further neighborhood investment. During this Action Plan period, infrastructure projects such as transportation projects and commercial façade improvements will be limited to this target area. Housing activities will happen citywide, however, a more concentrated marketing strategy for rehabilitation efforts will be deployed in the West Side Target Area as an opportunity to expand housing stability. FIGURE: 2020-2024 WEST SIDE CDBG TARGET AREA SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 54 | P a g e Salt Lake City’s HUD entitlement funds are geographically distributed with the following priorities: The CDBG program’s primary objective is to promote the development of viable urban communities by providing decent housing, suitable living environments and expanded economic activities to persons of lo w and moderate income. To support the CDBG program’s primary objectives, Salt Lake City is taking a two -pronged approach to the distribution of funding: 1. Direct funding to local target areas to build capacity and expand resources within concentrated areas of poverty. 2. Utilize funding citywide, in accordance with meeting a national objective, to support the city’s most vulnerable populations, including the chronically homeless, homeless families, food -insecure individuals, the disabled, persons living with HIV/AIDS, victims of domestic violence and the low - income elderly. The ESG program’s primary objective is to assist individuals and families regain housing stability after experiencing a housing or homelessness crisis. ESG funding is distributed citywide to support emergency shelter, day services, resource centers, rapid re-housing and homeless prevention activities. The majority of funding is target to Salt Lake City’s urban core, as this is where the highest concentration of homeless services are located. The HOME program’s primary objective is to create affordable housing opportunities for low -income households. HOME funding is distributed citywide to provide direct financial assistance to homebuyers, tenant - based rental assistance, acquisition, and rehabi litation. The HOPWA program’s primary objective is to provide housing assistance and related supportive services to persons living with HIV/AIDS and their families. HOPWA funding is distributed throughout the Salt Lake City MSA, including Salt Lake, Summi t, and Tooele counties, to provide project-based rental assistance, tenant- based rental assistance, short-term rental assistance, and supportive services. The majority of funding is utilized in Salt Lake County, as the majority of HIV/AIDS services are loc ated in the Salt Lake area. TABLE: GEOGRPAHIC DISTRIBUTION Target Area % of Funds 1 West Side CDBG Target Area 12% Rationale for the priorities for allocating investments geographically SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 55 | P a g e The Target Area was identified through an extensive process that analyzed local poverty rates, low -and moderate-income rates, neighborhood conditions, citizen input, and available resources. A recent fair housing equity assessment (May 2018) completed by the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute at the University of Utah states that there is a housing shortage in Utah, with the supply of new homes and existing “for sale” homes falling short of demand. While the impact of higher housing prices is widespread, affecting buyers, sellers, and renters in all income groups, the report concludes that those households below the median income, and particularly low -income households, are disproportionately hurt by higher housing prices. In fact, households with incomes below the median have a 1 in 5 chance of a severe housing cost -burden, paying at least 50% of their income toward housing, while households with incomes above the median have a 1 in 130 chance.1 Discussion The City’s west side and central corridor continue to have economic disparities that can be addressed through investments of CDBG funding. Expanding and building upon the target areas of the 2015 -2019 Consolidated Plan, will allow the city to continue to focus resources in a meaningful way. The first year of this plan is a transition year and will see a small level of i nvestment at approximately 12%. The city will look to grow that in future years that will ultimately end up in investments closer to 35% on an annual basis. While not limited to the target area, housing rehabilitation efforts will be heavily marketed in th e target area. For the 2020-2021 Action Plan, this includes efforts of partners such as ASSIST, NeighborWorks, and Salt Lake City ’s Housing & Neighborhood Development (HAND). Each organization provides housing rehabilitation services targeted to low-to-moderate income households. Marketing these programs will help ensure that aging housing stock does not fall into disrepair or become blighted. Throughout this Plan period and beyond, t he City will leverage and strategically target funding for neighborhood im provements, transportation improvements, and economic development to maximize impact within targeted neighborhoods. 1 James Wood, Dejan Eskic and D. J. Benway, Gardner Business Review, What Rapidly Rising Prices Mean for Housing Affor dability, May 2018. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 56 | P a g e AP-55 AFFORDABLE HOUSING Introduction The Salt Lake City’s Housing and Neighborhood Development Division (HAND) is committed to lessening the current housing crisis that is affecting Salt Lake City, and all U.S. cities, through a range of robust policy and project initiatives to improve housing affordability for all residents, with an emphasis on households earning 40% AMI or below. One Year Goals for the Number of Households to be Supported Homeless: 378 Non -Homeless: 1365 Special Needs: 65 TOTAL: 1808 One Year Goals for the Number of Households Supported Through Discussion The City’s Housing and Neighborhood Development Division (HAND) is committed to lessening the current housing crisis that is affecting Salt Lake City, and all U.S. cities, throu gh a range of robust policy and project initiatives to improve housing affordability for all residents, with an emphasis on households earning 40% AMI or below. To guide these initiatives, in December 2017, the City approved Growing SLC, A Five Year Hous ing Plan, 2018- 2022, a thoughtful, data-driven strategy for ensuring long-term affordability and preservation while continuing to enhance neighborhoods, while balancing their unique needs. Salt Lake City will support affordable housing activities in the c oming year by utilizing the following federal community development funding programs: CDBG, ESG, HOME, and HOPWA. Affordable housing activities will provide subsidies for individuals and families ranging from 0% to 80% AMI. Activities will include:  Tenant-based rental assistance;  Short-term rental/utility assistance;  Rapid re-housing;  Homeowner housing rehabilitation ; and  Direct financial assistance for eli gible homebuyers. Rental Assistance: 492 The Production of New Units: 7 Rehab of Exi sting Units: 257 Acquisition of Existing Units: 23 TOTAL: 790 SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 57 | P a g e AP-60 PUBLIC HOUSING Introduction The Housing Authority of Salt Lake City (HASLC) is responsible for managing the public housing inventory, developing new affordable housing units and administering the Housing Choice voucher programs for the City. The Authority strives to provide affordable housing opportunities throughout the communit y by developing new or rehabilitating existing housing that is safe, decent, and affordable – a place where a person’s income level or background cannot be identified by the neighborhood in which they live. In addition to the development and rehabilitation of units, the HASLC also manages several properties emphasizing safe, decent, and affordable housing that provides an enjoyable living environment that is free from discrimination, efficient to operate, and remains an asset to the community. The HASLC ma intains a strong financial portfolio to ensure flexibility, sustainability, and continued access to affordable tax credits, foundations, and grant resources. As an administrator of the City’s Housing Choice voucher programs, the Housing Choice Voucher Pro gram provides rental assistance to low -income families (50% of area median income and below). This program provides