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02/01/2011 - Work Session - Minutes PROCEEDINGS OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH WORK SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2011 The City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah, met in a Work Session on Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 3 : 00 p.m. in Room 326, City Council Office, City County Building, 451 South State Street . In Attendance: Council Members Carlton Christensen, Van Turner, Stan Penfold, Luke Garrott, Jill Remington Love, JT Martin and Soren Simonsen. Also in Attendance: Cindy Gust-Jenson, Executive Council Director; Jennifer Bruno, Council Deputy Director; Janice Jardine, Council Land Use Policy Analyst; Karen Halladay, Council Policy Analyst; Cheri Coffey, Assistant Planning Director; Casey Stewart, Planner; Ray Milliner, Principal Planner; Ana Valdemoros, Associate Planner; Nick Norris, Planning Manager; Ed Rutan, City Attorney; Lynn Pace Deputy City Attorney; David Everitt, Chief of Staff; Helen Langan, Mayor' s Senior AAdvisor; Tim Harpst, Transportation Director; Frank Gray, Director of Community and Economic Development; Elizabeth Elder, Library Director; Hugh Gillian, Chair of Library Board; Ella Olsen, Library Board Member; John McConkie, CRSA Library Architect and Chris Meeker, City Recorder. Councilmember Love presided at and conducted the meeting. The meeting was called to order at 3 : 05 p.m. AGENDA ITEMS #1 . 3 : 05 : 52 PM REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, INCLUDING A REVIEW OF COUNCIL INFORMATION ITEMS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS. See File M 11-5 for announcements . #2 . 6 : 01 : 29 PM RECEIVE A BRIEFING REGARDING THE LIST OF LEGISLATIVE ISSUES FOR THE 2011 STATE LEGISLATIVE SESSION. Lynn Pace and Helen Langan briefed the Council . Mr . Pace said Senate Bill 139 was to facilitate the collection of unpaid parking tickets . He said after four tickets a hold would be placed on a vehicle registration. He said the immigration debate was on going and the focus on cost of enforcement. Ms . Langan said the bicycle bill was the review of current laws governing vehicles vs . bicycles and right-of-way issues . Mr. Pace said there was a segregated waste bill . Ms . Langan said there were a couple of spice bills . #3 . 3 : 18 :42 PM RECEIVE A BRIEFING REGARDING THE TRANSPORTATION DIVISION' S WORKLOAD, PRIORITIES AND RESOURCES . View Attachments 11 - 1 PROCEEDINGS OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH WORK SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2011 Tim Harpst, Frank Gray and David Everitt briefed the Council with attached handouts . Councilmember Love asked what type of public processes would there be between now and the spring for the Sunnyside Avenue project . Mr. Harpst said a kick-off meeting would be held to review what was planned and then meetings with the Community Councils . Councilmember Simonsen asked that a bike lane be placed on 1300 East . Mr. Harpst said some changes could be made in areas along 1300 East but they would not be consistent and could cause more safety problems . Councilmember Love said Council Members were very interested creating new ways to create multi uses on roads . #4 . 4 : 02 : 03 PM DISCUSS PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE CITY' S ZONING REGULATIONS RELATING TO URBAN EQUIPMENT (E. G. SOLAR PANELS AND WIND TURBINES) RELATED PROVISIONS OF TITLE 21A - ZONING - MAY ALSO BE AMENDED AS PART OF THIS PETITION. PETITIONER MAYOR RALPH BECKER, (SUSTAINABLE CITY CODE INITIATIVE) , PETITION NO. PLNPCM2010-01337 . View Attachments Janice Jardine, Cheri Coffey and Ray Milliner briefed the Council with the attached handout . Mr. Milliner asked the Council if a citizen wanted to demolish a home and use the property for a garden would the owner need to go through mitigation process . #5 . 4 :27 : 37 PM DISCUSS PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE CITY' S ZONING REGULATION RELATING TO GREENHOUSES, COLD FRAMES AND HOOP HOUSES FOR GARDENING AND SMALL SOLAR AND WIND ENERGY SYSTEMS (E.G. SOLAR PANELS AND WIND TURBINES) RELATED PROVISIONS OF TITLE 21A - ZONING - MAY ALSO BE AMEND AS PART OF THIS PETITION. PETITIONER MAYOR RALPH BECKER, (SUSTAINABLE CITY CODE INITIATIVE) , PETITION NO. PLNPCM2010-01338 . View Attachments Janice Jardine, Cheri Coffey and Casey Stewart briefed the Council with the attached handouts . Councilmember Martin was concerned that the ordinance did not address accessory structures such as hen houses relating to size and lot coverage . Councilmember Love asked staff to check Chapter 8 for this . #6 . 4 :46 : 31 PM RECEIVE AN UPDATE FROM SALT LAKE CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY LIBRARIAN BETH ELDER ON PROGRESS TOWARD BUILDING THE GLENDALE AND MARMALADE BRANCH LIBRARIES. View Attachments 11 - 2 PROCEEDINGS OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH WORK SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2011 Russ Weeks, Elizabeth Elder, Hugh Gillian, Ella Olsen, Councilmember Turner and John McConkie briefed the Council with the attached handout . Councilmember Turner said he was in favor of the North Family site and recommended that the Administration purchase the property and begin the process . All Council Members were in favor. #7 . 7 :27 : 36 PM RECEIVE A BRIEFING REGARDING THE UPCOMING REDISTRICTING PROCESS WHICH WILL ESTABLISH BOUNDARIES FOR THE SALT LAKE COUNCIL AND SALT LAKE CITY SCHOOL BOARD DISTRICTS BASED ON THE 2010 CENSUS . View Attachments Karen Halladay and Ed Rutan briefed the Council with the attached handouts . Ms . Halladay asked the Council for direction on how they wanted to organize the project . She asked them what the criteria should be for selecting an external committee of community members and how involved the community should be. She asked who should set the Salt Lake School Board District boundaries and what would the policy guidelines be. Councilmember Love asked staff to come back to the Council with advice on an external committee and the School Board District boundaries . #8 . 6 : 00 : 23 PM RECEIVE A BRIEFING REGARDING AN ORDINANCE CLOSING AND VACATING AN ALLEY AS A PUBLIC RIGHT-OF-WAY ADJACENT TO PROPERTIES LOCATED AT 1575 SOUTH STATE STREET, 1631 SOUTH STATE STREET AND 127- 135 EAST 1700 SOUTH PURSUANT TO PETITION NO. PLNPCM 2010-00013 (SALT LAKE COMMUNITY COLLEGE) . (Item H1)View Attachments Jennifer Bruno, Ana Valdemoros and Nick Norris briefed the Council with the attached handouts . #9 . RECEIVE A REPORT FROM TIM BROWN, TRACY AVIARY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, REGARDING NEW EXHIBITS CONSTRUCTED IN 2010 AND AN INTRODUCTION OF 2011 PROJECTS. This issue was not discussed. #10 . 5 :27 : 07 PM INTERVIEW ELIZABETH BARLOW GUPTA PRIOR TO CONSIDERATION OF HER APPOINTMENT TO THE LIBRARY BOARD. (ITEM H3) #11 . INTERVIEW LUANA CHILELLI PRIOR TO CONSIDERATION OF HER APPOINTMENT TO THE LIBRARY BOARD. (ITEM H4) Councilmember Love said Ms . Gupta' s and Ms . Chilelli' s names would be forwarded to the consent agenda. 11 - 3 PROCEEDINGS OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH WORK SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2011 #12 . 6 : 17 :46 PM INTERVIEW CURTIS LINTON PRIOR TO CONSIDERATION OF HIS APPOINTMENT TO THE HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION. (ITEM H5) #13 . INTERVIEW MOISES PROSPERO PRIOR TO CONSIDERATION OF HIS APPOINTMENT TO THE HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION. (ITEM H6) Councilmember Love said Mr. Linton' s and Mr. Prospero' s names would be forwarded to the consent agenda. #14 . HOLD A DISCUSSION WITH ADMINISTRATION REGARDING LAND USE MASTER PLAN NEEDS AND PRIORITIES FOR THE CITY. This issue was not discussed. #15 . COUNCIL MEMBERS WHO HAVE ATTENDED OUT-OF-TOWN CONFERENCES OR SITE VISITS WILL PROVIDE BRIEF REPORTS ON THEIR OBSERVATIONS . This issue was not discussed #16. CONSIDER A MOTION TO ENTER INTO CLOSED SESSION TO DISCUSS COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PURSUANT TO UTAH CODE § 52-4-204, FOR ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PURPOSES: (a) A STRATEGY SESSION TO DISCUSS COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PURSUANT TO UTAH CODE §54-2-205 (1) (B) ; (b) A STRATEGY SESSION TO DISCUSS THE PURCHASE, EXCHANGE, OR LEASE OF REAL PROPERTY (INCLUDING ANY FORM OF WATER SHARES) WHEN PUBLIC DISCUSSION OF THE TRANSACTION WOULD DISCLOSE THE APPRAISAL OR ESTIMATED VALUE OF THE PROPERTY UNDER CONSIDERATION OR PREVENT THE CITY FROM COMPLETING THE TRANSACTION ON THE BEST POSSIBLE TERMS PURSUANT TO UTAH CODE §52-4-205 (1) (C) ; (c) A STRATEGY SESSION TO DISCUSS PENDING OR REASONABLY IMMINENT LITIGATION PURSUANT TO UTAH CODE § 52-4-205 (1) (c) ; (d) A STRATEGY SESSION TO DISCUSS THE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY (INCLUDING ANY FORM OF WATER RIGHT OR WATER SHARES) IF (1) PUBLIC DISCUSSION OF THE TRANSACTION WOULD DISCLOSE THE APPRAISAL OR ESTIMATED VALUE OF THE PROPERTY UNDER CONSIDERATION OR PREVENT THE CITY FROM COMPLETING THE TRANSACTION UNDER THE BEST POSSIBLE TERMS, (2) THE CITY PREVIOUSLY GAVE NOTICE THAT THE PROPERTY WOULD BE OFFERED FOR SALE, AND (3) THE TERMS OF THE SALE ARE PUBLICLY DISCLOSED BEFORE THE CITY APPROVES THE SALE; 11 - 4 PROCEEDINGS OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH WORK SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1 , 2011 (e) A STRATEGY FOR ATTORNEY-CLIENT MATTERS THAT ARE PRIVILEGED PURSUANT TO UTAH CODE §78B-1-137 . 7 rid i0 PU: _ _)'1'.lc-_I cmb _ c err ol.i Co,incjimmber Simon,ass seconded t -- go into Closed Session, al ru11 cnli Coto was roJ: n, which a] 1 members voted ave . Th meeting a_burned at F : 0' n.m. _ 1 -;' � c,corde' — — — rJ� (t)�v/ 'BRAT This doc ment along, with the digital recording constitute the official minutes of the City Council Work Session meeting held February 1, 2011 . cm 11 - 5 • v ) 3 WORKLOAD & PROJECT PRIORITIES Transportation Division January, 2011 __, DAILY WORKLOAD ' There are 16 positions in the Division. Little time is available for special projects since the great majority of their time is dedicated to routine, daily work such as: Responding to the public's service requests involving data collection and traffic control investigations (270 annually) Reviewing and issuing traffic barricade control permits (1,400 annually) and meter bagging permits (400 annually) Reviewing and issuing permits for special events Administering the Residential Parking Permits Program (9 areas) and issuing permits (3,500 annually) Administering the Street Light Program (15,000 street lights, 3 annual assessment areas) Administering the Orange Flag Program (223 crosswalks) Administering the Banner Program, Pedestrian Safety Program and SLC Green Vehicle Program (Ongoing) Operating the Traffic Signal Control Center (55 hours/week), coordinating with UDOT/County Designing new and upgraded traffic signals (4/year) Advising Planning Commission, Board of Adjustment, Downtown Alliance on transportation issues (300 issue reviews) Staffing One-Stop, Development Review Team (daily) Performing street design reviews (100 annually) and development plan reviews (2,500 annually) Maintaining/updating street striping plans and providing in-the-field oversight for street striping and signing projects Developing and operating trails and on-street bike lanes Locating and installing bike racks (50 annually) Coordinating safe routes, school zones, parking and traffic issues with all private and public schools Staffing and preparing info for Transportation Advisory Board and MBAC Coordinating with UDOT on roadway and signal issues Coordinating with UTA on bus route/stop issues, light rail operation, planning, design Coordinating with Wasatch Front Regional Council on planning and programming Coordinating with Contractors and City departments on construction projects in the public way Coordinating with City departments on Accela use and development Maintaining the Division website Responding to the public's requests for information on all of the above 1 Salt Lake City Transportation Division 2010 Transportation Division Trarnlortatlorr Director tars Rapist P .PTOF I ■ Planning Operations Traffic Engineering * Non-Motorized harts.Planning Engineer Kevin Young P.E. Engineer kart Orson Pt.PTOE Oty Traffic Engineer Saott Vatenaus P.F. Wansportation Walls Coordinator Dan Demential P.E. Design al Development I. Signal Timing 'traffic investigations 1 Eng.Tear.VI Party VI SI1 TLC.Director Toni Stele St Wilk Tech II Ro[t Simpson BNte/Pedestrlan Safety • St 'Wank Teel n Norm Weiss CC.C.Operator tt Bryan Medren Sr.Traffic Tear Ric Mond° Sr.TraTIK Ara Dodd Pratt Pe6JMke t oaro. Derma Poor Sr.Traffkller tamer nttsotl 11. Administrative Services r + Street Light 1 Olnoe Tech N Array Petal, Permit Parking EllNprleer IV Me Bury P.E. S.I.C. Division of itanspoitatlon 349 South 200 East,Sutte ISO PO Box 145502 Salt Lace City,Utah 811145502 Phone=535-6630 Fax =535.6019 www sktrans.com 16 Full Time Employees 2 ACTIVE PROJECTS These are projects currently being worked on maximizing budgeted resources. PROJECT LEAD CONTACT STATUS/TIMELINE Parking Pay Stations Scott V RFP published 1/13. Pre-proposal meeting held 1/26. Bids due 2/23. Early schedule: interview/select contractor Mar/Apr, 90-day test of 50 units downtown in summer, implement citywide by end of 2011 Parking Management Study Kevin Y Kickoff meetings held 11/9-10. Vision/Mission/12 Guiding Principles drafted 1/11 Schedule: Consultant crafting organization options Jan/Feb. City review Feb/Mar. Present recommendations Mar/Apr. Bike-Sharing Becka R Currently drafting RFP for 9 stations/80 bikes. Discussing w/ Downtown Alliance their being the contracting agent for pilot. Submitted Budget Amendment request for $25,000 for program match. City to seek sponsor funding for as much as $600,000, if system is purchased. Main Street shared bike lanes Becka R Implemented. Needs final field review Advertising on Public Way Becka R Ordinances drafted. Discussed once by Planning Commission. Seeking recommendation to forward to City Council. Ordinance change would allow sponsor funding on bike-sharing kiosks and funding for bus shelters. Bicycle Friendly Communities Becka R Ongoing data compilation for annual reporting Program Bicycle Facilities Expansion Becka R Ongoing planning for approximately 10 projects next year 3 {kF Bicycle Boulevard Becka R Submitted a CIP proposal for implementation on 600 East. Need to refine the work that will be done to create the BB. Bicycle Street connecting Kurt L, Becka R Crafting a proposal. Will need to begin public process. If successful, possible Downtown and U of U testing this summer subject to funding. North Temple bikeway Dan B, Becka R. Design of bikeway markings / signs along light rail section and design. And implementation of dedicated and green shared lanes from State Street to new viaduct this summer Jordan River Trail — North Dan B Contractor selected. Construction to be complete by summer. Perform oversight, funding, coordination with Davis County, minor design details regarding striping or signage until project completion in Spring 2011 Jordan River Trail over UPRR Dan B Meetings underway with UPRR, UDOT and City Engineering to finalize crossing type and begin design. Need to secure construction funding. City Creek Canyon Road/Trail Dan B Working with Public Utilities to develop plan to add new signs and pavement markings in City Creek Canyon. Public meetings to discuss canyon safety. Summer/Fa112011 completion 900 South & Surplus Canal Dan B Coordinating with several City Departments to plan for trail and development of Trails adjacent land. Working with National Park Service on public outreach. Developing short term project to pave trail on rail line while planning work is done. Desired to pave trail from Redwood to 700 West and provide trail/bikelane connection from 700 West to 200 West TRAX station. Parleys Trail Dan B Board member and City point person for project. Coordinate within city for trail planning and design. Install on-street temporary route signs this winter from 2300 East to 1700 East. 4 Trails Coordination Dan B Bi-Weekly Coordination meeting with City Parks/Open Space and City Engineering. Coordinate regularly with adjacent Counties, Cities, UDOT and UTA on Trails and Bike/Ped Issues and Program Development. Member of Salt Lake County Trails Advisory Committee. Staff Member of New Parks, Trails & Open Space Committee Bonneville Shoreline Trail Dan B Managing State grant for maintenance, oversee contracted trail maintenance Maintenance Project work, seek ongoing maintenance funding, Spring 2011 completion Federal Highway Administration Dan B Prepare report of findings from 200 South green shared lanes experiment Airport Light Rail Kevin Y Continual work on design and construction issues. Completion 2013. Becka R, Dan B Finalize design of multi-use pathway signage and markings this winter. Pedestrian Safety Becka R, Dan B Submitted recommendation to City Council for use of$228,000 CIP funds appropriated for pedestrian crossing protection. Grant Tower UPRR Track Shift Kevin Y Designing new 500 West and road connections for properties near new N. Temple viaduct. Submitted petition to close 800 West UPRR crossing.in trade for reconfiguration of tracks at Grants Tower. City Design Standards & Kevin Y Weekly coordination meetings with other departments. Policy Manual All Drafting manual content. Completion late 2011. 1300 East south of 1-80 Kevin Y Designing HAWK at Stratford for 2011 installation. CIP application Safety Project submitted for street overlay, curb and gutter and 2 crosswalk protections. Completion when funding approved. 5 Energy Efficiency Block Grant Mike B 1,340 conversions completed Jan 2011 LED Street Lighting Street Lighting Program Mike B Sufficient sustainable O&M funding for lighting needs to be identified. Lighting needs to be upgraded to energy efficient fixtures. Master plan needs to be revisited to determine if current lighting levels are still desired. Transmittal submitted to brief City Council. Energy Efficiency Block Grant Kurt L Completed to date: data collection, existing downtown timing plan review, Traffic Signal Coordination non-downtown arterial timing review, computer modeling of synchronization, Development of recommended timing plans. Next steps: implementation of timing plans and fine tuning, check and verification of traffic delay/pollution reduction, final report submittal. Project Completion Date: Aug 2011. Traffic signal design Kurt L 2 replacement signals and 2 HAWKS — under design now through Feb 2011, bid spring and build summer/fall 2011 Emergency Management Kurt L November 2010 Tabletop Exercise, Jan/Feb 2011 Information Analysis Brief, Planning & Earthquake Exercise March 2011 SLSC, October 2011 Courses of Action Brief, March 2012 Full-Scale Exercise. Venue Evacuation Planning Kurt L Metro governments jointly developing comprehensive site evacuation plans. Target completion Spring 2012. Sugar House Streetcar Kevin Y TIGER II grant of$26M approved. Agencies meeting weekly to develop implementation schedule and interlocal agreement. Downtown Streetcar Kevin Y Presenting recommendations for preferred alignment to various organizations. Received federal grant for formal alternatives analysis to qualify for federal construction funding. 6 • Sunnyside Avenue — Kevin Y Fehr & Peers under contract to analyze options and conduct public process to 900 East to Foothill identify improvements to implement. Schedule: recommendations by late spring Implementing Downtown in Most Ongoing. Most recently lowered speed limits and added green shared lanes. Motion Master Plan 200 South Bus Station Kevin Y Ongoing work with UTA, RDA to find site, development partners Public Safety Building Several Ongoing coordination with consultants on design issues: access, parking, 300 Coordination East configuration, Traffic Garden State St shared lane markings Becka R Coordination and implementation with UDOT of shared lane markings and/or green shared lanes on state-owned roadways, especially on State St. between 200 South to North Temple. Bike Summit Bike Utah Bike Utah (formerly the Utah Bicycle Coalition) is moving forward with organizing a summit on April 29 from 8 AM to 5 PM at the Miller Campus of the Salt lake Community College. Andy Clarke from the League of American Bicyclists will be the keynote speaker. SLC Transportation staff has been asked to present. The Facebook invitation is up: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=136142136448945 Bicycle Map Becka R Almost complete. Targeting printing by 2011 Bike Summit. "ON DECK" PROJECTS" These are projects identified, but no resources budgeted to perform them. PROJECT Traffic Garden Placeholder pending to locate a traffic garden site on Public Safety Building plaza. Need to find funding, then proceed to design. Foothill Blvd. Project needs to be defined TRAX Operations Plan 2015 w/ UTA Joint review required as part of Airport LRT interlocal agreement with UTA, but no activity by either party Citywide Streetcar Master Planning Planning underway for first CBD line and design work underway for Sugar House line, but citywide master plan needs to be done South Davis Streetcar Little activity on project, but City needs to undertake process to define route alignment, station locations and cross-sections Pedestrian Safety Resurrect Pedestrian Safety Committee . Evaluate, test, implement new safety devices such as flashing warning lights, latching pedestrian push buttons Bicycle & Pedestrian Safety Education & Promotion This could include activities such as booths at safety fairs, weekend trail events, presentations at schools, bicycle rodeos, etc. Wayfinding Signs Find funds to rehabilitate system & update messages Downtown maps updated, but need funds to replace them. CIP funding requested. 8 k Bicycle Wayfinding Signs City-wide project identifying six key corridor routes and bicycle network throughout the City. Shared Bike Lane Markings Need to identify streets, host public involvement and perform design work for adding shared lane markings. Bicycle Detection at Traffic Signals Need to field evaluate problem locations, identify solutions, fund and implement Cyclovia, Open Street event Weekend bicycle/pedestrian event on city streets closed to motor vehicle traffic. Similar events in other cities have participation in the 20-30,000 range. Events are programmed with live music and other entertainment, police and barricading/signing is required to close streets and monitor cross streets. Bike Utah (formerly the Utah Bicycle Coalition) had hoped to piggyback an event on the 9th & 9th street festival, but the 9th & 9th organizing committee did not see this as an easy fit. Bike Utah is now considering options for a route; for a stand-alone event in 2012. Bicycle parking /welcome center at the SLC Airport To tie into North Temple project and Airport Trail. Trails: Determine Locations for new paved and unpaved trails Log Existing Trail Signs and Develop City Trail Sign Standards Map Proposed Trails Based on City Master Plans Collect Trail User Volume Counts Help Public Utilities eliminate unofficial trails Create and Maintain Trails Page on City Website Cycle Tracks Would like to plan one downtown 9 Ped/Bike Master Plan update 2004 plan needs updating. CIP request submitted. Maintaining ped/bike crash data Not occurring due to lack of resources SLC Green Vehicle Program Program/Ordinance revisions needed to account for cleaner vehicles & new state rules for C plates. Ordinance governing use and control of oddball wheeled vehicles Need exists for ordinance governing allowable use of motorized and non-motorized skateboards, mini-bikes, rollerblades, etc. Some work on locations and allowable use done. Electronicizing hard paper traffic studies records Older records and data collection info should be converted to electronic records to facilitate use and retention Traffic signal timing plan updates Very minor capability due to position cut so Sorted by Council Area Crossing Street/Coordinate [Speed Limit ADT Travel Lanes I Median Qualifying Level CBD*or SHBD? Unique Priority Improvment I Estimated Cost Council Area 600 North 1400 West 35 15800 5 5 1 LED Signs $7,500 1 00 North 800 West 35 15800 5 5 1 LED Signs _ $7,500 1&3 900 West Freemont Ave(1100 South) 35 13000 5 5 Park&Church 1 LED Signs $7,500 2 900 West Fayette Ave.(970 South) 35 13000 5 5 Park&Skate Park 1 LED Signs $7,500 2 1700 South 1300 West 40 7300 5 Y 3,4 Regional Park 1 LED Signs $7,500 2 200 South 50 West 25 12001 5 5 CBD Existing Flashers 1 Activation Bollards $6,000 4 200 South _150 East 25 19500 5 5 _ CBD Ped Volumes 1 LED Signs/Bollards $13,200 4 _ 200 South 150 West 25 12001 5 5 CBD Ped Volumes 1 _LED Signs/Bollards $13,200 4 200 South 250 East 25 19500 5 5 CBD 1 LED Signs/Bollards_ $13,200 4 200 South 350 West 25 12001 5 5 _ CBD 1 LED Signs/Bollards $13,200 4 200 South Rio Grande(450 West) 25 12001 5 5 CBD Trax Crossing 1 LED Signs/Bollards $13,200 4 _ 200 South 550 West 25 ? 4 Y 3,4 CBD Trax Station 1 LED Signs/Bollards $13,200 4 400 West 150 South 25 12001 4 Y 3,4 CBD Trax Station 1 _LED Signs/Bollards $13,200 4 _ 100 South Rio Grande(450 West) 25 ? 5 CBD In Mall 1 _LED Signs/Bollards $26,400 4 West Temple Pierpont Ave.(240 South) 25 15001 7 _ 5 Existing Flashers 1 Activation Bollards $6,000 4 West Temple Market St.(340 South) 25 15001 7 5 _ Existing Flashers 1 Activation Bollards $6,000 4 1300 South Richards St.(40 West) 35 15001 5 5 _ Stadium 1 LED Signs $7,500 5 2100 South 600 East 30 12001 4 5 1 LED Signs $7,500 5&7 2300 East Garfield Ave.(1850 South) 35 10300 3 3,4 1 LED Signs $7,500 6 2100 South 1900 East 30 _ 15001 4 5 1 _ LED Signs $7,500 6&7 2100 South 1200 East 30 16600 5 5 _ SHBD 1 LED Signs $7,500 7 100 South Lincoln St.(945 East) 30 16600 5 _ 5 SHBD Senior Apts. 1 LED Signs $7,500 7 Parley's Way Maywood Dr(2400 South) 40 ? 5 _ 5 _ 1 LED Signs $7,500 7 Parley's Way Stringham Ave. 40 ? 5 5 1 LED Signs $7,500 7 Total $234,300 2 - 1 -// Sw SALT LAKE CITY COUNCIL STAFF REPORT DATE: January 27, 2011 SUBJECT: Petition No. PLNPCM2010-01337 -Proposed changes to the City's zoning regulations relating to urban farms, community gardens, seasonal farm stands, and large renewable energy generation equipment(e.g. solar arrays and large wind turbines or windmills) AFFECTED COUNCIL DISTRICTS: • If the ordinance is adopted the zoning regulation changes would affect Council Districts citywide. STAFF REPORT BY: Janice Jardine,Land Use Policy Analyst ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. Community Development Department, Planning Division AND CONTACT PERSON: Ray Milliner, Principal Planner KEY ELEMENTS: A. An ordinance has been prepared for Council consideration that would change the City's zoning regulations relating to urban farms, community gardens, seasonal farm stands)and large renewable energy generation equipment(e.g. solar arrays and large wind turbines or windmills).Key elements are summarized below. (Please see the proposed ordinance for details.) 1. New definitions are provided for—community garden, seasonal farm stand,urban farm(income earning food production), large wind energy system, and solar array(interconnected solar panels or cells). (pg. 8) 2. The uses will be allowed as permitted or conditional uses in the Residential, Commercial, Downtown, Gateway, Manufacturing and Special Purpose Zoning Districts. Urban farms will be allowed as a home occupation in Residential zoning districts. 3. Specific criteria and regulations intended to address potential negative impacts are identified for each use. Examples include: a. Community gardens, seasonal farm stands and urban farms: • storage/disposal; delivery,pick-up,parking; hours of operation and on site sales/events; fencing, and licensing(pgs. 1-5) b. Solar arrays and large wind energy systems: • Setbacks,height and lot size;noise, lighting, signage; solar easements,and non-maintained or abandoned equipment(pgs. 5-7) B. The Planning staff reports, dated June 23 &July 28, 2010,provide the following information relating to the proposed uses. 1. Urban Farms a. Urban farms would be allowed within commercial and residential zoning districts. Concerns raised by the public, staff and consultants relate to the commercial aspect of the farm in residential zones. Although commercial in nature, urban farms can be very small in size and 1 ) can be located in the rear yard of a single family residence. This use can be a significant source of revenue for an individual selling produce to restaurants or other people. b. The changes will allow an individual operating an urban farm as a home occupation to sell produce from the residence. Currently,the sale of produce is not allowed in residential zoning districts.Employees would be allowed at an urban farm in non-residential districts. 2. Community Gardens a. Community Gardens would be allowed within most zoning districts. b. The impact of a community garden would be similar to those of an urban farm.Most issues are associated with the impacts of the use on adjacent properties such as parking,noise,and 1101 activities not directly related to the gardening use. c. Specific criteria and standards are identified to address these issues. 3. Seasonal Farm Stands a. Seasonal farm stands will be allowed on collector and arterial streets,not on smaller residential streets in order to reduce impacts on residential neighborhoods. b. The Business Advisory Board expressed concerns relating to the ability of the fanner to sell a product without first obtaining the necessary permits and approvals from the Department of Agriculture. Staff researched the issue and found that seasonal farm stands are excluded from regulation by both the U.S.Department of Agriculture and the County Health Department provided certain standards are met. 4. Solar Arrays a. Solar arrays will be allowed only in zoning districts where they can be built on large expanses of land with limited shading. The effectiveness of the arrays diminishes significantly when shaded. Screening,landscaping and other common techniques for mitigating visual impacts are not viable for the arrays and will not be required. b. To address potential impacts of solar panels on adjacent properties,these uses will be limited by distance,scale and type of use. 5. Large Wind Energy Systems a. Large Wind Energy Systems will be allowed in non-residential zoning districts and on large lot areas that would provide a buffer between uses. The primary issue with large wind energy systems is size and location. b. In zones where the impacts are more pronounced,large wind energy systems will be reviewed by the Planning Commission as a conditional use. This will provide policy makers with an opportunity to impose conditions to mitigate harmful impacts on adjacent properties. c. In order to operate efficiently,large wind turbines must be located in windy areas. Salt Lake City has very few locations where there is sufficient wind to warrant installation of a turbine. These locations are generally in residential neighborhoods where the impacts of the towers would be significant. d. It is unlikely that there will be many large wind energy systems built in the near future,but with the increasing emphasis on finding alternative power sources and the likelihood that technological advances will make windmills viable in less windy areas,it is anticipated that there will be a market for wind energy systems in the proposed zoning districts. C. The Administration's paperwork provides detailed information relating to the proposed zoning regulations.Key points are summarized below. (Please see the Administration's transmittal letter and Planning staff reports for details.) 1. The proposed zoning regulations are part of the Mayor's Sustainability Code Initiative to CO encourage sustainable living practices throughout the City. 2 2. Promoting sustainability by encouraging local food production and renewable energy systems are intended to reduce the need for imported foods, create new sources of affordable energy and reduce environmental impacts from transportation and air pollution. 3. The proposed regulations include standards to mitigate adverse impacts on neighboring property owners and clarify regulations that were not clear or concise. D. The Planning Staff report provides findings for the Zoning Ordinance Section 21 A.50.050—Standards for General Amendments. The standards were evaluated in the Planning staff report and considered by the Planning Commission. (Discussion and findings for the standards are found on pages 13-14 of the June 23, 2010 Planning Staff report and pages 14-16 of the July 28,2010 Planning Staff report.) E. The City's Departments and Divisions have reviewed the request. Recommended changes have been included in the proposal. • F. The public process included: 1. Planning Division sponsored Open Houses 2. Discussions with representatives from Wasatch Community Gardens,the Federal Department of Agriculture, County Health Department and the Business Advisory Board. 3. Notification of the Historic Landmark Commission and Planning Commission briefings/hearings to Community Council Chairs and the Planning Division electronic list serve. Notice was also posted on the City's website. 4. A majority of the issues raised through the public process have been addressed in the proposed zoning regulations. G. On July 28,2010, the Planning Commission unanimously passed a motion to forward a favorable recommendation to the City Council. MATTERS AT ISSUE /POTENTIAL QUESTIONS FOR THE ADMINISTRATION: Planning staff has noted an issue relating to demolition of residential structures to be replaced by urban farms or community gardens. This issue is not addressed in the proposal before the Council. The Administration will be prepared to discuss this issue and possible solutions at the Council's briefing The Council may wish to discuss the following items in further detail with the Administration. A. Solar Easements 1. At the June Planning Commission meeting,the Commission debated the possibility of making a solar easement between adjacent property owners and the applicant a requirement of approval for a solar array. 2. The Planning staff report notes that staff reviewed available information relating to solar easements and recommended that the Commission not change the proposed criteria for the following reasons: • The purpose of this language is to encourage solar arrays. Adding a requirement that an applicant receive solar easements from adjacent property owners may discourage the use,as it is sometimes difficult to obtain the easements. • Leaving the language as is makes the applicant aware of the need for an easement but does not make it a requirement. At that point, the applicant can decide what if anything they would like to do about it. 3 B. Riparian Corridor The Council may wish to consider if it may be appropriate to add urban farms and community gardens to the appropriate use tables in the Riparian Corridor Overlay Zoning District. 1. At the June Planning Commission meeting,the Commission discussed concern relating to the location of urban farms and community gardens in areas within the Riparian Corridor Overlay Zoning District. 2. The Planning staff report notes: 3. Approval of an urban farm or community garden in these areas would be permitted as grading and planting of non-invasive plants(which are allowed uses)because urban farms and community gardens are not identified on the use tables. 4. Development within each area of the corridor is defined by a use table wherein specific uses are identified as permitted or requiring a riparian permit process. MASTER PLAN AND POLICY CONSIDERATIONS: A. The Administration's paperwork and Planning staff report note the following related to Master Plan and Policy considerations: 1. The proposed regulations are not site specific and do not pertain to any single master plan. Promoting sustainability is a priority in Salt Lake City,and is addressed,or is scheduled to be addressed in all master plan documents in the City. 2. The proposed amendments are written to mitigate issues in potentially high-impact districts,while enabling sustainable uses in the various zones throughout the City. 3. The proposed text amendments are a priority for policy makers as they mirror current trends in community sustainability by providing alternates for renewable energy and food production systems. 4. The proposed amendments are consistent with current planning practices in that they create and maintain efficient infrastructure,foster close-knit neighborhoods,provide a sense of community and preserve natural habitat. • Additional citywide Master Plan and Policy considerations are provided below. B. The City's Strategic Plan and the Futures Commission Report express concepts such as maintaining a prominent sustainable city,ensuring the City is designed to the highest aesthetic standards and is pedestrian friendly,convenient,and inviting,but not at the expense of minimizing environmental stewardship or neighborhood vitality. C. The Council's growth policy notes that growth in Salt Lake City will be deemed the most desirable if it meets the following criteria: 1. Is aesthetically pleasing; 2. Contributes to a livable community environment; 3. Yields no negative net fiscal impact unless an overriding public purpose is served;and 4. Forestalls negative impacts associated with inactivity. D. The City's 1990 Urban Design Element includes statements that emphasize preserving the City's image, neighborhood character and maintaining livability while being sensitive to social and economic realities. Policy concepts include: I. Allow individual districts to develop in response to their unique characteristics within the overall urban design scheme for the city. 2. Ensure that land uses make a positive contribution to neighborhood improvement and stability. 3. Ensure that building restoration and new construction enhance district character. 4 4. Require private development efforts to be compatible with urban design policies of the city regardless of whether city financial assistance is provided. 5. Treat building height, scale and character as significant features of a district's image. 6. Ensure that features of building design such as color, detail,materials and scale are responsive to district character,neighboring buildings,and the pedestrian. CHRONOLOGY: The Administration's transmittal provides a chronology of events relating to the proposed zoning regulation changes. Key dates are listed below. Please refer to the Administration's chronology for details. • November 18,2009 Petition initiated • December 17, 2009&April 15, 2010 Planning Division Open Houses • April 12, 20010 Historic Landmark Commission briefing • June 23 &July 28,2010 Planning Commission briefings&hearings • Oct. 29, 2010 Ordinance requested from Attomey's office cc: David Everitt,,Bianca Shreeve,Karen Hale,Lisa Harrison-Smith,Art Raymond,Holly Hilton,Ed Rutan, Lynn Pace,Paul Nielson,Jeff Niermeyer,Tom Ward,Rick Graham,Vicki Bennett,Emy Maloutas,Frank Gray,Mary De La Mare-Schafer,Orion Goff,Les Koch,Larry Butcher,Craig Spangenberg,Wilf Sommerkorn,Cheri Coffey,Joel Paterson,Ray Milliner,City Council Liaisons,Mayors Liaisons File Location: Community and Economic Development Dept.,Planning Division,Zoning Text change— _ , urban agriculture uses(e.g.urban farms,community gardens,seasonal farm stands)and large renewable energy generation equipment(e.g. solar arrays and large wind turbines or windmills) 5 RECEIVED FRANK B. GRAY le\ 1 ^`.3� ,lic:f1) y U A .,� ttt 1 NOV 1 9 2010 RALPH BECKER DIRECTOR DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY&,FRBNQMIC DEVELOPMENT OFFICE OF THE J OLi�R2010 Salt Lake"amity Mayo 2Y DE LA MARE-SCHAEFER DEPUTY DIRECTOR SLC COUNCIL OFFICE SCANNED 1 ROBERT FARRINGTON, JR. DEPUTY DIRECTOR CITY COUNCIL TRANSMITTAL SCANNED BY: der DATE: 1\4q/� Date Received: I g o Davi veritt, Chief of Staff Date sent to Council: b TO: Salt Lake City Council DATE: November 16, 2010 JT Martin, Chair FROM: Frank Gray, CED Director SUBJECT: Petition PLNPCM2009-01337: Sustai ble City Code Initiative Relating to Urban Agriculture and Renewable Energy STAFF CONTACTS: Ray Milliner, Principal Planner(801) 535-7645 ray.milliner@slcgov.com DOCUMENT TYPE: Ordinance RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council hold a briefing and schedule a Public Hearing BACKGROUND/DISCUSSION: This petition is part of the Sustainable Code Amendment project initiated by Mayor Becker on November 18,2009. Attached is Mayor Becker's Vision for a Green City,outlining the Sustainable City Code initiative in its entirety. The purpose of the project is to amend the Salt Lake City Zoning Ordinance to create a series of regulations promoting sustainability throughout the City. Ordinance amendments for a series of sustainability components have been prepared and are being progressively presented to the Planning Commission and City Council in phases. The proposals discussed herein are part of the first phase of the project. Amendments for consideration feature changes to the use tables of the Zoning Ordinance relating to principal uses for urban agriculture and renewable energy including: A. Urban Farms B. Community Gardens C. Seasonal Farm Stands D. Solar Arrays E. Large Wind Energy Systems 451 SOUTH STATE STREET, ROOM 404 P.O. BOX 145486, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84114-5486 TELEPHONE: BO1-535-6230 FAX: 801.535-6005 WWW.SLCBOV.COM/CED ��� PLCVPL[D PfPcn The Planning Commission reviewed this petition and conducted a public hearing on June 23, 2010 and again on July 28, 2010. At the July 28, 2010 meeting the Commission forwarded a positive recommendation to the City Council. Because of its similarity with petition PLNPCM2009-001338, text amendments to the accessory structures chapter relating to urban agriculture and renewable energy, this transmittal was held until the Planning Commission took action on both. Master Plan Considerations These amendments are not site specific, and therefore, do not pertain to any single master plan. Nonetheless, the proposed text amendments are a priority for policymakers, as they mirror current trends and best practices in community sustainability, by providing alternatives for renewable energy and food production systems. These amendments are consistent with current planning practices in that they create and maintain efficient infrastructure, foster close-knit neighborhoods and a sense of community, and preserve natural habitat. Furthermore,these amendments are consistent with the stated purpose of the Zoning Ordinance, which is to promote the health, safety, morals, convenience, order,prosperity and welfare of the present and future inhabitants of Salt Lake City. The proposed changes to the ordinance will enable urban agriculture and renewable energy systems in various zones throughout the City as principal uses. The uses will empower individuals seeking to work more efficiently in community gardens and sell locally grown foods and products. This will lessen the need for imported foods and reduce the environmental impacts from transportation, air pollution etc. Amendments allowing renewable energy sources will enable citizens to create new sources of energy while lessening overall dependence on fossil fuels, which also decreases air pollution. Impacts from these uses are mitigated through the qualifying provisions for each use. They are designed to protect citizens from harmful impacts and to further foster responsible application of the uses while providing decision makers with an opportunity to mitigate impacts through the conditional use process, such as with large wind energy systems. PUBLIC PROCESS: The proposed amendments were reviewed at an open house on December 17, 2010 and again on April 15, 2010. Public comments received are attached as attachment B of the July 28 2010 staff report(attachment 5B). Between January and May of 2010, staff met with representatives from Wasatch Community Gardens, the Federal Department of Agriculture, the Business Advisory Board (BAB), the County Health Department and the Historic Landmark Commission to discuss the amendments. They have provided technical input regarding appropriate practice to regulate these uses while mitigating any undesired impacts on residents and local businesses. Staff has received a number of substantive and thoughtful citizen comments regarding the proposed text amendments. Suggestions have been very helpful, and have provided a good basis for the qualifying provisions of the amendment. The Planning Commission held a public hearing on June 23, 2010 the Planning Commission conducted an issues only hearing to provide staff with direction, and on July 28, 2010 the Commission conducted a public hearing. The Planning Commission passed a motion to transmit a favorable recommendation to the City Council. The vote was unanimous. RELEVANT ORDINANCES Amendments to the Zoning Ordinance and Maps are authorized under Section 21A.50 of the Salt Lake City Zoning Ordinance, as detailed in Section 21A.50.050: "A decision to amend the text of this title or the zoning map by general amendment is a matter committed to the legislative discretion of the City Council and is not controlled by any one standard." It does, however, list five standards, which should be analyzed prior to rezoning property (Section 21A.50.050 A-E). The five standards are discussed in detail starting on page 14 of the July 28, 2010 Planning Commission Staff Report (Attachment 5B). r .- 0....._., . .. ., .._ _. ... e • •-• _-...--- , ..- —.., ..-- — •.,-. _ __ -•--.- , • Da t t • ii- 1 - r 0 - iii 0 CO CD 1/1111111M11111 MI 1 0.. CD (1) CD 0 ! ' * —•czi, • .. 1 t , . • ,-..--, 0 : i -ill , • D -•••••• = = . 1 ' k ....... r•- - -.... • - . 'l • - .. 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Ali ft*CICTvw in, •••*p...."' 401 i I.: 40 .4. .", ".-4.s..•A 4,""1.NZA, • .....-.> "zi rriu.:11,11.zyi!imui i •-,... ago for ,k1 I ED]m_.ztz, ? i. , . . • _ . . . ..,., „.,„,,, ,.....,....,, „3,•,,.... s 110' Ie. .. wr vie i#111 z : Er 0:17 Ia_ a • ,.. . -.„ ." , • ,; .. . ..... „... • . .. t . 4._ .. 1 . 4. _ .y,'.7.ya: - -.4>S,b'w:'t. .x h12. ,i lrl...rFv %_ •fi= tAA"$9?-d. t u � �.r. a' + ` ,R ^+yo ,y* «,.9�.-rr .a+ti. y_ .._ .,, ,cf� <c ,� •^-, -2""th g am. ni:y 1tFZCLUCt �. r ! le .t """» "1 a / +s' e .. a 3 " P �� �` .._ Salt Lake City residents deserve a city to match the spectacular scenery.A green city is a place that uses energy efficiently. " .. *, It reduces, reuses and recycles its waste. It works to keep its air and water clean. A green city protects its open spaces as t', • , "• , x ecological and recreational treasures.It offers its residents healthy and efficient transportation and housing choices. .w ° * .* X By doing these things, a city becomes green: it becomes a highly desirable place to live, work, play, raise a family and own a , ,/a ,d',�, .I„ business. A green city is a place where people want to be because the quality of life is high. As a result, a green city is eco- z 4 „ts t _'',4iv it, ; nomically stable and less vulnerable to the ups and downs of national and global forces, such as the prices of imported fos- 3 sil fuels, over which city residents have little control. Salt Lake City can be one of America's leading green cities. In fact,Salt Lake City has the potential to be the greenest city in America. To improve Salt Lake City's green credentials,we must: • Reduce air pollution from sources both within the City and, with the cooperation of other cities; counties and the state,outside it. A�. ` j. ` ,-.:ii.r • Use energy efficiently and from clean, renewable sources. I'` `.'Ai, •_ ; . t t 1 • Develop convenient public transit and non-motorized transportation choices for residents and visitors that link open t I spaces, residential neighborhoods,downtown and suburban cities. ' 4 ) tfr • Preserve, improve and expand the network of open space and greenbelts throughout the City. ‘May$i'«mf + `er • Establish neighborhood centers for commercial and governmental services that foster walkable neighborhoods, reducing vehicular traffic and thus air pollu- tion. Salt Lake City's Sustainable City Code Initiative is one way to implement this vision. This project is a ground-breaking initiative to incorporate sustainability provi- sions into the City's development codes (Zoning, Subdivision and Site Development Ordinances). The revised codes will contribute to making Salt Lake City one of the most sustainable communities in the country. The Sustainable City Code Initiative implements the Mayor's Blueprint for a Green City in many ways. This Vision document indicates how the project will help im- plement the vision for a green city. z,.:;;S. 1 e �} ,Y~1.}... a*�1 4�r4a'tant Cl i fit M q'-i 't i Yi� �� 1: ,` H t� 4' 7 .i '.�r'y i��`-u h,p3-'tf,- «3z' ' .r f- - �-r av.?i? ^t$., �, ,t,..PtI+St. ', ,.4. 5'. _dot s. ,�* .n3! ':-atE+i....<..a`......... - - 'A'h. !::,_.4*j .Zt.'' •' $s . rMra„ s. ,__. s..... ...>ti . . .. .. .._ .. ..1," '1, - ..b. 1. Embrace public transit, cycling, walking and alternative energy vehicles By giving people easy and efficient options for moving around the City, we can reduce the amount of emissions that are put into the air in the first place. Transporta- tion choices affect our daily lives, from how quickly we get to work or back home again, to traffic congestion, to where there are convenient bus and light rail stops, to the safety of bike lanes, to how we get around town or from one town to the next, to how clean our air is. These choices also can directly affect business and com- merce entities,and even the amount of exercise we get in a day. The following points are things to consider: • We need to provide transportation choices for Salt Lake City residents(automobiles, light rail,buses, improved and safer bicycle lanes, enlarged and safer pe- destrian-friendly zones)to promote livability and to reduce congestion,reduce air pollution,and reduce the use of fossil fuels. • Salt Lake City should be enhanced as a regional and state hub by emphasizing mobility into and out of the City and accessibility to a variety of transportation choices within the City. • The walking environment should be enhanced so that residents can leave cars behind as often as possible or park in one convenient place to access many desti- nations on foot. A. Connectivity Connectivity is the connections within and between developments. The proposed con- J nectivity regulations are geared to ensuring that there are ample options for pedestri- ans, bicycles, and vehicles to reach destinations within a development, around a devel- opment and between developments. Increased mobility options can reduce vehicle miles traveled (VMTs)and thus greenhouse gas emissions,and promote healthy life- i i al ' .- I __ .. styles by encouraging walking and bicycling. I , , The proposed regulations require: -- . • Street and sidewalk connections between activity centers such as neighborhood D. - _ i commercial nodes,schools,and parks. "- - ='o • Internal access between adjacent non-residential uses to avoid unnecessary drive- �- r ,, t. = 1`: r ways which disrupts pedestrian movement. ;-, , ... �, , . ., • Sidewalks on both sides of the streets. ,, d �� '--- +," • Access to entrances of non-residential uses to public sidewalks,to transit areas,to ' �'' , �_�"" ` t �� s4.: park and ride lots, to parks and trails, to schools, community centers, libraries, ��,* ,_�r—,,, -,,-- places of worship and other similar activity centers. • Midblock walkways 4 ' '"al ays on large blocks t ,i ,.x • Designation of pedestrian access through parking areas to building entrances - � f '`" Y "- ,•, • Safe and convenient bike routes. '` ..' � '.' x , x s" z. ` �> Crosswalk with pedestrian flags on South Temple - - , `, ,:. .. .; -J 1 M1. - . ,-- n : l .,,,, ey 7,--w ` -/sc a = .:th i S .t .. Pl _ 6 :�r 1 r ill i.li i?4 r . ! '��Ia. i. , . • T¢ 1. Embrace public transit, cycling, walking and alternative energy vehicles (continued) B. Transit Oriented Development Regulations Transit Oriented Development (TOD) integrates land use and transit to help create compact, walkable mixed-use communities close to transit stations. It brings people,.,, jobs, and services together in such a way that makes it safe and convenient to travel by foot, bicycle, and transit as well as by car. In addition, Transit Oriented Develop- . ment can create lively neighborhood activity centers. C Salt Lake City has a great opportunity to promote sustainable development in concert 1 with its growing transit system. There is growing evidence that mixed-use, transit- , -- oriented developments can significantly reduce the use of automobiles and associ- t'''' ated greenhouse gases from burning of fossil fuels. r ' 1 ! , ,'' - ,x A The specific regulations of the new Transit Station Area Zones adopted by the City �' ' Council in August 2010 include: -! V I ,; l • Encouraging mixed-use moderate and high-density, economically viable devel- _ opments within walking distance of transit stations to increase transit ridership ,, and reduce use of automobiles and associated reduce greenhouse gas emis- '' t sions. -• 1 ,� i • Promoting transit-supportive uses that are high pedestrian generators that di- i E rectly promote greater transit ridership and opportunities for multi-purpose trips while discouraging auto-oriented uses. 11. i • Creating a pedestrian-friendly environment to encourage walking, bicycling, and ,; . e healthier lifestyles. f' • Creatingattractive, lively, and safeplaces for living,working,shopping, learning,y g, g, and recreating. 2 ► 1 • Providing a range of housing options for people of different income levels and at , ' _'' , �_ _ •, fj i different stages of life. x; : ,i , • Encouraging developments that are connected with surrounding neighborhoods � o ` N� r and compatible in terms of uses,scale,and other aspects. o • Incorporating engaging, high-quality public spaces such as small parks and pla- * , . , zas as organizing features and gatheringsurrounding -��-,��- **=4° "�'g g places for residents and ,, ���,�. =����;t...._� � _ , .._ neighborhoods. Mixed use development and transit stop on 2nd South t m •••_tie 6 .1 a +,II'N' ,*+.,' r1 t-'.-. -' ‘ .'4 ;:11 I (v.)+;.. 11, r�.-b+ j.' . \'1S'° •, '-: .l ` - - z xr, r. i,-+ • w . , ', 2. Plant a tree, save a life :A. 4, : ;.' ' ` 1.":7' ItiL''a 4 b ,,^0. , -� ? is '� , .•` .•,I r• Trees absorb carbon dioxide, the chief greenhouse gas, and produce oxy- ,', ' , ` '`� `�.v ' K• ' 'f gen. They also prevent erosion and water runoff, and they cool the air by 6ie`' �"'` producing moisture and providing shade. That keeps people and buildings k ✓' ' naturally cool, reducing our need for energy-consuming air-conditioning.A ="' w . '�► ..: /" ;.� .: continuous tree canopy helps reduce smog by reducing the amount of f ,_ s`y.,`•'' '' t ,. "' �h , A C heat radiating off roads, parking lots and roofs. In the winter, trees lower % • • "• ' ,• i• • • E . ' our heating costs by blocking winter wind. Trees provide key environ- ,,, 1 -,,,,.: mental benefits that increase community sustainability such as: , s ... • Absorb greenhouse gases. The U.S. Department of Energy finds a 30- ., ,, i + +1; ; �+ year old hardwood tree can sequester the equivalent of 136 pounds /i ;.