rental subsidies to 3,000 low -income families, disabled, elderly, and chronically homeless clients. Other programs under the Housing Choice umbrella include: Housing Choice Moderate Rehabilitation; Housing Choice New Construction; Project Based Vouchers; Multifamily Project Based Vouchers; Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing Vouchers; Housing Opportunities for Persons with HIV/AIDS; and Shelte r plus Care Vouchers. Under these other Housing Choice programs, the HASLC provided rental subsidies to additional qualified program participants. Actions planned during the next year to address the needs to public housing HASLC continues to build a stron g portfolio of new properties and aggressively apply for additional vouchers. As part of a strategic planning process held with Commissioners, staff, and residential leaders, HASLC has also identified several goals for 2020-2021. Among these goals are increased focus on assisting local leaders and agencies respond to homelessness in the City as well as developing and attaining more capacity for additional living units through real estate activities, rehabilitation, pursuing new Shared Housing (previously referred to as Single Room Occupancy) projects, developing increased relationships and services targeting and attracting landlords, and sophisticated management of HUD programs. In April 2019, HASLC broke ground on Pamela’s Place a new 100 unit PSH project f or chronically homeless individuals. This project is anticipated to be completed in August 2020. HASLC also utilizes HUD RAD to preserve and improve their many properties . SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 58 | P a g e HASLC continues to look for ways to expand their portfolio by identifying challengin g properties and continuing to develop catalytic and transformative projects and programming. Actions to encourage public housing residents to become more involved in management and participate in homeownership Both HASLC and Housing Connect have active monthly tenant meetings and encourage participation in management decisions related to the specific housing communities. Housing Connect has a Resident Advisory Board that has representatives from public housing, Section 8, and special needs programs. A me mber of the Resident Advisory Board is appointed to the Housing Connect’s Board of Commissioners. HASLC operates Family Self -Sufficiency programs that address areas of improving personal finances and homeownership preparation for voucher recipients. If the PHA is designated as troubled, describe the manner in which financial assistance will be provided or other assistance Housing Connect and HASLC are both designated as high performers. AP-65 HOMELESS AND OTHER SPECIAL NEEDS ACTIVITIES Introduction Salt Lake City works with a large homeless services community to reduce the number of persons experiencing homelessness, reduce the length of time individuals experience homelessness, increase successful transitions out of homelessness, and reduce the number of instances that clients may return to homelessness. Salt Lake City representatives participate in the local Continuum of Care’s executive board and its prioritization committee specifically, so the Continuum of Care’s priorities are considered during Eme rgency Solutions Grant allocations. The three local ESG funders also meet regularly to coordinate ESG and CoC activities to ensure an accurate level of funding is provided to match the community’s service needs and goals. Additionally, the City participates in Salt Lake County’s Coalition to End Homelessness and the State Homeless Coordinating Council to further coordinate efforts. The Salt Lake Continuum of Care contracts with the State of Utah to administer HMIS. All service agencies in the region and the rest of the state are under a uniform data standard for HUD reporting and local ESG funders. All ESG funded organizations participate in HMIS. A representative from Salt Lake City sits on the HMIS Steering C ommittee. HMIS data allows Salt Lake City and its partners to track the effectiveness of programs and gauge SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 59 | P a g e the continuing service needs of the community. The State of Utah, in coordination with local service providers and volunteers, conduct an annual Point In Time count at the end of January to co unt sheltered (emergency shelter and transitional housing) and unsheltered homeless individuals. Unsheltered homeless individuals are counted by canvassing volunteers. The volunteers use the VI-SPDAT assessment tool to interview and try to connect unshelte red homeless individuals into services. Describe the jurisdictions one-year goals and actions for reducing and ending homelessness including reaching out to homeless persons (especially unsheltered persons) and assessing their individual needs Salt Lake City’s primary homeless services goal is to help homeless individuals and families get off the street and into permanent housing. In the short term, Salt Lake City will continue to provide collaborative services to the homeless population. Salt Lake City recognizes that not every homeless individual is alike and because of that, there is no one size fits all solution. There is a wide variety of homeless subpopulations in the greater community. Each of these groups have different needs that Salt Lake City focuses on in order to provide the best services possible. There are groups of chronic homeless individuals, veterans, families, women with children, youth, and homeless-by-choice in the greater community. Each of these groups have different needs and ea ch stage of homelessness must also be considered. The four stages of homelessness are prevention (keeping people from dropping into homelessness with jobs and affordable housing), homelessness (helping with daily needs – lockers, showers, etc.), transcendi ng homelessness (finding housing, employment), preventing recurrence (offering supportive services to housing). If the four stages are not considered for each group, efforts will eventually be unsuccessful. Personalized one-on-one outreach to homeless individuals providing information about the specific services that individual needs (e.g., housing, mental health treatment, a hot meal) is the most effective outreach approach. Salt Lake City is exploring how to introduce lived experience peer support assis tance as outreach teams work with unsheltered homeless individuals. Salt Lake City works regularly with various community partners that provide outreach and assessment of individuals experiencing homelessness including Catholic Community Services; Volunteers of America, Utah; the Department of Veterans Affairs; The Road Home and others. In 2016, Salt Lake City opened the Community Connection Center (CCC) located in the primary SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 60 | P a g e homeless services area of the City. The CCC operates as a drop-in center and employs social workers that assess individuals’ needs and help connect people with available housing and supportive services. The CCC has been successful in filling the need for additional homeless outreach and case management services in the City. The work of the CCC is continuing through 2020 and continues to be a support space as Salt Lake City looks to readdress homeless services in our community . Addressing the emergency shelter and transitional housing needs of homeless persons Starting with the State of Utah’s Ten-Year Plan to End Chronic Homelessness, most efforts to deal with homelessness in Utah rely on the Housing First m odel. Although the ten year plan has sunset, the programs and direction are still being implemented throughout the State. The prem ise of Housing First is that once homeless individuals have housing, they are more likely to seek and continue receiving services and can search for employment. The Housing First m odel has been effective in Salt Lake City, though meeting the varied housing needs of this population can be challenging. The homeless housing market needs more permanent supportive housing, housing vouchers, affordable non -supportive housing, and housing located near transit and services. Salt Lake City is working towards new sol utions in these areas as outlined in the City’s adopted five-year housing plan, Growing SLC . There is a continued need for day services to meet the basic needs of persons experiencing homelessness. Needed daytime services include bathrooms, laundry, safe storage for their life’s belongings, mail receipt, and an indoor area to “hang out”. Salt Lake City addresses these issues by supporting shelters, day services, and providing a free storage program. These things were all considered in the recent creation of the homeless resource centers. These centers also provide food services and look to be all inclusive, one stop shop for services and connection to community resources. This shift in how homeless services are provided will help the community realize our goal that homelessness is rare, brief, and non-recurring. Moving forward, Salt Lake City will aim to assist homeless persons make the transition to permanent housing, including shortening the period of time that individuals and families experience homeless ness, facilitating access for homeless individuals and families to affordable housing units, and preventing individuals and families who were recently homeless from becoming homeless again. The City plays an important role by providing strategic funding for the valuable efforts undertaken by other stakeholders and, at times, filling in gaps in essential services. The City can also lend its voice and political weight to lobby for changes in policy, regulation, and statutes as needed to facilitate a compreh ensive and effective approach to addressing homelessness and related issues. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 61 | P a g e Salt Lake City’s newly adopted housing plan, Growing SLC, includes efforts to provide affordable housing options along with the spectrum of housing including permanent supportive housing, transition in place, tenant based rental assistance, and affordable non -supportive housing. Shelter the Homeless, Collective Impact to End Homelessness Steering Committee, and the Salt Lake City Continuum of Care voted in support of merging thes e two entities into a new homeless system structure called the Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness. This Coalition’s primary goals are to prevent and end homelessness in the Salt Lake Valley through a system -wide commitment of resources, services, data collection, analysis and coordination among all stakeholders. Salt Lake City staff play a key role in assisting this effort as it moves forward. Helping homeless persons (especially chronically homeless individuals and families, families with children, veterans and their families, and unaccompanied youth) make the transition to permanent housing and independent living, including shortening the period of time that individuals and families experience homelessness, facilitating access for homeless ind ividuals and families to affordable housing units, and preventing individuals and families who were recently homeless from becoming homeless again Salt Lake City and its service partners work with homeless individuals to help them successfully transition from living on the streets or shelters and into permanent housing or independent living. Salt Lake City has been working with service partners and other governmental agencies through the Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness (SLVCEH). This includes work on various subgroups that focus on specific areas of service, including housing and coordinated entry. Salt Lake City has the goal to help streamline service delivery to the homeless community with the express purpose of shortening the period that individuals and families experience homelessness. Salt Lake City has also funded the creation of new permanent supportive housing units and programs which serve the most vulnerable members of our community. Progress is being made on both goals. Salt Lake City and its partner, the Road Home, are continuing to operate the House 20 program. The House 20 program engages with some of the most vulnerable members of our community, the majority of whom are now in stable housing. Through the City’s Funding Our Future efforts, the City has funded a variety of housing programs that aim to fill in gaps in services in our community. These programs include a new shared housing pilot program and housing programs which target families with children, individuals with subst ance use disorders, refugees, and victims of domestic violence. Salt Lake City has provided funding to support the creation of a combined 280 new units of permanent supportive housing that are at various stages of development in the City. 175 of SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 62 | P a g e these PSH units are slated for completion within the calendar year. These permanent supportive housing units have been identified by the Salt Lake Continuum of Care as a need in the larger homeless services community. Salt Lake City continues to make progress on o ur 5-year housing plan, Growing SLC, which seeks to improve the housing market in the City by focusing on three primary goals:  Reforming City practices to promote a responsive, affordable high -opportunity housing market;  Increasing housing opportunities for cost-burdened households; and  Building a more equitable city. Through implementation of Growing SLC and the funding of housing programs through Funding our Future and Federal dollars, Salt Lake City is working to increase access to affordable housin g units for individuals and families experiencing homelessness. These efforts will help shorten the period of time individuals and families experience homeless and prevent recently homeless individuals and families from falling back into homelessness. Helping low-income individuals and families avoid becoming homeless, especially extremely low - income individuals and families and those who are: being discharged from publicly funded institutions and systems of care (such as health care facilities, mental he alth facilities, foster care and other youth facilities, and corrections programs and institutions); or, receiving assistance from public or private agencies that address housing, health, social services, employment, education, or youth needs Salt Lake City, along with other organizations in the Salt Lake Continuum of Care, work to prevent and divert individuals and families from experiencing homelessness. Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County and the State of Utah all provide funding to Utah Community Action fo r short-term rental assistance to families at risk of falling into homelessness. Discussion Salt Lake City is reducing and ending homelessness in the community through strong collaborations with partner organizations throughout the Salt Lake Continuum of Care. Salt Lake City works closely with Salt Lake County, the State of Utah and service providers to stop families from dropping into homelessness, reduce the length of time individuals and families experience homelessness, help individuals and families s uccessfully transition out of homelessness, and keep individuals and families from rescinding back into homelessness. AP-70 HOPWA GOALS SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 63 | P a g e One year goals for the number of households to be provided housing through the use of HOPWA for Short-term Rent, Mortg age, and Utility Assistance Payments: 65 Tenant-Based Rental Assistance: 66 Units Provided in Permanent Housing Facilities Developed, Leased, or Operated with HOPWA Funds: 0 Units provided in Transitional Short -Term Housing Facilities Developed, Leased, or Operated with HOPWA Funds: 0 TOTAL: 131 AP-75 ACTION PLAN BARRIERS TO AFFORDABLE HOUSING Introduction As discussed in sections MA -40 and SP-55 of the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan, several barriers to the development and preservation of affordable h ousing exist within Salt Lake City, including the following:  Land costs  Construction costs  Housing and transportation costs  Development and rehabilitation financing  Housing rehabilitation complexities  Foreclosures and loan modifications  Neighborhood market conditions  Economic conditions  Land use regulations  Development fees and assessments  Permit processing procedures  Environmental review procedures  Lack of zoning and development incentives  Complicated impact fee waiver process  Competition for limited development incentives  Landlord tenant policies  NIMBY’ism While not all of these barriers can be addressed during with federal funding, d uring the 2020-2021 program year, the City will work to reduce barriers to affordable housing through the following planni ng efforts and initiatives: SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 64 | P a g e  Growing SLC: A Five-Year Plan, 2018-2022: The City has formally adopted a housing plan that is addressing the barriers listed above and has served as a catalyst on a local and regional level to focus on the housing crisis. The plan provides an assessment of citywide housing needs, with emphasis on the availability and affordability of housing, housing needs for changing demographics, and neighborhood-specific needs. Growing SLC identifies several goals to remove barriers to affordable housing. Those goals include reforming City practices to promote a responsive, affordable, high - opportunity housing market; increase housing opportunities for cost -burdened households; and building a more equitable City.  