��l�jlll ,�, �1��� toil •�l:. of carbon dioxide annually. "'�: " ,;, • Reduce the amount of energy used and costs associated with indoor ` ' ' ...-, ""' ' ��� cooling and heating by 30-40%, , _ • Reduce ground-level ozone concentrations by reducing air tempera- 1 __._ =- tures biologically, ` , -- • Provide buffers that can reduce highway noise by 50%, :. f p,, W„0..,�.�rx atr M4f:. ..., �,4:, • Reduce topsoil erosion, slow down water runoff, and act as pollution Tree shad@d sidewalk on South Temple filters,and • Shade lawns that can reduce the demand on irrigation water require A. Tree Protection ments by 20% While the City already has tree protection measures in place to protect trees in pub- lic places and on publicly-owned lands, Salt Lake City's regulations are not strong enough in protecting trees on private property. The proposed regulations specifically address the protection of specimen trees on private property as new development occurs. Specimen trees are those trees that in general add to the quality of life of the Salt Lake City community and the environ- ment by virtue of their size, quality,and species. The proposed regulations: • Protect specimen trees on private property when new development occurs. • Include options for protection of specimen trees, such as modifications in zon- ing setbacks in order to build around the tree,or • Require additional and larger trees to be planted beyond the minimum require- ment if the specimen tree cannot be preserved. . .!'y+teawn+.r.•a.c.z. �;amnw +a �, q, r a «� f�+*. rmw:,-x.< r • , • r!Q• e. .: ?`.e• . 'a. ! •i,) .1 l;e r`- ., ,. .r� :k r'?.., .-�h iz' .� �y.,.xh: . .`a 3. Make our buildings more energy efficient and use renewable energy resources. Most buildings in Salt Lake City consume energy inefficiently because they are older structures that do not have the most efficient mechanical systems, nor have they been retrofitted to minimize energy loss or to take advantage of passive solar design principles. The increased use of renewable resources could help mitigate the negative effects of air pollution and the use of costly, imported fossil fuels that are ultimately a finite resource and that contribute to global warming. A. Renewable Energy The proposed regulations address three distinct issues: • Require all new single-and twin-family dwellings to be"solar-ready,"that is, be equipped for the future use of solar power for electric power or hot water heat- ing. • Provide that all new major subdivisions be laid out to require a minimum percentage of the lots have optimal solar orientation for the installation of solar sys- tems. • Permit solar and small-scale wind energy systems as accessory structures in certain zone districts subject to compatibility and safety standards. Also, permit solar arrays and large wind generating systems as principal uses(e.g.,a ground-mounted solar array and large wind generating systems in appropriate zoning districts.), again subject to standards. The proposed regulations include: • Providing a priority hierarchy for location of solar collectors in historic districts. The installation of the panels would be more flexible where the panels are least visible from the street and the placement does the least damage to the historic structure. • Allow for small wind energy facilities where height is based on the size of the lot. • Allow Large Wind Generating Systems in appropriate zoning districts with criteria to address impacts. • Allow Solar Arrays as a principal use in appropriate zoning districts. • Require a percentage of Solar Oriented buildings in new large subdivisions. • Require solar ready buildings in new residential development. „, „H t Rooftop oat ty'inilf Lake City Photo Credit deltaMike@Flickr e-+''','"r p ,n„—+—"".""'"*+er "'"7"^Mr «", . ' i'""T. ' c sv:•'"' • if: a telik.ir „;1 1. e7 _ b "}' i is ,. ail '-';� y + t : may. 63 1:1,4 4. Promote Recycling and Minimize Construction Waste Recycling and waste reduction means fewer materials enter the landfill, thereby extending its life and also reducing emissions of methane, a land- , fill and greenhouse gas. For Salt Lake City, reducing waste will result in Reduce xk Recycle more tended efficient f landfillien life.sh collection services, longterm cost savings, and ex- '�(„.` � , : gf - sue• •It...�,• In a sustainable community, waste is considered as a resource to be used ; .. U., • and reused, not a problem to be disposed of. Communities, not just build- , "-i `' , is ings or the operations of homes and businesses, should be designed to - "' *'; P minimize and manage solid waste. A comprehensive solid waste man- i y,;. , agement program should incorporate: -. • Reduction of the amount of waste produced, A. Recycling and Waste Reduction • Reuse of waste materials where possible, and • Recycling of wastes. Salt Lake City has made great strides with its recycling programs by implementing Preventing waste at the source, through strategic purchasing by busi- private contractor service for approximately 7,300 residential homes per day/5 days nesses and citizens, can decrease the consumption of raw materials and a week, variable refuse rates based on container size, and municipally funded corn- energy during manufacturing, transportation, and disposal. Public aware- posting and waste operations. ness to this basic tenet of recycling, along with the basic platform within the City to allow for more recycling, reuse, and waste reduction will be The proposed regulations include: key in moving Salt Lake City forward on this front. • Requiring recycling station areas in non-residential and mixed use buildings (the size of the facility is based on the size of the building) and in multi-family devel- ..` opments(the size of the area is based on the number of units.) 'I r • Requiring centralized neighborhood recycling and composting stations in new 'I - 1 .. residential developments including built in kitchen recycling centers. 1.y!1 • Requiring existing development to meet the new standards as upgrades of a 1. * Apr • certain percentage are made. • fi /1\ 4 • _ • Allowing the conversion of parking or common space in existing developments '" t in order to retrofit for recycling areas(convert up to 3-6 stalls based on specific -e,ti�,4 ;4 , ,' 4 "." • $ - criteria.) 1��,,�, "` V. • Requiring construction waste management plans and encouraging deconstruc- r1. 4 li 6-"•tii"�` ,, tion plans and recycling/ reuse staging areas as part of the issuance of a demo- %ilk ,1„kt� -' '`�,_ 1 �.�° lition permit. 1 . '"�*� • Requiring that for all demolition applications for multifamily, low density resi- t i ,v, dential with 20+ units and non-residential development to include a plan to „r Ek F i `� , ` separate waste types. ti Salt L „: : 02 On , t , ,, idit:Salt L. . ,,,..,p 4 "rc f••�•• ..wan w.�rX7r W 5. Preserveacquire ' ,�"°; t s: ,�,j% It* . and open space ,t '�: r :,., ,.,,{ tact,.,re•_• u fir + y "L: AV'. Without a Big Picture plan for preserving and acquiring our precious open spaces, .' 'f0- - '';'. ;.'� Mp,,. our green spaces will "suffer death by a thousand cuts"as they are slowly nibbled • • '.n •, '• a +;q Y•.•.',.,r.# away.Along-range plan for both retaining our current open spaces and for acquiring "' "1'" " `' ' •�_ yt„`, 'K..41, '` additional ones is critical to our health and quality of life from both a recreational ".. 0. n!� Y; ;' ;': and an ecological standpoint. �,x 4 r 1., 4" 1C •„ ,4.A Ca ��, �"�' �+ Eta' :,ti y 14 A. Open Space Dedication Requirements �.� �. -= "' ;',' .�..�----- 'r rw� , ii: ..ail Salt Lake City has a history of public parks dating back to the dedication of the first I major public park in the City: Liberty Park in 1882. Well-located near the City's busi- - t i ness core close to workers and residents alike, Liberty Park stands as a shining ex- `' „ ample of public open space that serves a multitude of uses - passive, active, and - ''' ` � I E➢ ,' - urban green space. Today, the City's park system includes 71 parks of a variety of ` sizes and uses, totaling 172 acres. According to the Salt Lake City Parks and Rec- reation Recovery Plan, these parks provide a ratio of 1.24 acres to every 1000 resi- L f 'x'n i K 11ydents. In addition, Salt Lake City is blessed with access to the multiple-use public lands of the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management that provide numerous recreational options within close proximity to the City.These are coveted lands and continued access to them is important not only to Salt Lake City citizens and the thousands of recreationalists that visit the Wasatch Front every year, but to the economy of the City as well. But access to public lands and trails can be challenged by new developments,cutting off historic public access-an issue Salt Lake City understands. Future growth in the City's west/northwest region and in the foothills will place more pressure on existing open space and increase demand for more parks, open space, and potentially cut access to public lands. Moreover, desired redevelopment of higher density and mixed use complexes in established parts of the City will create demand and the need for a variety of new open space and recreational opportunities. To address community sustainability related to the provision of parks, open space, and access,the proposed regulations would require major new residential devel- opments to provide open space and parks as a condition of approval. This will help position the City so that if new development is addressing the demands of growth, the City will not see increased pressure on its existing open space and park resources, taxpayer money will not be spent on new growth but rather on other desirable lands to add to its system,and developments will have parks and open space in close proximity to serve its residents. Proposed Regulations include: • Requiring new residential developments to dedicate land for parks and open space in proportion to the demand generated by the residents of the project • Allowing up to 25%of the public land dedication requirement to be provided as private open space set aside for exclusive use of residents of the development; • Tailoring open space dedication standards for infill development by allowing alternatives to traditional parks and open space such as courtyards, plazas, green roofs, and community garden space,and • Preserving access to public lands through the use of incentives. i ��+• 1,1 . s ' r + .; 3� � •e 4 i 1i t r t . f i.l ,.i €�- xr '- 2,--, 6. Use Water Wisely Water supplies will be stretched even further in the region over •- ,,;0' ` the next several decades. We have tremendous untapped oppor- ' ,, lib,, tunities for wastewater ling and reuse (to irrigate golf courses, etc)and for thecchannel channeling and reuse of storms wa� ;- j'�' '.+ s , ,y4' ..4' , I. ,''4 ' r ', ter runoff. In addition, innovative urban water conservation F s/,t$Ma�`• �,�� ',' *.( 'r ' �.„ strategies must be developed that will sharply reduce our house- f. } `'� � 'r` "�.,+ 'l 'ar . r'r`• ''`'e" ' ' / hold water use. This ordinance will build on the City's past ef- ' ' forts to decrease water use and attain the ambitious water- consumption reduction goals in the water master plan thereby ,\ :i.'" ir' ►; I • ''' j 4.l,� ` . '• ' ;,0 reducing impacts on aquifers and riparian habitat while at the r ,. e,\�, ' f' ' - • ' ;. Ej •• ; ' same time greatly reducing energy consumption. { ' , , • , • •• .' .,.,•.. i� `! l ;". ti. /'�.0. � ., '• , 1, ( py4. •*,.A44,p .aI Pc +' ./'t, ...It ,r. • j .. y • '��..� '7 sir" 1 , ' ! • . �- ,I. l •t e�4♦ + t lr t" f' t:it r. ,.r`C.�. .x , ' � L 1 f `,. f / + --Jr "'t` !� `" ,,�a',-., . •/� r il."}i•' "V",,1,. i M1,..,, r � Water efficient landscaped yard in Salt Lake City A. Water Efficient Landscaping Because landscape irrigation is one of the biggest water users, many communities have adopted landscaping standards in their zon- ing regulations to address water conservation.The proposed regulations would replace and expand on the City's existing water con- serving regulations relating to landscaping and water conservation.The proposed regulations take a three-pronged approach to water conservation by: 1. Requiring plants to be installed according to watering needs(hydrazones)so that plants that have similar water needs are lo- cated together. 2. Establishing overall landscaping water budgets for non-residential and multi-family developments that penalize users that ex- ceed the water budget by requiring irrigation audits and increased water rates under the City's current water rate structure. 3. Adding more specific standards regarding irrigation system design and efficiency. Importantly,the new regulations would apply primarily to new commercial, industrial, institutional, multi-family, and common areas of large single-family subdivisions(10+lots). They would not apply to landscaping in existing developments or to most low-density residential developments. ... s.M:, Tw arr.,,rMR.wn.,+aN+W "'9"e'*.•".+^k'aRY•n'++rya�y„z•+r.+.ri w .... w »,.r•.-•.Fa....,,, ,...ti,,..,rw. . . _ ,Cngn.,.e.w.. .. ,nw'rt•i,w. '•5tt t y '.'_la. _ C • A^t..ir,rt11: r It',', 14,r_},p"il'os-'42. lejj I.ti _ , -- ' .. 'r 21't 7. Improve Air Quality Air quality is an overriding concern. To improve our air quality, we need to work within the context of federal and state law. There is no single solution to this difficult problem. It will take a concerted effort from all of the municipalities in the valley and region to bring about positive changes. Our continued economic prosperity is dependent upon having a city and region with clean and healthy air. Salt Lake City must take the lead and serve as a model in comprehensively reducing the amount of pollutants that are put into the air.Among other things, this means: • Making it easy and convenient for residents to walk, bike or take transit throughout the City. • Finding ways to ensure that housing in the City(near where most people work)is affordable so that driving is less necessary • Having zoning laws that carefully permit commercial and public centers in neighborhoods that complement residential areas • Providing incentives to builders, homeowners,and business owners to retrofit their structures so that they use fuels efficiently and/or use renewable and clean- A. Urban Agriculture -.�•. ,,.1.- , Local food production can save energy through diminished transport = a `'• needs and reduced reliance on mechanical equipment associated =- wk '•`" with large scale agriculture. Urban farms, community gardens and ! ,,. • ' farm stands located near where people live and work allows people to = "1 access locally grown produce without relying on private automobiles, . _ _` �_ - which in turn decrease green house gas. Additionally, urban farmers a, ti h and residents benefit as the local economy is enhanced and social impacts strengthen neighborhoods. Studies have shown that commu ... k ,i y t,,, s+e.. nity gardening increases community pride, property values, and per- '`1;t:,i' " '.e . ;' ° " ' t ' ,_.. .. sonal physical health,while reducingcrime and blighted lands. -%.• ' 4 ,'+ 2:4` N � e "rt • st ' ' S M14, , ?,. ' The proposed regulations ' { - "'.' • Allow accessory structures relating to urban agriculture with di- '~ • • .4, * . ' mensional and locational requirements in appropriate zoning dis- ,. , _ .,„`�.:,�-,i) 5" ram . + " - . tricts including residential z41 :� ' '.,-+� 4; ._ , , .r • Allow urban farm uses for food cultivation allowed in more zoning • districts including residential and commercial. �; r %' e'S $� �. ' >i rt • Allow residents to grow, distribute and sell produce from resides- ,' , •. ""'`''�,,;; '�k ` T, `"__-r • "; „.•- " , , tial zoning districts with qualifying provisions to mitigate impacts. ,',) s, .� „ ,,";� ,i r •�`w • *„ ,: •,r. .4;•: .i- , • Allow community gardens in more zoning districts and allow the =4 ".7 '. � __ ,- 4,4. ' `� ,, �;,` `�` Y' sale of food grown on site. "� � ' 'ems '; •* " trrt3E ";sfii` „ �r�' • Allow Seasonal Farm stands in more zoning districts but limit the ` •'• -4. his: `=, -,.. -= "t-,' .4., . -4- `-' -A . ;_ _ V. sale to locally grown produce. A community garden in Salt Lake City Credit:WFRC l �ft,4i i te,- �• �.{ frig �I,q�n.l !"� _. .L_'�.1� t�, ��j� ' f :kt•; .... 7. Improve Air Quality (continued) t. L 6. Transportation Demand Management ZF k 4 3w'7^• �� yuh1 Transportation Demand Management(TDM) refers to a variety of strategies that can '. k u' i} N4 • dr µ . be used by a city to influence travel decisions by residents and employees and ; " '.R r V,#e" thereby reduce vehicle miles traveled (VMT), alter driving from peak to off-peak peri- ` ods,and shift use of automobiles to alternative modes. Reducing the use of automo- �� � '" 4 �nF biles is a key to reducing greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate �i' t " `� �1�, • change and also to control air pollution that affects public health. In the United 4, States transportation accounts for fully 33% of CO2 emissions (the primary green r s `a •� house gas), and that percent is growing according to recent studies. Moreover, de- spite technological advances, VMT are expected to increase nationwide and in Utah. "E ;; :.:; � " �' ` Throughout the Intermountain West, sprawling growth patterns has lead to poor in- ' a to ration between land use and transportation. Between 1990 and 2007, the state 1 i i § '` of Utah experienced a 47% increase in population, but at the same time VMT in- creased 71%. 1 • , Proposed Regulations include: Bike parking at the Salt Lake City Main Library Credit:davidsilver@Flickr • Requiring bike parking with at least 50%of outdoor bike parking to be covered and to be located close to the main entrance. • Requiring bike lockers and showers on site for companies with 100 or more employees. • Ensuring car pool parking gets a preferential location. • Requiring minimum and maximum parking requirements for high density residential, in the Downtown area and in Transit Oriented Development projects. • Decreasing the parking requirement for development which includes more than 10 units,and where at least 20%of the units are affordable,senior or assisted living. • A maximum parking requirement with a conditional use out for certain types of land uses. • Allowing credit for on-street parking in all zones with criteria to mitigate impacts and where the on-street parking is located along the frontage adjacent to the use. • Requiring lease and sale prices of commercial and residential space to be listed separate from lease sale space of associate parking for the use. • Continuing to allow shared parking. • Requiring TDM measures for uses that are proposed to have more than 2500 Vehicle Miles Traveled per day, have 500 employees or students or have 100 units or more. Examples of the measures include * Facilities and Improvements(such as bike facilities,transit stops,onsite business centers,etc.) Parking Management(such as reserved parking for alter- native fuel vehicles,electric charge stations,etc.)and Alternative Modes of Circulation (such as transit passes,shared bike fleet,shared car fleet,flex work strategies, etc.) "4777 r+na.r.a"7°"a r r""'--."p'M'. +.rw.e grate;msmvc+ wen.,.r.cwq+w:r±+ ,mar; ..fir.w„�„ A t - • r . ! (: .. .l :A. r k r ,!e i _ ' � .r m .,,� {*. 8. Housing Diversity A key aspect of a sustainable community is that people have the opportu- A. Accessory Dwelling Units nity to live in housing that is located in close proximity to work,schools, services, and community activity centers ,that is affordable,and that pro- Accessory dwelling units (ADUs) have become an important component of the hous- vides a range of choices in terms of types(single family, multi-family, ing stock in many communities- both large and small - in the United States. By pro- etc.).As Salt Lake City continues to grow and demographics change,the viding housing on existing lots in developed neighborhoods, ADUs are a form of land demand for a sustainable housing stock will also continue to grow. Land use that makes good use of land and existing prices are rising in the Wasatch Region and land availability is decreasing public infrastructure investment. ADUs, so the challenge to develop work force housing will heighten.While the when located near employment and retail centers, help increase use of mobility alter- city is well positioned with numerous programs,the land use regulatory natives leading to a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and energy (fuel) use. strategies available to the city can make important contributions to build- Additionally,the changing face of the American public and its housing needs supports ing a sustainable housing stock. the inclusion of ADUs as a housing alternative. More people are aging, are "empty nesters", and desire to down-size. In addition, the work force continues to be chal- Some of the land use regulatory approaches that may support Salt Lake lenged to find affordable housing and ADUs can help address that demand. City's goals include: The proposed regulations include: • Removing barriers for constructing accessory dwelling units and • Allowing where single-family dwellings are allowed or where single-family dwell- "granny flats," ings exist. • Allowing more flexibility for various building types(town homes,du- • Limiting the size of ADU:The proposal is to limit the size of an Accessory Dwelling plexes,studios) Unit to ensure it is subordinate to the principal structure.The regulation would • Reducing large minimum lot size requirements in some residential limit the size to 50%of the square footage of the principal structure or 650 square zone districts.Allow smaller(<5,000)square foot lots and smaller lot feet;whichever is greater. splits for affordable housing. • Requiring Owner Occupancy: Require either the principal unit or the ADU to be oc- • Offering expedited review/permitting processes for affordable hous- cupied by the owner of the lot.The idea is that if an owner is on site,they are more ing development. likely to ensure tenants are not causing problems(such as noise, etc.)and will en- • Allowing mixed use developments by-right in appropriate locations sure the property is maintained. near public transportation facilities. • Limiting ADUs to one ADU per lot. • Providing density bonuses for developments including all or part af- • Requiring ADUs to be registered/ licensed with City. fordable housing. • Requiring one parking stall per ADU.As written, parking would be required but the Transportation Division could modify the requirement(such as allow Tandem Park- ing or no Parking)where certain factors are evident(such as where there is avail- able on-street parking, it is within 4 mile of a Trax Station, it is within walking dis- tance to a Business District area,etc.) • Allowing home occupations(such as an office) in an ADU, but not conditional �w.. . home occupations(such as music lessons or hair styling)where person would >,, come to house. ( • Requiring the ADU to meet height,setback and building coverage for the principal structure regulations of the zoning district. ,A, , �;,;' �"" 3 • Requiring the entrances for an ADUs to the back or side of the property.This is to enforce the subordinate nature of the unit. 1411101 Example of an ADU/garage `' Credit: Peterson Architects C4 ^ .hy, S ,q. y d . s:. } , f �' Yr1 ! [ . ! Ia �G, ,t ks�y "mot- .'� e I �' ':�C ti 1`.T.I�t� .� ,! ��t � t'h. .,fs �. aaw ss xyrt` ',y� :-. x z:ti 2 ..�. �:..:. '� '!�x� � � _. 4,e 9. Lighting To set forth lighting standards for outdoor uses that serve to create a safe and comfort- able nighttime environment,while protecting the public's ability to view the night sky. These lighting standards are designed to ensure personal safety and prevent motor R vehicle and pedestrian conflicts by reducing the negative effects of glare, light pollution ol �^' and light trespass. Fossil fuels—coal, oil, and natural gas—currently provide more than 85% of all the en- , ergy consumed in the United States. Nearly two-thirds of this is used to produce elec- r4 tricity. Energy generation from these fossil fuels is the single largest contributor to , , ' • greenhouse gas emissions. The vast majority of Salt Lake City's energy comes from Rocky Mountain Power (PacifiCorp) which generates 93% of its electricity from coal- • r powered plants. Salt Lake City's consumption of electricity has grown steadily over the past 40 years due to the city's growth and development. Nationally, U.S. residential per ,. household energy consumption has increased 39% since 1970 reflecting the trend to- ward larger homes and a greater variety of lighting, electronics, and appliances. Re- - cently, home energy use has been trending downwards,an encouraging sign. 4} , One of the major sources of consumption of electricity is outdoor lighting. Lighting was • estimated to consume about 11% of the total electrical demand in the residential sec- Full cutoff fixtures,whiCh;direct light downvi►�'rd,iCab retlu a fight tor in 2007. Large commercial establishments like shopping centers use huge amounts pollution CreditHolophane of electricity to light parking lots and other outdoor areas. Many communities throughout the West have adopted very strong controls on outdoor lighting in their development codes to reduce potential adverse impacts on surrounding properties,to preserve the dark western sky, and to reduce energy consumption. The proposed regulations include modern comprehensive lighting regulations that reduce over-lighting of sites, address hours of lighting, and other energy and dark-sky saving provisions.. The purposes of the proposed lighting regulations include: • Ensuring outdoor lighting that is adequate for safety and convenience; in scale with the activity to be illuminated and its surroundings; directed to the surface or activity to be illuminated;and designed to clearly render people and objects visible and contribute to a pleasant nighttime environment. • Providing safety and personal security as well as convenience and utility in areas of public use or traverse,for uses where there is outdoor public activity during hours of darkness; • Controlling glare and excessive brightness to improve visual performance,allow better visibility with relatively less light,and protect residents from nuisance and discomfort; • Controlling trespass light onto neighboring properties to protect inhabitants from the consequences of stray light shining in inhabitants'eyes or onto neighbor- ing properties; • Resulting in cost and energy savings to establishments by carefully directing light at the surface area or activity to be illuminated, using only the amount of light necessary;and • Controlling light pollution to minimize the negative effects of misdirected light and recapture views to the night sky. TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. CHRONOLOGY 2. ORDINANCE 3. CITY COUNCIL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE 4. MAILING LABELS 5. PLANNING COMMISSION 5.A. POSTMARK OF PLANNING COMMISSION NOTICE 5.B. PLANNING COMMISSION STAFF REPORT FOR JUNE 23, 2010 5.C. PLANNING COMMISSION STAFF REPORT FOR JULY 28, 2010 5.D. BUSINESS ADVISORY BOARD INFORMATION 5.E. HISTORIC LANDMARK COMMISSION INFORMATION 5.F. PLANNING COMMISSION MINUTES 6. OPEN HOUSE INFORMATION 7. ORIGINAL PETITION PROJECT CHRONOLOGY Petition: PLNPCM2009-01337 November 18, 2009 Petition received by Planning. December 17, 2009 Petition Reviewed in a Public Open House February 2010 Petition Assigned to Ray Milliner for staff analysis and processing April 12, 2010 Petition Reviewed by the Historic Landmark Commission April 15, 2010 Petition Reviewed in a Public Open House May 10, 2010 Petition Reviewed by Business Advisory Board (BAB) June 10, 2010 Planning Commission hearing notice was published in the paper and notices were mailed to adjacent property owners. June 23. 2010 Planning Commission reviews project as an issue only item, conducts a public hearing and provides staff with direction. July 28, 2010 Planning Commission held public hearing and voted unanimously to forward a positive recommendation to the City Council. August 25, 2010 Planning Commission ratified minutes for July 28, 2010 meeting. October 29, 2009 Staff requests ordinance from City Attorney's office. Staff received draft of proposed ordinance from City Attorney's Office. SALT LAKE CITY ORDINANCE No. of 2010 (An ordinance amending portions of Title 21A of the Salt Lake City Code concerning urban agriculture and large renewable energy site uses) An ordinance amending sections 21A.36 (Zoning: General Provisions), 21A.62 (Zoning: Definitions), 21A.24 (Zoning: Residential Districts), 21A.26 (Zoning: Commercial Districts), 21A.28 (Zoning: Manufacturing Districts), 21A.30 (Zoning: Downtown Districts), 21A.31 (Zoning: Gateway Districts), and 21A.32 (Zoning: Special Purpose Districts) of the Salt Lake City Code pursuant to Petition No. PLNPCM2009-01337 to recognize and allow certain sustainable uses and structures. WHEREAS, the Salt Lake City Planning Commission ("Planning Commission") held public hearings on June 23, 2010 and July 28, 2010 to consider a request made by Salt Lake City Mayor, Ralph Becker (petition no. PLNPCM2009-01337), to amend certain sections of Title 21A of the Salt Lake City Code to recognize and allow urban agriculture and large renewable energy sites as permitted or conditional uses in certain zoning districts, as set forth herein; and WHEREAS, at its July 28, 2010 meeting, the Planning Commission voted to transmit a positive recommendation to the Salt Lake City Council ("City Council") on said application; and WHEREAS, after a public hearing on this matter the City Council has determined that adopting this ordinance is in the City's best interests. NOW, THEREFORE, be it ordained by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah: SECTION 1. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.36 to adopt section 21 A.36.200. That the Salt Lake City Code shall be, and hereby is, amended to adopt section 21A.36.200 (Zoning: General Provisions: Qualifying provisions for an Urban Farm), which shall read as follows: 21A.36.200: Qualifying provisions for an Urban Farm: 1. Accessory Buildings: Accessory buildings associated with urban farms are subject to the standards in Chapter 21A.40, Accessory Uses, Buildings and Structures and the requirements of the International Building Code. Structures, such as coops and pens, associated with the keeping and raising of animals, livestock, and poultry must meet the requirements of Chapter 8.08 of the Salt Lake City Municipal Code, Keeping Animals, Livestock, and Poultry and are subject to the requirements of the adopted Building Code, when applicable. 2. Riparian Corridor: Urban farms proposed in a riparian corridor, as defined in Section 21A.34.130 of the Zoning Ordinance shall be subject to all rules and regulations therein. 3. Storage Requirements: All flammables, pesticides and fertilizers shall be stored in accordance with the regulations of the Uniform Fire Code and Utah State Department of Agriculture or successor agency. At a minimum, any area where such materials are stored shall have a continuous concrete floor and lip which is tall enough to contain one hundred and ten percent (110%) of the volume of all the materials stored in the area. No pesticides, chemical fertilizers or other hazardous materials shall be stored outside of buildings. 4. Disposal Requirements: All flammables, pesticides, fertilizers and other hazardous wastes should be disposed of according to Federal and State requirements. 5. Large Vehicles: No vehicles in excess of five (5) tons shall be kept, stored or parked on the property, except that such vehicles may be on the property as necessary for completion of grading performed in accordance with a grading permit issued by the City Building Services Division. 6. Hours of Operation: All urban farm related uses shall operate only during daylight hours, except for irrigation. 7. Irrigation Systems. Sufficient irrigation shall be provided to cover all needs of the urban farm. Irrigation systems designed for water conservation such as, but not limited to,hand watering, and drip irrigation are strongly encouraged. 8. Delivery and Pick-up: In single family and two family zones, delivery and pick-up of products is allowed provided pick-up times are staggered so that only one patron is on site at a time. 9. Parking: Unless otherwise approved by the Transportation Division, parking for employees, and patrons of the urban farm shall be provided on site, at a rate of two parking stalls per acre with a minimum of one ADA stall,unless within a single family or two family zoning district. All vehicular circulation, staging, and parking shall be on a hard surface. 10. On Site Sales and Events: Products produced or grown on urban farms may be donated or sold on site provided the following requirements are met; a) The sales stand may not exceed 100 square feet in size. b) Signs are allowed as temporary portable signs subject to the regulations in Chapter 21A.46.55 of this ordinance. Signs must be removed immediately following the sale each day. c) All necessary City business licenses shall be obtained prior to the sale. d) Sales stands must be setback a minimum of 10 feet from the edge of pavement of a City street. e) The sales stand shall be a non-permanent structure, and must be removed immediately following the sale. 0 Perishable foods must be stored in a vermin-proof area or container when the facility is closed. 11. Fencing: Fencing of urban farms shall comply with the standards in Section 21A.40.120,Regulation of Fences,Walls, and Hedges. 12. License: A business license is required for an urban farm. When the urban farm is accessory to a residential use, a home occupation license is required. SECTION 2. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.36 to adopt section 21A.36.210. That the Salt Lake City Code shall be, and hereby is, amended to adopt section 21A.36.210 (Zoning: General Provisions: Qualifying provisions for a Community Garden), which shall read as follows: 21A.36.210: Qualifying provisions for a Community Garden: 1. Accessory Buildings: Accessory buildings associated with community gardens are subject to the standards in Chapter 21A.40, Accessory Uses. Buildings and Structures and the requirements of the International Building Code. Structures, such as coops and pens. associated with the keeping and raising of animals, livestock, and poultry must meet with the requirements of Chapter 8.08 of the Salt Lake City Municipal Code, Keeping Animals, Livestock, and Poultry and are subject to the requirements of the adopted Building Code,when applicable. 2. Riparian Corridor: Community gardens proposed in a riparian corridor, as defined in Section 21A.34.130 of the Zoning Ordinance shall be subject to all rules and regulations therein. 3. Disposal Requirements: All flammables, pesticides, fertilizers and other hazardous wastes should be disposed of according to Federal and State requirements. 4. Hours of Operation: In residential zones, community gardens shall operate only during daylight hours except for irrigation. 5. Large Vehicles: No vehicles in excess of five (5) tons shall be kept or stored on the property, except that such vehicles may be on the property as necessary for completion of grading performed in accordance with a grading permit issued by the City Building Services Division. 6. Irrigation: Sufficient irrigation shall be provided to cover all needs of the community garden. Irrigation systems designed for water conservation such as, but not limited to, hand watering, and drip irrigation are strongly encouraged. 7. Parking: Unless otherwise required by the Transportation Division, community gardens shall be exempt from the off-street parking requirements of Section 21A.44, Off Street Parking and Loading. All vehicular circulation, staging, and parking provided shall be on a hard surfaced area. Any On-street parking is to comply with the existing roadway status. 8. On Site Sales and Events: Products produced or grown at community gardens may be donated or sold on site provided the following requirements are met; a) The sales stand may not exceed 100 square feet in size. b) Signs are allowed as temporary portable signs subject to the regulations in Chapter 21A.46.55 of this ordinance. Signs must be removed immediately following the sale each day. c) All necessary City business licenses shall be obtained prior to the sale. d) Sales stands must be setback a minimum of 10 feet from the edge of pavement of a City street. e) The sales stand shall be a non-permanent structure, and must be removed immediately following the sale. 0 Perishable foods must be stored in a vemiin-proof area or container when the facility is closed. 9. Fencing: Fencing of community gardens will comply with the standards in Section 21 A.40.120,Regulation of Fences,Walls, and Hedges. SECTION 3. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.36 to adopt section 21A.36.220. That the Salt Lake City Code shall be, and hereby is, amended to adopt section 21A.36.220 (Zoning: General Provisions: Qualifying provisions for a Seasonal Farm Stand), which shall read as follows: 21A.36.220: Qualifying Provisions for a Seasonal Farm Stand: 1. Location: A seasonal farm stand shall be located only along City streets designated as "collector"or"arterial"by the city's major street plan. If the stand is located within the public Right-Of-Way a revocable lease agreement from the City is required. 2. Parking: Unless approved by the Transportation Division, if the seasonal farm stand is located within an existing parking lot, it shall not remove or encroach upon required parking or loading areas for other uses on the site or impede access to parking or loading areas. All vehicular circulation, staging, and parking provided shall be on a hard surfaced area, any On-street parking shall comply with the existing roadway status. 3. Setback: Seasonal farm stands must be setback a minimum of 10 feet from the edge of pavement of a City street. 4. Size: A seasonal farm stand may not exceed 100 square feet in size. 5. Food Preparation: Food preparation is prohibited at farm stands, including food samples. 6. Signs: Sims for a seasonal farm stand are allowed as temporary portable signs subject to the regulations in Chapter 21A.46.55 of this ordinance. Signs are not allowed to be placed more than 50 feet from the stand location 7. Sales: Food crops and/or non-food, ornamental crops, such as flowers grown locally are allowed to be sold at a seasonal food stand. Prepackaged "shelf stable" foods produced in close proximity to the farm stand may be sold as well, provided they are fully labeled and produced in an approved health department or Utah State Department of Agriculture facility. 8. Animals: No live animals,birds, or fowl shall be kept or allowed within 20 feet of any area where food is stored or held for sale. This requirement does not apply to guide dogs, signal dogs,or service dogs. 9. Garbage: All garbage and refuse shall be stored and disposed of in accordance with established Health Department standards. 10. Storage: Perishable foods must be stored in a vermin-proof area or container when the facility is closed. SECTION 4. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.36 to adopt section 21A.36.230. That the Salt Lake City Code shall be, and hereby is, amended to adopt section 21A.36.230 (Zoning: General Provisions: Qualifying provisions for a Solar Array), which shall read as follows: 21A.36.230: Qualifying Provisions for a Solar Array: 1. Setbacks: A solar array shall meet all minimum setback requirements for the zone in which it is located. In no case shall a solar array be located less than 6 feet from a property line or other structure. 2. Height: A solar array shall not exceed 20 feet in height measured from established grade. 3. Landscape Buffer: No landscaped buffer yards shall be required on a site with a solar array as a principal use. 4. Code Compliance: Solar arrays are subject to review for compliance with all applicable International Building and Electrical Code requirements by the Salt Lake City Building Services Division. 5. Solar Easements: Solar easements are not a requirement for City approval; nonetheless, a property owner who has installed or intends to install a solar array may negotiate a solar easement with adjacent property owners to ensure perpetual sun on the property. Any easement agreed upon must be recorded by the County Recorder. 6. Electrical Wires: All electrical wires associated with a solar array. shall be located underground. 7. Nonmaintained Or Abandoned Arrays: The building official may require each nonmaintained or abandoned solar array to be removed from the premises when „fir such a system has not been repaired or put into use by the owner, person having control or person receiving benefit of such structure within thirty (30) calendar days after notice of nonmaintenance or abandonment is given to the owner, person having control or person receiving the benefit of such structure. The city may require a performance bond or other means of financial assurance to guarantee removal of abandoned structures. 8. Utility Inter-Connection: No solar array shall be installed that does not meet the requirements of Rocky Mountain Power for an interconnected customer-owned generator. Off-grid systems shall be exempt from this requirement. 9. Off-Street Parking and Loading: No additional parking is required for a solar array; however, a solar array may not replace or hinder existing required parking and loading. SECTION 5. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.36 to adopt section 21A.36.240. That the Salt Lake City Code shall be, and hereby is, amended to adopt section 21A.36.240 (Zoning: General Provisions: Qualifying Provisions for a Large Wind Energy System), which shall read as follows: 21A.36.240: Qualifying Provisions for a Large Wind Energy System: ., 1. Total Height: The total height of the large wind energy system shall be limited to 90 meters above existing grade or by FAA regulations, whichever dictates a lower height. 2. Minimum Lot Size: 2 Acres 3. Setbacks: A tower in a large wind energy system must be set back at least 1.25 times its total height from any property boundary, must be within the buildable area of the lot and at least 1.25 times its total height from any overhead utility power line; 4. Noise: Noise emitted from the large wind energy system shall not exceed maximum sound levels set forth in section 9.28 of the Salt Lake City Code (Health and Safety: Noise Control). 5. Blade Clearance: The vertical distance from existing grade to the tip of a wind generator blade when the blade is at its lowest point must be at least 15 feet. 6. Electrical Wires: All electrical wires associated with a large wind energy system, other than wires necessary to connect the wind turbine to the tower wiring, the tower wiring to the disconnect junction box, and the grounding wires shall be located underground. 7. Lighting: Lighting of tower(s) and turbine(s) is prohibited except where required by the Federal Aviation Administration. wre 8. Appearance, Color, and Finish: The wind turbine and tower shall remain painted or finished the color or finish that was originally applied by the manufacturer. 9. Signs: All signs are prohibited, other than the manufacturer's or installer's identification, appropriate warning signs, or owner identification on a wind turbine, tower, building, or other associated structure. 10. Utility Inter-Connection: No large wind energy system shall be installed that does not meet the requirements of local utility providers for an interconnected customer-owned generator. Off-grid systems shall be exempt from this requirement. 11. Nonmaintained Or Abandoned Facilities: The building official may require each nonmaintained or abandoned large wind energy system to be removed from the premises at the cost of the owner when such a system has not been repaired or put into use by the owner, person having control or person receiving benefit of such structure within thirty (30) calendar days after notice of nonmaintenance or abandonment is given to the owner, person having control or person receiving the benefit of such structure. The city may require a performance bond or other means of financial assurance to guarantee removal of abandoned structures. 12. Off-Street Parking or Loading Requirements: None. A large wind energy system shall not remove or encroach upon required parking or loading areas for other uses on the site or access to such parking or loading areas. SECTION 6. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.36.030.B. That section 21A.36.030.B of the Salt Lake City Code(Zoning: General Provisions: Home Occupations), shall be, and hereby is, amended to read as follows: B. Permitted Home Occupations: Subject to compliance with the standards specified in this section, the following occupations, that do not have the client come to the home, shall be permitted as home occupations subject only to approval by the zoning administrator pursuant to subsection H of this section: 1. Artists, illustrators, writers, photographers, editors, drafters, and publishers; 2. Consultants, private investigators, field representatives and other similar activities; 3. Bookkeeping and other similar computer activities; 4. Locksmith; 5. Distribution of products grown or assembled at home for off premises sales (such as g^'• z+ee, crafts, etc.); 6. Janitorial services; and 7. Mail order business or sales representative; and S. Distribution of products grown as part of an urban farm for on or off premise sales (such as garden produce). SECTION 7. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.62.040. That section 21A.62.040 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Definitions), shall be, and hereby is, amended, in pertinent part, such that each of the following definitions shall be added and inserted alphabetically into that section: COMMUNITY GARDEN: "Community garden" means an area of land managed and maintained by an individual or group to grow and harvest food crops and/or non-food, ornamental crops, such as flowers, for personal or group use, consumption, donation, or sale." LARGE WIND ENERGY SYSTEM: A "Large Wind Energy System" is a wind energy conversion system consisting of a wind turbine or group of wind turbines, tower, and associated control or conversion electronics,which has rated capacity of more than 100 kW. LOCALLY GROWN: "Locally Grown" means food crops and or non-food, ornamental crops, such as flowers that are grown within the state of Utah. SEASONAL FARM STAND: "Seasonal farm stand" means a sales table, area, or kiosk of food crops and/or non-food, an ornamental crop, such as flowers, that is located off-premise from the location where the food was grown, or when located in any agricultural district, and operates during-the time of year coinciding with the growing season. SOLAR ARRAY: A "solar array" (Systems of about 100 Kilowatt in size) is a principal use of a packaged interconnected assembly of solar cells used to transform solar energy into thermal. chemical, or electrical energy. A solar array uses solar energy for any or all of the following-purposes: (1)water heating, (2) space heating or cooling, and (3)power generation. URBAN FARM: "Urban Farm" is a farm where food is cultivated, processed and distributed in or around a residential or commercial area. Urban fanning is generally practiced for income earning or food producing activities." SECTION 8. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.24.010.Q. That section 21A.24.010.Q of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Residential Districts: General Provisions), shall be, and hereby is, amended to read as follows: Q. Omitted. sectionble OfPermittee n„d Conditional Uses For Residential Districts", of this chapter, shall conform to the following regulations: ith that of SECTION 9. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.24.190. That section 21A.24.190 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Residential Districts), shall be, and hereby is, amended to add the use categories of Community Garden, Large Wind Energy System, Seasonal Farm Stand, Solar Array, and Urban Farm to be inserted alphabetically in that table under the category of"Miscellaneous" and that the use category of"Community gardens"presently listed under the category of"Recreation, cultural and entertainment" in that table is omitted, as shown on Exhibit"A"hereto. SECTION 10. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.26.080. That section 21A.26.080 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Commercial Districts), shall be, and hereby is, amended to add the use categories of Community Garden, Large Wind Energy System, Seasonal Farm Stand, Solar Array, and Urban Farm to be inserted alphabetically in that table under the category of"Miscellaneous", as shown on Exhibit "B" hereto. SECTION 11. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.28.040. That section 21A.28.040 of the Salt Lake City Code(Zoning: Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Manufacturing Districts), shall be, and hereby is, amended to add the use categories of Community Garden, Large Wind Energy System, Seasonal Farm Stand, Solar Array, and Urban Farm to be inserted alphabetically in that table under the category of"Miscellaneous", as shown on Exhibit "C" hereto. SECTION 12. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.30.050. That section 21A.30.050 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Downtown Districts), shall be, and hereby is, amended to add the use categories of Community Garden, Large Wind Energy System, Seasonal Farm Stand, Solar Array, and Urban Farm to be inserted alphabetically in that table under the category of"Miscellaneous", as shown on Exhibit "D" hereto. SECTION 13. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.31.050. That section 21A.31.050 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for the Gateway District), shall be, and hereby is, amended to add the use categories of Community Garden, Large Wind Energy System, Seasonal Farm Stand, Solar Array, and Urban Farm to be inserted alphabetically in that table under the category of"Miscellaneous", as shown on Exhibit "E" hereto. SECTION 14. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.32.140. That section 21A.32.140 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Special Purpose Districts), shall be, and hereby is, amended to add the use categories of Community Garden, Large Wind Energy System, Seasonal Farm Stand, Solar Array, and Urban wwr'` Farm to be inserted alphabetically in that table under the category of"Miscellaneous", as shown on Exhibit "F" hereto. SECTION 15. Effective Date. This ordinance shall become effective on the date of its first publication. Passed by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah, this day of 2010. CHAIRPERSON ATTEST AND COUNTERSIGN: 21A.24.190: TABLE OF PERMITTED AND CONDITIONAL USES FOR RESIDENTIAL DISTRICTS: Legend: C= Conditional P= Permitted Permitted And Conditional Uses, By District Residential Districts 12- 12- R- FR-1/ FR-2/ ' FR-3/ R-1/ R-1/ R-1/ SR- SR- SR- R- RMF- - RMF- RMF- RMF- 12B MU- MU- MU RO Use 43,560 21,780 12,000 12,000 7,000 5,000 ' 1 2 , 3 2 30 35 45 75 35 45 Community Garden P P P P P P P P P P P P P P I' P I' P Large Wind Energy System Seasonal Farm Stand P P P P P Solar Array Urban Farm P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P Community burdens as C— C— C— C C C— C— C— C P P- P P P P P P- P defined in chapter 21A.62 of this title-aid as regulated by subsection 21 A.24.010Q-of this chapter 21A.26.080: TABLE OF PERMITTED AND CONDITIONAL USES FOR COMMERCIAL DISTRICTS: Legend: C = Conditional P = Permitted Permitted And Conditional Uses By District Use CN CB CS1 ' CC CSHBD' CG • TC-75 Community Garden P P P P p P p Large Wind Energy System P P P P Seasonal Farm Stand P P P P P P P Solar Array p Urban Farm P P P P P P P 21A.28.040: TABLE OF PERMITTED AND CONDITIONAL USES FOR MANUFACTURING DISTRICTS: Legend: C = " Conditional P = Permitted Permitted And Conditional Uses By District Use M-1 M-2 Community Garden P P Large Wind Energy System P P Seasonal Farm Stand P P Solar Array P P Urban Farm P P 21A.30.050: TABLE OF PERMITTED AND CONDITIONAL USES FOR DOWNTOWN DISTRICTS: Legend: C = Conditional P = Permitted Permitted And Conditional Uses By District Use D-1 D-2 D-3 D-4 Community Garden P P P P Large Wind Energy System Seasonal Farm Stand P PPP Solar Array Urban Farm P P P P 21A.31.050: TABLE OF PERMITTED AND CONDITIONAL USES IN THE GATEWAY DISTRICT: Legend: C = Conditional P = Permitted Permitted And Conditional Uses By District Use G-MU Community Garden P Large Wind Energy System Seasonal Farm Stand P Solar Array P Urban Farm P 21A.32.140: TABLE OF PERMITTED ANI) CONDITIONAL USES FOR SPECIAL PURPOSE DISTRICTS: Legend: C = Conditional use P = Permitted use Permitted And Conditional Uses RP BP FP AG AG-2 AG-5 AG-20 OS NOS A PL PL-2 I : UI MIT EI MU Use Community Garden P PPP P P P P P P P P P P Large Wind Energy C C C C C C C C P P System Seasonal Farm Stand P P P P P P P P P Solar Array P P P P P P Urban Farm P P P . P P P P P P P P P NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Salt Lake City Council will hold a public hearing regarding Petition PLNPCM2009- 01337, a request initiated by Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker to amend the use tables of the Zoning Ordinance relating to urban agriculture and renewable energy. The specific amendments for consideration include: A. Urban Farms B. Community Gardens C. Seasonal Farm Stands D. Solar Arrays E. Large Wind Energy Systems As part of its review, the City Council is holding an advertised public hearing to receive comments regarding the petition. During this hearing, anyone who would like to address the City Council about this issue will be given an opportunity to speak. The hearing will be held: Date: Time: 7:00 p.m. Place: Room 315 (City Council Chambers)* Salt Lake City and County Building 451 S. State Street Salt Lake City, UT *Please enter building from east side. If you have any questions relating to this proposal or would like to review the petition on file, please contact Ray Milliner, Principal Planner, at (801) 535-7645 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday or via e-mail at ray.milliner@slcgov.com. People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodations no later than 48 hours in advance in order to attend this public hearing. Accommodations may include alternate formats, interpreters, and other auxiliary aids. The City & County Building is an accessible facility. For questions, requests, or additional information, please contact the City Council Office at (801) 535-7600, or TDD (801) 535-6021. KEVIN JONES PETE TAYLOR ANGIE VORHER EAST BENCH CHAIR SUNNYSIDE EAST JORDAN MEADOWS CHAIR 2500 SKYLINE DRIVE 933 SOUTH 2300 EAST 1988 SIR JAMES DRIVE SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84108 SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84108 SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84116 GORDON STORRS ELLEN REDDICK RANDY SORENSON FAIRPARK CHAIR BONNEVILLE HILLS CHAIR GLENDALE CHAIR 159 NORTH 1320 WEST 2177 ROOSEVELT AVENUE 1184 SOUTH REDWOOD DR SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84116 SALT LAKE CITY UT 84108 SLAT LAKE CITY UT 84104 PHILIP CARLSON ESTHER HUNTER BILL DAVIS SUGAR HOUSE CHAIR UNIVERSITY NEIGHBORHOOD BALL PARK CHAIR 1917 EAST 2700 SOUTH 1049 NORRIS PLACE 332 WEST 1700 SOUTH SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84106 SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84102 SALT LAKE CITY UT 84115 TERRY THOMAS VACANT WESTPOINT CHAIR FOOTHILL/SUNNYSIDE CHAIR 1840 STALLION LANE SALT LAKE CITY UT SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84116 D. CHRISTIAN HARRISON JIM JENKIN DOWNTOWN CHAIR GREATER AVENUES CHAIR 336 WEST BROADWAY,#308 PO BOX 1679 SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84101 SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84110 DEWITT SMITH GARY FELT LIBERTY WELLS EAST CENTRAL CHAIR 328 EAST HOLLYWOOD AVE P.O. BOX 521809 SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84115 SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84152 LISETTE GIBBONS MIKE HARMAN YALECREST CHAIR POPLAR GROVE CHAIR 1764 HUBBARD AVE 1044 WEST 300 SOUTH SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84108 SALT LAKE CITY UT 84104 BEVERLY NELSON RON JARRETT FEDERAL HEIGHTS ROSE PARK CHAIR 26 SOUTH WOLCOTT STREET 1441 WEST SUNSET DRIVE SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84102 SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84116 PAMELA PEDERSEN EAST LIBERTY PARK KATHERINE GARDNER SALT LAKE CITY SCHOOL DIST. CAPITOL HILL CHAIR 440 EAST100 SOUTH 606 DE SOTO STREET SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84111 SALT LAKE CITY, UT. 84103 MARKTHOMAS MUTTER BRINTON CENTRAL CITY NEIGHBORHOOD WASATCH HOLLOW COUNCIL CHAIR 1869 LOGAN AVE 228 EAST 500 SOUTH#100 SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84108 SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84111 Sustainability Projects Roi Maufas Jordan Gates Harris-Dudley Co. Gina Zivkovic 1165 E Princeton Ave 339 Specialty Circle 868 W 300 North Salt Lake City UT 84105 SLC UT 84115 SLC UT 84116 Rod &Jeri Olsen Jonathon Krausert Claire Uno 744 W Jackson Ave 1444 Dupont Ave Wasatch Community Gardens SLC UT 84116 SLC UT 84116 345E 400 South, STE 204 SLC UT 84111 Erin Silva Travis Snyder & Katie Wagner Amy Barry 115 S 1100 E #505 1209 Gilmer Dr 1178 Ramona Ave SLC UT 84102 SLC UT 84105 SLC UT 84105 Chris Harris Aurora E. Shuen Jeff Williams 149 N St. 4187 S Neptune Dr 125 S State St, Ste 4402 SLC UT 84103 SLC UT 84124 SLC UT 84138 Mike Hathorne Carolyn Kenyon Paula Sargetakis S Triad Center, Suite 450 2750 S McClelland St 2254 Parleys Terrace SLC UT 84180 SLC UT 84106 SLC UT 84109 Lisette & David Gibson Myron Willson Mike Polacek 1764 E. Hubbard Ave 350 S 200 East #406 318 W 700 N SLC UT 84108 SLC UT 84111 SLC UT 84103 Patrick De Freitas Ben Mates Anne Cannon 1117 E 600 South 2879 Filmore St 1647 Kensington Ave SLC UT 84102 SLC UT 84106 SLC UT 84105 Amy Spend love Benjamin Rivkind Warren Lloyd 1366 Stewart ST 333 Goshen St 573 E 600 South SLC UT 84104 SLC UT 84104 SLC UT 84102 Camron Carpenter Stuart Silloway Matt Johnson 2816 E 2100 South 1231 Chandler Circle 1548 West California Avenue SLC UT 84109 SLC UT 84103 SLC UT 84104 Members: Amy Barry imissizzy@yahoo.com Amy Spendlove amyspendlove@q.com \ndrew Riggle ariggle@disabilitylawcenter.org Aurora Shuen lotuspixie@gmail.com Ben Mates benjmates@att.net Benjamin Rivkind Bananac@gmail.com Bennett, Vicki vicki.bennett@slcgov.com Bentley, Alene Alene.Bentley@PacifiCorp.com Bergenthal, Dan Dan.Bergenthal@slcgov.com Brandon Garcia saltiego@yahoo.com Camron Carpenter camron@senergymail.com Carolyn Kenyon kenyonorganics@comcast.net Chad Mullins chadmulling1@gmail.com Chris Duerksen cduerksen@clarionassociates.corn Chrissy Oberfell chrissyoborgfell@gmail.com Christopher Harris mr.christopher.harris@gmail.com Cindy Cromer 3cinslc@live.com Claire Uno director@wasatchgardens.org Dan Obergfell dobergfell@gmail.com Daniel Salmon dansalmon@comcast.net David L Jessen peopley@hotmail.com Devaki Murch devalki@parknpedal.com Duer, Stephanie stephanie.duer@slcgov.com Erin Silva erinrsilva@comcast.net George Sturzeneger georgest@xmission.com Gina Zivkovic urban.growth@yahoo.com jallgaier@clarionassociates.com jallgaier@clarionassociates.com Jeff Williams jeff.williams@ut.usda.gov Jeremy Larson jeremy.larson2010@yahoo.com urn French jfrench@dwelltek.com Joe Mikacevich topgatorslc@comcast.net John Norborg pickinweeks123@yahoo.com Jonathon Krausert j.krausert@hotmail.com Jordan Gates jordan@harrisdudley.com Julie Peck-Dabling JPeck-Dabling@slco.org Kate Whitbeck kate@momentumrecycling.com Kathy Lombardi Klombardi@entrix.com Katie Wagner kniwagn1@hotmail.com Kent R. Williams KentWilliams47@gmail.com Kyle LaMalfa slcpeoplesmarket@gmail.com Langan, Helen Helen.Langan@slcgov.com Lisette Gibson dmgib@xmission.com Lyons, Debbie debbie.lyons@slcgov.com Mathew Tison tisonmr@pella.com Mike Hatorne Hathornemj@zsc.com Mike Polacek michaelpolacek@msn.com Milliner, Ray Ray.Milliner@slcgov.com Myron Willson myron.willson@sustainability.utah.edu Naomi Franklin Franklin@biology.utah.edu Patrick De Freitas pdefreitas@earhlink.net Paula Sargetakis paulasarge@comcast.net Richard Parsoth reparsoth@gmail.com Rod & Jeri Olsen olsjer@gmail.com Rod Olsen olsrod@wfrmis.com Roi Maufas Roi@gorilladesign.org Roolf, Becka Becka.Roolf@slcgov.com Sarah Wright sarah@utahcleanenergy.org 3cott mendoza smendoza@co.weber.ut.us Shane Smith shane.smith@wvc-ut.gov Sophie Hayes sophie@utandequenergy.org Steve Mumford smumford@emcity.org Stewart, Brad Brad.Stewart@slcgov.com 2 Stewart, Casey Casey.Stewart@slcgov.com Storheim, Emy emy.storheim@slcgov.com Stuchly, Bridget Bridget.Stuchly@slcgov.com Suzanne Wagner swagner@myriad.com ,. Thanyne and Cari Tagge tagge@xmission.com Travis Snyder tgsnydermd@yahoo.com Nisi" Tyler Poulson tyler.poulson@parkcity.org Wallace Wright triwan@aol.com Warren Lloyd warren@Iloyd-arch.com Zollinger, Renee renee.zollinger@slcgov.com Nome 4770 S. 5600 W. P.O.BOX 704005 ne,z11 gaffe Xribune MEDIAE ge Deseret News WEST VALLEY CITY, UTAH 84170 °' FED.TAX I.D.# 87-0217663 PROOF OF PUBLICATION CUSTOMER'S COPY CUSTOMER NAME AND ADDRESS' :-ACCOUNT NUMBER I DATE PLANTNING DIVISION, 9001394298 6/28/2010 451 SOUTH STATE STREET,ROOM 4 SALT LAKE CITY UT 84111 _ ACCOUNT NAME _ -. - PLANNING DIVISION, __.TELEPITIONE' - `= -_."-< ADORDER#.=/ .INVOICE NUMBER:: 8015356184 0000590871 / _ Salt Lake City Master Plan SCHEDULEY' . - I Amendment On July 14, 2010, the Salt lake City Planning commis Start 06/25/2010 End 06/25/2010 Sian win hold a public hear- ing to consider making rec- ' " - : - I ommendations to the City Council regarding the follow- , . CUST,REF.NO.; mg petition:: Petition PLNPCM2009-01338: Acc Struct Sustain Amnd Sustainability Ordinancesurslfor accessory structures related to urban farming and renew- able energy. Mayor Ralph Becker initiated a request to CAPTION amend the Salt Lake City - : - - 4 Zoning Ordinance to facili- tate accessory structures used for urban farming and small Salt Lake City Master Plan Amendment scale renewable energy gen- eration. Types of structures contemplated include green- - __ - _ - _ _ houses, hoop houses, cold• _�IZ =,.''1 - - - - - -- .. . _- frames, and small solar and wind energy collections sys- tems. Proposed regulations 58 Lines 1.00 COLUMN specifically acknowledge these types of uses and nec- essary accessory structures,' _ - provide more areas in the .. �" .-.._ l' ' '=a`'"';�'= - RATE_ -4 - City where they are allowed, _ TIMES _ � s"`>-,_-<_ - " " _. . - _ - � _ - -' and provide more flexibility as to where they can be lo- cated on a lot. At the same 3 time, regulations ore pro- posed to mitigate impacts and ensure compatibility with -MISC.CHARGES . .. AD CHARGES - surrounding uses, especially -, - _ - . _ when they are located in single-family and/or histor- ic neighborhoods. The public hearing will begin at 5:45 p.m.in room 326 of the City County Building,451 - - - -' - - :TOTAL-COS.T; _ - - - South State Street,Solt Lake - . -. - _ •- " , City, UT. For more informa- tion or for special ADA ac- commodations,which may in- clude alternate formats, in- 77.50 terpreters, and other auxili- ary aids or additional infor- mation,please contact Casey Stewart at 535-6260 or call AFFIDAVIT OF PUBLICATION TDD 535-6220. 590871 UPAXLP AS NEWSPAPER AGENCY CORPORATION LEGAL BOOKER,1 CERTIFY THAT THE ATTACHED ADVERTISEMENT OF Salt Lake Cite Master Plan Amendment FOR PLANNING DIVISION,\VAS PUBLISHED BY THE NEWSPAPER AGENCY CORPORATION,AGENT FOR THE SALT LAKE TRIBUNE AND DESERET NEWS,DAILY NEWSPAPERS PRINTED IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE WITH GENERAL CIRCULATION IN UTAH,AND PUBLISHED IN SALT LAKE C1TY,SALT LAKE COUNTY IN THE STATE OF UTAH.NOTICE 1S ALSO POSTED ON UTAHLEGALS.COM ON THE SAME DAY AS THE FIRST NEWSPAPER PUBLICATION DATE AND REMAINS ON UTAHLEGALS.COM INDEFINATELY. Start 06/25/2010 End 06/25/2010 PUBLISHED ON --_ SIGNATURE \ .` J —_ --.\ .., I fl DATE 6/28/2010 1 r' iA THIS IS NOT A STATEMENT BUT A"PROOF OF PUBLICATION" �\ PLEASE PAY FROM BILI,ING STATEMENT \ 1) SALT LAKE CITY PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING AGENDA h—loom 26 of the City a:County Building at 45z South State Street Wednesday,y,June 23, 2010 at 5:45 p.m. fic:d trip is cc':edcied to leave at 4:00 p.m. Dinner will be served to the Planning Commissioners and Staff at in Room 126. 'AcrE Session—The Planning Commission will discuss Commercial Design Guidelines for properties with local historic designation.This portion of the meeting is open to the public for observation. Scored of Minutes from i April it 14,May 26 and June p Report of the Chair and Vice Chair Resort of the Director Debbie Hearings t. PL3-SUB2010-00044 Alder-Robinson Subdivision-a request by Greg Robinson to amend the Amended Plat of the Arcadia Heights Plat A Subdivision.The proposed subdivision is located at approximately 2857 East 2100 South in the FR-3 Foothills Residential zoning district in Council District 7 represented by Council\`ember Soren Simonsen. (Staff Contact:Wayne Mills at 801-535-7282 or way nc.nuils'a slo ov.com) 2. PLNPCM2809-01423 Public Safety Comrlex-Ceutrai Com,rsnnity Master Plan Amendment—a request by Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker to amend the Central Community Master Plan in preparation for the new public safety building and emergency operations center building and other possible mixed uses.The subject area is located approximately between 400 South and 500 South and 300 East and 400 East. The subject property is located in Council District 4,represented by Luke Garrott(Staff contact:Casey Steyr art at S01-535-6260 or ca sev.slcv a rt .slcgov.com -. .LTPCM20G9-71033 7 Amendments to the Use Table S_ustainabilit:'Re,zrrintiens-A petition by Mayor Ralph Becher to create now language in the Salt Lake City Zoning Ordinance to create a series of regulations promoting sss aiuebility throughout the City. Regulations arc City wide(staff contact:Ray Milliner at(80])535-7645 or ra .miiiine^a:sicgov.com)_ The following issues are being considered: a.Community Gardens:Modify the use tables;create a definition and qualifying provisions to allow community'gardens various zones throughout the City Uaan Agriculture: Modify the use tables;create a definition and qualifying provisions to allow urban agi iculture in zones throughout the City. a Scaso::a.Fares Stand:Modify the lase tables;treat„a d_fi.:i:i a an:l qualifying provisions to allow seasonal farm stands in various zones throughout the City. c Solar Array.Modify the use tables;create a definition and qualify:ng provisions to allow solar arrays in various zones t..ro:^_'rout the City. c.Large Wind Energy Sy stem:Modify the use tables;create a definition anal qualifying provisions to allow large wind energy systems in various zones throughout the City. x L-T CI1J2010-001SS—Al Auto Parts Conditional Use—A request by Mike Vanikiotis for a conditional use to n o:tdoor auto salvage and recycling facility at approximately 5 South 5100 West. The subject property is located in the M-1 (Light Manufacturing)zoning district in City Council District 2,represented by Van Turner. (Staff contact:Katie.Pace at 801-535-6354 or katia.pace iusleeov.com) 5. PL'P CM20:0-00320 South Temr,€e Street Closure-A request by Mayor Becker for a street closure and sale of the South Temple right-of-way between 500 West and 600 West The property is located in a DUD (Gateway Mixed-Use)zoning district in Council District 4,represented by Luke Garrott(Staff contact: Doug Da;ts e at S01- 35-6182 or ttez,g.c'aasic'Tsle ov._out) 6. Buena Vista Subdivision — a request by Allen Kimball to amend the Buena Vista subdivision located approximately beta:con Fulton Street (3000 West) and Gladiola Street (3400 West), and between 500 South and 625 South.The property is located in the M-2 Heavy Manufacturing_zoning district.The property is located in City Council District Two,represented by Van Turner.The request includes the following three petitions: P12TSUD20 e09-0057 Buena Vista Subdi+,islo:! A_mea4,noot—a request to amend the Buena Vista SUbelisisinn to consolidate 38 existing lots into 3 new lots;and _. Pi i'CM2009-00576 Buena vista Street Cinema—a request to close portions of three(3) streets within the Buena Vista subdivision;and a. PLtpCM2009-00577 Buena Vista Alley Closure—a request to close approximately nine(9)alleys within the Buena Vista subdivision.(Staff contact:Michael Maloy at 801-535-/1 1 S or miehael.malov r siecov.com.) Visit the Planning Division's website at www.slcgov.com/CED/planning for copies of the Planning Commission agendas;staff reports,.and minutes.Staff Reports will be posted the Friday prior to the meeting and minutes will be posted two days after they are ratified, which usually occurs at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Planning Commission. Planning Commission Meetings may be watched lice on SLCTV Channel 17:past meetings are recorded and archived,and may be viewed at www.slctee.coin Salt Lake City Planning Commission ' 451 S State Street,Room 406 PO Box 145480 -.• Salt Lake City,Utah 84114 5480 RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED ..Ni ,- ice.:.' i•i'� :i?ui•i i?:;_� INFORMATION TO APPLICANTS AND CITIZENS .. Attendance:Applicant or representative must be present during the meeting or the case v.ill not be revien ed. 2. Decision M '.;inc Process:Planning Commission will review one case at a time and receive information from the applicant, professional staff,adjoining neighbors and citizens.After revies.'ing the case,the Planning Commission will deliberate on the case in executive session.No additional testimony will be accented during the executive session,sinless requested by the Commission for clarification purposes.The Planning Commission will make their decision by making a motion,second, discussion and majority vote by the Commission. 3. Appeals process:Any person aegrieved by a r- 'the Planning Commission may appeal that decision to the Salt Lake City Land Use Appeals Board t;!thsn' 'fter the Planning Commission final decision. \:e.eting notices:Meeting notices are made available 12days in advance.If persons wish to submit written comments they should be directed to the Planning Connnission or Planning Staff member indicated at least 7 days in adsance to enable the Commissioners to consider those mitten comments.Comments should be sent to: Salt Lake City Planning Commission PO Box 1454S0 Salt Lake City,UT S4114-5480 Ph;sical Address:451 S State Street,Room 406 Salt Lake City,UT S4111 NOTE:Please turn oil cellular phones during the meeting.We comply with all ADA guidelines.People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodation no later than 48 hours in advance in order to attend this meeting. Accommodations may include alternate formats, interpreters, and other auxiliary aids. This is an accessible facility. For questions, requests, or additional information, please contact the Planning Commission Secretary at 535-6171 regarding this agenda or ADA accommodations.TOD 535-6220. 2nd AMENDED SALT LAKE CITY PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING AGENDA In Room 326 of the City&County Building at 451 South State Street Wednesday,July 28 2010 at 5:45 p.m. The field trip is scheduled to leave at 4:00 p.m. Dinner will be served to the Planning Commissioners and Staff at 5:00p.m., in Room 126. Work Session—The Planning Commission may discuss planning related issues. This portion of the meeting is open to the public for observation. Approval of Minutes from June 23 and July 11 Report of the Chair and Vice Chair Report of the Director Briefing 1. PLNPCM2010-00448 & PLNPCM2010-00461- YNC Yalecrest Neighborhood Character Overlay District - A request by the Salt Lake City Council to amend the Salt Lake City Zoning Ordinance and Map. The proposed zoning text amendment will create a new overlay district to limit demolition of homes that define the character of the Yalecrest neighborhood and preserve existing streetscape building setbacks. The proposed zoning map amendment will apply the YNC Yalecrest Neighborhood Character Overlay District to property located approximately between Sunnyside Avenue and 1300 South, and between 1900 East and 1300 East. The property affected is located in Council District 5, represented by Jill Remington Love, and Council District 6, represented by J.T. Martin. (Staff contact: Wayne Mills at 801-535-7282 or wayne.mills@slcgov.com or Michael Maloy at 801-535-7118 or michael.maloy@slcgov.com) Public Hearings 2. PLNPCM2009-00734 - Cannon Wards Parking Expansion -A request by Troy Anderson, architect, for a conditional use to expand an existing parking lot at approximately 1315 South 1200 West. The subject property is located in the R-1/5,000 (Single-Family Residential) zoning district in City Council District 2, represented by Van Turner. (Staff contact: Katia Pace at 801-535-6354 or katia.pace@slcgov.com) 3. PLNPCM2010-00013 - Salt Lake Community College Alley Vacation - A request by the Salt Lake Community College for an Alley Vacation at approximately 1650 South that runs east-west, between Edison Street and State Street. The abutting properties are zoned I Institutional and R-1- 5000 Single Family Residential. The properties are currently used for parking for the school. Located in Council District 5 represented by Jill Remington Love. (Staff contact: Ana Valdemoros at 501.535.7236 or ana.valdemoros@slcgov.com) 4. PLNPCM2009-010337- Amendments to the Use Table Sustainability Regulations - A petition by Mayor Ralph Becker to create new language in the Salt Lake City Zoning Ordinance to create a series of regulations promoting sustainability throughout the City. Regulations are City wide (Staff contact: Ray Milliner at (801) 535-7645 or ray.milliner@slcgov.com). The following issues are being considered: a. Community Gardens: Modify the use table, create a definition and qualifying provisions to allow community gardens in various zones throughout the City b. Urban Agriculture: Modify the use table; create a definition and qualifying provisions to allow urban agriculture in certain zones. c. Seasonal Farm Stand: Modify the use table; create a definition and qualifying provisions to allow seasonal farm stands in limited zones throughout the City. d. Solar Array: Modify the use table; create a definition and qualifying provisions to allow solar arrays in limited zones throughout the City. e. Large Wind Energy System: Modify the use table; create a definition and qualifying provisions to allow large wind energy systems in limited zones throughout the City. The files for the above items are available in the Planning Division offices,room 406 of the City and County Building.Please contact the staff planner for information,Visit the Planning Division's a ebsite at www.slegov.com/CEP/planning for copies of the Planning Commission agendas,staff reports,and minutes.Staff Reports will be posted the Friday prior to the meeting and minutes trill be posted two days after they are ratified,which usually occurs at the next regularly scheduled meeting of tic Planning Commission.Planning Commission Meetings may be watched live on SLC'IV Channel 1 ;past meetings arc recorded and archived,and may be viewed at maw slctv.com Salt Lake City Planning Conn Ivoie V O]?.C 451 5 State Street,Room 400 PO Box 145430 Salt Lake cry,bIoti 841145480 } -t: 441,`,5PRIA It act RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED ._. LEt. ay {N(dL;sr ;2Q 30,5 1 k543G S l r:-61 Vr-Cc4—y v(-ci�. IN FORMA "f0 APPLICANTS AND CITIZENS I. Attendance:Applicant or representative moat be present daring the meeting cr the case cull not be reviewed. __ Decision Malang Process:Planning Commission will review one case at a time and receive informal ion from the applie professional staff,adjoining neighbor and citizens.After reviewing the case,the Planting Commission will deliberate on the case in executive session.No additional testimony will be accepted during the executive session,unless requested by the Commission for clarification purposes.The Planning Co.n:nissien will nmake their decision by emkhng a motion,second, AI^ discussion and majority vote by the Cc:tuaission 3. Appeals process:Any person aggrieved by nm 100,0.irsg Couunission may appeal tint decision to 9m Salt Lake City Land Use Appeals Board within thing trey car-_,net the Planning Comnnission Imnl decision. 4. Nleethlg no'.ices.Meeting novices are made available 12days in advance.If persons wish to submit written connnents Choy should be directed to the Planning Commission or Plmming Staff member indicated at least 7 days in advance so enable the Commissioners to consider those•.vrincn comments.Comments should be sent to Salt Lake City Planning Commission PO Box.145450 Solt Lake City,UT 84114-5450 Physical Address:451 S State Street,Room 406 Sale lake City,UT 34111 NOTE:Please turn off cellular phones during the meeting.We comply with all ADA guidelines.People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodation no later than 45 hours in advance in order to attend this meeting.Accommodaticns may include alternate formats,interpreters,and other auxiliary aids.This is an accessible facility.Fcr questions,requests,cr additional information, please contact the Planning Commission Secretary at 535-6171 regarding this agenda or ADA accommodations.TDD 535-6220, PLANNING COMMISSION STAFF REPORT se USE TABLE AMENDMENTS SUSTAINABILITY REGULATIONS Case #PLNPCM2009-01337 m=r ' June 23, 2010 '�'• �I''"`T� `���� Planning and Zoning Division Department of Community and Economic Development Applicant Mayor Ralph Becker REQUEST Staff Ray Milliner On November 18, 2009, Mayor Becker initiated a petition to amend the Salt ray.milliner r slceov.com Lake City Zoning Ordinance to create a series of regulations promoting (801)535-7645 g P g sustainability throughout the City. Included in this staff report are draft Current Zone: amendments relating to the use tables for the regulation of urban agriculture N/A and large renewable energy sites. The proposed uses associated therein, would be allowed, in some form,throughout the City. Amendments for consideration Master Plan Designation: include City Wide Council District: A. Urban Farms City Wide B. Community Gardens C. Seasonal Farm Stands Review Standards D. Solar Arrays 21A.50.050 Standards for General Amendments E. Large Wind Energy Systems Affected Text Sections • 21A.62 Definitions STAFF RECOMMENDATION • Land Use Tables • 21A.36 Home Occupations Staff recommends that the Planning Commission review the proposed Notification modifications to The Land Use Tables, Chapters 21A36.030 21A.62, and • Notice mailed on June 10, 21A.40 of the Salt Lake City Zoning Ordinance, and based on the findings 2010 in this staff report forward a positive recommendation to the City Council. • Published in Deseret News June 10,2010 • Posted on City S.: State Websites June 10. 2010 Attachments A. Proposed Text Amendments B. Petition Initiation Request C. Public Comment 1 Background This petition is part of the Sustainable Code Amendment project initiated by Mayor Becker on November 18, °pro 2009; the purpose of the project is to amend the Salt Lake City Zoning Ordinance to create a series of regulations promoting sustainability throughout the City. The initial petition established 10 key components of sustainability including: • Recycling and waste reduction • Climate change and air quality • Energy conservation and renewable energy • Mobility and transportation • Open space, parks and trails • Urban forestry • Water Quality and conservation • Food production and nutrition • Community health and safety • Housing accessibility and diversity The City hired Clarion Associates as a consultant on the project,with the goal of creating appropriate zoning, subdivision and site development regulations that will make Salt Lake City one of the most sustainable communities in the Country. Ordinance amendments for each of the above components will be prepared and presented to the Planning Commission and City Council in phases over the next months. The proposals discussed herein are part of the first phase of the project. 4 .. *110 Included in this staff report are draft amendments relating to the use tables for the regulation of urban agriculture, and large renewable energy systems. The proposed uses may be allowed, in some form, in most zoning districts throughout the City. Public Participation The proposed amendments were reviewed at an open house on December 17, 2010 and again on April 15, 2010. Public comments received are attached as exhibit C. Between January and May of 2010, staff met with representatives from Wasatch Community Gardens, the Federal Department of Agriculture, the Business Advisory Board (BAB), the County Health Department and the Historic Landmark Commission to discuss the amendments. They have provided technical input regarding appropriate practice to regulate these uses while mitigating any undesired impacts on residents and local businesses. Staff has received numerous verbal comments from citizens who are interested in these amendments. Comments have been nearly unanimously in favor of the proposal. Written comments are included in attachment C of this report. Issue Analysis If adopted, the proposed changes would be located in various sections of the Zoning Ordinance. A`wo' definition for each use is being proposed, along with qualifying provisions and an amendment to the 2 table of permitted and conditional uses in the various chapters of the Ordinance. Below is a summary of the changes proposed along with analysis and rationale for the amendments. URBAN FARM Definition: "An Urban Farm" is a farm where food is cultivated,processed and distributed food in or around a residential or commercial area. Urban farming is generally practiced for income earning or food producing activities." Urban farms are proposed as a permitted use in most zones including residential and commercial zones. The size of these farms ranges from being located in large rear yards of single family homes, or on vacant lots to large multi-acre operations. Owners grow vegetables, herbs, and flowers that are then sold to consumers. The most common type of urban farm is Community Supported Agriculture, wherein individuals purchase shares of the farm produce prior to the growing season, then receive allotments of the harvest throughout the summer. Produce from urban farms may also be sold at farm stands and farmers markets. Issue: As proposed, these urban farms would be allowed within both commercial and residential zoning Districts. Concerns raised with regard to this use generally revolve around the commercial aspect of the farm in residential zones. Although commercial in nature, urban farms can be very small in size. It is not uncommon to see an urban farm operated in the rear yard of a single family residence. Though small,this use can be a significant source of revenue for an individual selling her produce to restaurants or other people. Hence,the staff recommendation is to allow this use in all residential zones. Nonetheless, the potential impacts of these farms could be significant. Concerns raised center on employees on site, parking, sensory impacts such as noise and smell, and water usage. The Commission may consider adding qualifying provisions for these or other issues: O Limit the size of the parcel on which the farm is placed O Limit the zones where the use is allowed © In some zones, make the use conditional • Further limit the hours of operation Affected Code Sections: Section 21A.36 Qualifying Provisions; Section 21A.62 Definitions; Section 21A.36.030 amendment to home occupation requirements; and all permitted and conditional use tables. Permitted Zones: Residential Foothill Residential (FR-1), Foothill Residential (FR-2), Foothill Residential (FR-3), Residential (R- 1/12,000), Residential (R-1/7,000), Residential (R-1/5,000), Special Development Pattern Residential (SR-1), Special Development Pattern Residential (SR-3), Single and Two Family Residential (R-2), Low Density Residential (RMF-30), Moderate Density Residential (RMF -35), Moderate/High Density Residential (RMF- 45), High Density (RMF-75), Residential/Business (RB), Residential Mixed Use (RMU-35), Residential Mixed Use (RMU-45),Residential Mixed Use (RMU), Residential Office (RO). 3 Commercial Neighborhood Commercial (CN), Community Business (CB), Community Shopping (CS), Corridor Commercial (CC), Sugar House Business District (CSHBD), General Commercial (CG), Light ,. Manufacturing (M-1), Heavy Manufacturing (M-2), Central Business (D-1), Downtown Support (D-2), ``"° Downtown Warehouse (D-3), Downtown Secondary Central Business (D-4), Gateway Mixed Use (GMU), Research Park(RP), Business Park(BP),Transit Stop Transit Station Area(TSA) Special Purpose Agricultural(AG),Agricultural(AG-2),Agricultural(AG-5),Agricultural(AG-20), Open Space(OS), Public Lands (PL),Public Lands (PL-2), Institutional(I), Urban Institute (UI), Mobile Home Park(MH), Mixed Use (MU),Foothills Protection(FP) Qualifying provisions: 1. Accessory Buildings: Storage and tool sheds, greenhouses, and hoop houses associated with urban farms are subject to the standards in Chapter 21A.40, Accessory Uses. Buildings and Structures and the requirements of the International Building Code. Structures, such as coops and pens, associated with the keeping and raising of animals, livestock. and poultry must meet the requirements of Chapter 8.08 of the Salt Lake City Municipal Code, Keeping Animals, Livestock. and Poultry and are subject to the requirements of the adopted Building Code, when applicable. 2. Riparian Corridor: Urban farms proposed in a riparian corridor, as defined in Section 21A.34.130 of the Zoning Ordinance shall be subject to all rules and regulations therein. 3. Storage Requirements: All flam mables, pesticides and fertilizers shall be stored in accordance with the regulations of the Uniform Fire Code and Utah State Department of Agriculture or successor agency. At a minimum. any area where such materials are stored shall have a continuous concrete`' S. floor and lip which is tall enough to contain one hundred and ten percent (110%) of the volume of all the materials stored in the area. No pesticides. chemical fertilizers or other hazardous materials shall be stored outside of buildings. 4. Disposal Requirements: All flammables. pesticides. fertilizers and other hazardous wastes should be disposed of according to Federal and State requirements. 5. Large Vehicles: No vehicles in excess of five (5)tons shall be kept. stored or parked on the property, except that such vehicles may be on the property as necessary for completion of grading performed in accordance with a grading permit issued by the City Building Services Division. 6. Hours of Operation: All urban farm related uses shall operate only during daylight hours. 7. Irrigation Systems. Sufficient irrigation shall be provided to cover all needs of the urban farm. An irrigation only meter will be required by the Public Utilities Department. Irrigation systems designed for water conservation such as. but not limited to. hand watering. and drip irrigation are strongly encouraged. 8. Delivery and Pick-up: In single family and two family zones. delivery and pick-up of products is allowed provided pick-up times are staggered so that one patron is on site at a time. 9. Parking: Parking for employees. and patrons of the urban farm shall be provided on site. at a rate of two parking stalls per acre with a minimum of one ADA stall, unless within a single family or two family zoning district. All vehicular circulation, staging. and parking shall be on a hard surface. 10. On Site Sales and Events: Products from urban farms may be donated or sold on site provided the following requirements are met: a) The sales stand may not exceed 100 square feet in size. 4 b) Signs are allowed as temporary portable signs subject to the regulations in Chapter 21 A.46.55 of this ordinance. Signs must be removed immediately following the sale. c) All necessary City business licenses shall be obtained prior to the sale. d) Sales stands must be setback a minimum of 10 feet from the edge of pavement of a City street. e) The farm stand shall be a non-permanent structure, and must be removed immediately following the sale. f) Perishable foods must be stored in a veiuiin-proof area or container when the facility is closed. 11. Fencing: Fencing of urban farms shall comply with the standards in Section 21A.40.120, Regulation of Fences. Walls.and Hedges. 12. License: A business license is required for an urban farm. When the urban farm is accessory to a residential use,a home occupation license is required. In addition to the above referenced changes, in order to allow urban farms as a home occupation, it will be necessary to make the following changes to Chapter 21A.36.030 of the Zoning Ordinance. The changes will allow an individual operating an urban farm as a home occupation to sell produce from the residence. Currently the ordinance does not allow the sale of produce from the residential lot. Not included in the proposed changes is an amendment to allow hired employees as part of an urban farm home occupation. Staff is requesting that the Planning Commission discuss the option of allowing employees as part of a home occupation, and determine whether or not it would be appropriate. Employees would be allowed at an urban farm that is not part of a home occupation in non residential uses. Proposed amendments are in red: 21A.36.030: HOME OCCUPATIONS: B. Permitted Home Occupations: Subject to compliance with the standards specified in this section, the following occupations, that do not have the client come to the home, shall be permitted as home occupations subject only to approval by the zoning administrator pursuant to subsection H of this section: 1. Artists, illustrators, writers, photographers, editors, drafters, and publishers; 2. Consultants, private investigators, field representatives and other similar activities; 3. Bookkeeping and other similar computer activities; 4. Locksmith; 5. Distribution of products grev=n--e-r assembled at home for off premises sales (such as garden produce, crafts, etc.); 6. Janitorial services; and 7. Mail order business or sales representative; and 8. Distribution of Uroducts crown as part of an urban farm for on or off premise sales (such as garden produce). COMMUNITY GARDEN Definition: 5 The proposed definition would replace the current definition found in Chapter 21A.62 of the Zoning Ordinance; Nei • nonprofit organization in which food produced is consumed by ' ' ea.,individuals and f mi ie "Community garden" means an area of land managed and maintained by an individual or group to grow and harvest food crops and/or non-food, ornamental crops, such as flowers. for personal or group use. consumption, donation, or sale." Community gardens are a type of garden where the property is owned and managed by an individual or group of individuals where food is grown for personal or group use. These gardens could be housed on a vacant lot, in a person's back yard, or in any open space area. Generally, an individual is assigned a"plot" in the garden for which she is responsible, and receives the benefits of her labors. Community gardens are very popular it's not uncommon for each to have a waiting list for plots. Further,the gardens are proving to be valuable community gathering spaces as it is not uncommon to find individuals from numerous social and economic backgrounds working side by side toward a common goal. Each garden is unique in the way it is managed, operated and tended. As a result, staff has worked with various entities, to ensure that the base impacts of the use are mitigated while providing operators with the flexibility necessary to create a vibrant,workable community garden. Issue: The impact of a community garden most likely would be similar to those of an urban farm. Community Gardens would be allowed within most zoning districts in the city. Most issues raised with regard to the gardens are associated with the impacts of the use on adjacent properties. Parking, noise, and'" ` activities not relating directly to the gardening use have been notable. Staff is requesting that the Commission review the proposed qualifying provisions and determine whether or not they are sufficient to ensure compliance. Proposed language includes: Affected Code Sections: Section 21A.36 Qualifying Provisions; Section 21A.62 Definitions; and all permitted and conditional use tables. Permitted Zones: Residential Foothill Residential (FR-1), Foothill Residential (FR-2), Foothill Residential (FR-3), Residential (R- 1/12,000), Residential (R-1/7,000), Residential (R-1/5,000), Special Development Pattern Residential (SR-1), Special Development Pattern Residential (SR-3), Single and Two Family Residential (R-2), Low Density Residential (RMF-30), Moderate Density Residential (RMF -35), Moderate/High Density Residential (RMF- 45), High Density (RMF-75), Residential/Business (RB), Residential Mixed Use (RMU-35), Residential Mixed Use(RMU-45),Residential Mixed Use(RMU), Residential Office (RO). Commercial Neighborhood Commercial (CN), Community Business (CB), Community Shopping (CS), Corridor **410' Commercial (CC), Sugar House Business District (CSHBD), General Commercial (CG), Light 6 Manufacturing (VI-l), Heavy Manufacturing (M-2), Central Business (D-1), Downtown Support (D-2), Downtown Warehouse (D-3), Downtown Secondary Central Business (D-4), Gateway Mixed Use (GMU), Research Park(RP), Business Park(BP),Transit Stop Transit Station Area(TSA) Special Purpose Agricultural (AG),Agricultural(AG-2),Agricultural (AG-5),Agricultural (AG-20), Open Space(OS), Public Lands (PL), Public Lands (PL-2), Institutional (I), Urban Institute(UI), Mobile Home Park(MH), Mixed Use (MU), Foothills Protection(FP) Qualifying provisions: 1. Accessory Buildings: Storage and tool sheds, greenhouses and hoop houses associated with community gardens are subject to the standards in Chapter 21A.40. Accessory Uses, Buildings and Structures and the requirements of the International Building Code. Structures, such as coops and pens. associated with the keeping and raising of animals, livestock. and poultry must meet with the requirements of Chapter 8.08 of the Salt Lake City Municipal Code, Keeping Animals, Livestock, and Poultry and are subject to the requirements of the adopted Building Code. when applicable. 2. Riparian Corridor: Community gardens proposed in a riparian corridor, as defined in Section 21A.34.130 of the Zoning Ordinance shall be subject to all rules and regulations therein. 3. Disposal Requirements: All flammables, pesticides, fertilizers and other hazardous wastes should be disposed of according to Federal and State requirements. 4. Size: In residential zones. community gardens less than '/ acre size shall be permitted. Community gardens greater than 1/2 acre in size shall be reviewed by the Planning Commission as a conditional use.pursuant to the requirements in Section 21A.54 of this ordinance. 5. Hours of Operation: In residential zones. community gardens shall operate during daylight hours. 6. Large Vehicles: No vehicles in excess of five (5) tons shall be kept or stored on the property, except that such vehicles may be on the property as necessary for completion of grading performed in accordance with a grading permit issued by the City Building Services Division. 7. Irrigation: Sufficient in-iaation shall be provided to cover all needs of the community garden. An irrigation only meter will be required by the Public Utilities Division. Irrigation systems designed for water conservation such as. but not limited to. hand watering. and drip irrigation are strongly encouraged. 8. Parking: Community gardens shall be exempt from the off-street parking requirements of Section 21A.44. Off Street Parking and Loading. All vehicular circulation. staging, and parking provided shall be on a hard surfaced area. Any On-street parking is to comply with the existing roadway status. 9. On Site Sales and Events: Products from community gardens may be donated or sold on site provided the following requirements are met: a) The sales stand may not exceed 100 square feet in size. b) Signs are allowed as temporary portable signs subject to the regulations in Chapter 21 A.46.55 of this ordinance. Signs must be removed immediately following the sale. c) All necessary City business licenses shall be obtained prior to the sale. d) Sales stands must be setback a minimum of 10 feet from the edge of pavement of a City street. e) The farm stand shall be a nor-permanent structure. and must be removed immediately following the sale. f) Perishable foods must be stored in a vermin-proof area or container when the facility is closed. g) Perishable foods must be stored in a veiiiiin-proof area or container when the facility is closed. 10. Fencing: Fencing of community gardens will comply with the standards in Section 21A.40.120. `""'" Regulation of Fences, Walls,and Hedges. SEASONAL FARM STAND Seasonal farm stands are sales tables or kiosks where food crops are sold away from where the food was grown. Traditionally,they will be seen cropping up along highways during the harvest season. They provide farmers with an alternative revenue source from that of selling to a large broker or market. Seasonal farm stands generally operate during the time of year coinciding with the growing season. Definition: "Seasonal farm stand" means a sales table, area, or kiosk of food crops and/or non-food. an ornamental crop, such as flowers, that is located off-premise from the location where the food was grown, or when located in any agricultural district,and operates durin5 the time of year coinciding with the growing season. "Locally Grown" means food crops and or non-food, ornamental crops. such as flowers that are grown within the state of Utah. Issue: As proposed, seasonal farm stands will not be allowed in single family residential zones, as a result, the impacts will be centered only on neighborhood commercial zones, downtown zones, and mixed use zones. When reviewed by the Business Advisory Board, concerns were raised with relation to the ability of the farmer to sell a product without first obtaining the necessary permits and approvals from the Department 140 of Agriculture. Staff researched the issue and found that seasonal farm stands are excluded from regulation by the health department provided certain standards are met (mitigating standards are included in the proposed language). See qualifying provisions. Affected Code Sections: Section 21A.36 Qualifying Provisions; Section 21A.62 Definitions; and all permitted and conditional use tables. Permitted Zones: Residential ResidentialBusiness(RB), Residential Mixed Use (RMU-35),Residential Mixed Use(RMU-45), Residential Mixed Use (RMU). Commercial Residential Office (RO), Neighborhood Commercial (CN), Community Business (CB), Community Shopping (CS), Corridor Commercial (CC), Sugar House Business District (CSHBD), General Commercial (CG), Light Manufacturing (M-1), Heavy Manufacturing (M-2), Central Business (D-1), Downtown Support (D-2), Downtown Warehouse (D-3), Downtown Secondary Central Business (D-4), Gateway Mixed Use (GMU), 8 Special Purpose Agricultural (AG), Agricultural(AG-2),Agricultural(AG-5),Agricultural (AG-20), Open Space(OS), Public Lands (PL), Public Lands (PL-2), Institutional(I),Urban Institute (UI),Mobile Home Park(WI), Mixed Use (MU), Foothills Protection(FP), Transit Stop Area(TSA) Qualifying Provisions: 1. Location: A seasonal farm stand shall be located only along City streets designated as "collector" or "arterial" by the city's major street plan. If the stand is located within the public Right-Of-Way a revocable lease agreement from the City is required. 2. Parking: If the seasonal farm stand is located within an existing parking lot. it shall not remove or encroach upon required parking or loading areas for other uses on the site or impede access to parking or loading areas. All vehicular circulation, staging. and parking provided shall be on a hard surfaced area, any On-street parking shall comply with the existing roadway status. 3. Duration: Seasonal farm stands shall operate only during the intermountain region harvest season. 4. Setback: Seasonal farm stands must be setback a minimum of 10 feet from the edge of pavement of a City street. 5. Size: A seasonal farm stand may not exceed 100 square feet in size. 6. Food Preparation: Food preparation is prohibited at farm stands. including food samples. 7. Signs: Suns for a seasonal farm stand are allowed as temporary portable signs subject to the regulations in Chapter 21A.46.55 of this ordinance. Signs are not allowed to be placed more than 50 feet from the stand location 8. Sales: Food crops and/or non-food. ornamental crops, such as flowers grown locally are allowed to be sold at a seasonal food stand. Prepackaged "shelf stable" foods produced in close proximity to the farm stand may be sold as well. provided they are fully labeled and produced in an approved health department or Utah State Department of Agriculture facility. 9. Animals: No live animals. birds. or fowl shall be kept or allowed within 20 feet of any area where food is stored or held for sale. This requirement does not apply to guide does. signal dogs. or service dogs. 10. Garbage: All garbage and refuse shall be stored and disposed of in accordance with established Health Department standards. 11. Storage: Perishable foods must be stored in a vermin-proof area or container when the facility is closed. SOLAR ARRAY Definition: A"solar array" is a principal use of a packaged interconnected assembly of solar cells used to transform solar energy into thermal. chemical. or electrical energy. A solar array uses solar energy for any or all of the following purposes: (1)water heating. (2) space heating or cooling. and(3)power generation. A solar array is a linked collection of solar panels and cells that in turn are used to generate electric power. These arrays are larger in size and scope to the solar panels used to generate energy for a single family home or small use (They will be addressed in future phases of the sustainability review). Arrays are used to transform solar energy into thermal, chemical and electrical power, are generally attached to the overall electric grid, and power generated by the use is sold to the electric company (Rocky Mountain Power), as part of a net metering agreement. 9 Issue: At issue with solar arrays are the impacts of the solar panels on adjacent properties. Solar arrays are most effective when placed in a large area with direct sunlight. The effectiveness of the arrays diminishes significantly when shaded. Therefore, screening, and other common techniques for mitigating visual impacts are not viable for the arrays. As a result, staff is proposing that they be*"." allowed only in zones where they can be built on large expanses of land, with limited shading and the impacts adjacent uses are limited by distance, scale and type of use. Affected Code Sections: Section 21A.36 Qualifying Provisions; Section 21A.62 Definitions; and all permitted and conditional use tables except residential zones. Permitted Zones: Residential None Commercial (CG), Light Manufacturing (M-1), Heavy Manufacturing (M-2), Central Business, Research Park (RP), Business Park(BP) Special Purpose Agricultural (AG), Agricultural (AG-2),Agricultural (AG-5),Agricultural (AG-20),Public Lands(PL) Qualifying Provisions: ` 'rrrr 1. Setbacks: A solar array shall meet all minimum setback requirements for the zone in which it is located. In no case shall a solar array be located less than 6 feet from a property line or other structure. 2. Height: A solar array shall not exceed 20 feet in height measured from established grade. 3. Landscape Buffer: No landscaped buffeLyards shall be required on a site with a solar array as a principal use. 4. Code Compliance: Solar arrays are subject to review for compliance with all applicable International Building and Electrical Code requirements by the Salt Lake City Building Services Division. 5. Solar Easements: Solar easements are not a requirement for City approval; nonetheless. a property owner who has installed or intends to install a solar array may negotiate a solar easement with adjacent property owners to ensure perpetual sun on the property. Any easement agreed upon must be recorded by the County Recorder. 6. Electrical Wires: All electrical wires associated with a solar array. shall be located underground. 7. Nonmaintained Or Abandoned Arrays: The building official may require each nonmaintained or abandoned- solar array to be removed from the premises when such a system has not been repaired or put into use by the owner. person having control or person receiving benefit of such structure within thirty (30) calendar days after notice of nonmaintenance or abandonment is given to the owner, person having control or person receiving the benefit of such structure. The city may require a performance bond or other — means of financial assurance to guarantee removal of abandoned structures. ✓o' 10 8. Utility Inter-Connection: No solar array shall be installed that does not meet the requirements of Rocky Mountain Power for an interconnected customer-owned generator. Off-grid systems shall be exempt from this requirement. 9. Off-Street Parking and Loading: No additional parking is required for a solar array; however. a solar array may not replace or hinder existing required parking and loading. LARGE WIND ENERGY SYSTEM Definition: A "Large Wind Enemy System" is a wind energy conversion system consisting of a wind turbine or group of wind turbines. tower. and associated control or conversion electronics, which has rated capacity of more than 100 kW. A large wind energy system is one that has a capacity to generate more than 100 Kilowatts of power (The average annual electrical energy consumption of a household in the United States is about 8,900 kilowatt-hours, equivalent to a steady power consumption of about 1 kilowatt, for an entire year). The height of the structures ranges from approximately 60 meters to 90 meters (approximately 200 — 300 feet tall) and the blades range from 20 to 40 meters (65 to 130 ft) in length and rotate at approximately 10 to 22 rotations per minute (at 22 rotations per minute, the tip of the blade is travelling approximately 200 miles per hour). Issue: The primary issue with large wind energy systems is the size and location. In order to operate efficiently, large wind turbines must be located in windy areas. Salt Lake City has very few locations where there is sufficient wind to warrant installation of a turbine, and these locations are generally in residential neighborhoods where the impacts of the towers would be significant. Nonetheless, staff is proposing that they be allowed in zones with no residential uses, and large lot areas that would provide a buffer between uses. As a result, it is unlikely that there will be many large wind energy systems built in the near future, but with the increasing emphasis on finding alternative power sources and the likelihood that technological advances will make windmills viable in less windy areas, it is anticipated that there will be a market for wind energy systems in the proposed zones. In zones where the impacts are more pronounced, staff is recommending that large wind energy systems be reviewed by the Planning Commission as a conditional use. This will provide policy makers with an opportunity to review and impose conditions of approval to mitigate harmful impacts on adjacent properties. Affected Code Sections: Section 21A.36 Qualifying Provisions: Section 21A.62 Definitions; and all permitted and conditional use tables. Permitted/Conditional Use Zones: Residential None Commercial Permitted 11 Light Manufacturing (M-1), Heavy Manufacturing(M-2) Conditional Research Park(RP), Business Park(BP) Miscellaneous Permitted Institutional (I),Urban Institute(UI)Permitted Conditional Agricultural (AG), Agricultural(AG-2),Agricultural (AG-5), Agricultural (AG-20),Public Lands(PL) Open Space(OS),A, Public Land(PL) Qualifying Provisions: 1. Total Height: The total height of the large wind energy system shall be limited to 90 meters above existing grade or by FAA regulations, whichever dictates a lower height. 2. Minimum Lot Size: 2 Acres 3. Setbacks: A tower in a large wind energy system must be set back at least 1.25 times its total height from any property boundary. must be within the buildable area of the lot and at least 1.25 times its total height from any overhead utility power line: 4. Noise: Noise emitted from the large wind energy system shall not exceed maximum sound levels set forth in section 9.28 of the Salt Lake City Code (Health and Safety: Noise Control). 5. Blade Clearance: The vertical distance from existing grade to the tip of a wind generator blade when the blade is at its lowest point must be at least 15 feet. 6. Electrical Wires: All electrical wires associated with a large wind energy system. other than wires necessary to connect the wind turbine to the tower wiring. the tower wiring to the disconnect junction box. and the grounding wires shall be located underground. 7. Lighting: Lighting of tower(s) and turbine(s) is prohibited except where required by the Federal Aviation Administration. 8. Appearance, Color, and Finish: The wind turbine and tower shall remain painted or finished the color or finish that was originally applied by the manufacturer. 9. Signs: All signs are prohibited. other than the manufacturer's or installer's identification, appropriate warning signs, or owner identification on a wind turbine, tower. building. or other associated structure. 10. Utility Inter-Connection: No large wind energy system shall be installed that does not meet the requirements of Rocky Mountain Power for an interconnected customer-owned generator. Off- grid systems shall be exempt from this requirement. 11. Nonmaintained Or Abandoned Facilities: The building official may require each norunaintained or abandoned large wind energy system to be removed from the premises at the cost of the owner when such a system has not been repaired or put into use by the owner. person having control or person receiving benefit of such structure within thirty (30) calendar days after notice of nonmaintenance or abandonment is given to the owner, person having control or person receiving the benefit of such structure. The city may require a performance bond or other means of financial assurance to guarantee removal of abandoned structures. 12. Off-Street Parking or Loading Requirements: None. A large wind energy system shall not , remove or encroach upon required parking or loading areas for other uses on the site or access to 12 such parking or loading areas. All vehicular circulation, staging. and parking provided shall be on a hard surface. STANDARDS FOR GENERAL AMENDMENTS A decision to amend the text of the Zoning Ordinance or the Zoning Map by general amendment is a matter committed to the legislative discretion of the City Council and is not controlled by any one standard. However, in making its decision concerning a proposed amendment, the City Council should consider the following factors: 1. Whether a proposed text amendment is consistent with the purposes, goals, objectives, and policies of the City as stated through its various adopted planning documents; Discussion: The promoting sustainability is a priority in Salt Lake City, and is addressed, or is scheduled to be addressed in all master plan documents in the City. The proposed Ordinance amendments are written to mitigate issues in potentially high-impact districts, while enabling sustainable uses in the various zones throughout the City. Finding: The proposed text change is consistent with adopted master plans. 2. Whether a proposed text amendment furthers the specific purpose statements of the zoning ordinance. Analysis: Chapter 21A.02.030: of the Zoning Ordinance states: "PURPOSE AND INTENT: The purpose of this title is to promote the health, safety, morals, convenience, order, prosperity and welfare of the present and future inhabitants of Salt Lake City, to implement the adopted plans of the city, and to carry out the purposes of the municipal land use development and management act, title 10, chapter 9, of the Utah Code Annotated or its successor, and other relevant statutes. This title is, in addition, intended to: a. Lessen congestion in the streets or roads; b. Secure safety from fire and other dangers; c. Provide adequate light and air; d. Classify land uses and distribute land development and utilization; e. Protect the tax base; f. Secure economy in governmental expenditures; g. Foster the city's industrial, business and residential development; and h. Protect the environment. (Ord. 26-95 § 2(1-3), 1995)" The proposed changes to the ordinance will further the purpose statement of the Zoning Ordinance by enabling urban agriculture and alternative energy systems in various zones throughout the City. Specifically these uses are consistent with intent statements c, d, e, g and h. By enabling the uses, individuals will be able to work more efficiently in community gardens and sell locally grown foods and products thereby lessening the need for imported foods and reducing the environmental impacts from transportation, air pollution etc. Amendments allowing renewable energy sources will enable citizens to 13 create new sources of energy while lessening overall dependence on fossil fuels, which also decreases air pollution. The qualifying provisions for each use are designed to protect citizens from harmful impacts and to`""° further foster responsible application of the uses while providing decision makers with an opportunity to mitigate impacts through the conditional use process (large wind energy systems). These modifications create qualifying provisions that will facilitate mitigation of adverse impacts on neighboring property owners and will clarify sections of the ordinance that were not clear or concise. Finding: Staff finds that the proposed changes to the Zoning Ordinance are consistent with the overall purpose of the Zoning Ordinance as stated in Chapter 21A.02.030. 3. Whether a proposed text amendment is consistent with the purposes and provisions of any applicable overlay zoning districts which may impose additional standards. Discussion: The proposed text amendment is not site specific, and is not associated with any overlay zoning districts. Where a particular installation is within an overlay zoning district, any applicable regulations must be met. Finding: The proposed text amendment meets this standard. 4. The extent to which a proposed text amendment implements best current, professional practices of urban planning and design. Discussion: The proposed text amendments mirror current trends in community sustainability, by providing alternatives for renewable energy and food production systems. These amendments will` update planning practices that create and maintain efficient infrastructure, foster close-knit neighborhoods, a sense of community, and preserve natural habitat. Finding: The proposed text amendment implements the best current practices in urban planning and design. 14 DRAFT USE TABLE URBAN FARM Residential Zones Use 0 8 0 o u M v .-1 N M \ us N M LL M 'Li' ^ 7 ry 2 2 `G 2 m 2 2 2 " " LL cL re K in of sn ch cc cc cc cc cc rr K cL URBAN FARM P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P Definition: Commercial Zones "An Urban Farm"is a farm where agricultural products are cultivated, o processed and distributed in or around a i ^ •-+ ry ti ry M 6 O z m Fn u ri u Si Si 0 0 oa. m a. residential or commercial area. Urban z u u u u u CG farming includes income earning or food producing activites for profit. P P P P P P P P P p P P P P P P P Special Purpose Zones 0 N VI N ry x n a 4 ¢ Si ZZ ¢ a n. _ x 2 w f r p p p P P p P P P P P p Qualifing: 1.Accessory Buildings:Storage and tool sheds,greenhouses,and hoop houses associated with urban farms are subject to the standards in Chapter 21A.40,Accessory Uses,Buildings and Structures and the requirements of the International Building Code.Structures,such as coops and pens,associated with the keeping and raising of animals,livestock,and poultry must meet the requirements of Chapter 8.08 of the Salt Lake City Municipal Code,Keeping Animals,Livestock,and Poultry and are subject to the requirements of the adopted Building Code,when applicable. 2.Riparian Corridor: Urban farms proposed in a riparian corridor,as defined in Section 21A34.130 of the Zoning Ordinance shall be subject to all rules and regulations therein. 3.Flammables,Pesticides and Fertilizers:All flammables,pesticides and fertilizers shall be stored in accordance with the regulations of the Uniform Fire Code and Utah State Department of Agriculture or successor agency.At a minimum,any area where such materials are stored shall have a continuous concrete floor and lip which is tall enough to contain one hundred and ten percent(110%)of the volume of all the materials stored in the area.No pesticides,chemical fertilizers or other hazardous materials shall be stored outside of buildings. All chemical application should be applied by a licensed sprayer. 4.Disposal Requirements: All flammables,pesticides,fertilizers and other hazardous wastes should be disposed of according to Federal and State requirements. 5.Large vehicles:No vehicles in excess of five(5)tons shall be kept,stored or parked on the property,except that such vehicles may be on the property as necessary for completion of grading performed in accordance with a grading permit issued by the City Building Services Division. 6.Hours of Operation: All urban farm related uses shall operate only during daylight hours. 7.Irrigation Systems.Sufficient irrigation shall be provided to cover all needs of the urban farm. Irrigation systems designed for water conservation such as,but not limited to,hand watering,and drip irrigation are strongly encouraged. 8.Delivery and Pick-up: In single family and two family zones,delivery and pick-up of products is allowed provided pick-up times are staggered so that one patron is on site at a time. 9.Parking: Unless otherwise required by the Transportation Division,parking for employees,and patrons of the urban farm shall be provided on site,at a rate of two parking stalls per acre with a minimum of one ADA stall,unless within a single family or two family zoning district. All vehicular circulation,staging,and parking shall be on a hard surface. 10.On Site Sales and Events: Products produced or grown on urban farms may be donated or sold on site provided the following requirements are met; a)The sales stand may not exceed 100 square feet in size. h)Signs are allowed as temporary portable signs subject to the regulations in Chapter 21A.46.55 of this ordinance. Signs must be removed immediately following the sale. c)All necessary City business licenses shall be obtained prior to the sale. d)Sales stands must he setback a minimum of 10 feet from the edge of pavement of a City street. e)The sales stand shall be a non-permanent structure,and must be removed immediately following the sale. f)Perishable foods must be stored in a vermin-proof area or container when the facility is closed 11.Fencing: Fencing of urban farms shall comply with the standards in Section 21A 40.120,Regulation of Fences,Walls,and Hedges. 12.License:A business license is required for an urban farm. When the urban farm is accessory to a residential use,a home occupation license is required. DRAFT I `ABLE Commun, —4arden Residential Zones Use O 0 0 0 O O O M O ` M LL r. K LL ,+ N .y [Y. K N 2 2 2 2 m 2 2 2 as K xc N rr 2 K is 2 K K Cs K COMMUNITY GARDEN P p p P p P p p p p P P p P p P p Definition: Commercial Zones "Community garden"means an area of land managed and maintained by o an individual or group to grow and i - N ,.., N m harvest food crops and/or non-food, 0xc u `u u U u CG F 2 2 o Q p' o t7 m m a. ornamental crops,such as flowers, p p p p p p P P p p P P P P p P p P for personal or group use, Special Purpose Zones consumption,donation,or sale. 0 VI N ox O so so v, 0 .J 2 : a Q Q Q <c 0 as 2 2 — 5 w I... p P p P P p p p p P P P Qualifing: 1.Accessory Buildings:Storage and tool sheds,greenhouses and hoop houses associated with community gardens are subject to the standards in Chapter 21A.40,Accessory Uses,Buildings and Structures and the requirements of the International Building Code.Structures,such as coops and pens,associated with the keeping and raising of animals,livestock,and poultry must meet with the requirements of Chapter 8.08 of the Salt Lake City Municipal Code,Keeping Animals,Livestock,and Poultry and are subject to the requirements of the adopted Building Code,when applicable. 2.Riparian Corridor: Community gardens proposed in a riparian corridor,as defined in Section 21A.34.130 of the Toning Ordinance shall be subject to all rules and regulations therein. 3.Disposal Requirements: All flammables,pesticides,fertilizers and other hazardous wastes should be disposed of according to Federal and State requirements. 4.Hours of Operation: In residential zones,community gardens shall operate during daylight hours. 5.Large Vehicles:No vehicles in excess of five(5)tons shall he kept or stored on the property,except that such vehicles may be on the property as necessary for completion of grading performed in accordance with a grading permit issued by the City Building Services Division. 6.Irrigation:Sufficient irrigation shall be provided to cover all needs of the community garden. Irrigation systems designed for water conservation such as,but not limited to,hand watering,and drip irrigation are strongly encouraged. 7.Parking: Unless otherwise required by the Transportation Division,community gardens shall be exempt from the off-street parking requirements of Section 21A.44,Off Street Parking and Loading. All vehicular circulation,staging,and parking provided shall be on a hard surfaced area. Any on-street parking is to comply with the existing roadway status. 8.On Site Sales and Events: Products from community gardens may be donated or sold on site provided the following requirements are met; a)The sales stand may not exceed 100 square feet in size. b)Signs are allowed as temporary portable signs subject to the regulations in Chapter 21A.46.55 of this ordinance. Signs must be removed immediately following the sale. c)All necessary City business licenses shall be obtained prior to the sale. d)Sales stands must be setback a minimum of 10 feet from the edge of pavement of a City street. e)The sales stand shall be a non-permanent structure,and must be removed immediately following the sale. f)Perishable foods must be stored in a vermin-proof area or container when the facility is closed. 9.Fencing: Fencing of community gardens will comply with the standards in Section 21A.40.120,Regulation of Fences,Walls,and Hedges. DRAFT USE TABLE Seasonal Farm Stand Residential Zones o Use o 0 Cr 0o m m ,n rr, 'n Ln `1 r. 7 m 0 N m \ N N 2 2 f ._ u K K ,1: tY N u> N cc K- K C CC C. K 2' K SEASONAL FARM STAND P P P P Definitions: Commercial Zones "Seasonal farm stand"means a sales table,area,or kiosk of food crops o and/or non-food,ornamental crops, Ln ^ ^' such as flowers,that is located off- rr Li co U i � CG I- o o o o to a. m U. premise from the location where the P P P P P P P P P P P P ,P P P food was grown,or when located in any Special Purpose Zones agricultural district,and operates during the time of year coinciding with the 0 growing season. ^' us r' N a a a VI0 i = N a o Z a i ii _ 5 2 i.T.i 2 r- P P P P P P P P P P P "Locally Grown"means food crops and Qualifing: or non-food,ornamental crops,such as 1.Location: A seasonal farm stand shall he located only along City streets designated as"collector"or"arterial"by the city's major street plan If the stand is located within the public Right-Of-Way a flowers that arc grown within the state revocable lease agreement from the City is required. of Utah. 2.Parking:Unless approved by the Transportation Division,if the seasonal farm stand is located within an existing parking lot,it shall not remove or encroach upon required parking or loading areas for other uses on the site or impede access to parking or loading areas.All vehicular circulation,staging,and parking provided shall be on a hard surfaced area,any On-street parking shall comply with the 3.Duration: Seasonal farm stands shall operate only during the intermountain region harvest season. 4.Setback: Seasonal farm stands must be setback a minimum of 10 feet from the edge of pavement of a City street. 5.Size: A seasonal farm stand may not exceed 100 square feet in size. 6.Food Preparation: Food preparation is prohibited at farm stands,including food samples. 7.Signs: Signs for a seasonal farm stand are allowed as temporary portable signs subject to the regulations in Chapter 21A.46.SS of this ordinance. Signs are not allowed to be placed more than 50 feet from the stand location 8.Sales: Food crops and/or non-food,ornamental crops,such as flowers grown locally are allowed to be sold at a seasonal food stand. Prepackaged"shelf stable"foods produced in close proximity to the farm stand may be sold as well,provided they are fully labeled and produced in an approved health department or Utah State Department of Agriculture facility. 9.Animals:No live animals,birds,or fowl shall be kept or allowed within 20 feet of any area where food is stored or held for sale.This requirement does not apply to guide dogs,signal dogs,or service 10.Garbage:All garbage and refuse shall be stored and disposed of in accordance with established Health Department standards. 11.Storage:Perishable foods must be stored in a vermin-proof area or container when the facility is closed. 4 DRAFT I. ABLE Solar Array Residential Zones 0 cn Use o o 0 Ln Q 0 0 0in n "1 N m — � - N m U. lcU Lcl cLL C� c_ c_c cL LL K cL cL N C G G C m L C G cc cc cC cL cL SOLAR ARRAY Definition: Commercial Zones A"solar array"is a principal use of a packaged interconnected assembly of solar cells used to transform solar energy m Ln = n .--1 N e-1 N m V into thermal,chemical,or electrical 0 z co cc u u u u u CO I 2 , 0 0 0 0 tO , m u°'.energy. A solar array uses solar energy P p P P P P for any or all of the following purposes: (1)water heating,(2)space heating or Special Purpose Zones cooling,and(3)power generation. 0 N Lrl N Q Q Q Q O 00 -' N = in an. _ LT, I-. P P P P Qualifing Provisions: 1.Setbacks: A solar array shall meet all minimum setback requirements for the zone in which it is located. In no case shall a solar array be located less than 6 feet from a property line or other structure. 2.Height: A solar array shall not exceed 20 feet in height measured from established grade. 3.Landscape Buffer:No landscaped buffer yards shall be required on a site with a solar array as a principal use. 4.Code Compliance: Solar arrays are subject to review for compliance with all applicable International Building and Electrical Code requirements by the Salt Lake City Building Services Division. 5.Solar Easements: Solar easements are not a requirement for City approval;nonetheless,a property owner who has installed or intends to install a solar array may negotiate a solar easement with adjacent property owners to ensure perpetual sun on the property. Any easement agreed upon must be recorded by the County Recorder. 6.Electrical Wires:All electrical wires associated with a solar array,shall be located underground. 7.Nonmaintained Or Abandoned Arrays:The building official may require each nonmaintained or abandoned solar array to be removed from the premises when such a system has not been repaired or put into use by the owner,person having control or person receiving benefit of such structure within thirty(30)calendar days after notice of nonmaintenance or abandonment is given to the owner,person having control or person receiving the benefit of such structure.The City may require a performance bond or other means of financial assurance to guarantee removal of abandoned structures. 8.Utility Inter-Connection:No solar array shall be installed that does not meet the requirements of Rocky Mountain Power for an interconnected customer-owned generator.Off-grid systems shall be exempt from this requirement. 9.Off-Street Parking and Loading: No additional parking is required for a solar array;however,a solar array may not replace or hinder existing_required parking and loading. DRAFT USE TABLE Wind Energy System Residential Zones o o Use o 0 0 �n m m m v M M v c .-1 N m , H ti .-1 N M 2 2 �' K N Lr m K K u_ K ac d' N v1 ut rL K cc cc cc cc cL ce K LARGE WIND ENERGY SYSTEM Definition: Commercial Zones A"Large Wind Energy System"is a wind energy conversion system cn o u> consisting of a wind turbine or group o z m 'v, u x u e^5 ~ N `I `si M v cc u u u u u u I-- th rL O 0 0 0 [7 K m LL of wind turbines,tower,and associated control or conversion electronics,which has rated capacity P P C C of more than 100 kW. Special Purpose Zones 0 N V, N V N x D Q Q th Q ¢ 0 zz Q ii a _ 5 2 w 2 I- C C C C C C C P P Quaffing Provisions: 1.Total Height:The total height of the large wind energy system shall be limited to 90 meters above existing grade or by FAA regulations,whichever dictates a lower height. 2.Minimum Lot Size:2 Acres 3.Setbacks:A tower in a large wind energy system must be set back at least 1.25 times its total height from any property boundary,must be within the buildable area of the lot and at least 1.25 times its total height from any overhead utility power line. 4.Noise: Noise emitted from the large wind energy system shall not exceed maximum sound levels set forth in section 9.28 of the Salt Lake City Code(Health and Safety:Noise Control). 5.Blade Clearance:The vertical distance from existing grade to the tip of a wind generator blade when the blade is at its lowest point must be at least 15 feet. 6.Electrical Wires:All electrical wires associated with a large wind energy system,other than wires necessary to connect the wind turbine to the tower wiring,the tower wiring to the disconnect junction box,and the grounding wires shall be located underground. 7.Lighting:Lighting of tower(s)and turbine(s)is prohibited except where required by the Federal Aviation Administration. 8.Appearance,Color,and Finish:The wind turbine and tower shall remain painted or finished the color or finish that was originally applied by the manufacturer. 10.Utility Inter-Connection:No large wind energy system shall be installed that does not meet the requirements of Rocky Mountain Power for an interconnected customer-owned generator.Off-grid systems shall be exempt from this requirement. 11.Nonmaintained Or Abandoned Facilities:The building official may require each nonmaintained or abandoned large wind energy system to be removed from the premises at the cost of the owner when such a system has not been repaired or put into use by the owner,person having control or person receiving benefit of such structure within thirty(30)calendar days after notice of nonmaintenance or abandonment is given to the owner,person having control or person receiving the benefit of such structure.The City may require a performance bond or other means of financial assurance to guarantee removal of abandoned structures. 12.Off-Street Parking or Loading Requirements:None. A large wind energy system shall not remove or encroach upon required parking or loading areas for other uses on the site or access to such parking or loading areas.All vehicular circulation,staging,and parking provided shall be on a hard surface. 3 (., ) ( '''''0 From: Bentley, Alene [mailto:Alene.Bentley@PacifiCorp.com] Sent: Monday, May 17, 2010 5:37 PM To: Coffey, Cheri Cc: Milliner, Ray; Stewart, Casey �rrr►° Subject: RE: Sustainability Code Revisions Cheri, Thanks for giving Rocky Mountain Power an opportunity to offer input. It's critical for customers to understand the requirements of a generation project up-front so it's designed and installed properly. We suggest that the wind spec should include the same code compliance provision as the solar array spec. It would also be helpful to specifically state that installations must meet electric utility clearance requirements (even though ifs implied through state law and National Electric Safety Code requirements), especially since these installations, which generate electric power, could be interpreted as synonymous with electric utility facilities. Alene Alene E. Bentley Rocky Mountain Power 201 South Main Street, Suite 2300 Salt Lake City, UT 84111 801.220.4437 (office) 801.910.6527 (cell) 801.220.3116 (fax) From: James Bennett [mailto:JBennett©slco.org] Sent: Tuesday, May 11, 2010 12:11 PM ,fir To: Coffey, Cheri; Milliner, Ray Subject: RE: Sustainability Code Revisions I have read through the tables as have been sent, we do have some recommended changes. At this time we are gathering the correct information from our contacts and will forward that information to you shortly. In many of the references that you refer back to the Health Department, the appropriate agency should be the State Department of Agriculture. We do also have some concerns relating to the noise standards and believe it would be more prudent to make these references back to the specific City noise code section rather than listing a specific measurement. If it is left as a specific measurement, it would make it a mess to have to go back at a later date to change each specific standard if the noise code is amended, as our Department is currently considering. Thanks James F. Bennett, LEHS Environmental Health Compliance Officer Salt Lake Valley Health Department 788 E Woodoak Lane Murray, UT 84107 Voice:801-313-6668 Fax: 801-31 3-6669 Email: jbennett,vslco.oru www.slvhealth.org .4410, From: Williams, Jeff - Salt Lake City, UT [jeff.williams@ut.usda.gov] 17 Sent: Monday, December 21, 2009 10: 30 AM To: Coffey, Cheri Subject: Sustainability Code Revision: Urban Agricutlre Name: Jeff Williams Address: 125 South State St. , Ste 4402, Salt Lake City, UT 84138 Phone: 801-524-4254 E-Mail : jeff.williams@ut.usda.gov Comments: Urban Agriculture: General Questions: 1. All zoning districts consistent with such uses a. Applied through out city with priority areas identified through community input. Consider a pledge of participation from majority of citizens impacted. b. Should be allowed and encouraged on public properties as supported by local community. c. Should be allowed and encouraged on institutional spaces, consider providing incentives to reward such behavior. 2 . Difinitions : CSA should include food and non-food products grown locally. 3 . Sale of products grown from each individual garden should be allowed and encouraged. 4 . Impacts: a. Traffic should be mitigated through creative partnerships with local businesse or residents, again with input from impacted locals residents . b. ibid. c . Noise should be carefully monitored and strictly enforced. Urban agriclture should produce limited, localized and seasonal noise impacts that can be mitigated effectively. d. Fugitive dust may be an impact of short duration. Chemical application should be applied by a licensed sprayer. Compost may be most acceptable to neighbors in self-contained barrels. Thanks for allowing me to provide feedback on this important subject . Please let me know if I can provide further assistance. Jeff Williams, RC&D Coordinator NRCS Wallace F. Bennett Federal Building 125 South State Street, Room 4402 Salt Lake City, UT 84138-1100 phone: (801) 524-4254 fax: (801) 524-4593 cell : (801) 557-0521 www.greatsaltlakercd.org and now www.csautah.org "Money often costs too much" . Emerson 18 From: Duer, Stephanie Sent: Friday, May 21, 2010 6:56 AM To: Niermeyer, Jeff; Briefer, Laura; Stewart, Brad Subject: commnets on draft use tables Seasonal Farmstand: Will they be using 1) water for washing or 2) coolers with ice/water for storing? Could there be residues in that water we don't want down the stormdrain?This doesn't address this type of dispoal in any way. And why June 1 (thre are crops produced earlier than that...just a notion. Community Gardens: 1) require specific water efficiencies 2) require irrigation-only meter 3) are there issues with properties adjacent to riparian corridor protection areas? Not addressed at all. 4) are there issues with stormwater run-off pertaining to pesticide use that we want to address? 5) "hours of operation" missing language 6)"sales" references urban farms, not community gardens Urban Farms: 1) are there issues pertaining to properties adjacent to riparian corridor? Pesticide use and run-off? invasive species? 2) do we want to address stormwater quality issues and pesticide run-off? 3) I didn't see reference to size...do we want to require irrigation-only meters? Require irrigation efficiencies as defined in landscape code if the farm is commercial? Stephanie 20 May 12, 2010 ,. Ray Milliner, Planning Re: Sustainability Code revisions—Use Tables The division of transportation review comments and recommendations are as follows: Solar Array. The last sentence, "Off-Street Parking and Loading: No additional parking is required for a solar array; however, a solar array may not replace or hinder existing parking and loading." We suggest , "Off-Street Parking and Loading: No additional parking is required for a solar array; however, a solar array may not replace or hinder existing required parking and loading." In the chart the "P" permitted use is not noted in many of the areas. Is solar array different from solar panels? (residential roof top applications etc.). Large Wind Energy System. No parking required; All vehicular circulation, staging, and parking provided is to be on a hard surface. Urban Farm. Parking: Parking for employees, and patrons of the urban farm shall be provided on site, at the rate of two parking stalls per acre, with a minimum of one ADA stall. All vehicular circulation, staging, and parking is to be on a hard surface. ,,, wite Community Garden. Parking: Community gardens shall be exempt from off-street parking requirements of section 21 A.44. Off Street Parking and Loading. All vehicular circulation, staging, and parking provided is to be on a hard surfaced area. any On-street parking is to comply with the existing roadway status. Seasonal Farm Stand. Location: Residential zoning districts, Seasonal Farm Stands shall be located only along streets designated as "collector" or"arterial" on the adopted City Street Classification Map. In some areas there is "no stopping, standing, or parking" along the roadway. Setback: Seasonal farm stands must be setback a minimum of 10 feet from the edge of pavement of a City street. This would indicate that it is possible located within the public ROW and will require a revocable lease agreement and DRT review. It may also be located within an existing parking lot etc. and needs to be subject to: Shall not remove or encroach upon required parking or loading areas for other uses on the site or access to such parking or loading areas. All vehicular circulation, staging, and parking provided is to be on a hard surfaced area, any On-street parking is to comply with the existing roadway status. Sincerely, Barry Walsh Cc Kevin Young, P.E. Randy Drummond, P.E. 21 Peggy Garcia, Public Utilities Ted Itchon, Fire Larry Butcher, Permits John Spencer, Property Management File. From: McCandless, Allen Sent: Monday, May 24, 2010 1:34 PM To: Coffey, Cheri Subject: RE: Sustainability Regulations Cheri. I reviewed the attached use tables for the various zones that included the A-airport district. I do not observe any impacts to the airport or to airport operations and have no additional corrections. Thank you for including_ our comments from last October regarding these ordinance changes. —Allen McCandless We don't have any comments on the proposed changes to the Zoning Ordinance Use Tables. Justin Justin D. Stoker, PE, LEE1Y'AP, CFM Salt Lake City Public Utilities 1530 S. West Temple, SLC, UT 84115 ph. (801) 483-6786 - justin.stoker(c�slcgov.com b Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail 22 PLANNING COMMISSION STAFF REPORT ,.,`•i IT! .4 USE TABLE AMENDMENTS ,•'ti,o0%,,es SUSTAINABILITY REGULATIONS 7 't � Case #PLNPCM2009-01337 , - July 28, 2010 �'°•c,�I r"T,�'�� CONTINUATION FROM JUNE 23 2010 Planning and Zoning Division Department of Community and Economic Development Applicant Mayor Ralph Becker REQUEST. Staff Ray Milliner On November 18, 2009, Mayor Becker initiated a petition to amend the Salt ray.milliner,I slcrov.com Lake City Zoning Ordinance to create a series of regulations promoting (801)535-7645 sustainability throughout the City. Included in this staff report are draft Current Zone: amendments relating to the use tables for the regulation of urban agriculture N/A and large renewable energy sites. The proposed uses associated therein, would be allowed, in some form, within the City. Amendments for consideration Master Plan Designation: include: City Wide Council District: A. Urban Farms City Wide B. Community Gardens C. Seasonal Farm Stands Review Standards D. Solar Arrays 21A.50.050 Standards for General Y E. Large Wind Energy Systems Amendments Affected Text Sections • 21A.62 Definitions STAFF RECOMMENDATION • Land Use Tables • 21A.36 Home Occupations Staff recommends that the Planning Commission review the proposed Notification modifications to The Land Use Tables, Chapters 21A.36.030, 21A.62, and • Notice mailed on June 10. 21A.40 of the Salt Lake City Zoning Ordinance, and based on the findings 2010 in this staff report forward a positive recommendation to the City Council. • Published in Deseret News June 10,2010 • Posted on Cite R State Websites June 10, 2010 Attachments A. Proposed Text Amendments B. Petition Initiation Request C. Public Comment 1 • Background The Planning Commission reviewed this petition and conducted a public hearing on June 23, 2010. At Nalr the meeting, the Commission directed staff to revise the document and return at a later meeting for further review and a possible recommendation. Staff has incorporated the changes directed by the Commission into the proposed language featured below. Suggested changes included: • Eliminate the requirement that urban farms and community gardens install irrigation only water meters. This change has been incorporated into the draft language. • Require that seasonal farm stands be temporary. This change has been incorporated into the draft language. • Look at making solar easements a requirement for solar arrays. See staff analysis below. • Provide information regarding limitations of agriculture in the riparian corridor. See staff analysis below. Solar Easements At the June Planning Commission meeting, the Commission debated the possibility of making the creation of a solar easement between adjacent property owners and the applicant a requirement of approval for a solar array. Currently, Chapter 57-13-2 of the Utah State code allows a property owner to grant an adjacent property owner a solar easement as a conveyance of real property. A solar easement is a right, expressed as an easement, restriction, covenant, or condition contained in any deed, contract, or other written instrument executed by or on behalf of any landowner for the purpose of assuring adequate access to direct sunlight for solar energy systems. A typical solar *ftirti easement establishes certain land use conditions agreed upon by the property owners involved. Such agreements will normally contain the following elements: • A description of the dimensions of the easement, including vertical and horizontal angles measured in the degrees or the hours of the day, on specified dates, during which direct sunlight to a specified surface or structural design feature may not be obstructed; • Restrictions placed upon vegetation, structures, and other objects which may impair or obstruct the passage of sunlight through the easement, and; • The terms and conditions, if any, under which the easement may be revised or terminated. Staff has reviewed available information relating to solar easements and recommends that the Commission not change the proposed qualifying provisions as they relate to solar easements for the following reasons: • The purpose of this language is to encourage solar arrays. Adding a requirement that an applicant receive solar easements from adjacent property owners may discourage the use, as it is sometimes difficult to obtain the easements. • Leaving the language as is makes the applicant aware of the need for an easement but does not make it a requirement. At that point, the applicant can decide what if anything they would like to do about it. 2 Riparian Corridor The requirements of the riparian corridor apply to all uses or developments within 100 feet of the high water line of City Creek, Red Butte Creek, Emigration Creek, Parleys Creek and the Jordan River. Any development within this area is required to receive a riparian protection permit prior to the commencement of any construction, subject to review by the Public Utilities Department. The riparian corridor is divided into three distinct areas, each with its own requirements. • Area A: A "no disturbance area" located between the annual high water line and twenty five feet (25') from the approximate high water line (AHWL); • Area B: A "structure limit area" located between twenty five (25) and fifty feet (50') from the AHWL; and • Area C: A "buffer transition area" located between fifty (50) and one hundred feet (100') from the AHWL. AHWL cam.: • a AreaA--1: Area 6''.e . AraC ;s _tom=:,"-�•��. z e • 25' 50' 100' Development within each area of the corridor is delineated by a use table wherein specific uses are called out as permitted or requiring a riparian permits process. Urban farms and community gardens are not a featured use on the table. Approval of an urban farm or community garden in these areas would be permitted as grading and planting of non-invasive plants (which are allowed uses in the table). Public Participation The proposed amendments were reviewed at an open house on December 17, 2010 and again on April 15, 2010. Public comments received are attached as exhibit C. Between January and May of 20]0, staff met with representatives from Wasatch Community Gardens, the Federal Department of Agriculture, the Business Advisory Board (BAB), the County Health Department and the Historic Landmark Commission to discuss the amendments. They have provided technical input regarding appropriate practice to regulate these uses while mitigating any undesired impacts on residents and local businesses. Staff has received a number of substantive and thoughtful citizen comments regarding the proposed text amendments. Suggestions have been very helpful, and have provided a good basis for the qualifying provisions of the amendment. Staff has incorporated many of the suggestions into the language, and has attached the written comments to this report as exhibit C. 3 Issue Analysis If adopted, the proposed changes would be located in various sections of the Zoning Ordinance. A definition for each use is being proposed, along with qualifying provisions and an amendment to the table of permitted and conditional uses in the various chapters of the Ordinance. Below is a summary of the changes proposed along with analysis and rationale for the amendments. URBAN FARM Definition: "An Urban Farm" is a farm where food is cultivated. processed and distributed in or around a residential or commercial area. Urban farming is generally practiced for income earning or food producing activities." Urban farms are proposed as a permitted use in most zones including residential and commercial zones. The size of these farms ranges from being located in large rear yards of single family homes, or on vacant lots to large multi-acre operations. Owners grow vegetables, herbs, and flowers that are then sold to consumers. The most common type of urban farm is Community Supported Agriculture, wherein individuals purchase shares of the farm produce prior to the growing season, then receive allotments of the harvest throughout the summer. Produce from urban farms may also be sold at farm stands and farmers markets. Issue: As proposed, these urban farms would be allowed within both commercial and residential zoning Districts. Concerns raised with regard to this use generally revolve around the commercial aspect of the farm in residential zones. Although commercial in nature, urban farms can be very small in size. It is not uncommon to see an urban farm operated in the rear yard of a single family residence. Though small,this use can be a significant source of revenue for an individual selling produce to restaurants or other people. Hence, the staff recommendation is to allow this use in all residential zones. Affected Code Sections: Section 21A.36 Qualifying Provisions; Section 21A.62 Definitions; Section 21A.36.030 amendment to home occupation requirements; and all permitted and conditional use tables. Permitted Zones: Residential Foothill Residential (FR-1), Foothill Residential (FR-2), Foothill Residential (FR-3), Residential (R- 1/12,000), Residential (R-1/7,000), Residential (R-1/5,000), Special Development Pattern Residential(SR-1), Special Developthent Pattern Residential (SR-3), Single and Two Family Residential (R-2), Low Density Residential (RMF-30), Moderate Density Residential (RMF -35), Moderate/High Density Residential (RMF- 45), High Density (RMF-75), Residential/Business (RB), Residential Mixed Use (RMU-35), Residential Mixed Use (RMU-45), Residential Mixed Use(RMU),Residential Office (RO). Commercial Neighborhood Commercial (CN), Community Business (CB), Community Shopping (CS), Corridor Commercial (CC), Sugar House Business District (CSHBD), General Commercial (CG), Light Manufacturing (M-1), Heavy Manufacturing (M-2), Central Business (D-1), Downtown Support (D-2),Nee Downtown Warehouse (D-3), Downtown Secondary Central Business (D-4), Gateway Mixed Use (GMU), Research Park (RP), Business Park(BP),Transit Stop Transit Station Area(TSA) 4 Special Purpose Agricultural (AG), Agricultural (AG-2),Agricultural(AG-5),Agricultural (AG-20), Open Space (OS), Public Lands (PL), Public Lands (PL-2), Institutional (I), Urban Institute(UI), Mobile Home Park(MH), Mixed Use (MU), Foothills Protection(FP) Qualifying provisions: 1. Accessory Buildings: Storage and tool sheds. greenhouses. and hoop houses associated with urban farms are subject to the standards in Chapter 21A.40. Accessory Uses. Buildings and Structures and the requirements of the International Building Code. Structures. such as coops and pens. associated with the keeping and raising of animals, livestock. and poultry must meet the requirements of Chapter 8.08 of the Salt Lake City Municipal Code, Keeping Animals. Livestock. and Poultry and are subject to the requirements of the adopted Building Code, when applicable. 2. Riparian Corridor: Urban farms proposed in a riparian corridor, as defined in Section 21A.34.130 of the Zoning Ordinance shall be subject to all rules and regulations therein. 3. Storage Requirements: All flammables. pesticides and fertilizers shall be stored in accordance with the regulations of the Uniform Fire Code and Utah State Department of Agriculture or successor agency. At a minimum. any area where such materials are stored shall have a continuous concrete floor and lip which is tall enough to contain one hundred and ten percent(110%) of the volume of all the materials stored in the area. No pesticides, chemical fertilizers or other hazardous materials shall be stored outside of buildings. 4. Disposal Requirements: All flammables. pesticides, fertilizers and other hazardous wastes should be disposed of according to Federal and State requirements. 5. Large Vehicles: No vehicles in excess of five (5)tons shall be kept. stored or parked on the property. except that such vehicles may be on the property as necessary for completion of grading performed in accordance with a grading permit issued by the City Building Services Division. 6. Hours of Operation: All urban farm related uses shall operate only during daylight hours. 7. Irrigation Systems. Sufficient irrigation shall be provided to cover all needs of the urban farm. Irrigation systems designed for water conservation such as. but not limited to. hand watering, and drip irrigation are strongly encouraged. 8. Delivery and Pick-up: In single family and two family zones. delivery and pick-up of products is allowed provided pick-up times are staggered so that only one patron is on site at a time. 9. Parking: Unless otherwise approved by the Transportation Division. parking for employees, and patrons of the urban farm shall be provided on site. at a rate of two parking stalls per acre with a minimum of one ADA stall. unless within a single family or two family zoning district. All vehicular circulation. staging. and parking shall be on a hard surface. 10. On Site Sales and Events: Products produced or grown on urban farms may be donated or sold on site provided the following requirements are met: a) The sales stand may not exceed 100 square feet in size. b) Signs are allowed as temporary portable signs subject to the regulations in Chapter 21 A.46.55 of this ordinance. Signs must be removed immediately following the sale. c) All necessary City business licenses shall be obtained prior to the sale. d) Sales stands must be setback a minimum of 10 feet from the edge of pavement of a City street. e) The sales stand shall be a non-permanent structure. and must be removed immediately following the sale. 5 f) Perishable foods must be stored in a vermin-proof area or container when the facility is closed. , 11. Fencing: Fencing of urban farms shall comply with the standards in Section 21 A.40.120. Regulation of Fences. Walls, and Hedees. 12. License: A business license is required for an urban farm. When the urban farm is accessory to a residential use, a home occupation license is required. In addition to the above referenced changes, in order to allow urban farms as a home occupation, it will be necessary to make the following changes to Chapter 21A.36.030 of the Zoning Ordinance. The changes will allow an individual operating an urban farm as a home occupation to sell produce from the residence. Currently the ordinance does not allow the sale of produce from the residential lot. Issue: Not included in the proposed changes is an amendment to allow hired employees as part of an urban farm home occupation. Staff is requesting that the Planning Commission discuss the option of allowing employees as part of a home occupation, and determine whether or not it would be appropriate. Employees would be allowed at an urban farm that is not part of a home occupation in non residential uses. Proposed amendments are in red: 21A.36.030: HOME OCCUPATIONS: B. Permitted Home Occupations: Subject to compliance with the standards specified in this, ,., section, the following occupations, that do not have the client come to the home, shall be, permitted as home occupations subject only to approval by the zoning administrator pursuant to subsection H of this section: 1. Artists, illustrators, writers, photographers, editors, drafters, and publishers; 2. Consultants, private investigators, field representatives and other similar activities; 3. Bookkeeping and other similar computer activities; 4. Locksmith; 5. Distribution of products grown or assembled at home for off premises sales (such as garden produce, crafts, etc.); 6. Janitorial services; anfl 7. Mail order business or sales representative; and S. Distribution of products crown as part of an urban farm for on or off premise sales (such as Qarden produce). COMMUNITY GARDEN Definition: The proposed definition would replace the current definition found in Chapter 21A.62 of the Zoning Ordinance; COMMUNITY GARDEN: The exclusive use of a vacant lot fer the growing of garden produce by—a `"" nonprofit organization in which food produced is consumed by local dy' di iduals and f„nlies 6 "Community garden" means an area of land managed and maintained by an individual or group to grow and harvest food crops and/or non-food. ornamental crops. such as flowers. for personal or group use, consumption, donation. or sale." Community gardens are a type of garden where the property is owned and managed by an individual or group of individuals where food is grown for personal or group use. These gardens could be housed on a vacant lot, in a person's back yard, or in any open space area. Generally, an individual is assigned a"plot"in the garden for which she is responsible,and receives the benefits of her labors. Community gardens are very popular it is not uncommon for each to have a waiting list for plots. Further, the gardens are proving to be valuable community gathering spaces as it is not uncommon to find individuals from numerous social and economic backgrounds working side by side toward a common goal. Each garden is unique in the way it is managed, operated and tended. As a result, staff has worked with various entities, to ensure that the base impacts of the use are mitigated while providing operators with the flexibility necessary to create a vibrant,workable community garden. Issue: The impact of a community garden most likely would be similar to those of an urban farm. Community Gardens would be allowed within most zoning districts in the city. Most issues raised with regard to the gardens are associated with the impacts of the use on adjacent properties. Parking, noise, and activities not relating directly to the gardening use have been notable. Staff is requesting that the Commission review the proposed qualifying provisions and determine whether or not they are sufficient to ensure compliance. Proposed language includes: Affected Code Sections: Section 21A.36 Qualifying Provisions; Section 21A.62 Definitions; and all permitted and conditional use tables. Permitted Zones: Residential Foothill Residential (FR-1), Foothill Residential (FR-2), Foothill Residential (FR-3), Residential (R- 1/12,000), Residential (R-1/7,000), Residential (R-1/5,000), Special Development Pattern Residential (SR-1), Special Development Pattern Residential (SR-3), Single and Two Family Residential (R-2), Low Density Residential (RMF-30). Moderate Density Residential (RMF -35), Moderate/High Density Residential (RMF- 45), High Density (RMF-75), Residential/Business (RB), Residential Mixed Use (RMU-35), Residential Mixed Use (RMU-45). Residential Mixed Use(RMU),Residential Office(RO). Commercial Neighborhood Commercial (CN), Community Business (CB), Community Shopping (CS), Corridor Commercial (CC), Sugar House Business District (CSHBD), General Commercial (CG), Light Manufacturing (M-1), Heavy Manufacturing (M-2), Central Business (D-1), Downtown Support (D-2), Downtown Warehouse (D-3). Downtown Secondary Central Business (D-4), Gateway Mixed Use (GMU), Research Park (RP). Business Park(BP),Transit Stop Transit Station Area(TSA) Special Purpose Agricultural(AG),Agricultural(AG-2),Agricultural (AG-5),Agricultural (AG-20), Open Space (OS),Public Lands (PL), Public Lands (PL-2), Institutional(I),Urban Institute(UI),Mobile Home Park(MH), Mixed Use (MU),Foothills Protection(FP) Now Qualifying provisions: 1. Accessory Buildings: Storage and tool sheds, greenhouses and hoop houses associated with community gardens are subject to the standards in Chapter 21A.40, Accessory Uses, Buildings and Structures and the requirements of the International Building Code. Structures, such as coops and pens, associated with the keeping and raising of animals, livestock, and poultry must meet with the requirements of Chapter 8.08 of the Salt Lake City Municipal Code, Keeping Animals, Livestock, and Poultry and are subject to the requirements of the adopted Building Code,when applicable. 2. Riparian Corridor: Community gardens proposed in a riparian corridor. as defined in Section 21A.34.130 of the Zoning Ordinance shall be subject to all rules and regulations therein. 3. Disposal Requirements: All flammables, pesticides, fertilizers and other hazardous wastes should be disposed of according to Federal and State requirements. 4. Hours of Operation: In residential zones. community gardens shall operate only during daylight hours. 5. Large Vehicles: No vehicles in excess of five (5) tons shall be kept or stored on the property, except that such vehicles may be on the property as necessary for completion of grading performed in accordance with a grading permit issued by the City Building Services Division. 6. Irrigation: Sufficient irrigation shall be provided to cover all needs of the community garden. Irrigation systems designed for water conservation such as, but not limited to.hand watering, and drip irrigation are strongly encouraged. 7. Parking: Unless otherwise required by the Transportation Division. community gardens shall be'"l'" exempt from the off-street parking requirements of Section 21 A.44. Off Street Parking and Loading. All vehicular circulation. staging. and parking provided shall be on a hard surfaced area. Any On- street parking is to comply with the existing roadway status. 13. On Site Sales and Events: Products produced or grown at community gardens may be donated or sold on site provided the following requirements are met: a) The sales stand may not exceed 100 square feet in size. b) Signs are allowed as temporary portable signs subject to the regulations in Chapter 21A.46.55 of this ordinance. Signs must be removed immediately following the sale. c) All necessary City business licenses shall be obtained prior to the sale. d) Sales stands must be setback a minimum of 10 feet from the edge of pavement of a City street. e) The sales stand shall be a non-permanent structure. and must be removed immediately following the sale. f) Perishable foods must be stored in a vermin-proof area or container when the facility is closed. 8. Fencing: Fencing of community gardens will comply with the standards in Section 21A.40.120. Regulation of Fences.Walls. and Hedges. Community garden regulations are currently featured in Chapter 21A.24.010 as well as the Use table in Chapter 21A.24.190. The ordinance amendment discussed above would replace these requirements, ands' 8 therefore, staff is requesting that the Commission consider eliminating the following language from the zoning ordinance. Section 21A.24.010 „ b , n following regulations: property in the neighborhood. F F F R R R 1 2 3 l I I 4 2 1 3 1 2 U , , , R- R- R R R- R- s 5 7 0 1/ 1/ S S M M M M R- e 6 8 0 12, 7, R-1/ S R- R- R RM F- F- RM R U- U- M R 0 0 0 00 00 5,00 R- 2 3 -2 F- 35 45 F- B 35 45 U 0 0 0 0 1 30 75 Community C GGGCCG - GGP PPRP P R P- s gardens as - - - - - - _ - - - - - - _ defined in chapter 21A.62 of this title and as regulated by subsection 21 A.2'1.010Q of this chapter SEASONAL FARM STAND Seasonal farm stands are sales tables or kiosks where food crops are sold away from where the food was growm Traditionally, they will be seen cropping up along highways during the harvest season. They provide farmers with an alternative revenue source from that of selling to a large broker or market. Seasonal farm stands generally operate during the time of year coinciding with the growing season. Definition: 9 "Seasonal farm stand" means a sales table, area, or kiosk of food crops and/or non-food. an ornamental crop, such as flowers. that is located off-premise from the location where the food was grown, or when located in any agricultural district.and operates during the time of year coinciding with the growing season. "Locally Grown" means food crops and or non-food, ornamental crops, such as flowers that are grown within the state of Utah. Issue: As proposed, seasonal farm stands will not be allowed on smaller residential streets, as a result, the impacts will generally be centered away from residential neighborhoods (not all residential areas will be exempt, as there are residential uses along collector and arterial streets). When reviewed by the Business Advisory Board, concerns were raised with relation to the ability of the farmer to sell a product without first obtaining the necessary permits and approvals from the Department of Agriculture. Staff researched the issue and found that seasonal farm stands are excluded from regulation by the health department provided certain standards are met(mitigating standards are included in the proposed language). See qualifying provisions. Affected Code Sections: Section 21A.36 Qualifying Provisions; Section 21A.62 Definitions; and all permitted and conditional use tables. Permitted Zones: Residential Residential/Business (RB), Residential Mixed Use (RMU-35),Residential Mixed Use(RMU-45), Residential Mixed Use(RMU). Niro Commercial Residential Office (RO), Neighborhood Commercial (CN). Community Business (CB), Community Shopping (CS), Corridor Commercial (CC), Sugar House Business District (CSHBD). General Commercial (CG), Light Manufacturing (M-1), Heavy Manufacturing (M-2), Central Business (D-1), Downtown Support (D-2), Downtown Warehouse (D-3), Downtown Secondary Central Business (D-4), Gateway Mixed Use (GMU), Special Purpose Agricultural (AG), Agricultural (AG-2),Agricultural(AG-5), Agricultural (AG-20), Open Space(OS), Public Lands (PL), Public Lands (PL-2),Institutional (I),Urban Institute (UI), Mobile Home Park (MH), Mixed Use (MU),Foothills Protection(FP), Transit Stop Area(TSA) Qualifying Provisions: 1. Location: A seasonal farm stand shall be located only along City streets designated as -collector- or "arterial" by the city's major street plan. If the stand is located within the public Right-Of-Way a revocable lease agreement from the City is required. 2. Parking: Unless approved by the Transportation Division. if the seasonal farm stand is located within an existing parking lot, it shall not remove or encroach upon required parking. or loading areas for- other uses on the site or impede access to parking or loading areas. All vehicular circulation. staeine.""i' 10 and parking provided shall be on a hard surfaced area, any On-street parking shall comply with the existing roadway status. 