Homeless Strategies: Salt L ake City works collaboratively with service providers, local municipalities, the State of Utah, the Continuum of Care, and other stakeholders through the Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness (Coalition) to ensure a regional and concerted effort t o address homeless issues within the City. The structure of the Coalition provides a succinct network for data collection, resource deployment, and service implementation. The City will continue to play a critical and visionary role in the Coalition in the coming year.  Home Ownership Options: The City has launched a new program for homeownership, Welcome Home SLC. The program provides low to moderate-income families the opportunity to purchase a home in Salt Lake City. It will help stabilize communities, p rovide incentive for neighborhood investments, and allow families to build wealth.  Community Land Trust: Salt Lake City has launched a Community Land Trust that will allow donated and trusted land to maintain perpetual affordability while ensuring the stru cture on the land, the home, is purchased, owned, and sold over time to income-qualifying households, just as any other home would be. By holding the land itself in the trust, the land effectively receives a write down each time the home is sold, insulatin g the property for growing land costs but still allowing equity to be built by the homeowner.  Funding Our Future: Will provide additional funding during FY 20-21 to increase housing opportunities in Salt Lake City through a new .5% sales tax increase app roved by Council in May 2018.  Leverage Public Land: The City has been and will continue to look at City owned properties as an investment in affordable housing. Additionally, proceeds from development on public land could be used for future affordable hou sing development.  Redevelopment Agency: The Salt Lake City Redevelopment Agency has committed $17 million since 2017 to address affordable housing efforts in the City, with a specific focus on areas with high land values.  Housing Trust Fund: The Housing Trust Fund was created in 2000 to provide financial assistance to support the development and preservation of affordable and special needs housing in Salt Lake City. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 65 | P a g e Eligible activities include acquisition, new construction, and rehabilitation of both mult ifamily rental properties and single-family homeownership. Additional assistance relating to housing for eligible households also may include project or tenant -based rental assistance, down payment assistance and technical assistance. Applications for funding can be accepted year-round and are approved through a citizen’s advisory board, the Mayor and the City Council.  Policy: The City is continually evaluating policies that may impede the development of affordable housing. A few policy changes the City is considering over the coming year include an Affordable Housing Overlay zoning ordinance, Housing Loss Mitigation ordinance amendment, and a Single Room Occupancy (SRO)/Shared Housing ordinance. Actions planned to remove or ameliorate the negative effects of public policies that serve as barriers to affordable housing such as land use controls, tax policies affecting land, zoning ordinances, building codes, fees and charges, growth limitations, and policies affecting the return on residential investment Salt Lake City will work to remove or ameliorate public policies that serve as barriers to affordable housing through the following efforts:  Affordable Housing Development Incentives: Zoning and fee waiver incentives will be implemented and/or strengthened, including the following: o Review the City’s Housing Loss Mitigation ordinance to ensure that the city’s stock of inexpensive housing isn’t rapidly being replaced by more expensive units. o Develop an Affordable Housing Overlay zone that allows for and provide s incentives for the creation and preservation of affordable housing. o Evaluate the desire for a Single Room Occupancy (SRO)/Shared Housing ordinance that allows for SRO’s in single-family neighborhoods throughout the City. o Off-Street Parking Ordinance update to improve pedestrian-scale development and amenities. o Low-Density Multi-Family Residential Zoning amendments to remove local zoning barriers to housing density and types of housing.  Leverage Public Resources for Affordable Housing Development: Publi c resources, including city - owned land, will be leveraged with private resources for affordable housing development.  Funding Targeting: The Division of Housing and Neighborhood Development is evaluating ways to coordinate and target affordable housing subsidies more effectively, to include the coordination of SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 66 | P a g e local funding sources (Olene Walker Housing Loan Fund, Salt Lake City Housing Trust Fund, Salt Lake County funding, etc.).  Implement Fair Housing Action Items: Salt Lake City will work to remove and/or ameliorate housing impediments for protected classes through action items as identified in the City’s 2020-2024 Fair Housing Action Plan.  Utilize Federal Funding to Expand Affordable Housing Opportunities: Utilize CDBG, ESG, HOME, and HOPWA funding to expand housing opportunity through homeowner rehabilitation, emergency home repair, acquisition/rehabilitation, direct financial assistance, tenant -based rental assistance, project- based rental assistance, and rapid re-housing. AP-85 OTHER ACTIONS Introduction This section outlines Salt Lake City’s efforts to carry out the following:  Address obstacles to meeting underserved needs  Foster and maintain affordable housing  Reduce lead-based paint hazards  Reduce the number of poverty -level families  Develop institutional structure  Enhance coordination between public and private housing and social service agencies  Radon Mitigation Policy Actions planned to address obstacles to meeting underserved needs The most substantial impediment in meeting underserved needs is a lack of funding and resources. Strategic shifts identified through Salt Lake City’s 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan provide a framework for maximizing and leveraging the City's block grant allocations better focus funding to address underserved needs. Underse rved needs and strategic actions are as follows: Underserved Need: Affordable housing  Actions: Salt Lake City is utilizing federal and local resources to expand both rental and homeownership opportunities. In addition, the City is utilizing public land to leverage private capital for the development of affordable housing. These efforts will work to address the affordable housing gap in Salt Lake City. Underserved Need: Homelessness SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 67 | P a g e  Actions: Salt Lake City is working with housing and homeless service provid ers to coordinate and streamline processes for service delivery. By utilizing the VI-SPDAT pre-screen survey, providers are able to access and prioritize services based on chronicity and medical vulnerability. These efforts will assist in addressing unmet needs by utilizing resources more effectively. Underserved Need: Special needs individuals.  