3. Duration: Seasonal farm stands shall operate only during the intermountain region harvest season. 4. Setback: Seasonal farm stands must be setback a minimum of 10 feet from the edge of pavement of a City street. 5. Size: A seasonal farm stand may not exceed 100 square feet in size. 6. Food Preparation: Food preparation is prohibited at farm stands. including food samples. 7. Signs: Signs for a seasonal farm stand are allowed as temporary portable signs subject to the regulations in Chapter 21A.46.55 of this ordinance. Signs are not allowed to be placed more than 50 feet from the stand location 8. Sales: Food crops and/or non-food, ornamental crops, such as flowers grown locally are allowed to be sold at a seasonal food stand. Prepackaged "shelf stable" foods produced in close proximity to the farm stand may be sold as well, provided they are fully labeled and produced in an approved health department or Utah State Department of Agriculture facility. 9. Animals: No live animals. birds, or fowl shall be kept or allowed within 20 feet of any area where food is stored or held for sale. This requirement does not apply to guide dogs, signal dogs. or service dogs. 10. Garbage: All garbage and refuse shall be stored and disposed of in accordance with established Health Department standards. 11. Storage: Perishable foods must be stored in a vermin-proof area or container when the facility is closed. SOLAR ARRAY Definition: A "solar array" is a principal use of a packaged interconnected assembly of solar cells used to transform solar energy into thermal. chemical, or electrical energy. A solar array uses solar energy for any or all of the following purposes: (11 water heating. (2) space heating or cooling, and (3)power generation. A solar array is a linked collection of solar panels and cells that in turn are used to generate electric power. These arrays are larger in size and scope to the solar panels used to generate energy for a single family home or small use (They will be addressed in future phases of the sustainability review). Arrays are used to transform solar energy into thermal, chemical and electrical power, are generally attached to the overall electric grid, and power generated by the use is sold to the electric company (Rocky Mountain Power), as part of a net metering agreement. Issue: At issue with solar arrays are the impacts of the solar panels on adjacent properties. Solar arrays are most effective when placed in a large area with direct sunlight. The effectiveness of the arrays diminishes significantly when shaded. Therefore, screening, and other common techniques for mitigating visual impacts are not viable for the arrays. As a result, staff is proposing that they be allowed only in zones where they can be built on large expanses of land, with limited shading and the impacts adjacent uses are limited by distance, scale and type of use. Affected Code Sections: Section 21A.36 Qualifying Provisions; Section 21A.62 Definitions; and all permitted and conditional use tables except residential zones. 11 Permitted Zones: Residential None Commercial (CG), Light Manufacturing (M-1), Heavy Manufacturing (M-2), Central Business, Research Park (RP), Business Park(BP) Special Purpose Agricultural (AG),Agricultural(AG-2),Agricultural(AG-5),Agricultural(AG-20),Public Lands(PL) Qualifying Provisions: 1. Setbacks: A solar array shall meet all minimum setback requirements for the zone in which it is located. In no case shall a solar array be located less than 6 feet from a property line or other structure. 2. Height: A solar array shall not exceed 20 feet in height measured from established grade. 3. Landscape Buffer: No landscaped buffer yards shall be required on a site with a solar array as a principal use. 4. Code Compliance: Solar arrays are subject to review for compliance with all applicable International Building- and Electrical Code requirements by the Salt Lake City Building Services Division. 5. Solar Easements: Solar easements are not a requirement for City approval: nonetheless, a property owner who has installed or intends to install a solar array may negotiate a solar easement with adjacent property owners to ensure perpetual sun on the property. Any' easement agreed upon must be recorded by the County Recorder. 6. Electrical Wires: All electrical wires associated with a solar array. shall be located underground. 7. Nonmaintained Or Abandoned Arrays: The building official may require each nonmaintained or abandoned solar array to be removed from the premises when such a system has not been repaired or put into use by the owner. person having control or person receiving benefit of such structure within thirty (30) calendar days after notice of nonmaintenance or abandonment is given to the owner. person having control or person receiving the benefit of such structure. The city may require a performance bond or other means of financial assurance to guarantee removal of abandoned structures. 8. Utility Inter-Connection: No solar array shall be installed that does not meet the requirements of Rocky Mountain Power for an interconnected customer-owned generator. Off-grid systems shall be exempt from this requirement. 9. Off-Street Parking and Loading: No additional parking is required for a solar array: however. a solar array may not replace or hinder existing required parking and loading. LARGE WIND ENERGY SYSTEM Definition: A"Large Wind Energy System" is a wind energy conversion system consisting of a wind turbine or group of wind turbines_ tower. and associated control or conversion electronics. which has rated capacity of more than 100 kW. 12 A large wind energy system is one that has a capacity to generate more than 100 Kilowatts of power (The average annual electrical energy consumption of a household in the United States is about 8,900 kilowatt-hours, equivalent to a steady power consumption of about 1 kilowatt, for an entire year). The height of the structures ranges from approximately 60 meters to 90 meters (approximately 200 — 300 feet tall) and the blades range from 20 to 40 meters (65 to 130 ft) in length and rotate at approximately 10 to 22 rotations per minute (at 22 rotations per minute, the tip of the blade is travelling approximately 200 miles per hour). Issue: The primary issue with large wind energy systems is the size and location. In order to operate efficiently, large wind turbines must be located in windy areas. Salt Lake City has very few locations where there is sufficient wind to warrant installation of a turbine, and these locations are generally in residential neighborhoods where the impacts of the towers would be significant. Nonetheless, staff is proposing that they be allowed in zones with no residential uses, and large lot areas that would provide a buffer between uses. As a result, it is unlikely that there will be many large wind energy systems built in the near future, but with the increasing emphasis on finding alternative power sources and the likelihood that technological advances will make windmills viable in less windy areas, it is anticipated that there will be a market for wind energy systems in the proposed zones. In zones where the impacts are more pronounced, staff is recommending that large wind energy systems be reviewed by the Planning Commission as a conditional use. This will provide policy makers with an opportunity to review and impose conditions of approval to mitigate harmful impacts on adjacent properties. Affected Code Sections: Section 21A.36 Qualifying Provisions; Section 21A.62 Definitions; and all permitted and conditional use tables. Permitted/Conditional Use Zones: Residential None Commercial Permitted Light Manufacturing (M-1). Heavy Manufacturing(M-2) Conditional Research Park(RP). Business Park(BP) Miscellaneous Permitted Institutional (I). Urban Institute(UI)Permitted Conditional Agricultural (AG). Agricultural (AG-2),Agricultural (AG-5),Agricultural (AG-20),Public Lands (PL) Open Space(OS),A. Public Land (PL) 13 Qualifying Provisions: 1. Total Height: The total height of the large wind energy system shall be limited to 90 meters above existing grade or by FAA regulations, whichever dictates a lower height. 2. Minimum Lot Size: 2 Acres 3. Setbacks: A tower in a large wind energy system must be set back at least 1.25 times its total height from any property boundary. must be within the buildable area of the lot and at least 1.25 times its total height from any overhead utility power line: 4. Noise: Noise emitted from the large wind energy system shall not exceed maximum sound levels set forth in section 9.28 of the Salt Lake City Code (Health and Safety: Noise Control). 5. Blade Clearance: The vertical distance from existing grade to the tip of a wind generator blade when the blade is at its lowest point must be at least 15 feet. 6. Electrical Wires: All electrical wires associated with a large wind energy system. other than wires necessary to connect the wind turbine to the tower wiring. the tower wiring to the disconnect junction box. and the grounding wires shall be located underground. 7. Lighting: Lighting of tower(s) and turbine(s) is prohibited except where required by the Federal Aviation Administration. 8. Appearance. Color, and Finish: The wind turbine and tower shall remain painted or finished the color or finish that was originally applied by the manufacturer. 9. Signs: All signs are prohibited, other than the manufacturer's or installer's identification. appropriate yarning signs. or owner identification on a wind turbine. tower. building. or other associated structure. 10. Utility Inter-Connection: No large wind energy system shall be installed that does not meet the requirements of Rocky Mountain Power for an interconnected customer-owned generator. Off- grid systems shall be exempt from this requirement. 11. Nonmaintained Or Abandoned Facilities: The building official may require each nonmaintained or abandoned large wind energy system to be removed from the premises at the cost of the owner when such a system has not been repaired or put into use by the owner. person having control or person receiving benefit of such structure within thirty (30) calendar days after notice of iionmaintenance or abandonment is given to the owner. person having control or person receiving the benefit of such structure. The city may require a performance bond or other means of financial assurance to guarantee removal of abandoned structures. 12. Off-Street Parking or Loading Requirements: None. A large wind energy system shall not remove or encroach upon required parking or loading areas for other uses on the site or access to such parking or loading areas. All vehicular circulation. staging. and parking provided shall be on a hard surface. STANDARDS FOR GENERAL AMENDMENTS A decision to amend the text of the Zoning Ordinance or the Zoning Map by general amendment is a matter committed to the legislative discretion of the City Council and is not controlled by any one standard. However, in making its decision concerning a proposed amendment, the City Council should consider the following factors: 1. Whether a proposed text amendment is consistent with the purposes, goals, objectives, and policies of the City as stated through its various adopted planning documents; 14 Discussion: The promoting sustainability is a priority in Salt Lake City, and is addressed, or is scheduled to be addressed in all master plan documents in the City. The proposed Ordinance amendments are written to mitigate issues in potentially high-impact districts, while enabling sustainable uses in the various zones throughout the City. Finding: The proposed text change is consistent with adopted master plans. 2. Whether a proposed text amendment furthers the specific purpose statements of the zoning ordinance. Analysis: Chapter 21A.02.030: of the Zoning Ordinance states: "PURPOSE AND INTENT: The purpose of this title is to promote the health, safety, morals, convenience, order, prosperity and welfare of the present and future inhabitants of Salt Lake City, to implement the adopted plans of the city, and to carry out the purposes of the municipal land use development and management act, title 10, chapter 9, of the Utah Code Annotated or its successor, and other relevant statutes. This title is, in addition, intended to: a. Lessen congestion in the streets or roads; b. Secure safety from fire and other dangers; c. Provide adequate light and air; d. Classify land uses and distribute land development and utilization; e. Protect the tax base; f. Secure economy in governmental expenditures; g. Foster the city's industrial,business and residential development; and h. Protect the environment. (Ord. 26-95 § 2(1-3), 1995)" The proposed changes to the ordinance will further the purpose statement of the Zoning Ordinance by enabling urban agriculture and alternative energy systems in various zones throughout the City. Specifically these uses are consistent with intent statements c, d, e, g and h. By enabling the uses, individuals will be able to work more efficiently in community gardens and sell locally grown foods and products thereby lessening the need for imported foods and reducing the environmental impacts from transportation, air pollution etc. Amendments allowing renewable energy sources will enable citizens to create new sources of energy while lessening overall dependence on fossil fuels, which also decreases air pollution. The qualifying provisions for each use are designed to protect citizens from harmful impacts and to further foster responsible application of the uses while providing decision makers with an opportunity to mitigate impacts through the conditional use process (large wind energy systems). These modifications create qualifying provisions that will facilitate mitigation of adverse impacts on neighboring property owners and will clarify sections of the ordinance that were not clear or concise. Finding: Staff finds that the proposed changes to the Zoning Ordinance are consistent with the overall purpose of the Zoning Ordinance as stated in Chapter 21A.02.030. 3. Whether a proposed text amendment is consistent with the purposes and provisions of any applicable overlay zoning districts which may impose additional standards. 15 Discussion: The proposed text amendment is not site specific, and is not associated with any overlay zoning districts. Where a particular installation is within an overlay zoning district, any applicable regulations must be met. Finding: The proposed text amendment meets this standard. 4. The extent to which a proposed text amendment implements best current, professional practices of urban planning and design. Discussion: The proposed text amendments mirror current trends in community sustainability, by providing alternatives for renewable energy and food production systems. These amendments will update planning practices that create and maintain efficient infrastructure, foster close-knit neighborhoods, a sense of community, and preserve natural habitat. Finding: The proposed text amendment implements the best current practices in urban planning and design. Nape 16 DRAFT USE TABLE URBAN FARM Residential Zones Use Fi $ FO o m ' M > Zr Zt Tc 0-2 rc $ z c 2 en URBAN FARM P P Y P LL p 4- P m P P N N P P P P P p p P p p Definition: Commercial Zones "An Urban Farm"is a farm where agricultural products are cultivated, a processed and distributed in or around a ' j 'V " ^' ^' " 2 m u_ p u m u u CO r - o 0 0 0 sb residential or commercial area.Urban farming includes income earning or food producing activites for profit. P P P f P P P P p p p P p p p p P Special Purpose Zones 0 7 Va a i O VI �t a n _ S — f if'- p P P p P P P p P p p p Qualifing: 1-Accessory Buildings:Storage and tool sheds,greenhouses,and hoop houses associated with urban farms are subject to the standards in Chapter 214.40,Accessory Uses.Buildings and Structures and the requirements of the International Building Code.Structures,such as coops and pens,associated with the keeping and raising of animals,livestock,and poultry must meet the requirements of Chapter 8.08 of the Salt Lake City Municipal Code,Keeping Animals,Uvestock,and Poultry and are subject to the requirements of the adopted Building Code,when applicable. 7_Riparian Corridor-Urban farms proposed in a riparian corridor,as defined in Section Z1A.34.130 of the Zoning Ordinance shall be subject to all rules and regulations therein. 3.Flammables,Pesticides and Fertilizers:All flammables,pesticides and fertilizers shall be stored in accordance with the regulations of the Uniform Fire Code and Utah State Department of Agriculture or successor agency.At a minimum,any area where such materials are stored shall have a continuous concrete floor and lip which is tall enough to contain one hundred and ten percent(110%)of the volume of all the materials stored in the area.No pesticides,chemical fertilizers or other hazardous materials shall be stored outside of buildings.All chemical application should be applied by a licensed sprayer. 4.Disposal Requirements:All flammables,pesticides,fertilizers and other hazardous wastes should be disposed of according to Federal and State requirements. 5.Large Vehicles:No vehicles in excess of five(5)tons shall be kept,stored or parked on the property,except that such vehicles may be on the property as necessary for completion of grading performed in accordance with a grading permit issued by the City Building Services Division. 6.Hours of Operation:All urban farm related uses shall operate only during daylight hours. 7.Irrigation Systems.Sufficient irrigation shall be provided to cover all needs of the urban farm.Irrigation systems designed for water conservation such as,but not limited to,hand watering,and drip irrigation are strongly encouraged. 8.Delivery and Pick-up:In single family and two family zones,delivery and pick-up of products is allowed provided pick-up times are staggered so that one patron is on site at a time. 9.Parking:Unless otherwise required by the Transportation Division,parking for employees,and patrons of the urban farm shall be provided on site,at a rate of two parking stalls per acre with a minimum of one ADA stall,unless within a single family or two family zoning district.All vehicular circulation,staging,and parking shall be on a hard surface. 10.On Site Sales and Events:Products produced or grown on urban farms may be donated or sold on site provided the following requirements are met; a)The sales stand may not exceed 100 square feet in sae. b)Signs are allowed as temporary portable signs subject to the regulations in Chapter 21,14655 of this ordinance.Signs must be removed immediately following the sale. c)All necessary City business licenses shall be obtained prior to the sale. d)Sales stands must be setback a minimum of 10 feet from the edge of pavement of a City street. e)The sales stand shall be a non-permanent structure,and must be removed immediately following the sale. f)Perishable foods must be stored in a vermin-proof area or container when the facility is closed. 1L Fencing:Fencing of urban farms shall comply with the standards in Section 21A.40.120,Regulation of Fences,Walls,and Hedges. 12.License:A business license is required for an urban farm.When the urban farm is accessory to a residential use,a home occupation license is required. Co , 1 d DRAFT USE TABLE Community Garden Residential Zones 0 USC 0 O o `^ '^ 0 0 o in an rn 9' v r•i c? in M v n LL cc i ♦-I 2 _ - 't : L 2 an 2 2 2 K cc rk va rc cc d' cc K = K ck cE COMMUNITY GARDEN P P P P [ p I P p P P p p P P P P P I P Definition: Commercial Zones "Community garden"means an area of land managed and maintained by 0 an individual or group to grow and = .1 N - , ,r harvest food crops and/or non-food, O urn u v CO � S o C. 0 o th m u: ornamental crops,such as flowers, p p p P P P P P P p P P P P P P P P for personal or group use, Special Purpose Tones consumption,donation,or sale. I o _ m a a ¢ ¢ o se ¢ a. - o w 2 P P P P P _ P P p P P P Qualifing: 1.Accessory Buildings:Storage and tool sheds,greenhouses and hoop houses associated with community gardens are subject to the standards In Chapter 21A.40,Accessory Uses,Buildings and Structures and the requirements of the International Building Code.Structures,such as coops and pens,associated with the keeping and raising of animals,livestock,and poultry must meet with the requirements of Chapter 8.08 of the Salt Lake City Municipal Code,Keeping Animals,Livestock,and Poultry and are subject to the requirements of the adopted Building Code,when applicable. 2.Riparian Corridor. Community gardens proposed in a riparian corridor,as defined in Section 21A.34.130 of the Zoning Ordinance shall be subject to all rules and regulations therein. 3_Disposal Requirements:All flammables,pesticides,fertilizers and other hazardous wastes should be disposed of according to Federal and State requirements. 4_Hours of Operation: In residential zones,community gardens shall operate during daylight hours. S.Large Vehicles:No vehicles in excess of five(5)tons shall be kept or stored on the property,except that such vehicles maybe on the property as necessary for completion of grading performed in accordance with a grading permit issued by the City Building Services Division. 6.Irrigation:Sufficient irrigation shall he provided to cover all needs of the community garden. Irrigation systems designed for water conservation such as,hut not limited to,hand watering,and drip irrigation are strongly encouraged. 7_Parking: Unless otherwise required by the Transportation Division,community gardens shall be exempt from the off-street parking requirements of Section 21A.44,Off Street Parking and Loading.All vehicular circulation,staging,and parking provided shall be on a hard surfaced area.Any on-street parking is to comply with the existing roadway status. 8.On Site Sales and Events: Products from communitygardens may be donated or sold on site provided the following requirements are met; a)The sales stand may not exceed 100 square feet in size. b)Signs are allowed as temporary portable signs subject to the regulations in Chapter 21A.46.55 of this ordinance. Signs must be removed immediately following the sale. c)All necessary City business licenses shall be obtained prior to the sale. d)Sales stands must be setback a minimum of 10 feet from the edge of pavement of a City street. e)The sales stand shall be a non-permanent structure,and must be removed immediately following the sale. f)Perishable foods must be stored in a vermin-proof area or container when the facility is closed. 9.Fencing: Fencing of community gardens will comply with the standards in Section 21A.40.120,Regulation of Fences,Walls,and Hedges. DRAFT USE TABLE Seasonal Farm Stand Residential Zones 0 Use o o N o `I o O m m V r v-1 N m ,, .-1 N el = do cL N 2 2 2 m u. U- Li_ K 2 K N N ✓1 K K cc cc K cc C rr ch SEASONAL FARM STAND P P P P Definitions: Commercial Zones "Seasonal farm stand"means a sales table,area,or kiosk of food crops a and/or non-food,ornamental crops, _ ^ -s N . N m such as flowers,that is located off- o U v U v u CD . 0 0 0 0 0 cc m premise from the location where the P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P food was grown,or when located in any Special Purpose Zones agricultural district,and operates during the time of year coinciding with the 0 growing season. ^' Ln ^' L Iv = O N Q a a n o i n. T. rC O z < i c P P P P P P P P P P P "Locally Grown"means food crops and Qualifing: or non-food,ornamental crops,such as 1.location:A seasonal farm stand shall be located only along City streets designated as"collector"or"arterial"by the city's major street plan.If the stand is located within the public Right-Of-Way a flowers that are grown within the state revocable lease agreement from the City is required. of Utah. 2.Parking:Unless approved by the Transportation Division,if the seasonal farm stand is located within an existing parking lot,it shall not remove or encroach upon required parking or loading areas for other uses on the site or impede access to parking or loading areas.All vehicular circulation,staging,and parking provided shall be on a hard surfaced area,any On-street parking shall comply with the 3.Duration: Seasonal farm stands shall operate only during the intermountain region harvest season. 4.Setback: Seasonal farm stands must be setback a minimum of 10 feet from the edge of pavement of a City street. S.Size:A seasonal farm stand may not exceed 100 square feet in size. 6-Food Preparation: Food preparation is prohibited at farm stands,including food samples. 7.Signs: Signs for a seasonal farm stand are allowed as temporary portable signs subject to the regulations in Chapter 21A.46.5S of this ordinance. Signs are not allowed to be placed more than 50 feet from the stand location 8.Sales-. Food crops and/or non-food,ornamental crops,such as flowers grown locally are allowed to be sold at a seasonal food stand. Prepackaged"shelf stable"foods produced in close proximity to the farm stand may be sold as well,provided they are fully labeled and produced in an approved health department or Utah State Department of Agriculture facility. 9.Animals:No live animals,birds,or fowl shall be kept or allowed within 20 feet of any area where food is stored or held for sale.This requirement does not apply to guide dogs,signal dogs,or service 10.Garbage:All garbage and refuse shall be stored and disposed of in accordance with established Health Department standards. 11.Storage:Perishable foods must be stored in a vermin-proof area or container when the facility is closed. N 0 DRAFT USE TABLE Solar Array Residential Zones m Use 0 8 0 o rn rn M -1- el i vi m c . 7 7 cE cE C or rr nr er . 2 2 2 co 2 2 SOLAR ARRAY Definition: Commercial Zones A"solar array"is a principal use of a packaged interconnected assembly of solar cells used to transform solar energy m rn CD into thermal,chemical,or electrical CD co ire v CG u ry A r� n' '� o. , a. r_ `u u u u u I-- ri o C O th z m energy.A solar array uses solar energy P P P P P p for any or all of the following purposes: Special Purpose Zones (1)water heating,(2)space heating or cooling,and(3)power generation. 0 N ( (5 0N 2 = N <1 2 c .c 0 et -1- o_ ii _ J H P I—. __ — P P P Qualifing Provisions: 1.Setbacks:A solar array shall meet all minimum setback requirements for the zone in which it is located In no rase shall a solar array be located less than 6 feet from a property line or other structure. 2.Height: A solar array shall not exceed 20 feet in height measured from established grade. 3.Landscape Buffer:No landscaped buffer yards shall be required on a site with a solar array as a principal use. a.Code Compliance: Solar arrays arc subject to review for compliance with all applicable International Building and Electrical Code requirements by the Salt Lake City Building Services Division. S.Solar Easements: Solar easements are not a requirement for City approval;nonetheless,a property owner who has installed or intends to install a solar array may negotiate a solar easement with adjacent property owners to ensure perpetual sun on the property.Any easement agreed upon must be recorded by the County Recorder. 6.Electrical Wires:All electrical wires associated with a solar array,shall be located underground. 7.Nonmaintained Or Abandoned Arrays:The building official may require each nonmaintained or abandoned solar array to be removed from the premises when such a system has not been repaired or put into use by the owner,person having control or person receiving benefit of such structure within thirty(30)calendar days after notice of nonmaintenance or abandonment is given to the owner,person having control er person receiving the benefit of such structure.The City may require a performance band or other means of finanrial assurance to guarantee removal of abandoned structures. 8.Utility Inter-Connection:No solar array shall be installed that does not meet the requirements of Rocky Mountain Power for an interconnected customer-owned generator.Off-grid systems shall be exempt from this requirement. 9.Off-Street Parking and Loading: No additional parking is required for a solar array;however,a solar array may not replace or hinder existing required parking and loading. N DRAFT USE TABLE Wind Energy System Residential Zones ca 0 ca 8 o �n vi ui m o Use o 0 .., N M LL LL EL i N M N SL `z .� m 2 2 2 u C LL M M M M M N M M M Cr M M M M M LARGE WIND ENERGY SYSTEM Definition: Commercial Zones A"Large Wind Energy System"is a wind energy conversion system m ,, consisting of a wind turbine or group o z m u m t7 N `" N `° r of wind turbines,tower,and — __ u u u u u u t— �_ 0 0 0 o 6 cc m LL associated control or conversion electronics,which has rated capacity r P — C C of more than 100 kW. Special Purpose Zones a fV v N N Q _ Q Q Q Q 0 O 4 1 1 _- 5 $ to rL va C C C C C C C P P Qualifing Provisions: 1.Total Height:The total height of the large wind energy system shall be limited to 90 meters above existing grade or by FAA regulations,whichever dictates a lower height. 2-Minimum Lot Size:2 Acres 3.Setbacks:A tower in a large wind energy system must be set back at least 1.25 times its total height from any property boundary,must be within the buildable area of the lot and at least 1.25 times its total height from any overhead utility power line. 4.Noise: Noise emitted from the large wind energy system shall not exceed maximum sound levels set forth in section 9.28 of the Salt Lake City Code(Health and Safety:Noise Control). 5.Blade Clearance:The vertical distance from existing grade to the tip of a wind generator blade when the blade is at its lowest point must beat least 15 feet. 6.Electrical Wires:All electrical wires associated with a large wind energy system,other than wires necessary to connect the wind turbine to the tower wiring,the tower wiring to the disconnect junction box,and the grounding wires shall be located underground. 7.Lighting:Lighting of tower(s)and turbine(s)is prohibited except where required by the Federal Aviation Administration. 8_Appearance,Color,and Finish:The wind turbine and tower shall remain painted or finished the color or finish that was originally applied bythe manufacturer. 10.Utility Inter-Connection:No large wind energy system shall be installed that does not meet the requirements of Rocky Mountain Power for an interconnected customer-owned generator.Off-grid systems shall be exempt from this requirement. 11.Nonmaintained Or Abandoned Facilities:The building official may require each nonmaintained or abandoned large wind energy system to be removed from the premises at the cost of the owner when such a system has not been repaired or put into use by the owner,person having control or person receiving benefit of such structure within thirty(30)calendar days after notice of nonmaintenance or abandonment is given to the owner,person having control or person receiving the benefit of such structure.The City may require a performance bond or other means of financial assurance to guarantee removal of abandoned structures. 12.Off-Street Parking or Loading Requirements:None. A large wind energy system shall not remove or encroach upon required parking or loading areas for other uses on the site or access to such parking or loading areas.All vehicular circulation,staging,and parking provided shall be on a hard surface. From: Bentley, Alene [mailto:Alene.Bentley@PacifiCorp.com] Sent: Monday, May 17, 2010 5:37 PM „, To: Coffey, Cheri Cc: Milliner, Ray; Stewart, Casey Subject: RE: Sustainability Code Revisions Cheri, Thanks for giving Rocky Mountain Power an opportunity to offer input. It's critical for customers to understand the requirements of a generation project up-front so it's designed and installed properly. We suggest that the wind spec should include the same code compliance provision as the solar array spec. It would also be helpful to specifically state that installations must meet electric utility clearance requirements (even though it's implied through state law and National Electric Safety Code requirements), especially since these installations, which generate electric power, could be interpreted as synonymous with electric utility facilities. Alene Alene E. Bentley Rocky Mountain Power 201 South Main Street,Suite 2300 Salt Lake City, UT 84111 801.220.4437 (office) 801.910.6527 (cell) 801.220.3116 (fax) From: James Bennett [mailto:JBennett@slco.org] .r Sent: Tuesday, May 11, 2010 12:11 PM To: Coffey, Cheri; Milliner, Ray Subject: RE: Sustainability Code Revisions I have read through the tables as have been sent, we do have some recommended changes. At this time we are gathering the correct information from our contacts and will forward that information to you shortly. In many of the references that you refer back to the Health Department, the appropriate agency should be the State Department of Agriculture. We do also have some concerns relating to the noise standards and believe it would be more prudent to make these references hack to the specific City noise code section rather than listing a specific measurement. If it is left as a specific measurement, it would make it a mess to have to go back at a later date to change each specific standard if the noise code is amended, as our Department is currently considering. Thanks James F. Bennett. LEHS Environmental Health Compliance Officer Salt Lake Valley Health Department 788 E Woodoak Lane Murray, UT 84107 Voice:801-313-6668 Fax: 801-313-6669 Email: jbennett,c slco.orLY www.slvhealth.org From: Williams, Jeff - Salt Lake City, UT [jeff .williams@ut .usda.gov] 24 Sent: Monday, December 21, 2009 10:30 AM To: Coffey, Cheri Subject: Sustainability Code Revision: Urban Agricutlre Name: Jeff Williams Address: 125 South State St. , Ste 4402, Salt Lake City, UT 84138 Phone: 801-524-4254 E-Mail : jeff .williams@ut.usda.gov Comments: Urban Agriculture: General Questions: 1 . All zoning districts consistent with such uses a. Applied through out city with priority areas identified through community input. Consider a pledge of participation from majority of citizens impacted. b. Should be allowed and encouraged on public properties as supported by local community. c. Should be allowed and encouraged on institutional spaces, consider providing incentives to reward such behavior. 2 . Difinitions: CSA should include food and non-food products grown locally. 3 . Sale of products grown from each individual garden should be allowed and encouraged. 4 . Impacts: a. Traffic should be mitigated through creative partnerships with local businesse or residents, again with input from impacted locals residents . b. ibid. c. Noise should be carefully monitored and strictly enforced. Urban agriclture should produce limited, localized and seasonal noise impacts that can be mitigated effectively. d. Fugitive dust may be an impact of short duration. Chemical application should be applied by a licensed sprayer. Compost may be most acceptable to neighbors in self-contained barrels. Thanks for allowing me to provide feedback on this important subject . Please let me know if I can provide further assistance . Jeff Williams, RC&D Coordinator NRCS Wallace F. Bennett Federal Building 125 South State Street, Room 4402 Salt Lake City, UT 84138-1100 phone: (801) 524-4254 fax: (801) 524-4593 cell : (801) 557-0521 www.greatsaltlakercd.org and now www.csautah.org "Money often costs too much" . Emerson 25 Mayor's Office and Planning Commission: As a resident of Salt Lake City, I am privileged to comment on a proposed "Urban Farming" ordinance from two perspectives. First, as a grower of vegetables for market. And second, as the organizer of People's Market, a local artisan & farmer's market who specializes in featuring small, urban growers. Though urban farming has been popular for several thousand years, the recent media focus on the topic makes it a natural target for increased regulation. But frankly, there aren't very many urban farmers out there to be regulated. My fear is that by creating the unnecessary regulations, you will scare away any potential urban growers before they even get started. So my strong recommendation is to wait a year before doing anything to see if this fad blows over or becomes an important part of our way of life. Outlining "Urban Farming" as a permitted use is good for neighborhoods and good for people considering farming as an occupation or for supplemental income. However, the proposed "Urban Farming" ordinance in its current form (from staff report #PLNPCM2009- 01337 dated 6/23/2010) contains both good and bad regulation. The following is a list of points to consider when drafting a better ordinance. • The definition of "Urban Farming" the proposed ordinance is overly broad and could potentially be applied to anyone with a vegetable garden. It would be better to constrain the ordinance to only "farming" on empty lots without a house, "farms" with a house but with growing space greater than 0.33 acre and commercial farm- ,mom food processing operations. • The processing of farm products is substantially regulated by the *01100 Utah Department of Agriculture and Food. According to the UDAF, processing includes such techniques as washing, cutting, and drying. The UDAF requires any such activity to occur in a "commercial kitchen" or in a home kitchen certified for food processing. Codifying the commercial processing of food as an acceptable use in a variety of permitted zones is a very good thing. • "Urban Farming" should be considered as the production of any agricultural product: vegetables, ornamentals & perennial plants, cut flowers, herbs & medicinals, trees, fruits & nuts, animals & animal products, and plants grown for their ornamental fruits (gourds and the like) . A comprehensive list of agricultural products would be quite extensive. It's probably best to leave the definition vague and not name particular classes of products. • The code should provide for a regulatory incentive for Certified Organic operations. Certified Organic farming practices greatly reduce the negative environmental externalities associated with farming. Also, the organic planning process is a good exercise to create a more sustainable supply of urban farmers. In the near future, other agricultural certifications will be recognized by the federal government such as GAP: Good Agricultural Practices and GPP:Good Processing Practices. Leaving the ordinance open to incentivize these other certifications would be a positive benefit for increased food safety. • Qualifying Provision 1 - Accessory Buildings, with regards to hoop-houses, is ridiculous over-regulation. Hoop houses are temporary structures with limited to no value. Hoop houses should not be regulated alongside other structures or }.., subject to the International Building Code. A hoop house is an extremely minimal & Nig" temporary structure. • Qualifying Provision 3 - Storage Requirements, with regards to 26 pesticides and fertilizers is well-intentioned. However, the hazard of contamination is mitigated by the quantity of pesticides and fertilizers needed on-hand. Change this provision to limit the total volume of pesticides and fertilizers kept on-premise to be a sufficiently small amount. Storage requirements for an urban farm are no different from that of a community garden of similar size. • Qualifying Provision 5 — Large Vehicles, I'm not sure how much a large tractor with implements like a tiller, disc, or harvester weighs but it is unreasonable to ban the parking of such large vehicles on the property. • Qualifying Provision 7 — Irrigation Systems, it is onerous to require an expensive, separate metering system for irrigation. • Qualifying Provision 9 — Parking requirements are too much unless the urban farm is also used for demonstration & educational purposes. If the farm is used for education or other ancillary purpose, other codes & ordinances will apply. Thank you for your time and consideration. Recognition of Urban Farming is a positive development for the food security of Salt Lake City. Kyle LaMalfa 27 From: Duer, Stephanie Sent: Friday, May 21, 2010 6:56 AM To: Niermeyer, Jeff; Briefer, Laura; Stewart, Brad Subject: commnets on draft use tables Seasonal Farmstand: Will they be using 1) water for washing or 2) coolers with ice/water for storing? Could there be residues in that water we don't want down the stormdrain?This doesn't address this type of dispoal in any way. And why June 1 (thre are crops produced earlier than that...just a notion. Community Gardens: 1) require specific water efficiencies 2) require irrigation-only meter 3) are there issues with properties adjacent to riparian corridor protection areas? Not addressed at all. 4) are there issues with stormwater run-off pertaining to pesticide use that we want to address? 5) "hours of operation" missing language 6)"sales" references urban farms, not community gardens Urban Farms: 1) are there issues pertaining to properties adjacent to riparian corridor? Pesticide use and run-off? invasive species? 2) do we want to address stormwater quality issues and pesticide run-off? 3) I didn't see reference to size...do we want to require irrigation-only meters? Require irrigation efficiencies as defined in landscape code if the farm is commercial? Stephanie 29 May 12, 2010 wwto Ray Milliner, Planning Re: Sustainability Code revisions—Use Tables The division of transportation review comments and recommendations are as follows: Solar Array. The last sentence, "Off-Street Parking and Loading: No additional parking is required for a solar array; however, a solar array may not replace or hinder existing parking and loading." We suggest , "Off-Street Parking and Loading: No additional parking is required for a solar array; however, a solar array may not replace or hinder existing required parking and loading." In the chart the "P" permitted use is not noted in many of the areas. Is solar array different from solar panels? (residential roof top applications etc.). Large Wind Energy System. No parking required; All vehicular circulation, staging, and parking provided is to be on a hard surface. Urban Farm. Parking: Parking for employees, and patrons of the urban farm shall be provided on site, at the rate of two parking stalls per acre, with a minimum of one ADA stall. All vehicular circulation, staging, and parking is to be on a hard surface. , Community Garden. Parking: Community gardens shall be exempt from off-street parking requirements of section 21 A.44, Off Street Parking and Loading. All vehicular circulation, staging, and parking provided is to be on a hard surfaced area, any On-street parking is to comply with the existing roadway status. Seasonal Farm Stand. Location: Residential zoning districts, Seasonal Farm Stands shall be located only along streets designated as "collector" or "arterial" on the adopted City Street Classification Map. In some areas there is "no stopping, standing, or parking" along the roadway. Setback: Seasonal farm stands must be setback a minimum of 10 feet from the edge of pavement of a City street. This would indicate that it is possible located within the public ROW and will require a revocable lease agreement and DRT review. It may also be located within an existing parking lot etc. and needs to be subject to: Shall not remove or encroach upon required parking or loading areas for other uses on the site or access to such parking or loading areas. All vehicular circulation, staging, and parking provided is to be on a hard surfaced area. any On-street parking is to comply with the existing roadway status. Sincerely, Barry Walsh Cc Kevin Young, P.E. Randy Drummond, P.E. 30 Peggy Garcia, Public Utilities Ted Itchon, Fire Larry Butcher, Permits John Spencer, Property Management File. From: McCandless, Allen Sent: Monday, May 24, 2010 1:34 PM To: Coffey, Cheri Subject: RE: Sustainability Regulations Cheri. I reviewed the attached use tables for the various zones that included the A-airport district. I do not observe any impacts to the airport or to airport operations and have no additional corrections. Thank you for including our comments from last October regarding these ordinance changes. —Allen McCandless We don't have any comments on the proposed changes to the Zoning Ordinance Use Tables. Justin Justin D. Stoker, PE, LEED` AP, CFM Salt Lake City Public Utilities 1530 S. West Temple, SLC, UT 84115 ph. (801) 483-6786 -justin.stoker@slcgov.com a Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail 31 ,n, ljt Sustainability f1.1:iil;, t.Clfl: ifa .. ,, Code Revisions ,, Planning Division Community&Economic Development To: Business Advisory Board From: Cheri Coffey, Planning Manager Date: May 10, 2010 CC: Wilf Sommerkorn, Planning Director; Ray Milliner, Principal Planner; Mike Akerlow, Economic Development; Bob Farrington, Economic Development file Re: Petition PLNPCM2009-01337;Zoning Ordinance Use Table Amendments Relating to Sustainability At the April 2010 Business Advisory Board meeting, the Planning Staff presented information about changes to the Use Table relating to the Sustainability Code Revision Project. The main comments related to how Seasonal Farm Stands are regulated. There was also agreement that the Zoning Ordinance should address Large Wind Generating Facilities. Specific comments voiced relating to Seasonal Farm Stands included defining, "growing season" and "locally grown" as well as determine how the types of uses are regulated. Ray Milliner, project planner for this petition, spoke with the Salt Lake Valley Health Department about the requirements for Seasonal Farm Stands. He was told that the State does not require regulation of these types of temporary uses. Staff did make the following changes to address comments we received from the Business Advisory Board and others: 1. "Growing season" is between June 1st and October 31st 2. "Locally grown" means produce grown within the State of Utah. 44100 3. Home Occupation section of the Zoning Ordinance will be amended to allow sell of produce that is grown on site. Currently a person who has a Home Occupation to grown produce must sell it off-site. 4. Operating Hours will be extended to include day-light hours. We received comments that during the summer months, early morning and late evening are cooler and more people are willing to work during these times (especially community garden types of participants.) 5. Limit the use of mechanized equipment in residential zones or where abut residential zones to 7:00 A.M. and 9:00 P.M., consistent with the City's Noise Ordinance. 6. Prohibit seasonal farms stands in mixed use residential zones unless they are located on collector or arterial streets. 7. A business license and/ or home occupation license is required where the urban farm is accessory to a residential use. 8. Large Wind Generating Facilities have been included. Please let me know if you have any questions or comments cheri.coffey s1c�gov.com or (801) 535-6188. Thank You DRAFT USE TABLE Seasonnim Stand '1 ) Residential Zones 0 Use o 0 0 ^ 0 0 v n V .-I N m N. ri IN ,L ry M N m 2 z 2 SEASONAL FARM STAND P P P P Definitions: Commercial Zones "Seasonal farm stand"means a sales table,area,or kiosk of food crops o and/or non-food,ornamental crops, _ N N ,-I i m d. 2 0. such as flowers,that is located off- cc u u u u u CO r } ri ci d d, 5 re m m premise from the location where the P P P P P P P P P P P P _ P P P P P food was grown,or when located in any Miscellaneuous Zones agricultural district. 0 11 N m N T Q Q ¢ Q Q o z ¢ n. a — 5 2 w 2H P P P P P P P P P P P "Locally Grown"means food crops and Qualifing: or non-food,ornamental crops,such as Location: In residential zoning districts,Seasonal Farm Stands shall be located only along streets designated as"collector"or"arterial"on the adopted City Street Classification Map. flowers that are grown within the State of Utah. Duration: Farm stands may operate from June 1 to October 31. Setback: Seasonal farm stands must be setback a minimum of 10 feet from the edge of pavement of a City street. Size: A seasonal farm stand may not exceed 100 square feet in size. Food Preparation: Food preparation is prohibited at farm stands with the exception of food samples. Signs: Signs for a seasonal farm stand are allowed as temporary portable signs subject to the regulations in Chapter 21A.46.55 of this ordinance. Sales: Food crops and/or non-food,ornamental crops,such as flowers locally grown are allowed to be sold at a seasonal food stand. Prepackaged"shelf stable"foods produced in close proximity to the farm stand may be sold as well,provided they are produced in a Health Department approved facility. Density: One seasonal farm stand is allowed every 500 linear feet along a City street. Animals:No live animals,birds,or fowl shall be kept or allowed within 20 feet of any area where food is stored or held for sale. This requirement does not apply to guide dogs,signal dogs,or service dogs. Storage:Perishable foods must be stored in a vermin-proof area or container when the facility is dosed DRAFT USE TABLE URBAN FARM a Use 0 0 0 a n m v N N. \ .ti N Li m Li LL m 7 7 K K K rY K K K URBAN FARM P P P P P P P P P P P P P P p P P Definition: "An Urban Farm"is a farm where food is cultivated,processed and distributed in o in 7 or around a residential or commercial = ti N •-, N m a area. Urban farming is generally 0 Z u u � u CC r d o vs m LL practiced for income earning or food producing activites. P P p P p P P P P P p p p P P P P 0 N V N 7 7 7 O N = = F- Q a Q a o r a o. - w 2, 1— . P P P P P p P P P 'P P p Qualifing: Accessory Buildings:Storage and tool sheds,greenhouses,hoop houses,and cold frames associated with community gardens are subject to the standards in Chapter 21A.40,Accessory Uses,Buildings and Structures and the requirements of the International Building Code.Structures,such as coops and pens,associated with the keeping and raising of animals,livestock,and poultry must meet with the requirements of Chapter 8.08 of the Salt Lake City Municipal Code,Keeping Animals,Livestock,and Poultry and are subject to the requirements of the adopted Building Code,when applicable. Storage Requirements:All flammables,pesticides and fertilizers shall be stored in accordance with the regulations of the Uniform Fire Code and Salt Lake Valley Health Department or successor agency.At a minimum,any area where such materials are stored shall have a continuous concrete floor and lip which is tall enough to contain one hundred and ten percent(110%)of the volume of all the materials stored in the area.No pesticides,chemical fertilizers or other hazardous materials shall be stored outside of buildings. Large Vehicles:No vehicles in excess of five(5)tons shall be kept,stored or parked on the property,except that such vehicles may be on the property as necessary for completion of grading performed in accordance with a grading permit issued by the City Building and Services Division. Hours of Operation: In residential zoning districts and on properties that abut residential zoning districts,the use of mechanized equipment is prohibited from 9:00 pm through 7.00 am. Irrigation:Sufficient irrigation shall be provided to cover all needs of the urban farm. Irrigation systems designed with water conservation in mind are strongly encouraged. Parking: Parking for employees,and patrons of the urban farm shall be provided on site,at a rate of two parking stalls per acre. Delivery and Pick-up: In all single family and two family zoning districts,delivery and pick-up of products is allowed provided pick-up times are staggered so that one patron is on site at a time. Fencing: Fencing of urban farms will comply with the standards in Section 21A.40.120,Regulation of Fences,Walls,and Hedges. Sales: Products from urban farms may be sold on-site and off premise in accordance with the seasonal sales stand regulations in Section 21A.40 150. License: A business license is required for an urban farm. When the urban farm is accessory to a residential use,a home occupation license is required. DRAFT USE TABLE ' Comm()Garden 0 Use o 0 0 ^ 0 0 o vs m q ry m ti n .� N m m m 1 r� 0 0 M K K K N M K m cc cc cc K M M COMMUNITY GARDEN P P P P I' P P P P P P P P P p P P Definition: , "Community garden"means an area of land managed and maintained by b an individual or group to grow and m N r, N ,n harvest food crops and/or non-food, 0 U, u u o CG o d o o w LL ornamental crops,such as flowers, P P P P P P P P P p P • P p P P P P P for personal or group use, consumption,donation,or sale. 0 N vl N u rl x . Q Q a a a 0 o e o- _ 5 2 w s 1- P P P P P p P P p P P P Qualifing: Accessory Buildings:Storage and tool sheds,greenhouses,hoop houses,and cold frames associated with community gardens are subject to the standards in Chapter 21A.40,Accessory Uses,Buildings and Structures and the requirements of the International Building Code.Structures,such as coops and pens,associated with the keeping and raising of animals,livestock,and poultry must meet with the requirements of Chapter 8.08 of the Salt Lake City Municipal Code,Keeping Animals,Livestock,and Poultry and are subject to the requirements of the adopted Building Code,when applicable. Storage Requirements:All flammables,pesticides and fertilizers shall be stored in accordance with the regulations of the Uniform Fire Code and Salt Lake Valley Health Department or successor agency.At a minimum,any area where such materials are stored shall have a continuous concrete floor and lip which is tall enough to contain one hundred and ten percent(110%)of the volume of all the materials stored in the area.No pesticides,chemical fertilizers or other hazardous materials shall be stored outside of buildings. Size:In residential zones,community gardens shall not exceed one half 1/2 acre in size. Hours of Operation: In residential zoning districts,community gardens shall operate during daylight hours. In residential zoning districts and on propeities that abut residential zoning districts,the use of Large Vehicles:No vehicles in excess of five(5)tons shall be kept,stored on the property,except that such vehicles may be on the property as necessary for completion of grading performed in accordance with a grading permit issued by the City Building Services Division. Irrigation:Sufficient irrigation shall be provided to cover all needs of the community garden. Irrigation systems designed with water conservation in mind are strongly encouraged. Parking: Community gardens shall be exempt from the off-street parking requirements of Section 21A.44,Off Street Parking and Loading. Sales: Products from community gardens may be donated or sold on-site and off premise in accordance with the seasonal farm stand regulations in Section 21AA0.150. Fencing: Fencing of urban farms will comply with the standards in Section 21A.40.120,Regulation of Fences,Walls,and Hedges. DRAFT USE TABLE Large Wind Energy System 0 Use o 0 0 0 I u, m v N O O m m v N >� i.-, N n, • 7' N 2.' N as as as as co cc cc cc LARGE WIND ENERGY SYSTEM Definition: A"Large Wind Energy System"is a wind energy conversion system o m Ln D consisting of a wind turbine or group o z m a•, u L7 ~ v d a of wind turbines,tower,and cc u u u u u u o 0 0 o L7 m a associated control or conversion electronics,which has rated capacity P P C C of more than 100 kW. 0 N "2 N (7 L7 0 6v, O N a: C Q a a at ¢ 0 z ec a a _ 5 S EL5 1- C C C C C C C P P Qualifing Provisions: Total Height:The total height of the Large Wind Energy System shall be limited to 90 meters above existing grade or by FAA regulations,whichever dictates a lower height. Minimum Lot Size:2 Acres Setbacks:A tower in a Large Wind Energy System must be set back at least 1.25 times its total height from any property boundary,must be within the buildable area of the lot and at least 1.25 times its total height from any overhead utility power line; Noise: Large Wind Energy Systems shall not exceed the lesser of 60 dB or 5dB above the background noise level,as measured at the property lines of the site in question. The owner can apply for a conditional use for up to 80 decibels subject to the standards of review and factors for consideration in Chapter 21A.54 of this ordinance. Blade Clearance:The vertical distance from existing grade to the tip of a wind generator blade when the blade is at its lowest point must be at least 15 feet. Electrical Wires:All electrical wires associated with a Large Wind Energy System,other than wires necessary to connect the wind turbine to the tower wiring,the tower wiring to the disconnect junction box,and the grounding wires shall be located underground. Lighting:Lighting of tower(s)and turbine(s)is prohibited except where required by the Federal Aviation Administration. Appearance,Color,and Finish:The wind turbine and tower shall remain painted or finished the color or finish that was originally applied by the manufacturer. Signs:All signs are prohibited,other than the manufacturer's or installer's identification,appropriate warning signs,or owner identification on a wind turbine,tower,building,or other associated structure. Compliance with FAA Regulations: Large Wind Energy Systems must comply with applicable FAA regulations,including any necessary approvals for installations close to the airport. Utility Inter-Connection:No Large Wind Energy System shall be installed that does not meet the requirements of Rocky Mountain Power for an interconnected customer-owned generator.Off-grid systems shall be exempt from this requirement. Nonmaintained Or Abandoned Facilities:The building official may require each nonmaintained or abandoned Large Wind Energy System to be removed from the premises at the cost of the owner when such a system has not been repaired or put into use by the owner,person having control or person receiving benefit of such structure within thirty(30)calendar days after notice of nonmaintenance or abandonment is given to the owner,person having control or person receiving the benefit of such structure.The city may require a performance bond or other means of financial assurance to guarantee removal of abandoned structures. Off-Street Parking or Loading Requirements:None. A Large Wind Energy System shall not remove or encroach upon required parking or loading areas for other uses on the site or access to such parking or loading areas. DRAFT USE TABLE Sc rray 1 )o 0 Use oo g M2 vM 2 ' , ,-1 N rn \. titi N (' c G G cL cL cc r- ti cL cc cc G on ry cL cC K v, Vl_ v, K K cc cc a: cC K K SOLAR ARRAY - - Definition: A"solar array'is a principal use of a packaged interconnected assembly of solar cells used to transform solar energy m `o into thermal,chemical,or electrical 0 z con u = CG u `" ,i r" M v th cc u u u u u 1— o 0 0 0 cc m a. a energy. A solar array uses solar energy P P P P P P for any or all of the following purposes: (1)water heating,(2)space heating or cooling,and(3)power generation. O C u N N N O 0 0 u' (n 0 _1 _ - _ ✓ai Q Q Q Q O Z Q w a - w F P P P P Qualifing: Setbacks: A solar array shall meet all minimum setback requirements for the zone in which it is located. In no case shall a solar array be located less than six(6)fect from a property line or other structure. Location:Solar arrays as a principal use shall not exceed eighty(80)percent coverage of the lot. Adequate vehicle access shall be provided. The area covered by a solar array shall not be counted in calculating allowable maximum building coverage in any zone. Height: A solar array shall not exceed 20 feet in height measured from established grade. Landscape Buffer:No landscaped buffer yards shall be required on a site with a solar array as a principal use. Code Compliance: Solar arrays are subject to review for compliance with all applicable International Building and Electrical Code requirements by the Salt Lake City Building Services Division. Solar Easements: Solar easements are not a requirement for City approval;nonetheless,a property owner who has installed or intends to install a solar array may negotiate a solar easement with adjacent property owners to ensure perpetual sun on the property. Any easement agreed upon must be recorded by the County Recorder. Nonmaintained Or Abandoned Arrays:The building official may require each nonmaintained or abandoned solar array to be removed from the premises when such a system has not been repaired or put into use by the owner,person having control or person receiving benefit of such structure within thirty(30)calendar days after notice of nonmaintenance or abandonment is given to the owner,person having control or person receiving the benefit of such structure.l he city may require a performance bond or other means of financial assurance to guarantee removal of abandoned structures. Off-Street Parking and Loading: No additional parking is required for a solar array;however,a solar array may not replace or hinder existing parking and loading. „pt .. trill Y � L - . emoran urn __sir :mi;ntim:. Planning Division Community&Economic Development Department To: Historic Landmark Commission From: Ray Milliner Date: April 12,2010 Re: Zoning Ordinance Use Table Amendments Relating to Sustainability Petition: PLNPCM2009-01337 Background On November 18, 2009, Mayor Becker initiated a petition to amend the Salt Lake City Zoning Ordinance to create a series of regulations promoting sustainability and diversity throughout the City. Priorities of the proposed amendments include: e Urban Agriculture 0 Alternative Energy Included in this memorandum are draft amendments relating to the use table for the regulation of urban agriculture. The proposed uses associated therein,may be allowed,in some form,within each of the City's historic districts. As part of the public participation/approval process, staff is requesting that the Historic Landmark Commission evaluate the attached ordinance amendments and provide recommendations for modifications where applicable. Below is an assessment of the issues and a brief explanation for each. Issues/Requests URBAN FARM Urban fans are proposed as a permitted use in residential and commercial zones. These faims are commonly located in large rear yards,or on vacant lots. Owners grow vegetables,herbs, and flowers that are then sold to consumers. The most common type of urban farm is Community Supported 0 Page 1 Agriculture,wherein individuals purchase shares of the farm produce prior to the growing season, then receive allotments of the harvest throughout the summer. Produce from urban farms may also be sold at farm stands and farmers markets. Issue: As proposed,these urban farms would be allowed within both commercial and residential zoning Districts. Staff is requesting that the Commission review the attached definition and qualifying provisions and provide feedback as to whether or not they are sufficient to protect the integrity of historic neighborhoods. Qualifying provisions include: 1. Accessory Buildings: Storage and tool sheds, greenhouses, hoop houses, and cold frames associated with community gardens are subject to the standards in Chapter 21A.40, Accessory Uses, Buildings and Structures and the requirements of the International Building Code. Structures, such as coops and pens, associated with the keeping and raising of animals, livestock, and poultry must meet the requirements of Chapter 8.08 of the Salt Lake City Municipal Code, Keeping Animals, Livestock, and Poultry and are subject to the requirements of the adopted Building Code, when applicable. 2. Storage Requirements: All flammables,pesticides and fertilizers shall be stored in accordance with the regulations of the Uniform Fire Code and Salt Lake City Department of Health Services or successor agency.At a minimum,any area where such materials are stored shall have a continuous concrete floor and lip which is tall enough to contain one hundred and ten percent(110%)of the volume of all the materials stored in the area.No pesticides, chemical fertilizers or other hazardous materials shall be stored outside of buildings. 3. Large Vehicles:No vehicles in excess of five(5)tons shall be kept, stored or parked on the property, except that such vehicles may be on the property as necessary for completion of grading performed in accordance with a grading permit issued by the City Building Services lege Division. 4. Hours of Operation: All urban farm related uses shall operate only during daylight hours. 5. Irrigation Systems.All new or retrofitted agricultural irrigation systems for agricultural uses shall be designed with water conservation in mind. 6. Delivery and Pick-up: In residential zones,delivery and pick-up of products is allowed provided pick-up times are staggered so that one patron is on site at a time. 7. Parking: Parking for employees,and patrons of the urban farm shall be provided on site, at a rate of two parking stalls per acre. 8. Sales: Products from urban farms may be donated or sold on-site and off premise in accordance with the seasonal sales stand regulations in Section 21A.40.210. 9. Fencing: Fencing of urban farms shall comply with the standards in Section 21A.40.120, Regulation of Fences,Walls,and Hedges. Request: Staff requests that the HLC provide direction as to whether or not the proposed qualifying provisions for urban fanning are sufficient,or if additional changes need to be made to ensure compliance in Historic Preservation Overlay Zone. COMMUNITY GARDEN Community gardens are a type of garden where the property is owned and managed by an individual or group of individuals where food is grown for personal or group use. These gardens could be e Page 2 housed on a vacant lot,in a person's back yard,or in any open space area. The most visible community garden in the City is located at the corner of 800 South and 600 East in the Central City Historic District. Issue: The impact of a community garden most likely would be similar to those of an urban farm. Community Gardens would be allowed within various zoning districts in the city which means they would be allowed in each of the Historic Districts in the City. Staff is requesting that the Commission review the proposed qualifying provisions and provide feedback as to whether or not they are sufficient to ensure compliance with the historic preservation overlay. Qualifying provisions include: 1. Accessory Buildings. Storage and tool sheds, greenhouses,hoop houses,and cold frames associated with community gardens are subject to the development standards in Chapter 21A.40, of this code. 2. Size: In residential zones,community gardens shall not exceed one half 1/2 acre in size. 3. Hours of Operation: In residential zones,community gardens shall not operate between the hours of 9 pm and 7 am. 4. Large Vehicles:No vehicles in excess of five(5)tons shall be kept or stored on the property, except that such vehicles may be on the property as necessary for completion of grading perfonned in accordance with a grading permit issued by the City Building Services Division. 5. Irrigation Systems: All new or retrofitted agricultural irrigation systems for agricultural uses, shall be designed with water conservation in mind. 6. Sales: Products from community gardens may be donated or sold on-site and off premise in accordance with the seasonal farm stand regulations in Section 21A.40.210. Request: Provide feedback as to whether or not the proposed qualifying provisions for a community garden will mitigate any potential impacts on the existing historic districts. SEASONAL FARM STAND Seasonal farm stands are sales tables or kiosks where food crops are sold away from where the food was grown. Seasonal farm stands generally operate during the time of year coinciding with the growing season. Issue: As proposed, seasonal farm stands will not be allowed in residential zones, as a result,the impacts in historic districts will be centered only on neighborhood commercial zones,downtown exchange place and mixed use zones. Proposed qualifying provisions include: 1. Location: Seasonal farm stand shall be located only along City streets designated as "collector"or"arterial"by the cities major streets plan. 2. Duration: Seasonal farm stands shall operate only during the growing season. 3. Setback: Seasonal farm stands must be setback a minimum of 10 feet from the edge of pavement of a City street. 4. Size: A seasonal farm stand may not exceed 100 square feet in size. 5. Food Preparation: Food preparation is prohibited at farm stands with the exception of food samples. 0 Page 3 6. Signs: Signs for a seasonal farm stand are allowed as temporary portable signs subject to the regulations in Chapter 21A.46.55 of this ordinance. Signs are not allowed to be placed more than 50 feet from the stand location 7. Sales: Food crops and/or non-food,ornamental crops, such as flowers grown locally are allowed to be sold at a seasonal food stand. Prepackaged"shelf stable"foods produced in close proximity to the farm stand may be sold as well,provided they are produced in a Health Department approved facility. 8. Animals: No live animals, birds, or fowl shall be kept or allowed within 20 feet of any area where food is stored or held for sale. This requirement does not apply to guide dogs, signal dogs,or service dogs. 9. Garbage: All garbage and refuse shall be stored and disposed of in accordance with established Health Department standards. 10. Storage: Perishable foods must be stored in a vermin-proof area or container when the facility is closed. Request: Staff requests that the HLC review the proposed qualifying provisions and provide staff with direction,as it relates to mitigating potential impacts of seasonal farm stands in historic districts. EXHIBITS 1. Proposed Ordinance Amendments 0 Page 4 DRAFT U. BLE Community Supported Agriculture Residential Zones 0 Use 0 m o 0 o o M 6 Cl m v '-I N M \ _ = 7 ._ LL K rN K ,ii ii, _ r. rc K re cc rc K cL r. URBAN FARM Definition: "An Urban Commercial Tones Farm"is the practice of cultivating, processing and distributing food in or o around a residential or commercial area. s Urban farming is generally practiced for O v Lx u v v CD o n d ca 6 m d income earning or food producing activites. P P P P P P P P P P P Miscellaneuous Zones 0 N m Le 6 6 (0 �n O r., = 6 C Q 4 <r O -L <{ ct n — 5 G w N P P P P P Qualifing: Accessory Buildings:Storage and tool sheds,greenhouses,hoop houses,and cold frames associated with community gardens are subject to the standards in Chapter 21A.40,Accessory Uses,Buildings and Structures and the requirements of the International Building Code.Structures,such as coops and pens,associated with the keeping and raising of animals,livestock,and poultry must meet with the requirements of Chapter 8.08 of the Salt Lake City Municipal Code,Keeping Animals,Livestock,and Poultry and are subject to the requirements of the adopted Building Code,when applicable. Storage Requirements:All flammables,pesticides and fertilizers shall be stored in accordance with the regulations of the Uniform Fire Code and Salt Lake City Department of Health Services or successor agency.Ate minimum,any area where such materials are stored shall have a continuous concrete floor and hp which is tall enough to contain one hundred and ten percent(110%)of the volume of all the materials stored in the area.No pesticides,chemical fertilizers or other hazardous materials shall be stored outside of buildings. Large Vehicles:No vehicles in excess of five(5)tons shall be kept,stored or parked on the property,except that such vehicles may be on the property as necessary for completion of grading performed in accordance with a grading permit issued by the City Building and Licensing Department. Hours of Operation: All urban farm related uses shall operate only during daylight hours. Irrigation Systems.All new or retrofitted agricultural irrigation systems for agricultural uses,shall be designed with water conservation in mind. Parking: Parking for employees,and patrons of the urban farm shall be provided on site,at a rate of two parking stalls per acre. Delivery and Pick-up: In all agricultural zones,delivery and pick-up of products is allowed provided pick-up times are staggered so that one patron is on site at a time. Fencing: Fencing of urban farms will comply with the standards in Section 21A.40.120,Regulation of Fences,Walls,and Hedges. Sales: Products from urban farms may be donated or sold on-site and off premise in accordance with the seasonal sales stand regulations in Section 21A.40.210. SALT LAKE CITY HISTORIC LANDMARK COMMISSION Minutes of the Meeting Room 315, 451 South State Street April 12, 2010 This document along with the digital recording constitute the official minutes of the Historic Landmark Commission regular session meeting held on April 12, 2010. To download the FTR player and listen to audio excerpts from the record, click here. A regular meeting of the Historic Landmark Commission was held on April 12, 2010 at 5:52:37 PM in Room 315 of the City and County Building, located at 451 South State Street, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84111. Commissioners present for the meeting included: Earle Bevins Ill, Thomas Carter, Bill Davis, Arla Funk, Sheleigh Harding, Polly Hart, Creed Haymond, Warren Lloyd, Chairperson; Anne Oliver, Vice Chairperson and Dave Richards. Planning staff present for the meeting were: Pat Comarell, Assistant Planning Director, Angela Hasenberg, Historic Landmark Commission Secretary, Carl Leith, Senior Planner, Janice Lew, Senior Planner, Ray Milliner, Principal Planner, Paul Nielson, City Attorney and Joel Paterson, Planning Manager. A field trip was held prior to the meeting at 4:00 p.m. The field trip was attended by Commissioners Bevins, Carter, Funk, Harding, Hart, Haymond, Richards, Chairperson Lloyd and Vice Chairperson Oliver. A quorum was present. Field trip notes are included with the record of the minutes in the Planning Division Office. PLNPCM2009-01337 and PLNPCM2009-01338: Sustainability Code Revision Project— Urban Agriculture and Alternative Energy System. The Historic Landmark Commission will receive a briefing and discuss with staff various proposed zoning amendments relating to turban farming and alternative energy systems. The proposed regulations will amend the Use Tables and Accessory Structures sections of the Zoning Ordinance. Specific regulations relate to accessory structures, including green houses, hoop houses, cold frames, small wind energy equipment and solar collection equipment, as well as land uses including seasonal farm stands, community gardens and urban farming uses. (Staff contact: Cheri Coffey at 801-535-6188 or cheri.coffey[a)slcgov.com, Casey Stewart at 801-535-6260 or casey.stewartRslcgov.com, Ray Milliner at 801-535-7645 or ray.millinerRslcgov.com) Staff Presentation 7:37:06 PM Ms. Coffey noted that staff was ready for input on these draft ordinances. She stated that they would continue to return to the Commission as they progressed. Ms. Coffey indicated that the discussion that evening would focus upon amendments to the code regarding accessory structures and use tables relating to urban agriculture and renewable energy regulations to promote sustainability. Ms. Coffey noted that the urban agriculture uses related to accessory structures were the uses which the Commission would review most frequently. She stated that these structures included greenhouses, cold frames and hoop houses. Ms. Coffey indicated that the City did not currently require a building permit for any structure less than 120 square feet in size, however, if it were in a historic district it would require a Certificate of Appropriateness. She noted that all of those uses could be reviewed administratively. Ms. Coffey stated that the promotion of these uses did conflict somewhat with existing regulations. She noted that under the existing compatible infill regulations, the maximum lot coverage and Nike location were limited. She indicated that a typical accessory structure required a setback of five feet from the rear property line. Ms. Coffey noted that the new proposal removed these regulations regarding location, setbacks and maximum lot coverage for the aforementioned structures. Questions for Staff from the Commission 7:40:55 PM Commissioner Hart inquired if owners would be able to cover every square inch of property if the no maximum lot coverage standard were included. Ms. Coffey noted that owners would be able to do so in the rear yard, not in the front. Commissioner Hart inquired how the Commission could then stop the creation of these structures for alternative uses, giving the example that someone might then use a hoop structure for a garage. Ms. Coffey stated that this was an issue staff had raised. She noted that she didn't have an answer at the time; however, staff would explore the issue further. Commissioner Hart noted that the lack of maximum coverage was concerning as the Commission had just witnessed during the field trip that those types of structures could be quite overwhelmingly large. She indicated that she would advocate imposing some kind of limit on the maximum lot coverage. Chairperson Lloyd noted that the intent of the changes was to provide property owners the opportunity to have a greenhouse or hoop house in addition to their existing garage. varsO Commissioner Carter noted that he did not concur with Commissioner Hart and felt that there should be no limit on maximum lot coverage. Commissioner Bevins inquired if the proposed changes could be practically policed to address concerns like those raised by Commissioner Hart. Ms. Coffey noted that the more regulation that was included in the Ordinance, the more teeth the Enforcement Officers would have to enforce the code. She stated that many of these concerns of the Commission became enforcement issues. Commissioner Funk noted her concern that these uses might cause structures placed on the property line to shade the neighboring property and inhibit their ability to grow things. She stated that there were now greenhouses being built below grade in the area and noted that this might be preferable if additional height were requested. Commissioner Davis stated that he concurred with Commissioners Hart and Funk. He noted that he felt there should be an applicable setback of some sort for these types of structures. He also stated that he was concerned about usable materials in local historic districts. He noted that he could envision this ordinance creating huge enforcement issues. Commissioner Haymond noted that he felt there should be a way for an abutting urban farming structure to not be built to the maximum height for accessory structures. Mr. Paterson noted that there was no current standard regulating this for accessory structures. , Ms. Coffey noted that one of the items listed as a renewable energy resource was solar collection systems. She stated that there was not a listed size limit; however, there was a height limit, not to exceed three feet more than the maximum zone height. Ms. Coffey noted that in Salt Lake City Historic Districts solar collection systems would be reviewed for placement in the following order: 1. The collection system would be placed in the rear yard; 2. If this proved impossible, the collection system could be placed on an accessory structure; :3. If this proved impossible, it could be placed in the side yard; 4. If this proved impossible, it could be placed on the historic structure, but not where it was visible; 5. If this proved impossible, it could be placed where visible, but never on the front of the structure. Ms. Coffey noted that the draft ordinance included "reasonable restrictions"which allowed that staff could restrict where the collector was located, however, staff could only recommend placement in a location that would not reduce an applicant's perceived gained energy efficiency by more than twenty percent. Chairperson Lloyd noted that these collection systems were not becoming invisible. He stated that the technology had a good deal of growing to do before it could be compromised of regular materials people would enjoy looking at. He indicated however that placement for solar systems seemed to be more flexible as the technology continued to improve. Commissioner Richards stated that he did not believe that these collection systems should be allowed additional height over the maximum zone height unless it was a flat roofed structure. Commissioner Carter noted he felt as though there was a need for the Commission to respond supportively regarding the environmental and energy issues facing society. He stated that he did not care as much about preserving the view or appearance of an overall structure when considering these needs. Commissioner Richards noted his disagreement with Commissioner Carter. He stated that he did feel that advances in coming years would see more roofing products embedded with photo voltaic technologies which might make the requirement moot. Commissioner Hart stated that she did not wish to discourage the draft ordinance from moving forward but that more guidelines could help to inform better sustainable practices and compatible infill. Commissioner Davis noted he was in agreement with Commissioner Carter. He indicated he felt there was a need to address these technologies in a responsible way. Ms. Coffey reviewed proposed standards for wind turbines. She noted that the draft ordinance required a proposed turbine not exceed FAA standards coupled with stringent setback standards matching the height of the turbine plus five feet in every direction. Ms. Coffey stated that staff had also been told by several individuals that Salt Lake City was not a good place to implement wind energy. Commissioner Haymond noted that he felt the requirements of the draft ordinance regarding wind turbines to be adequate. Commissioner Davis stated he felt there were a few areas around the canyons which would be conducive to the use of wind power. Ms. Coffey reviewed tables of uses regarding urban farming. She noted that the current definition for community gardens was very stringent and that there was a great deal of interest in the community. She noted that the ordinance would attempt to limit the size, hours of operation, number of large vehicles on the property at any given time and allowing for sale of the produce grown in a community garden. Chairperson Lloyd inquired if a community garden would then require a business license. Ms. Coffey noted that while she was not certain of the exact regulations, she thought a business license might be required. Commissioner Davis stated that there was tremendous demand for community gardens and felt they should be encouraged. Ms. Coffey stated that there might be instances where a church, school, government site or park could lend space to a community garden group. Ms. Coffey reviewed proposed standards for urban farming and community supported agriculture. She noted that currently you could grow produce on a site but not sell from the site. She noted that the new regulations would allow for this use in residential areas. Ms. Coffey reviewed proposed standards for seasonal farm stands. She noted that under the proposed ordinance, farm stands would be allowed in Residential Mixed Use types of Zoning Districts on a main collector or arterial street. She stated that there had been a farming stand at 1300 East and 2100 South for some time which technically was not allowed due to the current restrictions, which seemed overly harsh as an enforcement issue. Ms. Coffey stated the Commission might mull over what restrictions they felt these transitory uses would require if allowed in an historic district. Public Hearings 8:23:23 PM Gina Zipcovich was present to comment on the draft ordinance on Community Gardens. She stated that the hours of operation restriction might be changed to read in line with hours of operation under urban farming, i.e. only during daylight hours. Ms. Zipcovich also questioned the size restriction requirement for community gardens and asked that the Commission consider amending the size to encompass slightly larger areas. Commissioner Davis stated that he felt that the draft ordinance language might well be changed to address these issues but still respect the existing noise ordinance. Commissioner Richards noted that the ordinance could also include a conditional use process to review parcels larger than one half acre that might have a desired use as a community garden. Other Business There was no further business. The meeting adjourned at 8:29:56 PM. SALT LAKE CITY PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING In Room 326 of the City&County Building 451 South State Street, Salt Lake City, Utah Wednesday, June 23, 2010 Present for the Planning Commission meeting were Chair Babs De Lay and; and Commissioners Mary Woodhead, Charlie Luke, Michael Fife, Michael Gallegos, Susie McHugh, and Matthew Wirthlin. Commissioners Frank Algarin,Angela Dean and Kathleen Hill were excused. A field trip was held prior to the meeting Planning Commissioners present were: Chair Babs De Lay, Commissioners Mary Woodhead, Charlie Luke, Michael Fife, and Michael Gallegos. A roll is being kept of all who attended the Planning Commission Meeting. The meeting was called to order at 5:45 p.m. Audio recordings of the Planning Commission meetings are retained in the Planning Office for an indefinite period of time. Planning staff members present at the meeting were: Wilford Sommerkorn, Planning Director, Nick Norris Planning Manager; Casey Stewart, Senior Planner; Wayne Mills, Senior Planner; Michael Maloy, Principal Planner; Ray Milner, Principal Planner; Doug Dansie, Senior Planner; Katia Pace, Associate Planner; Paul Nielson, City Attorney; and Michelle Poland, Senior Secretary. PLNPCM2oo9-o10337 Amendments to the Use Table Sustainability Regulations -A petition by Mayor Ralph Becker to create new language in the Salt Lake City Zoning Ordinance to create a series of regulations promoting sustainability throughout the City. Regulations are City wide Chair De Lay recognized Ray Milliner as staff representative. Mr. Milliner stated this is the first of many sustainability amendments to come. He reviewed the reason behind the petition and the amendments to the use tables for the following uses: a. Community Gardens: Modify the use table, create a definition and qualifying provisions to allow community gardens in various zones throughout the City Mr. Milliner explained an Urban Farm was a collective where individuals could grow the produce and sell them. It is very common with Urban Agriculture that there is a farm and a group of people who will buy into that farm and every week they pick up produce from the farm. Ms. Woodhead asked if it is always a collective. Mr. Milliner explained it is not. It was the most common use now. Mr. Fife asked how an individual could have a community garden. Mr. Milliner gave this example- He is the farmer who raises the farm and people could buy into the farm to buy produce and they pick up the produce. Ms. Woodhead was concerned about how this would effect someone with a garden in their backyard and decides to sell them at the people's market. Mr. Milliner replied if they rented out a space at the Farmer's Market to sell produce out of their garden it would not meet the definition because this would be where the business is operated out of the home. Included were amendments to the home occupation ordinance. Mr. Sommerkorn stated he does not think this would preclude and individual raising vegetables in their own backyard. Ms. Woodhead stated that it was her concern because she knew of people that have backyard farms as their business. Mr. Nielson asked if this would constitute an Urban Farm being a principal use on a lot could be the only use on a lot. Mr. Milliner stated that it did.. Staff is determining ways to allow the use while mitigating any of the potential impacts,because it is quite possible that if someone were to acquire a large sizable piece of ground in a residential area there could be some significant impacts. Mr. Milliner stated he would like input on the following: • Would it be appropriate to limit the size of the farm in residential areas • Are the zones we have proposed appropriate? • Should it be a conditional use in some zones or • Should we be stricter about the limits and hours of operation? Ms. Woodhead stated because the packets were late she felt the item should be tabled.s She noted that she had so many questions and hadn't formulated all of them yet. Nese Mr. Milliner asked for the Commissioners to go through each item individually and give him feedback. Mr. Fife asked at what point did it go from you growing vegetables in your back yard to it becomes and Urban Farm. Mr. Milliner explained that it would be when a family garden turns into Commercial Enterprise. The Commission discussed the definition of Urban Farming. Ms. McHugh stated that she is concerned about the dismantling of signage, and if that could be added. a. Urban Agriculture: Modify the use table; create a definition and qualifying provisions to allow urban agriculture in certain zones. b. Seasonal Farm Stand: Modify the use table; create a definition and qualifying provisions to allow seasonal farm stands in limited zones throughout the City. c. Solar Array: Modify the use table; create a definition and qualifying provisions to allow solar arrays in limited zones throughout the City. d. Large Wind Energy System: Modify the use table; create a definition and qualifying provisions to allow large wind energy systems in limited zones throughout the City. Ms. Woodhead asked how these regulations would go into effect. Mr. Milner stated that enforcement is based on a complaint basis. Ms. Woodhead stated.That she would like to find out how this could be done in a way to make it work for everyone. Mr. Milliner stated that the goal was to amend the ordinance in a way that would not be onerous on the farmer and the neighborhood. Mr. Sommerkorn stated it is interesting in this process,the intent of this and a lot of what we are doing on the sustainability is to make it easier to encourage it to happen. We started out with that as a general principal and then like with our Zoning Task Force and other groups the Business Advisory Board they start bring up all these questions of what happens when this and that case. Pretty soon the ordinance is overwhelming we need to balance that so everyone is able to function under the ordinance. Ms. McHugh stated that the Riparian Corridors a concern, because we have had feedback. She was concerned about regulating distance between the farms and the water. Mr. Milliner explained that it would be subject to the Riparian Corridor section. Mr. Milliner stated it was ioo'from the high water line. Mr. Norris explained the landscaping sections in the Riparian Corridor are varied based on whether the lot is developed or undeveloped as well as it does allow certain types of landscaping within those encroachments. The setbacks are primarily for structure. There is a 25'-50' buffer where natural vegetation is there it has to remain. Ms. McHugh stated she would like to know specifically what the regulations are in placement of gardens by the water. Mr. Fife asked what the purpose of having a separate water meter is. Mr. Milliner stated that was a request from Public Utilities Division I believe as it is a business they would like to monitor those separate from the residential use. So if it was in a residential zone they would like to have a separate monitoring system. Mr. Fife asked if there was a separate fee structure. Mr. Milliner stated he did not believe so. The Commission discussed the cost of adding an additional water meter. Mr. Norris stated we need to revisit the irrigation because there are some State Legislation on rain water harvesting that will come into play. Chair De Lay asked if there were Federal rules for selling produce. Mr. Milliner noted that the State Department of Agriculture and FDA had rules in place. Mr. Milliner stated he discussed this with the county Health Department and the State allows persons to sell produce off the vine without regulation. However, there were certain limitations to that. If you start selling it as a cooked or prepared food the regulations kick in. The way we wrote the Farm Stand criteria was to just make it so it is either from a Health Department '- approved facility or it is off the vine. .rrd Ms. Woodhead stated she noticed there was a reference to people not being required to get solar easements but maybe negotiate them. The Commissioners discussed the appropriateness of getting involved in this type of argument with neighbors and legal issues. It was determined that it is not the role of the City. Ms. Woodhead stated that there was such limited ability to say no to Conditional Uses. Mr. Milliner stated the way you would do that is with the conditional use criteria and the section on the impact to adjacent properties. You may be able to add that condition in on an individual basis. Mr. Wirthlin stated it is the property owner's responsibility to buy the easements to allow for the solar to be used properly. It is not this Commission's responsibility to police that. The Commission discussed language that would not guarantee users of solar power easements and more rights than anyone else. It was discussed what could be done by the property owner to help give them a better guarantee. Staff would look into the solar issues and bring them to the next meeting. Ms. McHugh stated she would like to know the different types of wind generators that could be proposed for residential property. Nese « ; Mr. Milliner stated we are not proposing they be used in residential areas. He reviewed the areas wind generators would be allowed as conditional use. Mr. Sommerkorn stated we would not see a lot of wind generated items here as it would not be beneficial in the valley. Mr. Wirthlin asked pertaining to both solar and wind facilities, under the non-maintained or abandoned sections you have a time frame of 3o days, and how was that determined? Mr. Milliner stated that language is taken from the existing ordinance which is used for other uses. Public Hearing 6:48:14 PM Chair De Lay asked for public comment. Ms. Cindy Crommer stated this is the easy stuff and it only gets harder as it moves forward when it comes to sustainability. She would like to have the plans modified for Salt Lake City. She would like to see these areas taken care of to the best of people's abilities. We need to think about the off season maintenance of the property. Recommends you tie them to best practices. In the case of wind power you have to do a cost benefit and their appropriateness for historic districts. Jeff Snelling stated that as a former Public Utilities employee the cost to install a water meter was approximately around two thousand dollars in fees and the other installation is around five thousand. MOTION 6:52:29 PM Commissioner Gallegos motioned to table PLNPCM2oo9-oio337 Amendments to the Use Table Sustainability Regulations until the July 14, 2010 meeting. Seconded by Commissioner Woodhead, Commissioners Luke, McHugh,Woodhead,Wirthlin Fife and Gallegos voted, "Aye". The motion passed. Public Hearing 6:s3:oo PM SALT LAKE CITY PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING In Room 326 of the City & County Building 451 South State Street, Salt Lake City, Utah Wednesday, July 28, 2010 Present for the Planning Commission meeting were Chair Babs De Lay and Vice Chair Frank Algarin; and Commissioners, Angela Dean, Michael Fife, Michael Gallegos, Susie McHugh, Matthew Wirthlin, Kathleen Hill, Mary Woodhead, Commissioner Charlie Luke was excused. A roll is being kept of all who attended the Planning Commission Meeting. The meeting was called to order at 5:45 p.m. Audio recordings of the Planning Commission meetings are retained in the Planning Office for an indefinite period of time. Planning staff members present at the meeting were: Wilford Sommerkorn, Planning Director, Cheri Coffey, Assistant Director; Michael Maloy, Principal Planner, Katia Pace, Associate Planner; Michael Maloy, Principal Planner; Paul Nielson, City Attorney; and Angela Hasenberg, Senior Secretary. 7:39:52 PM PLNPCM2009-010337- Amendments to the Use Table Sustainability Regulations - A petition by Mayor Ralph Becker to create new language in the Salt Lake City Zoning Ordinance to create a series of regulations promoting sustainability throughout the City. Regulations are City wideChairperson De Lay recognized Ray Milliner as staff representative. Commissioner Woodhead asked about accessory structures and whether they would be part of the vote. Assistant Director Coffey stated that there were two separate parts to this issue and accessory structures would be handled by planner Casey Stewart Mr. Milliner stated that the Planning Commission reviewed the application one month prior, the Planning Commission asked for clarification on the following issues. He also stated that he received an email from Commissioner Dean, and would like to address those issues first. First question was solar array and large energy wind systems are covered in the ordinance, should there also be consideration of solar thermal systems and ground source geothermal systems along with ordinance? Mr. Milliner responded that geothermal systems are mechanical use for a specific building; it would be an allowed use for a building permit. Solar thermal systems were something he was not familiar enough with, but was willing to do research. Question 2, page 12 indicates under permitted zones that residential equals none, which means there is no residential uses, and this is for the solar arrays, I assume that they are still permitted, but perhaps to no change to residential at this time, please clarify. Mr. Milliner stated that the clarification is that the solar arrays are the larger structures, and so the thought of staff was that having these large scales, large type, solar arrays would not be appropriate in residential zones. The smaller solar array panels on a roof, maybe a 5x5 in your backyard, is being addressed in the accessory structures, and so we consider those accessory structures. He stated that staff did not intend to limit solar panels in residential areas, but restricting the very large solar arrays. Commissioner Dean stated that this needed to be defined similar to the wind where it's said to the capacity of 100 kilowatts or greater, for the solar also, to distinguish that? Mr. Milliner agreed that a modification of the definition would help make things more clear. Question 3, Setbacks states a six foot minimum setback from the property line, please clarify the reason, it seems the solar setback should equal the building setback. Mr. Milliner stated a six foot setback would be a buffer for the entire property. Question 4, issues regarding height, what is the reason behind this specific "— dimension? Could we limit the height to the allowable building height in the zone or set some dimension such as three feet above the building roof. Mr. Milliner stated that right now staff is proposing a 20ft height limit for the larger solar arrays, twenty feet was a standard height offered by Clarion, and research, changes would be made if necessary. Question 5, page 13 relating to large wind energy systems, staff is proposing they be allowed in zones with no residential uses and large lot areas that would provide a buffer between uses, why not allow in residential or mixed use zones as a conditional use, if lot size and conditions allow, it seems other defined restrictions with regard to lot size and set backs would handle the potential conflicts. Mr. Milliner stated that the rational that staff used was that these large wind energy systems are for the large scale type. He further stated that if someone wanted an accessory windmill they could have that in their yard, but in residential zoning, it didn't seem there would be a location that you could place one and further, it would cause a significant amount of public outcry if the City said that they would place one in a public place. Question 6, off street parking and loading requirements for large wind systems , seem to run counter to sustainability goals, is it appropriate to pave an agricultural field where these may be located to accommodate the occasional access. Mr. Milliner answered that he felt it was a good comment, the criteria was based off of input given to staff by the transportation division. If the Commission feels that it was excessive, the staff could take it out. Questions from the Commissioners: Commissioner Woodhead was concerned about an item on page 6, which are the qualifying provisions for urban farms, there was testimony in a prior meeting about what buildings should be required to have building permits, and hoop houses were still in the ordinance, and the her understanding is that hoop houses are temporary structures and it seems excessive to require building permits. Commissioner Fife suggested that the wording be changed to accessory buildings associated with urban farms. Commissioner McHugh stated a question regarding an item on page 8, was there more clarification on "on site" sales and events, number 13e, "the sales stand should be a non permanent structure, it must be removed immediately following the sale." She stated that the wording made it seem that it could be an entire season, and the wording be changed to "following a sale everyday". Mr. Milliner stated that his intent was basically that when a vendor is finished with his stand, the table would be taken down. The definition of"sale" was discussed. Assistant Director Coffey stated that there is a limitation of 45 days in the ordnance, but it could be changed. She stated that the wording could adapted to fit the concerns. Commissioner McHugh noted that the issue for her was not whether the business or sale were to be every day, she was concerned about the tables and signs stay up continually. Commissioner De Lay asked for more clarification from Commissioner McHugh. Commissioner McHugh stated "it must be removed immediately following the sale each day." Commissioner Woodhead asked about the issue of "hours of operation" on page five, number 6: "all urban farm related uses shall operate only during daylight hours". If irrigation was one of the uses, that happens at night, and asked if that is considered a "use". She suggested that the phrase "all uses EXCEPT irrigation shall operate only during daylight hours." Commissioner Woodhead asked about the duration of seasonal farm stands, "shall only operate during the intermountain region harvest season." She asked if this applies to 7:57:57 PM Commissioner Hill made a motion to table the item. Mr. Milliner stated that this was a project that has been presented to the people at Wasatch Community Gardens, time had been spent with Kyle LaMalfa from the Farmer's Market, and time had been spent with Jeff Williams from the Agriculture Department. The individuals that had provided significant amounts of feedback and discussion are the one this most impacts. Chairperson De Lay clarified that it was his opinion that there was enough data. Mr. Milliner stated that was his opinion. 7:57:57 PM Commissioner Dean seconded the motion. City Attorney Nielson stated that this was listed on the agenda as a public hearing. Mr. Milliner stated that it was his preference not to table the issue, if it was to be tabled, he would need extensive information on what was lacking. 7:59:33 PM Chairperson De Lay opened the public hearing. Rick Gregory spoke asking about solar easements, looking at page 12, his concern was that easements were something that needed to be individually negotiated, and therefore confrontational. He would like the ordinance to be more specific. Anne Cannon spoke in concern for "provide information regarding limitations of agriculture in the riparian corridor." She asked where the information was provided. Mr. Milliner stated that it was found in section page 8 number 2. 8:08:41 PM Chairperson De Lay closed the public hearing. Vicky spoke about the public input, the open houses and said that approximately 30 residents came and listened. The process is ongoing. She stated that it was the hope that these changes would go through because this is something that would help the City from a sustainability standpoint. Assistant Director Cheri Coffey added that this was brought out in December; she stated that a majority of the people were interested in urban farming. Vicky's group has a large listsery grouping that they distribute information to, and they have been forwarding all of the information that we have been providing. Ms Coffey noted that this ordinance had been discussed and questions have been answered. 8:11:52 PM Commissioner Fife made the motion on PLNPCM2009-010337- Amendments to the Use Table Sustainability Regulations based on the information provided in the staff report and the recommendations of staff, moves that a positive recommendation be forwarded to City Council on these recommendations with the following changes: page 5, number 1: change to read that "accessory buildings: accessory buildings with urban farms are subject to the standards in chapter 21 A-40." Page 5 number 6: change to read "hours of operation: all urban farm related uses shall only operate only during daylight hours, except irrigation." Page 8 number 13-b, "signs must be removed immediately following the sale each day." 13-e add the words "each day" to each sentence. Commissioner Woodhead amended a change that page 11, number 4 to delete the wording that states" duration of the intermountain region harvest season" Commissioner Fife agreed to the changes. Commission Dean added: Page 11: define the solar array to this particular section of the ordinance as "systems about 100 kilowatt sizes" Off street parking, page 14 item 12, proposes that the parking requirement be removed. Page 14 number 12 under qualifying provisions to remove the last sentence. Commissioner Fife agreed to the changes. Assistant Director Coffey asked for the authority to make sure there is consistency based on the changes in the motion. Commissioner Fife agreed to that suggestion. City Attorney Nielson added a change that would change identifying specific companies. Commissioner Woodhead supported the amendment. Commissioner Fife agreed to that suggestion. 8:19:07 PM Commissioners Gallegos, Wirthlin, McHugh, Fife, Woodhead, Dean, all voted aye, Commissioner Hill voted "nay" the motion passed. Meeting adjourned at 8:19:26 PM t...:.._. __.r.,mow_ _ E� F. - O N= ��� ��_ ,-. �:�:_ _�. FUSE._ -- -" meµ=..�: z�'m _ ��:-. � .-- :.•,-s ���'--__ �s��r:�ra�== _- `_a >-- .. ; .-ems.._ -�: _ - = ALA'KE_.C1TY�PL��NING:�I�JISION"f�: =�� - -_ - _ Er�Ft_T- -- - `�:' _r..i•,;5=e�'�.'19+e��- :K.F�=- -?'s'= - -u.as z;±'-r -.;t_-,"_ __ _ +4 s _ �F: _ __ _ 'his is not a public hearing. The intent of this Open House is to obtain public comments and input prior to any public hearings. Items are not heard in order, but in an open forum style. Booths will be set up to talk directly to the planners and applicants of each petition for the following items: 1. PLNPCM2009-01272; Conditional Use for Telecommunication Equipment—a request for conditional use approval by Douglas Brown, representing Clearwire, for a rooftop wireless antenna structure, antennas, and supporting ground mounted equipment box located at East High School, 840 South 1300 East. The subject property is located in a PL(Public Lands)zoning district in Council District 4, represented by Luke Garrott (Staff contact: Lex Traughber at 801.535.6260 or lex.traughber(&slcgov.com). 2. Petition PLNPCM2008-00937, Zoning Text Amendment—The Planning Division is reviewing a petition requested by Mayor Becker to amend the Salt Lake City Zoning Ordinance, regarding Eleemosynary Facilities. The purpose of the request is to redefine and allow such facilities as appropriate in various zoning districts. The proposal includes allowing the use as a conditional use within low density and mediumdensity multi- family/mixed use residential zoning districts. The proposal also includes allowing the use as a permitted use in high-density multi-family/mixed use zoning districts as well as in transit corridor, public lands and institutional zoning districts. The proposed text change affects all residential, mixed use, transit corridor, public lands and institutional zoned properties city-wide (Staff contact: Everett Joyce at 801.535.7390 or everett.%oyce a slc_.ov.cols). 3. Sustainability Code Revision Project—The Planning Division is currently working with Clarion Associates to develop various amendments to the City's Zoning, Site Development and Subdivision Ordinances relating to sustainability regulations. The proposed changes include allowance for Accessory Dwelling Units, Alternative Energy Systems (Solar Oriented Subdivisions, Small Wind Energy Systems, Solar Arrays, Solar Collection Systems): Urban Agriculture (Community Gardens, Seasonal Farm Stands, Community Supported Agriculture, hoophouses, greenhouses and coldframes) and Street and Pedestrian Connectivity Standards for new development (Staff contact: Cheri Coffey at 801.535.6188 or cheri.coffevna.slcgov.com). 4. PLNPCM2009-01273; Cleanvire Rooftop Wireless Antenna: Uintah Elementar v—a request by Clearwire, LLC, represented by Doug Brown, for a conditional use to place wireless communication antennas on the roof of the existing school building (Uintah Elementary) located at approximately 1571 East 1300 South. The subject property is located in a PL zoning district (Public Lands) in Council District 6, represented by J.T. Martin. (Staff contact: Casey Stewart at 801.535.6260 or casev.stewartna.slcgov.com). S. PLNPCM2009-01274; Clearwire Power Pole Wireless Antenna: Hawthorne Elementary—a request by Clearwire, LLC, represented by Doug Brown, for a conditional use to place wireless communication antenna on top of a power pole located at approximately 1675 South 600 East(Hawthorne Elementary). The subject property is located in a PL zoning district (Public Lands) in Council District 5, represented by Jill Remington Love. (Staff contact: Casey Stewart at 801.535.6260 or casev.stewartslcgov.com). You are invited to the public open house to be held: Thursday December 17,2009 From 4:30 to 6:00 P.M. FIRST FLOOR HALLWAY SALT LAKE CITY AND COUNTY BUILIDNG 451 SOUTH STATE STREET SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH Since it is very difficult for us to inform all interested parties about these items, we would appreciate you discussing this matter with your neighbors and informing them of the meeting. People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodation no later than 48 hours in advance in order to attend this meeting. Accommodations may include: alternate formats, interpreters, and other auxiliary aids. This is an accessible facility. For questions, requests, or additional information, please contact the Planning llivicionat 53S_775 . Tnn 5:-7_677n OPEN HOUSE ,a!!,,1 PUBLIC COMMENT FORM - �,- ,-•-16:,, , December 179 2009 - " u ,f� r I 11 y � iTmC 'iilirr,,i'o,` Sustainability Code Revision Project Planning and Zoning Division Department of Community and Economic Development Name: �.