Actions: Salt Lake City is working to address underserved needs for refugees, immigrants, the elderly, victims of domestic violence, persons living with HIV/AIDS, and persons with a disability by providing resources for basic needs, as well as resources to expand self -sufficiency. For example, federal funding is utilized to provide early childhood education for refugees and other at -risk children; improve immediate and long-term outcomes for persons living with HIV/AIDS; and provide job training vulnerable populations; and provide medical services for at risk populations. Actions planned to foster and maintain affordable housing The City is committed to foster and m aintain affordable housing throughout our City. This is evident through identifying specific gaps that exist in the community, and then designing affordable housing efforts specifically to address these needs. The City has developed an aggressive strategy to develop, preserve and assist affordable housing over the next two years. The initiative aims to target households earning 80% AMI and below, with emphasis on households earning 40% AMI and below. Through this housing initiative and efforts identified in the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan, Salt Lake City aims to:  Address the City’s affordable housing shortage for those most in need.  Address housing needs for Salt Lake City’s changing demographics.  Address neighborhood specific needs, including the following: o Protect affordability in neighborhoods where affordability is disappearing. o Promote affordability in neighborhoods with a lack of affordable housing.  Preserve the City’s existing affordable housing stock.  Strengthen the City’s relationship with our housin g partners, financial institutions, and foundations.  Support those who develop and advocate for affordable housing. Toward this end, Salt Lake City will foster and maintain affordable housing during the 201 9-2020 program year through the following actions:  Utilize CDBG funding to support owner-occupied rehabilitation for households at 80% AMI and below.  Utilize CDBG and HOME funding for acquisition and rehabilitation of dilapidated and blighted housing.  Utilize ESG, HOME and HOPWA funding to create housing opportunities for individuals and households at 30% AMI and below through Tenant-Based Rental Assistance and Rapid Re-Housing. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 68 | P a g e  Utilize CDBG and HOME funding for direct financial assistance to homebuyers at 80% AMI and below.  Promote the development of aff ordable housing with low income housing tax credits, Salt Lake City Housing Trust Fund, Olene Walker Housing Loan Fund, Salt Lake City’s HOME Development fund and other funding sources.  Leverage public resources, including publicly owned land, with private capital for the development of affordable housing.  Work to ameliorate and/or eliminate housing impediments for protected classes as outlined in the Fair Housing Action Plan.  Work to leverage other city resources such as Redevelopment Agency funding/strate gies, maximize sales tax housing funding, and other sources as they are identified with federal funding where applicable.  Salt Lake City has launched a new Community Land Trust that currently has six properties, with plans to increase the number of properties in the coming years. Actions planned to reduce lead-based paint hazards Because of the high percentage of the housing units in Salt Lake City that were built before 1978, outreach and education efforts must continue. As such, the City has implemented a plan to address lead issues in our residential rehabilitation projects. The City’s Housing Rehabilitation Program is in compliance with HUD’s rules concerning identification and treatment of lead hazards. Du ring the 2020-2021 program year, Salt Lake City will work in conjunction with our partners on the state and county levels to educate the public on the dangers posed by lead based paint, to include the following:  Undertake outreach efforts through direct mailings, the Salt Lake City website, various fa irs and public events, and the local community councils.  Provide materials in Spanish to increase lead-based paint hazard awareness in minority communities.  Partner with Salt Lake County’s Lead Safe Salt Lake program to treat lead hazards in the homes of children identified as having elevated blood levels.  Emphasize lead hazards in our initial contacts with homeowners needing rehabilitation.  Work with community partners to encourage local contractors to obtain worker certifications for their employees and sub-contractors. Actions planned to reduce the number of poverty -level families In a strategic effort to reduce the number of households living in poverty and prevent households at risk of moving in to poverty from doing so, Salt Lake City is focusing on a two-pronged approach: SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 69 | P a g e 1. Creating neighborhoods of opportunity to build capacity and expand resources within concentrated areas of poverty. 2. Support the city’s most vulnerable populations, including the chronically homeless, homeless families, food-insecure individuals, the disabled, persons living with HIV/AIDS, victims of domestic violence and the low-income elderly. The City’s anti-poverty strategy aims to close the gap in a number of socioeconomic indicators, such as improving housing affordability, school-readiness of young children, employment skills of at-risk adults, access to transportation for low-income households, and access to fresh foods for food -insecure families. Efforts will focus on the following objectives:  Assist low -income individuals to maximize their incomes.  Reduce the linkages between poor health and poverty.  Expand housing opportunities.  Reduce the impacts of poverty on children.  Ensure that vulnerable populations have access to supportive services. Federal entitlement f unds allocated through this 2020-2021 Action Plan will support the City’s anti -poverty strategy through the following efforts:  Provide job training for vulnerable populations.  Provide early childhood education to limit the effects of intergenerational poverty.  Provide essential supportive services for vulnerable populations.  Provide housing rehabilitation for low -income homeowners.  Expanded affordable housing opportunities.  Improved neighborhood/commercial infrastructure in West Side Target Area.  Enhance support for sm all businesses and micro-enterprise businesses.  Reduce food insecurities for low income households. Actions planned to develop institutional structure As outlined in the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan, Salt Lake City is building upon the 2019-2015 Plan and c ontinuing to take a coordinated and strategic shift in allocating federal entitlement funds to place a stronger emphasis on community needs, goals, objectives and outcomes. This includes the following efforts to strengthen and develop institutional structu re: SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 70 | P a g e  Geographically target infrastructure and economic development funding to areas of the city with higher poverty rates, lower incomes, reduced access to transportation  Increase coordination between housing and supportive service providers to reduce/elimi nate duplicative efforts, encourage partnerships, increase transparency, and standardize processes.  Strengthen support for the city’s most vulnerable populations, including the chronically homeless, homeless families, the disabled, persons living with HIV/AIDS, victims of domestic violence and the low-income elderly.  Support housing efforts that connect residents with supportive services and programs that improve self-sufficiency.  Offer technical assistance to agencies implementing projects with CDBG, ESG, HOME, and/or HOPWA funding to ensure compliance and support of program objectives.  Support employee training and certifications to expand the internal knowledge base on HUD programs, as well as housing and community development best practices. Actions planned to enhance coordination between public and private housing and social service agencies Salt Lake City recognizes the importance of coordination between supportive service and housing providers in meeting priority needs. Stakeholders have been working towards developing and implementing a streamlined and effective delivery system to include the following efforts:  Created and implemented a no wrong door approach to accessing housing and other services.  Increased coordination through the Salt Lake Continu um of Care, Salt Lake Homeless Coordinating Committee, Salt Lake County Collective Impact Committee, and State Homeless Coordinating Council.  Coordinated assessments to help individuals and families experiencing homeless move through the system faster.  Coordinated diversion and homeless prevention resources to reduce new entries into homelessness.  Coordinated efforts to house the highest users of the homeless services and provide trauma informed case management.  Improved weekly “housing triage” meetings that provide a format for developing a housing plan for homeless individuals and families with the most urgent housing needs. Discussion Actions planned to mitigate impacts of Radon Salt Lake City is committed to providing safe, affordable housing opportunit ies that are free of contaminations that could affect the health and safety of occupants. Section 50.3(i) states that “it is HUD policy that all property proposed for use in HUD programs be free of hazardous materials, contamination, toxic chemicals and ga sses, SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 71 | P a g e and radioactive substances, where a hazard could affect the health and safety of occupants of conflict with the intended utilization of the property.” To that end, the city created a Radon Mitigation Policy that address the potential of Radon in homes that are newly constructed or rehabilitated utilizing federal funding issued through this Action Plan. In June 2020, Salt Lake City will host a training seminar to review the requirements with subrecipients and ensure that they are prepared to be complia nt with the updated requirements. The city has, and will continue, to provide technical assistance to each agency in an effort to ensure agencies are properly identifying sites that must be tested, how to test correctly, how to read test results, and the a ppropriate mitigation standards that must be followed. The Radon Mitigation Policy includes specifics on testing and mitigation requirements. The city has also partnered with the State of Utah to implement the mitigation policy, provide technical assist ance, and outreach/education materials. To leverage resources, the city will refer clients needing financial assistance for mitigation to other community resources. To ensure that even the most vulnerable and high risk populations have an opportunity to m itigate Radon, the City has implemented a grant program whereby residents meeting a set of criteria, may apply for a grant to bear the costs of mitigation. AP-90 PROGRAM SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS - 91.220(l)(1,2,4) Introduction Salt Lake City’s program speci fic requirements for CDBG, HOME, and ESG are outlined as follows. Community Development Block Grant Program (CDBG) Reference 24 CFR 91.220(l)(1) 1. Projects planned with all CDBG funds expected to be available during the year are identified in the Projects Table. The following identifies program income that is available for use that is included in projects to be carried out 1 The total amount of anticipated program income that will have been received before the start of the next program year and tha t has not yet been reprogrammed. $6,000,000 2 The amount of proceeds from section 108 loan guarantees that will be used during the year to address the priority needs and specific objectives identified in the grantee's strategic plan. 0 3 The amount of surplus fu nds from urban renewal settlements. 0 4 The amount of any grant funds returned to the line of credit for which the planned use has not been included in a prior statement or plan . 0 5 The amount of income from float‐funded activities. 0 SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 72 | P a g e Total Program Income: $6,000,000 2. Other CDBG Requirements 1 The amount of urgent need activities 0 2 The estimated percentage of CDBG funds that will be used for activities that benefit persons of low and moderate income 90% Overall Benefit - A consecutive period of one, two or three years may be used to determine that a minimum overall benefit of 70% of CDBG funds is used to benefit persons of low and moderate income. This Annual Action Plan covers a one year period. HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME) Reference 24 CFR 91.220(l)(2) 1. A description of other forms of investment being used beyond those identified in Section 92.205 is as follows Salt Lake City does not utilize HOME funding beyon d those identified in Section 92.205. 2. A description of the guidelines that will be used for resale or recapture of HOME funds when used for homebuyer activities as required in 92.254, is as follows In order to preserve the number of affordable housing uni ts for continued benefit to low -income residents, Salt Lake City requires that HOME funds used to assist homeownership be recaptured whenever assisted units become vacant prior to the end of the affordability period that is commensurate with the amount of funding invested in the activity. Trust deeds or property restrictions are filed on appropriate properties to ensure compliance with the period of affordability. Homeownership Recapture: Salt Lake City follows the HOME recapture provisions established at §92.253(a)(5)(ii). Any remaining HOME assistance to the home buyer must be recovered if the housing does not continue to be the principal residence of the family for the duration of the period of affordability. The HOME investment that is subject to recaptu re is based on the direct subsidy amount which includes the HOME assistance that enabled the home buyer to buy the housing unit. In all cases, the recapture provisions are limited to the net proceeds of the sale. Salt Lake City requires all sub-recipients and CHDO’s to follow the same recapture guidelines as outlined and required in the HOME rule. This provision is intended to ensure a fair return on investment for the homeowner if a sale occurs during the period of affordability. The City will utilize one of the following options: SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 73 | P a g e A) If it was determined that HOME regulations were not adhered to for initial approval of the homeowner or during the term of affordability, the entire HOME subsidy will be recaptured. B) In the event of change of title/ownership, the City will reduce the HOME investment amount to be recaptured on a pro-rata basis for the time the homeowner has owned and occupied the housing measured against the applicable affordability period. C) If the net proceeds are not sufficient to recapture the appropriate HOME investment plus enable the homeowner to recover the amount of the homeowner's down payment and any capital improvement investment made by the owner since purchase, the City will share the net proceeds. Net proceeds are the sales price minus loan repayment (other than HOME funds) and closing costs. The net proceeds will be divided proportionally on a pro -rata basis for the time the homeowner has owned and occupied the housing measured against the applicable affordability period. Owner investment returned first. The City may choose to permit the home buyer to recover the home buyer's entire investment (down payment and capital im provements made by the owner since purchase) before recapturing the HOME investment. HOME Funds Provided for Homebuyer Activity subject to Recapture of HOME Funds Minimum years of Affordability Under $15,000 5 Years Between $15,000 and $40,000 10 Years Over $40,000 15 Years Homeownership Resale: Resale requirements will only apply to HOME -funded affordable homeownership opportunities provided using the community land trust model. In that model, Salt Lake City provides funding to a community land trus t to sell homes at an affordable price while placing a 99-year leasehold on the estate. Resale provisions will be enforced by a recorded covenant signed by the land owner, the homebuyer, and the City, and also through a 99-year ground lease between the lan d owner (the trust) and the homebuyer. Under both the covenant and the ground lease, the home may be sold only to an income-qualified buyer who will occupy the home as a primary residence. The land owner, through the ground lease, shall have an option to p urchase in order to ensure that the home is sold to an eligible buyer at an affordable price. This provision is intended to ensure a fair retur n on investment for the homeowner if a sale occurs during the period of afforda bility. The Resale Requirement will limit the sales price, as described below. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 74 | P a g e Due to the growing costs of homes in the Salt Lake City residential market, the City has o pted to implement a Homeownership Value Limit of $378,100 for a single family home. Salt Lake City determined 95 percent of the median area purchase price for single family housing in the jurisdiction in accordance with procedures established at § 92.254(a)(2)(iii). Specifically, this purchase price was calculated based on a median sales price of $398,000 (i.e. $398,000 × 0.95 = $378,100) for single family homes. This figure is for both new construction and existing homes. The attached sales data includes a count of 2,361 sales since May 2019 and only includes addresses within incorporated Salt Lake City boundaries. Please see attachment s for additional information. 3. A description of the guidelines for resale or recapture that ensures the affordability of u nits acquired with HOME funds? See 24 CFR 92.254(a)(4) are as follows As stated above, Salt Lake City requires that HOME funds be recaptured whenever assisted units become vacant prior to the end of the affordability period that is commensurate with the am ount of funding invested in the activity. In very rare cases, Salt Lake City will use HOME funds as an acquisition source for multifamily projects. With these rental activities, rental projects must meet the appropriate period of affordability or HOME fund s provided to them will be recaptured by the City. Trust deeds or property restrictions are filed on appropriate properties to ensure compliance with the period of affordability. Rental Housing Recapture: All HOME-assisted units must meet the affordability requirements for not less than the applicable period specified below regardless of the term of any loan or mortgage, transfer of ownership, or repayment of loan funds. Rental Housing Activity Minimum years of Affordability Rehab or acquisition of existing housing per unit amount of HOME funds under $15,000 5 Years Between $15,000 and $40,000 10 Years Over $40,000 or rehab involving refinancing 15 Years New construction or acquisition of newly constructed housing 20 Years 4. Plans for using HOME funds to refinance existing debt secured by multifamily housing that is rehabilitated with HOME funds along with a description of the refinancing guidelines required that will be used under 24 CFR 92.206(b), are as follows Not applicable. Salt Lake City does not i ntend to use HOME funds to refinance multifamily housing debt. Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) Reference 24 CFR 91.220(l)(4) SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 75 | P a g e 1. Include written standards for providing ESG assistance (may include as attachment) The Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) Policies include written standards for providing ESG assistance. 2. If the Continuum of Care has established centralized or coordinated assessment system that meets HUD requirements, describe that centralized or coordinated assessment system The Salt Lake Continuum of Care has developed a collaborative, written coordinated assessment plan. Consensus exists for a coordinated assessment plan that covers the entire Continuum of Care with a multi - access entry point quick assessment method for any homeless individual or fam ily in need of emergency shelter or service. Our 211 system, service providers, government agencies, and others publicize all existing access points, striving to do everything we can to ensure individuals and families in need have clear direction for accessing appropriate services. After entry into an emergency service, individuals are tracked as they progress toward housing and/or support interventions. All homeless families and those individuals prioritized for permanent supportive housing placements are guided toward this centralized process and placed into one of several housing programs depending on assessment. Standardized assessments include a quick assessment for emergency services and eligibility and enrollment materials for housing placements. Salt Lake City worked with partners as part of the Collective Impact process to further improve our coordinated assessment system. Representatives of the City worked with the CoC, ESG funders, and service providers to improve the coordinated assessment system to meet requirements set forth in Notice CPD-17-01. The new coordinated assessment system was approved by the Salt Lake County Homeless Coordinating Committee in January, 2018. Salt Lake City is continuing to work with the CoC, ESG funders, and service p roviders to operationalize these new requirements through the Coordinated Entry Task Group. 3. Identify the process for making sub -awards and describe how the ESG allocation available to private nonprofit organizations (including community and faith -based o rganizations) will be allocated Granting sub-awards is an intensive, months-long process. It begins with applications being made available and education workshops held to explain different federal grant programs and eligible activities under each. Staff also reaches out to potential applicants through the Salt Lake Homeless Coordinating Council, the local Continuum of Care, the Utah Housing Coalition and others. After the application period closes, a general needs hearing is conducted to help guide how ESG monies should be spent. Applications are discussed with a citizen board in a public forum. Applicants are invited to meet with the citizen board to answer final questions or provide additional information regarding their programs and their role in the larger homeless services system structure. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 76 | P a g e The Community Development & Capital Improvement Programs Advisory Board (CDCIP Board) reviews the applications and makes a recommendation to the Salt Lake City Mayor based on federal guidelines, the 5 Year Consolidated Plan, and the City’s long term homeless services strategies. The Mayor then makes a recommendation on funding to the City Council based on the CDCIP board recommendation, federal guidelines, the 5 Year Consolidated Plan, and the City’s long -term homeless services strategies. The City Council holds a public hearing for comment on the programs and proposed benefits of each. The City Council then makes a funding decision based on public comment, the Mayor’s recommendation, federal guidelines, the 5 Year C onsolidated Plan, and the City’s long term homeless services strategies. 4. If the jurisdiction is unable to meet the homeless participation requirement in 24 CFR 576.405(a), the jurisdiction must specify its plan for reaching out to and consulting with homeless or formerly homeless individuals in considering policies and funding decisions regarding facilities and services funded under ESG Before the Salt Lake City Council makes the final funding decisions for ESG funds, there are multiple venues for public outreach including two public hearings. Efforts are made to include participation from homeless and formerly homeless individuals. Emergency Solutions Grant funds, along with other public and private monies, are used by Salt Lake City to implement our short and long term homeless service goals. Individuals experiencing homelessness often help the city craft and implement short -term and long-term service plans. Below are a few examples of how the city has created the opportunity for homeless persons to participate:  Homeless individuals participated in the creation of the long -term homeless services situation assessment.  The City interviewed over 100 homeless individuals as part of its Homeless Services Site Evaluation Commission in 2015.  Summer of 2016, the C ity held a workshop specifically with individuals experiencing homelessness to draft the criteria used to locate new homeless resource centers.  February 2017, a workshop was held with homeless individuals to gain feedback on the design, location and programming at new homeless resource centers.  March 2018, Salt Lake City participated in a Homeless Youth Forum, which brought together a wide range of service providers together to discuss service delivery for homeless youth. There were approximately 20 homeless and formerly homeless youth who were dispersed amongst the discussion groups and they provided valuable feedback on various service delivery systems. SALT LAKE CITY 2020 -2021 ACTION PLAN 77 | P a g e  Summer of 2018, the City coordinated with Salt Lake County to collect survey data on funding priorities from individuals experiencing homelessness on two separate occasions.  