( (, , /,' �b ZG , G / (A) (i Sl ' t1 (f'i1✓I'?4it i r f e t_ '� (-. 1,,S Address: .; (c L q-C.L.) / 2 C i q c CL t--. (Jlt(,t _ co-,,, L t ---- Zip Code S� I 1 Phone: /1,•L 1> -2�1 2�:' S ,. E-mail `L 1 v�( .,,- f.--, L L-c.( 5e(-4t.(.1CJ`4._a< - ^> •Please circle all that apply City Resident�'Owner Practitioner Special Interest"' ` J Please circle topics you are interested in Ac essory Dwellings' (Urban Agriculture Connectivity Alternativ'eEnergy Systems Please provide your contact information so we can notify you of other meetings or hearings on this issue. You may submit this sheet before the end of the Open House, or you can provide your comments via e-mail to cheri.coffey@slcgov.com or via mail at the following address: Cheri Coffey, Planning Manager, Salt Lake City Planning Division, PO Box 145480, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-5480. Please provide your comments by Thursday December 31, 2009. Cheri Coffey 801-535-6188 Comments: .Responses to questions: a. What zoning districts? Eyerywhere b. broad application or only in specific? A: Residential areas are most important to reexamine these restrictions Definitions: 1. "Community garden" should also mention that community gardens can include domestic livestock, can be used for public events, for educational purposes, and for sales of produce or other related items. "cold frame" can also be made of metal or plastic "Greenhouse" can also be made of wood, metal, straw bale, or masonry. They can be heated by passive or active solar or with electricity(or with indoor compost or worm bins). Should coldframes, greenhouses, and hoophouses be exempt from Accessory Structure regulations? 1. Location of structure on lot: - all three should be allowed to be 1- from rear property line - all three should be allowed to be 1' from principal structure 2. Structure size: all cold frames, all hoop houses, and greenhouses that are under 10'x 10' with no electricity or plumbing should be allowed to cover more than 50% of yard. it OPEN HOUSE ••'' ` " PUBLIC COMMENT FORM December 17, 2009 =�' ► R ; �'= li l i '`. ,,,jirrr(((1``= nn,',a" Sustainability Code Revision Project Planning and Zoning Division Department of Community and \ ,c Economic Development Name: ,J k\1� \e Address: U\ Lk lam, Zip Code 6 UI 1 — (M 21 `% E-mail - \c C) ) Lr �Z'C` �� Phone: \ 3 Please circle all that apply CResidentl Owner Practitioner Special Interest Please circle topics,you are interested in Accessory Dwellings Urban Agriculture Connectivity Alternative Energy Systems Please provide your contact information so we can notify you of other meetings or hearings on this issue. You may submit this sheet before the end of the Open House, or you can provide your comments via e-mail to cheri.coffey@slcgov.com or via mail at the following address: Cheri Coffey, Planning Manager, Salt Lake City Planning Division, PO Box 145480, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-5480. Please provide your comments by Thursday December 31. 2009. Cheri Coffey 801-535-6188 Comments: .Responses to questions: a. What zoning districts? Everywhere b. broad application or only in specific? A: Residential areas are most important to reexamine these restrictions Definitions: 1. "Community garden" should also mention that community gardens can include domestic livestock, can be used for public events, for educational purposes, and for sales of produce or other related items. "cold frame" can also be made of metal or plastic "Greenhouse" can also be made of wood,metal, straw bale, or masonry. They can be heated by passive or active solar or with electricity(or with indoor compost or worm bins). Should coldframes, greenhouses, and hoophouses be exempt from Accessory Structure regulations? 1. Location of structure on lot: - all three should be allowed to be 1' from rear property line - all three should be allowed to be 1' from principal structure 2. Structure size: all cold fi-ames, all hoop houses, and greenhouses that are under 10'x10' with no electricity or plumbing should be allowed to cover more than 50%of yard. II fI December 17,2009 „ ese RE: Salt Lake City Planning Division Sustainability Code Review As Salt Lake City works to identify zoning ordinances to work toward sustainability the opportunity to collect public comments is important. Sugar House is one area in Salt Lake City that has unumediate needs for more sustainable zoning ordinances. As chair of the Sustainability Committee for the Sugar House Community Council (SHCC) I am excited to take this opportunity to provide the planning division with clear feedback regarding the outlined goals stated by Salt Lake City. Currently many of Salt Lake City's zoning and subdivision ordinances hinder efforts to achieve a more sustainable footprint by individuals and businesses. The need to amend standing regulations in relation to the 10 identified areas has been long apparent. In order to work toward achieving a smaller footprint on our environment we welcome the review of current ordinances that hinder those efforts. The issues we face in Sugar I-Iouse are not unique to the city, but in many ways the distinctive character of our neighborhoods and businesses lend itself to a magnified impact by the constant development occurring in our borders both on the commercial and residential front. The SI-ICC Sustainability Committee supports changes in the code to give incentives to development to incorporate greener building practices and long term sustainability goals. One of the primary obstacles for both new and existing structures is the incorporation of alternative energy sources. The city should be encouraging the use of solar energy conversions and we should take advantage of smaller scale electricity grids to lessen our dependence on coal driven energy. Technology is rapidly giving us more choices in terms of energy production, use and conservation. \Ve will not achieve sustainability without a commitment to these principles. Alternatively urban agriculture has been a long ignored cornerstone of sustainability. In Sugar House we are looking at trying to establish a community garden or farmer's market to help keep our food more local. The success of the downtown farmer's market only illustrates the need to refocus our attention to neighborhood localities to reduce the need to travel long distances to take advantage of these markets. One component to urban agriculture that is not mentioned in the outline is the issue of water collection. Using culinary water for all outdoor uses is a waste of a natural resource. Changes to the regulations need to be visited to ensure that opportunities to harvest rain water on small scales are not only legal, but promoted. We are interested in learning about the calculated impact this may have on groundwater tables and other possible impediments to its iinplementation. Additionally, the issues of street and pedestrian connectivity take on paramount importance in the Sugar House area. The master plan has long called for a realignment of Wilmington Ave and Sugarmont to promote more walkability and efforts have long been underway to connect the trail from the Jordan River to Parley's Historic Nature Park. The master plan centers on the premise of being pedestrian friendly and yet we have so many obstacles to overcome. A serious problem we encounter with increased traffic congestion and r. heightened danger to pedestrians is the role of parking requirements from Salt Lake City on wr►e any new developments. Other cities, such as Portland place a maximum number of parking stalls for new developments and yet we place a minimum. While parking is important for any business district it does nothing to wean us off our vehicles and creates an expectation of parking in front of every store we want to visit. The parking stall regulations have only served to divide the Sugar House business district by encouraging people to drive to each separate location. The Sustainability Committee encourages the planning division to seriously review the relationship between parking and developments to promote sustainability. Clearly the issue of increased traffic creates air pollution issues along with the hindrance to pedestrian activity. We look forward to being part of a city that is working toward creating a more sustainable future for its residents. While most people may not see the connection the Sustainability Committee of the Sugar House Community Council understands that much of the obstacles we face are centered in the planning and zoning ordinances inherited from a time when sustainability was not on anyone's radar. We hope that you will consider the concerns raised in this letter in addition to what you have outlined as you move forward with creating recommendations for the city council. Sincerely, Amy Ba Sustainability, Chair Sugar House Community Council OPEN HOUSE ,;�'� , f L '� PUBLIC COMMENT FORM ' �..„A,� ;-�,:;„_ " December 17 2009 'l it� �l I tr Sustainability Code Revision Project Planning and Zoning Division Department of Community and Economic Development Name: ;/(-4. ;lam °'-\, ; i ) , Address: C ! `( �' 1 / ut,-- 1 Iv • t-- C--- t �I 4-1 l 0 j Zip Code Phone: v 1 ! C ?C Z C E-mail C t L" L: -- , - _l (:'• i l c. ' I- L''' I' r --cr LL _. Please circle all that apply ity Resident/Owner = Practitioner Special Interest Please circle topics you are interested in Accessory Dwellings Urban AgricuTt 1 e ClC'onnectivit lternative1nergy Systems: Please provide your contact information so we can notify you of other meetings or hearings on this issue. You may submit this sheet before the end of the Open House, or you can provide your comments via e-mail to cheri.coffey@slcgov.com or via mail at the following address: Cheri Coffey, Planning Manager, Salt Lake City Planning Division, PO Box 145480, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-5480. Please provide your comments by Thursday December 31, 2009. Cheri Coffey 801-535-6188 Comments: _i c 1, I.- Li -• m ( � c \ ,,_ r. -(..: ` ,,_ , ,_ ` ,_ J- c� 11.�. i ( ' c ' 't : ,'-t-,, , /( sc 1_ l C l 1,�i �\i,Lfk iL. l V✓- ) � t ���) I -)v-- ( U,- - 1 ' I C:. v (I r� 1 C� \ l l` ,,, ,) I', 1,...,,,.. , . , : '-'4‘)/ Y - ` ' it(i ,.,--- (7, I L (l J I , ( I 1- 1.�.' 1—i' 1 f `.. I ( L' 1 )' /L, ( ) \\ � '.; �� -�; �'.L,l � C' i �. ,�t(t i �� I 1. L�c�-' 1 `I ) 1.,.,_T 1 °C L ,,� -:.)----' L) al CO ( Li , C___() 'itito 7 S 1 e CD e,t,( caLt,:-.T io c,,___ utu , - 1 \-1) -\-AA),.1-;) \OUS, AA-/-94.- . 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Q,t,(.-\-- t-1) 17\ f D,,,,) (111: m -- .) , \ i i ( L-1 l' 4,1 ()1% 7 (,a--L-Cf /Th --(- ' \"----)' r_:,,l-- Q.(c(_L,)-iy 1 i 0._L.-, )(,,.--1,--(A.z) ---J iw., K, 4-1,LLL,,.., / , -J:_. I. C 't- ( v .L-- /-QC Y CU.,(---V J 0 J , ( J — Ocl,( IC ) - C _-(),/-) 0 i .I C- 1.,): ft.?1---•' . J . C\ \c; S ( 7.0 (7( v,,n L 2, c.) --) ct,..v, j,'Ai) ,---N I 0,--.2.,--_) h) ' 0 C,i(J, c.(_} ) •_ 0 (---) j 'I, 1. .11 K k i C_L I---1‘,,) (,:, tt(e'L 1 1 k.,''(- ICA.-/-9 (0 v _ 1 j , ( Lk ,---) c) - I - (;' C <L'CLk--' \,,L(3\1_,-- ___, L----0 \ ? tAA (-1,9 e_...t.,uc\.)) t-JA c 0 1ke.,,..,(- -\--_L,,, c? )4 c v\As --\-- U-uo c- -c, - (A-, .;',ti...., y-i'.7----/et I-)/• i OPEN HOUSE °'` , f1 PUBLIC COMMENT FORM December 17, 2009 Eti�Jii �idltl,. off/ lilfr/{111 Sustainability Code Revision Project Planning and Zoning''Division Department of Community and f (� Economic Development Name: Address: (2-6C) G, it,‘ 1_4k �'� Zip Code �S�(� v S Phone: �cx '�o3 "3`t �o E-mail S ��Gle 2 > e 7 �L,, Please circle all that apply City Resident/Owner Practitioner Special Interest Please circle topics you are interested in Accessory Dwellings Urban Agriculture Connectivity Alternative Energy Systems Please provide your contact information so we can notify you of other meetings or hearings on this issue. You may submit this sheet before the end of the Open House, or you can provide your comments via e-mail to cheri.coffey@slcgov.com or via mail at the following address: Cheri Coffey, Planning Manager, Salt Lake City Planning Division, PO Box 145480, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-5480. Please provide your comments by Thursday December 31, 2009. Cheri Coffey 801-535-6188 (� - �@ ( Comments: � .� S` u\--)� ,� � e ��e v-cJt �a .: � �l-� � � vr- ,vsti , I u a /� �, ;1- �a�-,-moo �o G e�.A ,..s e, es.) S5 t A ) 44.vs-e- + Lt-A- c ( J •C err ye , s - ,..� , ve- ` ,&-. Tie w J A(S--o / �� -0 t9 re-5,..��-� �..� 'f� -• p, v‘ ,s 1,ia,,se" G f 1,-s4 ke-�1- t" k 8 11—.Q-- i-Ct 4 LA r- r V e e`�z. ( e a)S ---c, -7. .i2....... --4.)_,_447-41.5 ____ ___,narvi 5=2 -71.. - 7?-) s-^-tii -)- s ace ` -' -a-v,;J Ilinommi S 4. Sed --...., 414 p N v, - a N ' }} _ S 1af (....0 rn I 1 I 1 .),-)zi --)-1) --F-1 0 d.ii, .N.,,,, e/1 N ")--"-a j, I--)r.. J.,,v �s � ��51 )1 s 15 ,,,)�-) l cvi 7-1-, A 1 ---$,A,i -k - pl 1 1—Ai __--P \Ir.-La-r 0 ifm _Lt ,i p 4-, Li a ...,1 1-5--- -.. -r-vi +, .. I „I :7 ., i I I"' '' t- --ir` ____t-,4--r ,,fir, s1--a-1_1 -T . �� �J b,--1 ►.___,--).. -AA-A-wt4) CI-D-,1-9 VI 11.) `sib ) 1 11 VS M i `N.1,'/14 p a v1 N 042 ------------------ ' C)) i► Q74j.10-A '‘4 d412j/1C)) Ia 2 ---a-,0 LI 1-f a`til t 1- M V f I,v) pars-J 4, OPEN HOUSE M L PUBLIC COMMENT FORM ' v ����3 : " 17, 2009 `► i_.-r� - Decemberw�=,1i R= ,z m : '• e11r . llmb - `• ',,A n,n ""` Sustainability Code Revision Project Planning and Zoning Division Department of Community and Economic Development • Name: , ,,,. t-,,,_,^:sue , l 1 Address: I 1 %'c. --.--0A:1�� T v-- . ''C._� Zip Code ')7-/e c) Phone: -.../ `\.u- - i';;'-'(/ _ E-mail ,1}1 I'»/ ' '\/ - \.•. li,,1 i r,, / / Please circle all that apply City Resident/Owner Practitioner Special Interest Please circle topics you are interested in Accessory Dwellings `Urban Agriculture Connectivity Alternative Energy Systems - Please provide your contact information so we can notify you of other meetings or hearings on this issue. You may submit this sheet before the end of the Open I-Iouse, or you can provide your comments via e-mail to cheri.coffey@slcgov.com or via mail at the following address: Cheri Coffey, Planning Manager, Salt Lake City Planning Division, PO Box 145480, Salt Lake City, UT 841 14-5480. Please provide your comments by Thursday December 31. 2009. Cheri Coffey 801-535-6188 Comments: _-'. a; t._ , ,r/-- ii 1 ( IL'I t �L.;. "/'_ . I .-- C°.— --�.�'����F_�_��-L�i_'�...._L.c ..-l.ti_��— `�it,.S1�_'.tL��.�_Jrl/�L1j ((�ib��{lr /l - l.f. - vire 1 I ' Solar Collectors or Panels refers to equipment capable of collecting and converting incident solar radiation into thermal, mechanical, or electrical energy,and transferring these forms of energy by a separate apparatus to storage or to the point of use;and (i) includes water heating, space heating or cooling,and electrical or mechanical energy generation. Zc. u c u LI z o* D m Z ^ o• G r I- U 5 T Eo r — o 3 O 0 Z T N cj __C J L f O . c t 0 fl _ E. r- _ U c.: o,-.,-- 2 r OFr a :M co O i < J-- O IL m w 6 I ' I id H J W 4 !D C � p., U ,er a 2 U u use=a^:.1s.:::.:.a���• : a-x r:,:�,,._��;.:.ia- ---.:--�;:x�x�ax�_:sre.,n.u.e__..:_.>..¢._..,, . .�. --- Comments on Urban Agriculture portion of Sustainability Code Revision Project ,040 Purpose statement: Item 9: suggest that you define "organic" soil amendment and "natural" pest control. Both are open to misrepresentation. General Questions 1. Zoning District- a) Allow in all areas. Market forces should be sufficient to determine siting. b) Public property. I do not support use of street medians -they will most probably have very significant accumulation of heavy metals in the soil. Even with remediation, passing autos will constantly reintroduce them. Otherwise, Yes, OK on public property, subject to i) Discussion w. local community council, ii) long-term lease (5 years minimum, preferably with 5 renewal) c) Institutional spaces: Why not? 2. Sales from community gardens: a) Appropriate city sales licenses required b) on-site farm stands only if non-permanent structures, only if produce is from the specific garden and is not highly processed. (Goal is to allow e.g. honey sales but not apple pies.) This avoids the temptation to import 'two produce from elsewhere and falsely sell as local produce. c) sales at farmers markets OK 3. Sales from private gardens: a. Seasonal stands OK, as 2(b) above. 4. Impacts: a. Attempt to minimize requirement for off-street parking. (No new parking lots if possible.) b. Require mowing, rototilling, mechanical shredding, chainsaw activities etc. be during normal working hours. (i.e. not before 8 a.m.) 5. Accessory Structures: suggest that the language be written loosely enough that there is some room for adaptation. Example: it may be that hoophouses become an economically significant way to grow produce in the City. In which case, needlessly restricting a Community Garden or a CSA from fully using their lot may not make much sense. Patrick de Freitas pdefreitas@earthlink.net � 801-582-1496 • • T ~ - SE TiLAKE C PLANNINC DIVISION _ - - - :tea; r - - - •F • PLNPCM2ooq-oo346; Zoning Map Amendment—a petition by Mayor Becker to amend the Salt Lake City Zoning Map for properties south of OC Tanner between 2000 South and 2100 South and between State Street and Main Street. The proposed Map amendment would change the current zoning from Business Park (BP) and Commercial Corridor (CC) to a Mixed-Use (MU) zone (Staff contact: Ray Milliner at 801.535.7645 or ray.millinerPslcgov.com). • PLNPCM2oo98-o1337; Sustainabilitv Development Code Changes; Amendment to the Zoning Ordinance Use Tables—a request by Mayor Ralph Becker to amend the Use Tables of the Zoning Ordinance to allow for more opportunity for community gardens, seasonal farm stands, community support agriculture, solar arrays, and wind generating systems in appropriate zoning districts throughout the City (Staff contact: Cheri Coffey at 801.535.7645 or ray.milliner(&slcgov.com). • PLNPCM2ooq-o1338; Sustainability Development Code Changes; amendment related to accessory buildings—a request by Mayor Ralph Becker to amend the Zoning Ordinance in regards to accessory structures associated with urban agriculture (such as greenhouses) and renewable energy systems (such as solar collection systems) in an effort to facilitate and regulate those activities throughout the City (Staff contact: Casey Stewart at 8oi.535.6260 or casev.stewart@slcgov.com). • Parley's Historic Nature Park Management Plan—Salt Lake City is in the process of developing a Management Plan for Parleys Historic Nature Park.The 88-acre nature park was established to protect historic and natural features. It has been identified for decades as a critical link in regional open space and trail networks. The City seeks citizen input on goals, management strategies and alternatives for finalization of the plan. (Staff contact: Emy Storheim at 801.535.7730 or emv.storheim(@slcgov.com). Further information is available at hUp://www.slcgov.com/PublicServices/Parks/Parleys/parlevsnaturepark.htm • PLNPCM2ooq-oo510 North Temple Boulevard Station Area Plans—The Planning Division will host an open house on the public draft of the North Temple Viaduct Station Area Plan. The public draft of the plan can be viewed on the project website at www.northtempleboulevard.com (Staff: Nick Norris at 801.535.6173 or nick.norrisPslcgov.cotn). • Transit Station Area Zoning District—The Planning Division will host an open house on the proposed Transit Station Area Zoning District. The purpose of the open house will be to introduce the zoning approach to the Planning Commission and obtain feedback on the overall direction of the proposed ordinance as well as the content. A presentation will be given starting at 5:oo p.m. The Transit Station Area Zoning District is being proposed within the station areas identified in the North Temple Boulevard Station Area Plan (Staff: Nick Norris at 801.535.6173 or nick.norris(a�slcgov.com). You are invited to the public open house to be held: Thursday, March 18, 2010 From 4:3o to 6:oo P.M. FIRST FLOOR HALLWAY SALT LAKE CITY AND COUNTY BUILIDNG 451 SOUTH STATE STREET SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH Since it is very difficult for us to inform all interested parties about these items, we would appreciate you discussing this matter with your neighbors and informing them of the meeting. People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodation no later than 48 hours in advance in order to attend this meeting. Accommodations may include: alternate formats, interpreters, and other awdliary aids. This is an accessible facility. For questions, requests, or additional information,please contact the Planning Division at 535-7757; TDD 535-6220. A OPEN HOUSE %%%%% :,,, %%% FORM `�'�';\\'-� / i�. PUBLIC COMMENT " _ ` .�'''4= IT fin Lf1_.j Ilk. March 18 2010 , SI �' � - 1 � ,x.,,,T,,,• Planning and Zoning Division Department of Community and Economic Development Sustainability Text Amendments Name: A rf D(� ,�'�"c.2'l' Address: ,713 n✓vt .\,,.rt'x 1 1^ Zip Code E409 Phone: E-mail �.ncA�--). �� l l P u g L .c a 1 ` Comments: C1/4,." i� P........."- ° - VN"-£.'e- Gce-e f 5 1 a CUw4 tArl,i--"-, jor Ag.n.5 �c 3-ce,c, S . Please provide your contact information so we can notify you of other meetings or hearings on this issue. You may submit this sheet before the end of the Open House, or you can provide your continents via e-mail at ray.milliner@slcnov.com or via mail at the following address: RayMilliner, Salt Lake City Planning Division, PO Box 145480, Salt Lake City, UT 84114- -" 5480. Please provide your comments by April 10, 2010. `NW ,,,,, Petition Initiation _tri mms�.�l�: Request Planning Division Community&Economic Development Department To: File From: Cheri Coffey, AICP Planning Manager Date: November 18, 2009 Re: Sustainability Regulations- Bundle 1: Amendments to the Use Table PLNPCM2009-01337 As part of the Sustainability Regulations- Bundle 1, the Planning Staff is processing amendments to the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses to incorporate the applicable elements of the regulations that have been developed by Clarion Associates. This petition will include the following concepts from Bundle 1 project: ID Community Gardens t Seasonal Farm Stands • Community Support Agriculture C. • Solar Arrays E Wind Generation Systems c • o Page 1 Remarks: Petition No: PLNPCM2009-01337 By: Planning Division Sustainability Regulations — Bundle 1: Amendments to the Use Table Date Filed: November 18, 2009 Address: City Wide SALT LAKE CITY COUNCIL STAFF REPORT DATE: January 27,2011 SUBJECT: Petition No.PLNPCM2010-01338 -Proposed changes to the City's zoning regulations relating to accessory structures for greenhouses, cold frames,hoop houses, small solar and wind energy systems (e.g. solar panels and wind turbines) AFFECTED COUNCIL DISTRICTS: If the ordinance is adopted the zoning regulation changes would affect Council Districts citywide. STAFF REPORT BY: Janice Jardine,Land Use Policy Analyst ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. Community Development Department,Planning Division AND CONTACT PERSON: Casey Stewart, Senior Planner KEY ELEMENTS: A. An ordinance has been prepared for Council consideration that would change the City's zoning regulations relating to accessory structures for greenhouses, cold frames, hoop houses, small solar and wind energy systems(e.g. solar panels and wind turbines). Key elements are summarized below. (Please see the proposed ordinance for details.) 1. New definitions are provided for—greenhouse, cold frame,hoop house, small solar and wind energy collection systems and urban agriculture. 2. Greenhouses, hoop houses, and cold frames associated with growing food and/or plants: a. Setbacks and Location-exempt from general yard area,building size and height regulations; must be setback 1 ft. from property line;prohibited in front yard and allowed in side and rear yards b. Lot coverage • 10%when located on vacant lot • 15%when located on a lot with a principal building c. Building coverage -35% of the principal building's footprint d. Height- Subject to zoning district height limit e. Materials -molded or thin sheet transparent plastic over a frame of wood, metal, or PVC piping 3. Accessory structures associated with keeping animals,bees,livestock and poultry are not included in this proposal but are subject to the provisions of the City Code Chapter 8 Animals. 4. Small Wind Energy Systems: a. Setbacks and Location—setback from lot lines a distance equal to the total height plus five feet. b. Tower height—regulated by required setback rules and Federal Aviation Administration height limits. c. Sound—Cannot exceed 55dBA measured at adjacent property line. Sound level may be exceeded during short-term events out of owner's control, such as severe storms for battery- charging systems or utility outages for systems connected to the power grid. 1 d. Appearance,color and finish—grays,browns,greens,tans and other earth tones permitted. e. Signage prohibited. f. Lighting—prohibited unless required by Federal Aviation Administration regulations. g. Abandonment—removal of inoperable equipment required within 6 months of City notification. h. If there is a conflict between this section and any other requirements of the zoning,site plan,and subdivision ordinances,the zoning administrator shall determine which requirements apply to the project in order to achieve the highest level of neighborhood compatibility. 5. Small Solar Energy Collection Systems a. Size,Area and Location-allowed on both primary and/or accessory buildings or as a separate structure,minimum 6 ft.setback from all property lines and other structures,90%maximum roof area coverage permitted. b. Height-not to exceed more than three feet the maximum height permitted in the zoning district or not extend more than 12 feet above the roofline of the structure,whichever is less. c. Solar easements-property owner responsible for negotiating with other property owners any desired solar easement to protect solar access and shall record the easement with the Salt Lake County Recorder. d. If there are conflicts between this section and any other requirements of the zoning,site plan,and subdivision ordinances,the zoning administrator shall determine which requirements apply to the project in order to achieve the highest level of neighborhood compatibility. 6. Small Solar Energy Collection Systems in Historic Overlay Zoning District. a. Installation required in a location on the building or lot that is least visible and obtrusive and that causes the least impact/damage to the historic integrity and character of the historic building,structure,site or district while maintaining efficient operation of the solar device. b. Small Solar Collection System Location Priorities �` • Administrative review and decision is allowed for: o Rear yard,side yard or on the principal building or accessory structures in a location not readily visible from a public right-of-way. • Historic Landmark review and decision is required for: o Any location on the principal building in that may be visible from a public right-of- way,but not on the structure's front façade. ; o Any location on the front façade of the principal building to ensure compatibility with the character-defining features of the structure. B. The Administration's paperwork provides detailed information relating to the proposed zoning regulations.Key points are summarized below. (Please see the Administration's transmittal letter and Planning staff report for details.) 1. The proposed zoning regulations are part of the Mayor's Sustainability Code Initiative to encourage sustainable living practices throughout the City. 2. Promoting sustainability by encouraging local food production and renewable energy systems is intended to reduce the need for imported foods,create new sources of affordable energy and reduce environmental impacts from transportation and air pollution. 3. The proposed regulations include standards to mitigate adverse impacts on neighboring property owners and clarify regulations that were not clear or concise. C. The purpose of the zoning rules relating to accessory uses is"to provide general regulations,applicable to all zoning districts,for accessory uses,buildings and structures which are customarily incidental and subordinate to the principal use and which are located on the same lot. It is further intended to provide specific standards for certain accessory uses,buildings and structures."(Chapter 21A.40.010) 2 1.. D. The purpose of the zoning regulations is to"promote the health,safety,morals,convenience,order, prosperity and welfare of the present and future inhabitants of Salt Lake City,to implement the adopted plans of the city,and to carry out the purposes of the municipal land use development and management act,title 10,chapter 9,of the Utah Code Annotated or its successor,and other relevant statutes.In addition,regulations are intended to: 1. Lessen congestion in the streets or roads; 2. Secure safety from fire and other dangers; 3. Provide adequate light and air; 4. Classify land uses and distribute land development and utilization; 5. Protect the tax base; 6. Secure economy in governmental expenditures; 7. Foster the city's industrial,business and residential development;and 8. Protect the environment." E. The Planning Staff report provides findings for the Zoning Ordinance Section 21 A.50.050—Standards for General Amendments. The standards were evaluated in the Planning staff report and considered by the Planning Commission. (Discussion and findings for the standards are found on pages 18-19 of the Planning Staff report.) F. The City's Departments and Divisions have reviewed the request. Recommended changes have been included in the proposal. G. The public process included: 1. Planning Division sponsored Open Houses 2. Discussion with the Business Advisory Board C3. Notification of the Historic Landmark Commission and Planning Commission briefmgs/hearings to Community Council Chairs and the Planning Division electronic list serve. Notice was also posted on the City's website 4. A majority of the issues raised through the public process have been addressed in the proposed zoning regulations. H. On October 6,2010 the Historic Landmark Commission provided a final recommendation to the Planning Commission. I. On October 27,2010,the Planning Commission unanimously passed a motion to forward a favorable recommendation to the City Council. MASTER PLAN AND POLICY CONSIDERATIONS: A. The Administration's paperwork and Planning staff report note the following related to Master Plan and Policy considerations: 1. The proposed regulations are not site specific and do not pertain to any single master plan. 2. The proposed text amendments are a priority for policy makers as they mirror current trends in community sustainability by providing alternates for renewable energy and food production systems. 3. The proposed amendments are consistent with current planning practices in that they create and maintain efficient infrastructure,foster close-knit neighborhoods,provide a sense of community and preserve natural habitat. 4. The executive summary section of the City's Futures Commission Report of 1998 states,"Vibrant neighborhoods are fundamental to the health and vitality of the city and citizens,business owners, and local government each have a role to play in creating and sustaining ideal neighborhoods." 3 Promoting sustainability by encouraging local food production and renewable energy systems is a priority in Salt Lake City. The proposed amendments related to urban agriculture accessory structures and small renewable energy systems offer opportunities to improve and sustain the health of citizens and neighborhoods. • Additional citywide Master Plan and Policy considerations are provided below. B. The City's Strategic Plan and the Futures Commission Report express concepts such as maintaining a prominent sustainable city,ensuring the City is designed to the highest aesthetic standards and is pedestrian friendly,convenient,and inviting,but not at the expense of minimizing environmental stewardship or neighborhood vitality. C. The Council's growth policy notes that growth in Salt Lake City will be deemed the most desirable if it meets the following criteria: 1. Is aesthetically pleasing; 2. Contributes to a livable community environment; 3. Yields no negative net fiscal impact unless an overriding public purpose is served;and 4. Forestalls negative impacts associated with inactivity. D. The City's 1990 Urban Design Element includes statements that emphasize preserving the City's image, neighborhood character and maintaining livability while being sensitive to social and economic realities. Policy concepts include: 1. Allow individual districts to develop in response to their unique characteristics within the overall urban design scheme for the city. 2. Ensure that land uses make a positive contribution to neighborhood improvement and stability. 3. Ensure that building restoration and new construction enhance district character. 4. Require private development efforts to be compatible with urban design policies of the city regardless of whether city financial assistance is provided. 5. Treat building height,scale and character as significant features of a district's image. 6. Ensure that features of building design such as color,detail,materials and scale are responsive to district character,neighboring buildings,and the pedestrian. CHRONOLOGY: The Administration's transmittal provides a chronology of events relating to the proposed zoning regulation changes. Key dates are listed below. Please refer to the Administration's chronology for details. • Petition initiated and assigned to planner o November 18,2009 • Planning Division Open Houses o December 17,2009 o March 18,2010 o April 12,2010 • Historic Landmark Commission o January 6&April 12,20010 briefings o Sept.1&Oct.6,2010 hearings o Sept.14,2010 subcommittee meeting • Planning Commission o July 14&Oct.27,2010 hearings • Ordinance requested from Attomey's office o Oct.29,2010 4 • cc: David Everitt,,Bianca Shreeve,Karen Hale,Lisa Harrison-Smith,Art Raymond,Holly Hilton,Ed Rutan, Lynn Pace,Paul Nielson,Jeff Niermeyer,Tom Ward,Rick Graham,Vicki Bennett,Emy Maloutos,Frank Gray,Mary De La Mare-Schafer,Orion Goff,Les Koch,Larry Butcher,Craig Spangenberg,Wilf Sommerkorn,Cheri Coffey,Joel Paterson,Casey Stewart,City Council Liaisons,Mayors Liaisons File Location: Community and Economic Development Dept.,Planning Division,Zoning Text change—urban agricultural accessory structures(greenhouses)and small renewable energy systems(solar and wind) • • • • • . FRANK B. GRAY �� �t�� +�i � "'� '���i""""� RALP BEC4KER DIRECTOR DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY St ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT NOV 1 2O Q OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR MARY DE LA MARE-SCHAEFER Salt Lake City Mayor DEPUTY DIRECTOR ROBERT FARRINGTON, JR. RECEIVED SCANNED TO, ' DEPUTY DIRECTOR ITY COUNCR I THNSMITTALNuv CANNED gY: - L41.11- 1111111 DATE: ���1�,( / SLC COUNCIL OFFICE Date Received: 11 l0 2010 David eritt, Chief 1►f :.taff Date sent to Council: I l 110 ZO I D TO: Salt Lake City Council_____ DATE: November 16, 2010 JT Martin, Chair FROM: Frank Gray, CED Di ctor SUBJECT: Sustainability Code Project PLNPC 2010-01338 for accessory structures associated with urban agriculture uses(e.g. greenhouses) and small renewable energy systems including solar and wind. STAFF CONTACT: Casey Stewart,Planning Division, 801-535-6260 DOCU yIENT TYPE: Zoning Text Amendment RECOMMENDATION: The City Council hold a briefing and schedule a public hearing. BACKGROUND/DISCUSSION: Issue Orrin In November 2009, Mayor Becker initiated a petition for the purpose of amending the Salt Lake City Zoning Ordinance to encourage practices of sustainable living. The City hired Clarion Associates as a consultant on the project, with the goal of creating appropriate zoning, subdivision and site development regulations that will make Salt Lake City a sustainable community. A portion of those regulations pertains to facilitating the use of accessory structures in support of urban agriculture and private, small scale renewable energy generation The amendments for accessory structures relating to urban agriculture are incorporated into the section of 21A.40.050 that establishes yard,bulk, and height limitations for accessory structures. The proposed amendments for structures relating to renewable energy (solar and wind)collection and generation are recommended as new sections, essentially new categories of accessory structures. Analysis: The executive summary section of the City's Futures Commission Report of 1998 states, "Vibrant neighborhoods are fundamental to the health and vitality of the city and citizens, business owners, and local government each have a role to play in creating and sustaining ideal 451 SOUTH STATE STREET, ROOM 404 P.O. BOX 145486, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH B4114.54E16 TELEPHONE: B01.535.6230 FAX:B01-535-6005 Re:PLNPCM2009-01338 Sustainability Code Project—Acceseevs4 6tulet resomicED 1 A«.CLE0 PAP.. neighborhoods." Promoting sustainability by encouraging local food production and renewable energy systems is a priority in Salt Lake City. The proposed amendments related to urban agriculture accessory structures and small renewable energy systems offer opportunities to improve and sustain the health of citizens and neighborhoods. The proposed changes to the ordinance will further the purpose statement of the Zoning Ordinance by enabling urban agriculture and renewable energy systems in various zones throughout the City. By enabling the uses, individuals will be able to work more efficiently in community gardens and sell locally grown foods and products thereby lessening the need for imported foods and reducing the environmental impacts from transportation,air pollution etc. Amendments allowing renewable energy sources will enable citizens to create new sources of energy while lessening overall dependence on fossil fuels,which also decreases air pollution. The qualifying provisions for the accessory structures are designed to encourage their use yet uphold the general health,safety, and welfare of citizens by reducing or eliminating harmful impacts. These modifications create qualifying provisions that will facilitate mitigation of adverse impacts on neighboring property owners and will clarify sections of the ordinance that were not clear or concise. Master Plan Considerations These amendments are not site specific and therefore do not pertain to any single master plan. Nonetheless,the proposed text amendments are a priority for policy makers as they mirror current trends in community sustainability, by providing alternatives for renewable energy and food production systems. These amendments are consistent with current planning practices in that they create and maintain efficient infrastructure,foster close-knit neighborhoods, a sense of community,and preserve natural habitat. Further,these amendments are consistent with the stated purpose of the Zoning Ordinance, which is to promote the health, safety,morals, convenience,order,prosperity and welfare of the present and future inhabitants of Salt Lake City. The proposed changes to the ordinance will enable urban agriculture and alternative energy systems in various zones throughout the City. The uses will empower individuals seeking to work more efficiently in community gardens and sell locally grown foods and products. This will lessen the need for imported foods and reduce the environmental impacts from transportation,air pollution etc. Amendments allowing renewable energy sources will enable citizens to create new sources of energy while lessening overall dependence on fossil fuels, which also decreases air pollution. Public Participation The proposed amendments were presented and available for review at open houses on December 17, 2009, March 18,2010,and April 15,2010. The Historic Landmark Commission received a briefing by planning staff on January 6,2010; conducted a subcommittee meeting on September 14,2010; and held two public hearings(September 1 and October 6,2010)prior to providing a final recommendation to the Planning Commission. owitiok Re:PLNPCM2009-01338 Sustainability Code Project—Accessory Structures 2 Between January and May of 2010, staff sought comments from numerous City departments and met with representatives from the Business Advisory Board,and the Historic Landmark Commission to discuss the amendments. They have provided technical input regarding appropriate practice to regulate the proposed structures while attempting to mitigate undesired impacts on residents,local businesses,and historic structures. • Re:PLNPCM2009-01338 Sustainability Code Project—Accessory Structures 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. PROJECT CHRONOLOGY 2. ORDINANCE 3. NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL HEARING 4. MAILING LABELS 5. PLANNING COMMISSION A) ORIGINAL HEARING NOTICES AND POSTMARK B) STAFF REPORT Attachment A: Salt Lake City Department comments Attachment B: Public Comments Attachment C: Historic Landmark Commission minutes/comments C) MINUTES July 14, 2010—Planning Commission October 27, 2010 —Planning Commission 6. ORIGINAL PETITION PROJECT CHRONOLOGY Petition PLNPCM2009-01338 November 18, 2009 Petition initiated and assigned to Casey Stewart, Principal Planner for staff analysis and processing. December 17, 2009 Planning staff conducted first open house to present project and gather public input. January 6, 2010 Planning staff briefed the Historic Landmark Commission on the proposed Sustainability Code. March 18, 2010 Planning staff conducted second open house to present project and gather public input. April 12, 2010 Planning staff briefed the Historic Landmark Commission on the proposed amendments and gathered commissioner comments. April 15, 2010 Planning staff conducted a third and final open house to present project and gather public input. June 25, 2010 Newspaper (Salt Lake Tribune) publication of Planning Commission public hearing notice for July 14, 2010 hearing. July 2, 2010 Publication and mailing of Planning Commission public hearing notice. July 14, 2010 Planning Commission held public hearing then tabled a decision pending more staff research on specific items. September 1, 2010 Historic Landmark Commission held public hearing and voted to form a subcommittee to formulate comments on the proposed amendments. September 8, 2010 Planning Commission ratified minutes of the July 14, 2010 meeting and finalized a motion to table the amendments pending clarification on specific items. September 14, 2010 Historic Landmark Commission held subcommittee meeting. October 6, 2010 Historic Landmark Commission held a public hearing and voted unanimously to forward a favorable recommendation on to the Planning Commission. October 27, 2010 Planning Commission held a public hearing and voted to forward a favorable recommendation to the City Council. October 29, 2010 Ordinance requested from City Attorney's office. November 10, 2010 Planning Commission ratified minutes of October 27, 2010 meeting. SCANNED TO:►" ' RECEIVED SCANNED BY:- NOV 1 9 2010 DATE: tki\l(te. SALT LAKE CITY'ORDINANCE v Salt Lake City Mayor No. of 2010 (An ordinance amending portions of Title 21A of the Salt Lake City Code concerning certain accessory structures intended to promote sustainable urban living) An ordinance amending sections 21A.24 (Zoning: Residential Districts), 21A.34 (Zoning: Overlay Districts), 21 A.40 (Zoning: Accessory Uses, Buildings and Structures), and 21 A.62 (Zoning: Definitions) of the Salt Lake City Code pursuant to Petition No. PLNPCM2009-01338 to recognize and allow certain accessory structures intended to promote sustainable urban living, namely accessory structures associated with urban agriculture uses and equipment relating to small renewable energy systems including solar and wind. WHEREAS, the Salt Lake City Planning Commission ("Planning Commission") held public hearings on July 14, 2010 and October 27, 2010 to consider a request made by Salt Lake City Mayor, Ralph Becker(petition no. PLNPCM2009-01338), to amend certain sections of Title 21 A of the Salt Lake City Code to recognize and allow accessory structures associated with urban agriculture uses and equipment relating to small renewable energy systems including solar and wind; and WHEREAS, the Salt Lake City Historic Landmark Commission("HLC") held public hearings on September 1, 2010 and October 6, 2010 to discuss application of the proposed ordinance amendments to the City's Historic Preservation Overlay District; and WHEREAS, at its October 27, 2010 meeting, the Planning Commission considered recommendations of the HLC and voted in favor of transmitting a positive recommendation to the Salt Lake City Council ("City Council") on said application; and WHEREAS, after a public hearing on this matter the City Council has determined that adopting this ordinance is in the City's best interests. NOW, THEREFORE,be it ordained by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah: SECTION 1. Amending text of Salt Lake City-Cod section 21A.62.040. That section 21 A.62.040 of the Salt Lake City Code(Zoning: Definitions), shall be, and hereby is, amended, in pertinent part, such that each of the following definitions shall be added and inserted alphabetically into that section: COLD FRAME: "Cold frame"means an unheated outdoor structure typically consisting of, but not limited to, a wooden or concrete frame and a top of glass or clear plastic, used for protecting seedlings and plants from the cold. GREENHOUSE: "Greenhouse"means a temporary or permanent structure typically made of, but not limited to, glass, plastic, or fiberglass in which plants are cultivated. HOOP HOUSE: "Hoop house"means a temporary or permanent structure typically made of, but not limited to, piping or other material covered with translucent plastic, constructed in a"half- round"or"hoop" shape, for the purposes of growing plants. A hoop house is considered more temporary than a greenhouse. SMALL SOLAR ENERGY COLLECTION SYSTEM: "Small solar energy collection system" shall mean an accessory structure that is roof-mounted, wall-mounted, or ground mounted panel, the primary purpose of which is to provide for the collection, inversion, storage, and distribution Afek of solar energy for electricity generation, space heating, space cooling, or water heating of buildings located on the same property. A small solar energy collection system shall not exceed a capacity of 100 kilowatts (kW). SMALL WIND ENERGY SYSTEM: "Small wind energy system"means an accessory structure defined as a wind energy conversion system consisting of a wind turbine, a tower, and associated control or conversion electronics that has a rated capacity of not more than 100 kilowatts (kW) and that is intended to generate electricity primarily for buildings and/or uses on the same property, thereby reducing on-site consumption of utility power. URBAN AGRICULTURE: "Urban agriculture" is a general term meaning the growing of plants, including food products, and the raising of animals in and around cities. Urban farms and community gardens with their accessory buildings, farm stands, farmers markets, and garden stands are components of urban agriculture. SECTION 2. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.40.030. That section 21A.40.030 of the Salt Lake City Code(Zoning: Accessory Uses, Buildings and Structures: Zoning Compliance Required), shall be, and hereby is, amended to read as follows: 21A.40.030: ZONING COMPLIANCE REQUIRED:— No No accessory use, building or structure shall be established or constructed unless it complies with the zoning ordinance and proper building permits, if required, have been obtained. Accessory buildings associated with keeping animals, bees, livestock and poultry are not subject to this chapter or the building coverage limits of the respective zoning district but are subject to the provisions of the City Code Chapter 8 Animals. SECTION 3. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.24.010.P.3.d. That. section 21A.24.010.P.3.d of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Residential Districts: General Provisions: Special Foothills Regulations), shall be, and hereby is, amended to read as follows: , 21A.24.010.P.3.d Special Foothills Regulations—Design Regulations Mechanical Equipment: Mechanical equipment including, without limitation, swamp coolers, air conditioning equipment, heat pumps, vents, blowers and fans shall be screened from view or painted to match the building color adjacent to the equipment. Roof mounted mechanical equipment, excluding solar panels which are subject to section 21A.040.180, shall not extend above the highest roof ridgeline. SECTION 4. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.34.020.F.1.a. That section 21A.34.020.F.1.a of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Historic Preservation Overlay District: Procedure for Issuance of Certificate of Appropriateness), shall be, and hereby is, amended add the following paragraph: (6) Installation of solar energy collection systems that are not readily visible from a public right-of-way, as described in and pursuant to Section 21A.40.180.2 of this title. SECTION 5. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.34.020.F.2.a. That section 21A.34.020.F.2.a of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Historic Preservation Overlay District: Procedure for Issuance of Certificate of Appropriateness), shall be, and hereby is, amended add the following paragraph: (7) Installation of solar energy collection systems that may be readily visible from a public right-of-way, as described in and pursuant to Section 21A.40.180.2 of this title. SECTION 6. Amending text of Salt Lake City-Code section 21A.40.050. That section 21A.40.050 of the Salt Lake City Code(Zoning: Accessory Uses, Buildings and Structures: General Yard, Bulk and Height Limitations), shall be, and hereby is, amended to read as follows: 21A.40.050: GENERAL YARD,BULK AND HEIGHT LIMITATIONS: All accessory buildings permitted by this chapter shall be subject to the following general requirements: A. Location Of Accessory Buildings In Required Yards: 1. Front Yards: Accessory buildings are prohibited in any required front yard and shall be setback at least as far as the principal building when the principal building exceeds the required front yard setback. 2. Corner Lots: No accessory building on a corner lot shall be closer to the street than the distance required for corner side yards. At no time, however, shall an accessory building be closer than twenty feet (20') to a public sidewalk or public pedestrian way and the accessory building shall be set back at least as far as the principal building. 3. Side Yards: Accessory buildings are prohibited in any required interior side yard; however, hoop houses, greenhouses, and cold frame structures associated solely with growing food and/or plants are allowed in an interior side yard but no closer than one ,,, iwk foot (1') to the corresponding lot line. If an addition to residential buildings results in an existing accessory building being located in a side yard, the existing accessory building shall be permitted to remain, subject to maintaining a four foot (4') separation from the side of the accessory building to the side of the residential building, as required in subsection A3b of this section. 4. Rear Yards: Location of accessory buildings in a rear yard shall be as follows: a. In residential districts, no accessory building shall be closer than one foot (1') to a side or rear lot line except when sharing a common wall with an accessory building on an adjacent lot. In nonresidential districts, buildings may be built to side or rear lot lines in rear yards, provided the building complies with all applicable requirements of the adopted building code. b. No portion of the accessory building shall be built closer than four feet (4') to any portion of the principal building; excluding cold frames associated solely with growing food and/or plants. c. Garages on two (2) or more properties that are intended to provide accessory building use for the primary occupants of the properties, in which the garage is located, may be constructed in the rear yards, as a single structure subject to compliance with adopted building code regulations and the size limits for accessory buildings on each property as indicated herein. d. In the R-1 districts, R-2 district and SR•districts accessory structures shall be located a maximum of five feet (5') from the rear property line subject to the following exceptions: (1) The building or structure is a hoop house, greenhouse, or cold frame associated solely with growing food and/or plants. (2) The maximum setback from the rear property line may be increased to meet the transportation division minimum required turning radius and other maneuvering standards. (3) The planning director or designee may authorize the issuance of building permits for an accessory structure with a maximum setback of more than five feet (5') from the rear property line if the property owner demonstrates that fifty percent (50%) or more of the properties on the block face have accessory structures located more than five feet (5') from the rear property line. In this case, the accessory structure may be set back from the rear property line a distance equal to the average setback of the other accessory structures on the block face. An appeal of this administrative decision shall be heard by an administrative hearing officer subject to the provision of chapter 21A.52 of this title. (4) The board of adjustment may approve an alternate location for an accessory structure as a special exception based on hardships created by topography or the location of mature vegetation. 5. ,Accessory Or Principal Lot: No portion of an accessory building on either an accessory or principal lot may be built closer than ten feet (10') to any portion of a principal residential building on an adjacent lot when that adjacent lot is in a residential zoning district; excluding hoop houses, greenhouses, and cold frames associated solely with growing food and/or plants. B. Maximum Coverage: 1. Yard Coverage: a. In residential districts, any portion of an accessory building, excluding hoop houses, greenhouses, and cold frames associated solely with growing food and/or plants, shall occupy not more than fifty percent (50%) of the total area located between the rear facade of the principal building and the rear lot line. b. The combined coverage for all hoop houses, greenhouses, and cold frames shall not exceed ten percent (10%) when located on vacant lots or, when located on a lot with a principal building, shall not exceed fifteen percent (15%) of the_total area located between the rear facade of the principal building and the rear lot line plus the side yard area between the front and rear facades of the principal building. 