The City continues to reach out to persons with “lived experience” to help shape the services being prioritized and funded throughout the homeless services system. ESG subgrantees and other homeless service providers routinely consult with current and formerly homeless individuals to make programming and service delivery decisions. There is representation from homeless and formerly homeless individuals on the Collective Impact Steering Committee and the CoC executive board. 5. Describe performance standards for evaluating ESG Salt Lake City scores programs receiving Emergency Solutions Grant funding using the performance metrics required by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Develop ment (HUD) and local priorities. In an effort to increase transparency, leverage resources, and maximize efficiencies, Salt Lake City does the following:  All applications undergo a risk analysis prior to the awarding of funds.  Standardized quarterly reporting is reviewed for compliance, timeliness, and accuracy.  Monitoring and technical assistance risk analyses are performed on all subgrantees to determine which organization would benefit from monitoring or technical assistance visits.  Collect information that supports the required performance measurement metrics and provides context on local initiatives. To ensure consistent performance metrics, the Salt Lake Continuum of Care contracts with the State of Utah to administer HMIS, or Hom eless Management Information System. All service agencies in the region and the rest of the state are under a uniform data standard for HUD reporting and local ESG funders. All ESG funded organizations participate in HMIS. Salt Lake City reviews HMIS data to ensure grantees are properly using funds as promised in their contracts and meeting larger City, Continuum of Care, and State goals. Exhibit 3 Substantial Amendments Regarding SLC CARES HUD-CV Allocation SUBSTANTIAL AMENDMENT, CON PLAN 20-24 & AAP 20 -21 1 SALT LAKE CITY SUBSTANTIAL AMENDMENTS TO 2020-2024 CONSOLIDATED PLAN 2020-2024 CITIZEN PARTICIPATION PLAN 2020-2021 ACTION PLAN MAYOR ERIN MENDENHALL CITY COUNCIL DISTRICT 1: JAMES ROGERS DISTRICT 2, VICE CHAIR: ANDREW JOHNSTON DISTRICT 3 , CHAIR: CHRIS WHARTON DISTRICT 4: ANALIA VALDEMOROS DISTRICT 5: DARIN MANO DISTRICT 6: DAN DUGAN DISTRICT 7: AMY FOWLER Prepared by S A L T L A K E C I T Y HOUSING and NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT DIVISION COMMUNITY and NEIGHBORHOODS DEPARTMENT SUBSTANTIAL AMENDMENT, CON PLAN 20-24 & AAP 20 -21 2 September 10, 2020 PY 2020 Salt Lake City CARES Act Substantial Amendment TO ADD COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT-CORONAVIRUS (CDBG-CV) EMERGENCY SOLUTIONS GRANT-CORONAVIRUS (ESG-CV) HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES FOR PEOPLE WITH AIDS/HIV-CORONAVIRUS (HOPWA-CV) SUMMARY Substantial Amendments to the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan, 2020-2024 Citizen Participation Plan, and 2020-2021 Annual Action Plan for utilization of CARES HUD-CV funds for coronavirus response and recovery. The requested amendments will allow the award of U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Securities Act (CARES Act) fund ing to Salt Lake City, a total of $7,138,203 for coronavirus (CV) response and recovery. These funds will be used by Salt Lake City for eligible activities and services in accordance with Community Development Block Grant (CDBG-CV), Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG-CV) and Housing Opportunities for People With AIDS/HIV (HOPWA-CV) HUD regulations and CARES Act waivers. CARES HUD-CV1 funds were allocated to Salt Lake City on April 2, 2020 via notification from HUD Acting Assistant Secretary for Community Plann ing and Development. On June 9, 2020, Salt Lake City was notified of an additional allocation of ESG-CV2 funds. On September 11, 2020, Salt Lake City was notified of an additional allocation of CDBG-CV3 funds.  Community Development Block Grant (CDBG-CV), first round $2,064,298, third round $999,551  Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG-CV), first round $1,040,462 and second round $2,946,449  Housing Opportunities for People With AIDS/HIV (HOPWA -CV), first round $87,443 Housing and Neighborhood Development (HAND) staff will administer the CARES HUD-CV funds. HAND staff will communicate with the Administration and City Council about the CARES HUD -CV allocation process. CARES HUD-CV FUNDING On March 27, 2020, the United States Congress passed The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) (H.R. 748, Public Law 116 -136), which makes available $5 billion in supplemental Community Development Block Grant (CDBG -CV) funding, $1 billion for Emergency Solutions Grants (ESG-CV) and $53.7 million for Hous ing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA-CV) grants to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus . SUBSTANTIAL AMENDMENT, CON PLAN 20-24 & AAP 20 -21 3 The CARES Act stipulated that HUD-CV funding must not fund duplicative activities and requires tracking to ensure no other funding source could be utilized for the expense. Grantees may use HUD -CV funds for a range of activities to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus. Funds must serve low - to moderate-income individuals or households, underserved communities or populations, and align with HUD National Objectives. PROGRAM YEAR (PY) 2020 SUBSTANTIAL AMENDMENT Due to the City’s allocated CARES HUD-CV funding Substantial Amendments to the City’s most recently adopted 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan, 2020-2024 Citizen Participation Plan, and 2020-2021 Annual Action Plan are required. These Substantial Amendments has been prepared with the guidance from HUD that has been issued to date. HUD REQUIREMENTS HUD’s Substantial Amendment Section 24 CFR 91.505 (b), outlines the criteria for Subst antial Amendment and states “the jurisdiction shall identify in its Citizen Participation Plan the criteria it will use for determining what constitutes a Substantial Amendment. It is these Substantial Amendments that are subject to a citizen participation process, in accordance with the jurisdiction's citizen participation plan.” SALT LAKE CITY 2020-2024 CONSOLIDATED PLAN REQUIREMENTS Salt Lake City’s Consolidated Plan for 2020 -2024 Citizen Participation Plan defines a Substantial Amendment as: 1. A proposed use of funds that does not address a goal or underlying strategy identified in the governing Consolidated Plan or Annual Action Plan; or 2. Increasing funding levels for a given project by 100% or more of the previously adopted amount; or 3. Decreasing funding levels for a given project by 100% AND pivoting impacted funds to another approved use during an action plan period; or 4. A change to a regulatory requirement or additional allocated funding from the US Department of Housing & Urban Development that defines that a Substantial Amendment must be completed. Substantial Amendment to 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan: #1 Accept Additional Allocations of Funding Section SP-35, The Strategic Plan, Anticipated Resources. HUD 24 CFR 91.215 (a)(4), 91.220 (c)(1,2). Located on page 146 of the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan. The CARES HUD-CV allocations represent an additional allocation of funding from HUD to Salt Lake City’s 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan, thus requiring a Substantial Amendment. (See the SP-35 Anticipated Resources Appendix) The City’s current 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan will be amended to reflect the additional funding and eligible uses of the grant funds. SUBSTANTIAL AMENDMENT, CON PLAN 20-24 & AAP 20 -21 4 . Substantial Amendments to 2020-2024 Citizen Participation Plan (Appendix C of the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan): #1 Shortened Public Comment Period Citizen Participation, HUD 24 CFR 91.105. Located on page 281 of the 2020-2024 Citizen Participation Plan (Appendix C of the 2020 -2024 Consolidated Plan) Substantial Amendments are required to follow the City’s Citizen Participation Plan, as outlined i