2. Building Coverage: a. In the FR, R-1, R-2 and SR residential districts the maximum building coverage of all accessory buildings, excluding hoop houses, greenhouses, and cold frames associated solely with growing food and/or planTs,- shall-not exceed fifty percent Awak (50%) of the building footprint of the principal structure up to a maximum of seven hundred twenty (720) square feet for a single-family dwelling and one thousand (1,000) square feet for a two-family dwelling. The maximum footprint for a primary accessory structure within the SR-lA is limited to four hundred eighty (480) square feet with an additional one hundred twenty (120) square feet allowed for a secondary accessory structure. Notwithstanding the size of the footprint of the principal building, at least four hundred eighty (480) square feet of accessory building coverage shall be allowed subject to the compliance with subsection B1 of this section. b. The combined coverage for all hoop houses, greenhouses, and cold frames shall not exceed thirty-five percent(35%) of the building footprint of the principal structure. C. Maximum Height Of Accessory Buildings/Structures: 1. Accessory To Residential Uses In The FP District, RMF Districts, RB, R-MU Districts, And The RO District: The height of accessory buildings/structures in residential districts shall conform to the following: a. The height of accessory buildings with flat roofs shall not exceed twelve feet (12'); b. The height of accessory buildings with pitched roofs shall not exceed seventeen feet(17') measured to the midpoint of the roof; and c. Accessory buildings with greater building height may be approved as a special exception,pursuant to chapter 21A.52 of this title. ,,2. Accessory To Residential Uses In The FR, R-1 Districts, R-2 District And SR Districts: The height of accessory buildings/structures in the FR districts, R-1 district, R-2 district and SR districts shall conform to the following: a. The height of accessory buildings with flat roofs shall not exceed twelve feet (12'); nine feet (9') in the SR-1A; b. The height of accessory buildings with pitched roofs shall not exceed seventeen feet (17') measured as the vertical distance between the top of the roof and the finished grade at any given point of building coverage. In the SR-1A the height of accessory buildings with pitched roofs shall not exceed fourteen feet(14'); and c. Accessory buildings with greater building height may be approved as a special exception, pursuant to chapter 21A.52 of this title, if the proposed accessory building is in keeping with other accessory buildings on the block face. SECTION 7. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.40 to adopt section 21A.40.170. That the Salt Lake City Code shall be, and hereby is, amended to adopt section 21A.40.170 (Zoning: Accessory Uses, Buildings and Structures: Small Wind Energy Systems), which shall read as follows: 21A.40.170: SMALL WIND ENERGY SYSTEMS: _. 1.Standards. All small wind energy systems shall comply with the following requirements. If there is any conflict between the provisions of this section and any other requirements of the zoning, site plan, and subdivision ordinances, the zoning administrator shall determine which requirements apply to the project in order to achieve the highest level of neighborhood compatibility. a. Setback. The base of the tower shall be set back from all property lines, public rights- of-way, and public utility lines a distance equal to the total extended height plus five feet. If the small wind energy system is on a roof, the total extended height is equal to the roof height and tower height. A tower may be allowed closer to a property line than its total extended height if the abutting property owner(s) grants written permission and the installation poses no interference with public utility lines or public road and rail rights-of-way. Guy wires and other support devices shall be setback at least five (5) feet from all property lines. b. Tower Height. Where the total extended height meets the sound and setback requirements of this section (See la above.), there shall be no specific height limitation, except as imposed by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations per subsection(j),below. c. Sound. Sound produced by the turbine under normal operating conditions, as measured at the property line of any adjacent property improved with a dwelling unit at the time of the issuance of the zoning certificate, shall not exceed 55 dBA for any period of time. The 55 dBA sound level may be exceeded during short-term events out of the owner's control such as utility outages and/or severe wind storms. d. Appearance, Color, and Finish. Colors permitted include grays, browns, greens, tans and other earth tones. Bright, luminescent, or neon colors are prohibited. e. Clearance. The blade tip or vane of any small wind energy system shall have a minimum ground clearance of 15 feet as measured at the lowest point of the arc of the blades. Blades on small wind energy systems in residential districts shall not exceed twenty (20) percent of tower height. All portions of the system shall maintain a clearance from power utility lines as required by the Utah High Voltage Line Safety Act. f. Signage Prohibited. All signs on a wind generator, tower, building, or other structure associated with a small wind energy system visible from any public road, other than the manufacturer's or installer's identification; appropriate warning signs, or owner identification, shall be prohibited. g. Lighting. No illumination of the turbine or tower shall be allowed unless required by the Federal Aviation Administration(FAA). h. Access. No foot pegs, rungs, or other climbing aids shall be allowed below 12 feet on a freestanding tower. For lattice or guyed towers, sheets of metal or wood or similar barriers shall be fastened to the bottom tower section such that it cannot readily be climbed. i. Requirement for Engineered Drawings. Building permit applications for small wind energy systems shall be accompanied by standard drawings of the wind turbine structure and stamped engineered drawings (by an engineer licensed by the State of Utah) of the tower, base, footings, and/or foundation as provided by the manufacturer. j. Compliance with FAA Regulations. No small wind energy system shall be constructed, altered, or maintained so as to project above any of the imaginary airspace surfaces described in FAR Part 77 of the FAA guidance on airspace protection or other current FAA regulations governing airspace protection. k. Compliance with Building and Electrical Codes. Small wind energy systems and all associated components shall comply with all applicable building and electrical codes adopted by Salt Lake City and the State of Utah. 1. Utility Notification. No small wind energy system shall be installed until evidence has been submitted to the city that the relevant electric utility company has been informed of the customer's intent to install an interconnected customer-owned generator. Off-grid systems shall be exempt from this requirement. m. Abandonment. If a wind turbine is inoperable for six consecutive months the owner shall be notified by Salt Lake City that they must, within six months of receiving the notice, restore their system to operating condition or remove the wind turbine from the tower. If the owner(s) fails to restore their system to operating condition within the six-month time frame, then the owner shall be required, at his expense, to remove the wind turbine from the tower for safety reasons. n. Off-Street Parking Or Loading Requirements. A small wind energy system shall not remove or encroach upon required parking or loading areas for other uses on the site or access to such parking or loading areas. SECTION 8. Amending text of fSalt Lake City Code-section 21 A.40 to adopt section 21 A.40.180. That the Salt Lake City Code shall be, and hereby is, amended to adopt section 21 A.40.170 (Zoning: Accessory Uses, Buildings and Structures: Small Solar Energy Collection Systems), which shall read as follows: 21A.40.180: SMALL SOLAR ENERGY COLLECTION SYSTEMS: 1. Standards All small solar energy collection systems shall comply with the following requirements except as provided in Section 2 relating to small solar energy collection systems in the Historic Preservation Overlay Districts. Per chapter 21A.34.020 the historic landmark commission or staff have authority to modify the setbacks, location and height to ensure compliance with the overlay district regulations. Excluding Section 2, if there is any conflict between the provisions of Section 1 Standards, and any other requirements of the zoning, site plan, and subdivision ordinances, the zoning administrator shall determine which requirements apply to the project in order to achieve the highest level of neighborhood compatibility. a. Setbacks, Location, and Height (1) A small solar energy collection system shall be located a minimum of six feet from all property lines and other structures, except the structure on which it is mounted. (2) A small solar energy collection system may be located on an accessory structure, including legal accessory structures located less than six feet from a property line. (3) A small solar energy collection system shall not exceed by more than three feet the maximum building height (based on the type of building -- principal or accessory - the system is located on) permitted in the zoning district in which it is located or shall not extend more than 12 feet above the roofline of the structure upon which it is mounted, whichever is less. (4) A development proposed to have a small solar energy collection system located on the roof or attached to a structure, or an application to establish a system on an existing structure, shall provide a structural certification as part of the building permit application. b. Coverage A small solar energy collection system mounted to the roof of a building shall not exceed ninety percent (90%) of the total roof area of the building upon which it is installed. A system constructed as a separate accessory structure on the ground shall count toward the total building and yard coverage limits for the lot on which it is located. c. Code Compliance - • - - , Small solar energy collection systems shall comply with all applicable building and electrical codes contained in the International Building Code adopted by Salt Lake City. d. Solar Easements A property owner who has installed or intends to install a small solar energy collection system shall be responsible for negotiating with other property owners in the vicinity for any desired solar easement to protect solar access for the system and shall record the easement with the Salt Lake County Recorder. e. Off-Street Parking And Loading Requirements Small solar energy collection systems shall not remove or encroach upon required parking or loading areas for other uses on the site or access to such parking or loading areas. 2. Small Solar Collection Systems And Historic Preservation Overlay Districts or Landmark Sites a. General In addition to meeting the standards set forth in this ordinance, Section 21A.040.180, all applications to install a small solar collection system within the Historic Preservation Overlay District shall obtain a Certificate of Appropriateness prior to installation. Small solar collection systems shall be allowed in accordance with the location priorities detailed in subsection 21A.40.180.2.c that follows. If there is any conflict between the provisions of this subsection ,21A.40.180.2, and any other requirements of Section 21A.40.180, Small Solar Energy Collection System, the provisions of this subsection shall take precedence. b. Installation Standards The small solar energy collection system shall be installed in a location and manner on the building or lot that is least visible and obtrusive and in such a way that causes the least impact to the historic integrity and character of the historic building, structure, site or district while maintaining efficient operation of the solar device. The system must be installed in such a manner that it can be removed and not damage the historic building, structure, or site it is associated with. c. Small Solar Collection System Location Priorities In approving appropriate locations and manner of installation, consideration shall include the following locations in the priority order they are set forth below. The method of installation approved shall be the least visible from a public right-of-way, not including alleys, and most compatible with the character-defining features of the historic building, structure, or site. Systems proposed for locations 1 —4, which are not readily visible from a public right- A, of-way may be reviewed administratively as set forth in Chapter 21A.34.020.F.1 Administrative Decision.; Systems proposed for locations 5 -- 6, which may be visible from a public right-of-way shall be reviewed by the Historic Landmark Commission in accordance with the procedures set forth in Chapter 21A.34.020.F.2 Historic Landmark Commission. (1) Rear yard in a location not readily visible from a public right-of-way. (2) On accessory buildings or structures in a location not readily visible from a public right-of-way. (3) In a side yard in a location not readily visible from a public right-of-way. (4) On the principal building in a location not readily visible from a public right-of-way. (5) On the principal building in a location that may be visible from a public right-of-way, but not on the structure's front façade. (6) On the front façade of the principal building in a location most compatible with the character-defining features of the structure. SECTION 9. Effective Date. This ordinance shall become effective on the date of its first publication. Passed by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah, this day of 2010. CHAIRPERSON ATTEST AND COUNTERSIGN: CITY RECORDER Transmitted to Mayor on Mayor's Action: Approved. Vetoed. MAYOR APPROVED AS TO FORM CITY RECORDER Salt Lake City Attorney's Office (SEAL) Date: By: c P l C.Niels , e for City Attorney SALT LAKE CITY ORDINANCE No. of 2010 (An ordinance amending portions of Title 21A of the Salt Lake City Code concerning certain accessory structures intended to promote sustainable urban living) An ordinance amending sections 21A.24 (Zoning: Residential Districts), 21A.34 (Zoning: Overlay Districts), 21A.40 (Zoning: Accessory Uses, Buildings and Structures), and 21A.62 (Zoning: Definitions) of the Salt Lake City Code pursuant to Petition No. PLNPCM2009-01338 to recognize and allow certain accessory structures intended to promote sustainable urban living, namely accessory structures associated with urban agriculture uses and equipment relating to small renewable energy systems including solar and wind. WHEREAS, the Salt Lake City Planning Commission ("Planning Commission") held public hearings on July 14, 2010 and October 27, 2010 to consider a request made by Salt Lake City Mayor, Ralph Becker (petition no. PLNPCM2009-01338), to amend certain sections of Title 21A of the Salt Lake City Code to recognize and allow accessory structures associated with urban agriculture uses and equipment relating to small renewable energy systems including solar and wind; and WHEREAS, the Salt Lake City Historic Landmark Commission ("HLC") held public hearings on September 1, 2010 and October 6, 2010 to discuss application of the proposed ordinance amendments to the City's Historic Preservation Overlay District; and WHEREAS, at its October 27, 2010 meeting, the Planning Commission considered recommendations of the HLC and voted in favor of transmitting a positive recommendation to the Salt Lake City Council ("City Council") on said application; and WHEREAS, after a public hearing on this matter the City Council has determined that adopting this ordinance is in the City's best interests. NOW, THEREFORE, be it ordained by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah: SECTION 1. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.62.040. That section ,, mok 21A.62.040 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Definitions), shall be, and hereby is, amended, in pertinent part, such that each of the following definitions shall be added and inserted alphabetically into that section: COLD FRAME: "Cold frame"means an unheated outdoor structure typically consisting of, but not limited to, a wooden or concrete frame and a top of glass or clear plastic, used for protecting seedlings and plants from the cold. GREENHOUSE: "Greenhouse"means a temporary or permanent structure typically made of, but not limited to, glass, plastic, or fiberglass in which plants are cultivated. HOOP HOUSE: "Hoop house"means a temporary or permanent structure typically made of, but not limited to, piping or other material covered with translucent plastic, constructed in a "half- round" or"hoop" shape, for the purposes of growingplants. A hoop house is considered more temporary than a greenhouse. SMALL SOLAR ENERGY COLLECTION SYSTEM: "Small solar energy collection system" shall mean an accessory structure that is roof-mounted, wall-mounted, or ground mounted panel, the primary purpose of which is to provide for the collection, inversion, storage, and distribution of solar energy for electricity generation, space heating, space cooling, or water heating of buildings located on the same property. A small solar energy collection system shall not exceed a capacity of 100 kilowatts (kW). SMALL WIND ENERGY SYSTEM: "Small wind energy system"means an accessory structure defined as a wind ener.y conversion system consisting of a wind turbine, a tower, and associated control or conversion electronics that has a rated capacity of not more than 100 kilowatts (kW) and that is intended to generate electricity primarily for buildings and/or uses on the same property, thereby reducing on-site consumption of utility power. URBAN AGRICULTURE: "Urban agriculture" is a general term meaning the growing of plants, including food products, and the raising of animals in and around cities. Urban farms and community gardens with their accessory buildings, farm stands, farmers markets, and garden stands are components of urban agriculture. SECTION 2. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.40.030. That section 21A.40.030 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Accessory Uses, Buildings and Structures: Zoning Compliance Required), shall be, and hereby is, amended to read as follows: 21A.40.030: ZONING COMPLIANCE REQUIRED: ,,ft, No accessory use, building or structure shall be established or constructed unless a zoning certificate has been issued it complies with the zoning ordinance and proper building permits, if required, have been obtained. Accessory buildings associated with keeping animals, bees, livestock and poultry are not subject to this chapter or the building coverage limits of the respective zoning district but are subject to the provisions of the City Code Chapter 8 Animals. SECTION 3. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21 A.24.010.P.3.d. That section 21A.24.010.P.3.d of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Residential Districts: General Provisions: Special Foothills Regulations), shall be, and hereby is, amended to read as follows: 21 A.24.010.P.3.d Special Foothills Regulations—Design Regulations Mechanical Equipment: Mechanical equipment including, without limitation, swamp coolers, air conditioning equipment, heat pumps, vents, blowers and fans shall be screened from view or painted to match the building color adjacent to the equipment. Roof mounted mechanical equipment, excluding solar panels which are subject to section 21A.040.180, shall not extend above the highest roof ridgeline. Roof mounted solar collection panels need not be screened or painted so long as they are mounted parallel to and flush with the roof slope and do not project above the ridgeline of the roof segment upon which they are mounted. Except as provided in the foregoing sentence, solar collection panels shall not be mounted upon any roof. SECTION 4. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.34.020.F.1.a. That section 21A.34.020.F.1.a of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Historic Preservation Overlay District: Procedure for Issuance of Certificate of Appropriateness), shall be, and hereby is, amended add the following paragraph: (6) Installation of solar energy collection systems that are not readily visible from a public right-of-way, as described in and pursuant to Section 21A.40.180.2 of this title. SECTION 5. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.34.020.F.2.a. Thai. section 21A.34.020.F.2.a of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Historic Preservation Overlay District: Procedure for Issuance of Certificate of Appropriateness), shall be, and hereby is, amended add the following paragraph: (7) Installation of solar energy collection systems that may be readily visible from a public right-of-way, as described in and pursuant to Section 21A.40.180.2 of this title. SECTION 6. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.40.050. That section 21A.40.050 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Accessory Uses, Buildings and Structures: General Yard, Bulk and Height Limitations), shall be, and hereby is, amended to read as follows: 21A.40.050: GENERAL YARD, BULK AND HEIGHT LIMITATIONS: All accessory buildings permitted by this chapter shall be subject to the following general requirements: A. Location Of Accessory Buildings In Required Yards: 1. Front Yards: Accessory buildings are prohibited in any required front, side or corner side yard and shall be setback at least as far as the principal building when the principal building exceeds the required front yard setback. If an addition to reside ti..l b ildings resu is in an existing b 'l,a' b 1 t .1 id t, ' lllll�, V1i1116 1VV yard, the existing accessory building shall be permitted to remain, subject to maim ' 'de of the,-es:dentia' building, as required in subsection A3b of this section. .ciluv V1 ul�.1�..1 2. Corner Lots: No accessory building on a corner lot shall be closer to the street than the distance required for corner side yards. At no time, however, shall an accessory building be closer than twenty feet (20') to a public sidewalk or public pedestrian way and the accessory building shall be set back at least as far as the principal building. 3. Side Yards: Accessory buildings are prohibited in any required interior side yard; however, hoop houses, greenhouses, and cold frame structures associated solely with growing food and/or plants are allowed in an interior side yard but no closer than one foot (1') to the corresponding lot line. If an addition to residential buildings results in an existing accessory building being located in a side yard, the existing accessory building shall be permitted to remain, subject to maintaining a four foot (4') separation from the side of the accessory building to the side of the residential building, as required in subsection A3b of this section. 43. Rear Yards: Location of accessory buildings in a rear yard shall be as follows: a. In residential districts, no accessory building shall be closer than one foot (1') to a side or rear lot line except when sharing a common wall with an accessory building on an adjacent lot. In nonresidential districts, buildings may be built to side or rear lot lines in rear yards, provided the building complies with all applicable requirements of the adopted building code. b. No portion of the accessory building shall be built closer than four feet (4') to any portion of the principal building; excluding cold frames associated solely with growing food and/or plants. c. Garages on two (2) or more properties that are intended to provide accessory building use for the primary occupants of the properties, in which the garage is located, may be constructed in the rear yards, as a single structure subject to compliance with adopted building code regulations and the size limits for accessory buildings on each property as indicated herein. d. In the R-1 districts, R-2 district and SR districts accessory structures shall be located a maximum of five feet (5') from the rear property line subject to the following exceptions: (1) The building or structure is a hoop house, greenhouse, or cold frame associated solely with growing food and/or plants. (24-) The maximum setback from the rear property line may be increased to meet the transportation division minimum required turning radius and other maneuvering standards. (32) The planning director or designee may authorize the issuance of building permits for an accessory structure with a maximum setback of more than five feet (5') from the rear property line if the property owner demonstrates that fifty percent (50%) or more of the properties on the block face have accessory structures located more than five feet (5') from the rear property line. In this case, the accessory structure may be set back from the rear property line a distance equal to the average setback of the other accessory structures on the block face. An appeal of this administrative decision shall be heard by an administrative hearing officer subject to the provision of chapter 21A.52 of this title. (43) The board of adjustment may approve an alternate location for an accessory structure as a special exception based on hardships created by topography or the location of mature vegetation. 5. Accessory Or Principal Lot: No portion of an accessory building on either an accessory or principal lot may be built closer than ten feet (10') to any portion of a principal residential building on an adjacent lot when that adjacent lot is in a residential zoning district; excluding hoop houses, greenhouses, and cold frames associated solely with growing food and/or plants. B. Maximum Coverage: 1. Yard Coverage: a. In residential districts, any portion of an accessory building, excluding hoop houses, greenhouses, and cold frames associated solely with growing food and/or plants, shall occupy not more than fifty percent (50%) of the total area located between the rear facade of the principal building and the rear lot line. b. The combined coverage for all hoop houses, greenhouses, and cold frames shall not exceed ten percent (10%) when located on vacant lots or, when located on a lot with a principal building, shall not exceed fifteen percent (15%) of the total area located between the rear facade of the principal building and the rear lot line plus the side yard area between the front and rear facades of the principal ,,,, building. 2. Building Coverage: a. In the FR, R-1, R-2 and SR residential districts the maximum building coverage of all accessory buildings, excluding hoop houses, greenhouses, and cold frames associated solely with growing food and/or plants, shall not exceed fifty percent (50%) of the building footprint of the principal structure up to a maximum of seven hundred twenty (720) square feet for a single-family dwelling and one thousand (1,000) square feet for a two-family dwelling. The maximum footprint for a primary accessory structure within the SR-lA is limited to four hundred eighty (480) square feet with an additional one hundred twenty (120) square feet allowed for a secondary accessory structure. Notwithstanding the size of the footprint of the principal building, at least four hundred eighty (480) square feet of accessory building coverage shall be allowed subject to the compliance with subsection B1 of this section. b. The combined coverage for all hoop houses, greenhouses, and cold frames shall not exceed thirty-five percent (35%) of the building footprint of the principal structure. C. Maximum Height Of Accessory Buildings/ Structures: 1. Accessory To Residential Uses In The FP District, RMF Districts, RB, R-MU Districts, And The RO District: The height of accessory buildings/structures in residential districts shall conform to the following: a. The height of accessory buildings with flat roofs shall not exceed twelve feet (12'); b. The height of accessory buildings with pitched roofs shall not exceed seventeen feet (17') measured to the midpoint of the roof; and c. Accessory buildings with greater building height may be approved as a special exception, pursuant to chapter 21A.52 of this title. 2. Accessory To Residential Uses In The FR, R-1 Districts, R-2 District And SR Districts: The height of accessory buildings/structures in the FR districts, R-1 district, R-2 district and SR districts shall conform to the following: a. The height of accessory buildings with flat roofs shall not exceed twelve feet (12'); nine feet (9') in the SR-1 A; b. The height of accessory buildings with pitched roofs shall not exceed seventeen feet (17') measured as the vertical distance between the top of the roof and the finished grade at any given point of building coverage. In the SR-lA the height of accessory buildings with pitched roofs shall not exceed fourteen feet (14'); and c. Accessory buildings with greater building height may be approved as a special exception, pursuant to chapter 21A.52 of this title, if the proposed accessory building is in keeping with other accessory buildings on the block face. SECTION 7. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.40 to adopt section 21A.40.170. That the Salt Lake City Code shall be, and hereby is, amended to adopt section 21A.40.170 (Zoning: Accessory Uses, Buildings and Structures: Small Wind Energy Systems), which shall read as follows: 21A.40.170: SMALL WIND ENERGY SYSTEMS: 1.Standards. All small wind energy systems shall comply with the following requirements. If there is any conflict between the provisions of this section and any other requirements' of the zoning, site plan, and subdivision ordinances, the zoning administrator shall determine which requirements apply to the project in order to achieve the highest level of neighborhood compatibility. a. Setback. The base of the tower shall be set back from all property lines, public rights- of-way, and public utility lines a distance equal to the total extended height plus five feet. If the small wind energy system is on a roof, the total extended height is equal to the roof height and tower height. A tower may be allowed closer to a property line than its total extended height if the abutting property owner(s) grants written permission and the installation poses no interference • with public utility lines or public road and rail rights-of-way. Guy wires and other support devices shall be setback at least five (5) feet from all property lines. b. Tower Height. Where the total extended height meets the sound and setback requirements of this section (See la above.), there shall be no specific height limitation, except as imposed by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations per subsection (j), below. c. Sound. Sound produced by the turbine under normal operating conditions, as measured at the property line of any adjacent property improved with a dwelling unit at the time of the issuance of the zoning certificate, shall not exceed 55 dBA for any period of time. The 55 dBA sound level may be exceeded during short-term events out of the owner's control such as utility outages and/or severe wind storms. d. Appearance, Color, and Finish. Colors permitted include grays, browns, greens, tans and other earth tones. Bright, luminescent, or neon colors are prohibited. e. Clearance. The blade tip or vane of any small wind energy system shall have a minimum ground clearance of 15 feet as measured at the lowest point of the arc of the blades. Blades on small wind energy systems in residential districts shall not ,— exceed twenty (20) percent of tower height. All portions of the system shall maintain a clearance from power utility lines as required by the Utah High Voltage Line Safety Act. f. Signage Prohibited. All signs on a wind generator, tower, building, or other structure associated with a small wind energy system visible from any public road, other than the manufacturer's or installer's identification, appropriate warning signs, or owner identification, shall be prohibited. g. Lighting. No illumination of the turbine or tower shall be allowed unless required by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). h. Access. No foot pegs, rungs, or other climbing aids shall be allowed below 12 feet on a freestanding tower. For lattice or guyed towers, sheets of metal or wood or similar barriers shall be fastened to the bottom tower section such that it cannot readily be climbed. i. Requirement for Engineered Drawings. Building permit applications for small wind energy systems shall be accompanied by standard drawings of the wind turbine structure and stamped engineered drawings (by an engineer licensed by the State of Utah) of the tower, base, footings, and/or foundation as provided by the manufacturer. j. Compliance with FAA Regulations. No small wind energy system shall be constructed, altered, or maintained so as to project above any of the imaginary airspace surfaces described in FAR Part 77 of the FAA guidance on airspace protection or other current FAA regulations governing airspace protection. k. Compliance with Building and Electrical Codes. Small wind energy systems and all associated components shall comply with all applicable building and electrical codes adopted by Salt Lake City and the State of Utah. I. Utility Notification. No small wind energy system shall be installed until evidence has been submitted to the city that the relevant electric utility company has been informed of the customer's intent to install an interconnected customer-owned generator. Off-grid systems shall be exempt from this requirement. in. Abandonment. If a wind turbine is inoperable for six consecutive months the owner shall be notified by Salt Lake City that they must, within six months of receiving the notice, restore their system to operating condition or remove the wind turbine from the tower. If the owner(s) fails to restore their system to operating condition within the six-month time frame, then the owner shall be required, Amok* at his expense, to remove the wind turbine from the tower for safety reasons. n. Off-Street Parking Or Loading Requirements. A small wind energy system shall not remove or encroach upon required parking or loading areas for other uses on the site or access to such parking or loading areas. SECTION 8. Amending text of Salt Lake City Code section 21A.40 to adopt section 21A.40.180. That the Salt Lake City Code shall be, and hereby is, amended to adopt section • 21 A.40.170 (Zoning: Accessory Uses, Buildings and Structures: Small Solar Energy Collection Systems), which shall read as follows: 21A.40.180: SMALL SOLAR ENERGY COLLECTION SYSTEMS: 1. Standards All small solar energy collection systems shall comply with the following requirements except as provided in Section 2 relating to small'solar energy collection systems in the Historic Preservation Overlay Districts. Per chapter 21A.34.020 the historic landmark commission or staff have authority to modify the setbacks, location and height to ensure compliance with the overlay district regulations. Excluding Section 2, if there is any conflict between the provisions of Section 1 Standards, and any other requirements of the zoning, site plan, and subdivision ordinances, the zoning administrator shall determine"which requirements apply to the project in order to achieve the highest level of neighborhood compatibility. a. Setbacks, Location, and Height (1) A small solar energy collection system shall be located a minimum of six feet from all property lines and other structures, except the structure on which it is mounted. (2) A small solar energy collection system may be located on an accessory structure, including legal accessory structures located less than six feet from aproperty line. (3) A small solar energy collection system shall not exceed by more than three feet the maximum building height (based on the type of building principal or accessory - the system is located on) permitted in the zoning district in which it is located or shall not extend more than 12 feet above the roofline of the structure upon which it is mounted, whichever is less. (4) A development proposed to have a small solar energy collection system located on the roof or attached to a structure, or an application to establish a system on an existing structure, shall provide a structural certification as part of the building permit application. b. Coverage A small solar energy collection system mounted to the roof of a building shall not exceed ninety percent (90%) of the total roof area of the building upon which it is installed. A system constructed as a separate accessory structure on the ground shall count toward the total building and yard coverage limits A001110 for the lot on which it is located. c. Code Compliance Small solar energy collection systems shall comply with all applicable building and electrical codes contained in the International Building Code adopted by Salt Lake City. d. Solar Easements A property owner who has installed or intends to install a small solar energy collection system shall be responsible for negotiating with other property owners in the vicinity for any desired solar easement to protect solar access for the system and shall record the easement with the Salt Lake County Recorder. e. Off-Street Parking And Loading Requirements Small solar energy collection systems shall not remove or encroach upon required parking or loading areas for other uses on the site or access to such parking or loading areas. 2. Small Solar Collection Systems And Historic Preservation Overlay Districts or Landmark Sites a. General In addition to meeting the standards set forth in this ordinance, Section Amitok 21A.040.180, all applications to install a small solar collection system within the Historic Preservation Overlay District shall obtain a Certificate of Appropriateness prior to installation. Small solar collection systems shall be allowed in accordance with the location priorities detailed in subsection 21A.40.180.2.c that follows. If there is any conflict between the provisions of this subsection ,21A.40.180.2, and any other requirements of Section 21A.40.180, Small Solar Energy Collection System, the provisions of this subsection shall take precedence. b. Installation Standards The small solar energy collection system shall be installed in a location and manner on the building or lot that is least visible and obtrusive and in such a way that causes the least impact to the historic integrity and character of the historic building, structure, site or district while maintaining efficient operation of the solar device. The system must be installed in such a manner that it can be removed and not damage the historic building, structure, or site it is associated with. c. Small Solar Collection System Location Priorities In approving appropriate locations and manner of installation, consideration shall include the following locations in the priority order they are set forth below. The method of installation approved shall be the least visible from a OPRONIN public right-of-way, not including alleys, and most compatible with the character-defining features of the historic building, structure, or site. Systems proposed for locations 1 — 4, which are not readily visible from a public right- of-way may be reviewed administratively as set forth in Chapter 21A.34.020.F.1 Administrative Decision. Systems proposed for locations 5 — 6, which may be visible from a public right-of-way shall be reviewed by the Historic Landmark Commission in accordance with the procedures set forth in Chapter 21A.34.020.F.2 Historic Landmark Commission. (1) Rear yard in a location not readily visible from a public right-of-way. (2) On accessory buildings or structures in a location not readily visible from a public right-of-way. (3) In a side yard in a location not readily visible from a public right-of-way. (4) On the principal building in a location not readily visible from a public right-of-way. (5) On the principal building in a location that may be visible from a public right-of-way, but not on the structure's front façade. (6) On the front facade of the principal building in a location most compatible with the character-defining features of the structure. SECTION 9. Effective Date. This ordinance shall become effective on the date of its first publication. Passed by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah, this day of 2010. CHAIRPERSON ATTEST AND COUNTERSIGN: CITY RECORDER Transmitted to Mayor on Mayor's Action: Approved. Vetoed. MAYOR CITY RECORDER NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Salt Lake City Council will hold a public hearing regarding Petition PLNPCM2009- 01338 to promote sustainable living by creating regulations specifically for accessory structures associated with urban agriculture uses (e.g. greenhouses) and equipment relating to small renewable energy systems including solar and wind. The amendments would apply city-wide. As part of its study, the City Council is holding an advertised public hearing to receive comments regarding the petition. During this hearing, anyone desiring to address the City Council concerning this issue will be given an opportunity to speak. The hearing will be held: Date: Time: 7:00 p.m. Place: Room 315 (City Council Chambers)* Salt Lake City and County Building 451 S. State Street Salt Lake City, UT Please enter building from east side. If you have any questions relating to this proposal or would like to review the petition on file, please contact Casey Stewart, Senior Planner, at 535-6260 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday or via e-mail at casey.stewart@iislcgov.com. People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodations no later than 48 hours in advance in order to attend this public hearing. Accommodations may include alternate formats, interpreters, and other auxiliary aids. The City & County Building is an accessible facility. For questions, requests, or additional information, please contact the City Council Office at 535-7600, or TDD 535-6021. Small Neighborhood Business I a 1-11 D 1,2 South Temple St. Avenues 0 ,40 A Parcels ....101.... • 111111111111111 • Conforming ,X1L1 7-• gni II No >•' Small Neighborhood ...........„ Yes Business Admendment Information on Nonconforming Parcels kmendment Zoning '::-**".t-".=:• vti,st,to 4111) RMF-75 2% Land Uses Salt Lake City Cemetery SEM 111 Bad Ckft asissiamm Ii • [xi 0.125 0.25 0.5 0.75 1 Parking Location Miles r), Jordan Meadows Community Council Chair Angie Vorher SLC Planning—Casey Stewart Salt Lake City Business Advisory Board 1988 Sir James Dr P.O. Box 145480 c/o Mike Akerlow Salt Lake City, UT 84116 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-5480 P.O. Box 145484 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-5484 The Downtown Alliance Downtown Merchants Association Utah Hispanic Chamber of Commerce 175 East 400 South#600 10 W Broadway#430 1635 South Redwood Road Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 Salt Lake City, UT 84101-2165 Salt Lake City, UT 84104-5108 Local First Utah Salt Lake City Chamber of Commerce Vest Pocket Business Coalition 154 East Ford Avenue 175 East 400 South 859 East 900 South Salt Lake City, UT 84115-4935 Salt Lake City, UT 84111-2329 Salt Lake City, UT 84105-1362 Sugar House Merchants Association Westside Alliance c/o Duncan Williamson 622 West 500 North P.O. Box 520356 Salt Lake City, UT 84116 Salt Lake City, UT 84152-0356 Laser/Ink Jet Labels ® www.avery.com AVERY° 48460TM Use Avery®TEMPLATE 5160® 1-800-GO-AVERY PETE TAYLOR KEVIN JONES ANGIE VORHER SUNNYSIDE EAST EAST BENCH CHAIR 933 SOUTH 2300 EAST JORDAN MEADOWS CHAIR 2500 SKYLINE DRIVE SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84108 1988 SIR JAMES DRIVE ,— SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84108 SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84116 GORDON STORRS ELLEN REDDICK RANDY SORENSON FAIRPARK CHAIR BONNEVILLE HILLS CHAIR GLENDALE CHAIR 159 NORTH 1320 WEST 2177 ROOSEVELT AVENUE 1184 SOUTH REDWOOD DR SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84116 SALT LAKE CITY UT 84108 SLAT LAKE CITY UT 84104 PHILIP CARLSON ESTHER HUNTER BILL DAVIS SUGAR HOUSE CHAIR UNIVERSITY NEIGHBORHOOD BALL PARK CHAIR 1917 EAST 2700 SOUTH 1049 NORRIS PLACE 332 WEST 1700 SOUTH SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84106 SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84102 SALT LAKE CITY UT 84115 TERRY THOMAS VACANT WESTPOINT CHAIR FOOTHILL/SUNNYSIDE CHAIR 1840 STALLION LANE SALT LAKE CITY UT SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84116 D. CHRISTIAN HARRISON JIM JENKIN DOWNTOWN CHAIR GREATER AVENUES CHAIR 336 WEST BROADWAY, #308 PO BOX 1679 SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84101 SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84110 DEWITT SMITH GARY FELT LIBERTY WELLS EAST CENTRAL CHAIR 328 EAST HOLLYWOOD AVE P.O. BOX 521809 SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84115 SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84152 LISETTE GIBBONS MIKE HARMAN YALECREST CHAIR POPLAR GROVE CHAIR 1764 HUBBARD AVE 1044 WEST 300 SOUTH SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84108 SALT LAKE CITY UT 84104 BEVERLY NELSON RON JARRETT FEDERAL HEIGHTS ROSE PARK CHAIR 26 SOUTH WOLCOTT STREET 1441 WEST SUNSET DRIVE • SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84102 SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84116 PAMELA PEDERSEN EAST LIBERTY PARK KATHERINE GARDNER SALT LAKE CITY SCHOOL DIST. CAPITOL HILL CHAIR 440 EAST100 SOUTH 606 DE SOTO STREET SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84111 SALT LAKE CITY, UT. 84103 Amok MARK BRINTON THOMAS MUTTER WASATCH HOLLOW CENTRAL CITY NEIGHBORHOOD COUNCIL CHAIR 1869 LOGAN AVE 228 EAST 500 SOUTH#100 SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84108 SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84111 Ail3AV-09-008-L ®OgLs wege6 al zasM111 Sustainability Projects Roi Maufas Jordan Gates Gina Zivkovic Harris-Dudley Co. 1165 E Princeton Ave 339 Specialty Circle 868 W 300 North It Lake City UT 84105 SLC UT 84115 SLC UT 84116 Claire Uno Rod &Jeri Olsen Jonathon Krausert Wasatch Community Gardens 744 W Jackson Ave 1444 Dupont Ave 345 E 400 South, STE 204 SLC UT 84116 SLC UT 84116 SLC UT 84111 Erin Silva Travis Snyder& Katie Wagner Amy Barry 115 S 1100 E #505 1209 Gilmer Dr 1178 Ramona Ave SLC UT 84102 SLC UT 84105 SLC UT 84105 Chris Harris Aurora E. Shuen Jeff Williams 149 N St. 4187 S Neptune Dr 125 S State St, Ste 4402 SLC UT 84103 SLC UT 84124 SLC UT 84138 Paula Sargetakis Mike Hathorne Carolyn Kenyon 2254 Parleys Terrace 5 Triad Center, Suite 450 2750 S McClelland St SLC UT 84180 SLC UT 84106 SLC UT 84109 Lisette & David Gibson Myron Willson Mike Polacek 1764 E. Hubbard Ave 350 S 200 East #406 318 W 700 N SLC UT 84108 SLC UT 84111 SLC UT 84103 Patrick De Freitas Ben Mates Anne Cannon 1117 E 600 South 2879 Filmore St 1647 Kensington Ave SLC UT 84102 SLC UT 84106 SLC UT 84105 Amy Spendlove Benjamin Rivkind Warren Lloyd 1366 Stewart ST 333 Goshen St 573 E 600 South SLC UT 84104 SLC UT 84104 SLC UT 84102 Camron Carpenter Stuart Silloway Matt Johnson 2816 E 2100 South 1231 Chandler Circle 1548 West California Avenue SLC UT 84109 SLC UT 84103 SLC UT 84104 Members: Amy Barry imissizzy@yahoo.com Amy Spendlove amyspendlove@q.com Andrew Riggle ariggle@disabilitylawcenter.org ,t—me Aurora Shuen lotuspixie@gmail.com Ben Mates benjmates@att.net Benjamin Rivkind Bananac@gmail.com Bennett, Vicki vicki.bennett@slcgov.com Bentley, Alene Alene.Bentley@PacifiCorp.com Bergenthal, Dan Dan.Bergenthal@slcgov.com Brandon Garcia saltiego@yahoo.com Camron Carpenter camron@senergymail.com Carolyn Kenyon kenyonorganics@comcast.net Chad Mullins chadmullingl@gmail.com Chris Duerksen cduerksen@clarionassociates.com Chrissy Oberfell chrissyoborgfell@gmail.com Christopher Harris mr.christopher.harris@gmail.com Cindy Cromer 3cinslc@live.com Claire Uno director@wasatchgardens.org Dan Obergfell dobergfell@gmail.com Daniel Salmon dansalmon@comcast.net David L Jessen peopley@hotmail.com Devaki Murch devalki@parknpedal.com Duer, Stephanie stephanie.duer@slcgov.com Erin Silva erinrsilva@comcast.net George Sturzeneger georgest@xmission.com Gina Zivkovic urban.growth@yahoo.com jallgaier@clarionassociates.com jallgaier@clarionassociates.com Jeff Williams jeff.williams@ut.usda.gov Jeremy Larson jeremy.larson2010@yahoo.com olok Jim French jfrench@dwelltek.com Joe Mikacevich topgatorslc@comcast.net John Norborg pickinweeks123@yahoo.com Jonathon Krausert j.krausert@hotmail.com Jordan Gates jordan@harrisdudley.com Julie Peck-Dabling JPeck-Dabling@slco.org Kate Whitbeck kate@momentumrecycling.com Kathy Lombardi Klombardi@entrix.com Katie Wagner kniwagnl@hotmail.com Kent R. Williams KentWilliams47@gmail.com Kyle LaMalfa slcpeoplesmarket©gmail.com Langan, Helen Helen.Langan@slcgov.com Lisette Gibson dmgib@xmission.com Lyons, Debbie debbie.lyons@slcgov.com Mathew Tison tisonmr@pella.com Mike Hatorne Hathornemj@zsc.com Mike Polacek michaelpolacek@msn.com Milliner, Ray Ray.Milliner@slcgov.com Myron Willson myron.willson@sustainability.utah.edu Naomi Franklin Franklin@biology.utah.edu Patrick De Freitas pdefreitas@earhlink.net Paula Sargetakis paulasarge@comcast.net Richard Parsoth reparsoth@gmail.com Rod &Jeri Olsen oisjer@gmail.com Rod Olsen olsrod@wfrmis.com Roi Maufas Roi@gorilladesign.org Roolf, Becka Becka.Roolf@slcgov.com Sarah Wright sarah@utahcleanenergy.org Amok Scott mendoza smendoza@co.weber.ut.us Shane Smith shane.smith@wvc-ut.gov Sophie Hayes sophie@utandequenergy.org Steve Mumford smumford@emcity.org Stewart, Brad Brad.Stewart@slcgov.com 2 Stewart, Casey Casey.Stewart@slcgov.com Storheim, Emy emy.storheim@slcgov.com Stuchly, Bridget Bridget.Stuchly@slcgov.com Suzanne Wagner swagner@myriad.com hanyne and Cari Tagge tagge@xmission.com Travis Snyder tgsnydermd@yahoo.com Tyler Poulson tyler.poulson@parkcity.org Wallace Wright triwan@aol.com Warren Lloyd warren@Iloyd-arch.com Zollinger, Renee renee.zollinger@slcgov.com 3 Utah Legal Notices l - i• - ;:- '- mot..... ,r:-.:::t • E AL • . t Home Browse Alerts Events Contact Search: All Newspapers for Sustainability GO - - .- Need help with your search? E''• �-, �r^ Click here to view our step by step guide. r Show/Hide Newspaper View Results 1- I of i for 'Sustainability'(The Salt flake Tribune) `` 06/25/2olo - o6/28/2010 Click here to nr orIifi/range Salt Lake City Master Plan Amendment On July (06/25/2010 -06/25/2010) .e Fes`: t_caf t rew..rr Salt Lake City Master Plan Amendment On July 14, 2010, the Salt Lake City Planning Commission will hold a public hearing to consider making recommendations to the City Council regarding the following petitions: Petition PLNPCM2009-01338: Sustainability Ordinances for accessory structures related to urban farming and renewable energy. Mayor Ralph Becker initiated a request to amend the Salt Lake City Zoning Ordinance to facilitate accessory structures used for urban farming and small scale renewable energy generation. Types of structures contemplated include greenhouses&... READ MORE Posted June 25 2010 25 26 am Newspaper Administration • SALT LAKE CITY PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING AGENDA In Room 326 of the City&County Building at 451 South State Street Wednesday, October 27, zolo at 6:15 p.m. • The field trip is scheduled to leave at 4:oo p.m. • Dinner will be served to the Planning Commissioners and Staff at 5:oop.m. in Room 126. • Work Session: 5:3o in Room 326. The Planning Commission will hold a work session from approximately 5:30-6:15. During the Work Session the Planning Staff will brief the Planning Commission on pending projects, discuss project updates and minor administrative matters.This portion of the meeting is open to the public for observation. o PLNPCM2o10-oo322:Water Efficient Landscaping/Tree Protection-A request by Mayor Becker for a zoning text amendment relating to requiring water efficient landscaping and tree protection. This request is part of the Sustainability Code Amendment Project. (Staff contact: Doug Dansie at 801- . 535-6182 or doug.dansie@slcgov.com)slcgov.com) • Approval of Minutes • Report of the Chair and Vice Chair • Report of the Director • Unfinished Business 1. Apollo Burger,143 N. Redwood Road(Tabled from October 13, 2010) —A proposal by Brandon Lundeen for the new'construction of an Apollo Burger drive-thru restaurant at approximately 143 N. Redwood Road.At the time the application was deemed complete,the property was zoned TC-75 Transit Corridor District and the application is therefore processed under the zone applicable standards.The property is located in Council District 1 represented by Carlton Christensen.The proposal requires the review cf the following petitions: a. PLNPCM2o10-00516 Conditional Use for a restaurant with a drive thru; and b. PLNPCM2o10-00488 —Building and Site Design Review requesting a modification of the 25 foot • maximum building setback along Redwood Road and Gertie Avenue. (Staff contact: Ana Valdemoros at(Sol) 535-7236 or ana.valdemoros85slcgov.com) • Public Hearings 1. PLNPCM2o09-01238: Sustainability Development Code Changes (Tabled from July 1:L. 2010): a request by Mayor Ralph Becker to amend the Zoning Ordinance in regards to accessory structures associated with urban agriculture(such as greenhouses)and renewable energy systems (such as small solar and wind energy collection systems)in an effort to facilitate and regulate those activities throughout the City (Staff contact: Casey Stewart at 801.535.626o or casey.stewart@slcgov.com). 2, PLNPCM2o10-o0549 Zoning Map Amendment for Residential Mixed Use (RMU) -A petition initiated by Sattar Tabriz to rezone property located at approximately 137o and 138o South West Temple Street from Residential Business (RB)to Residential Mixed Use(RMU). The property is located within City Council District 5,represented by Jill Remington Love. (Staff contact: Elizabeth Reining at Sol- • 535-6313 or elizabeth.reining@slcgov,com) The files for the above items are available in the Planning Division offices,room 406 of the City and County Building. Please contact the staff planner for information,Visit the Planning Division's website at www.slcgov.com/CED/planning for copies of the Planning Commission agendas,staff reports,and minutes.Staff Reports will be posted the Friday prior to the meeting and minutes will be posted two days after they are rated,which usually occurs at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Planning Commission.Planning Commission Meetings may be watched live on SLCTV Channel iy;past meetings are recorded and archived,and may be viewed at wtvw.slctv.con 08VS-b11V8 ue111 `AlIO e>lei lies / - • 08tSK x08 Od 90V Wo08 'laallS alelS S ZSti uo!s!Ala 2uluueld Alq a>Iel lleS ONftN H dO DOI1ON yy 08b9-VI.6b8 In 'A110 3>i'dl llVS 9 1 tb8 =1000c1IZ UVOZId a311V01 :fir- t!„S3 x b -^, 90b VJ 1332j1S 31`d1S HiflOS (.9b ot.oz o t ico L696£zh0o0 . ' ,F� in. 08b9b6 XOS Od 0 IA.1. 0 -•n- A&., -I �- o • NOISIAI4 JNINNVld �,^,--,77-�-T. P ''; z a: � _ ie rri- rn x r�r: . f r•'K'•f ==':-r'-: t i�:'"t•.1 alt-)`)GJlV 10d100 A110 DWI llf/S J��''SOd CO'''' MEETING GUIDELINES 1. Fill out registration card and indicate if you wish to speak and which agenda item you will address. 2. After the staff and petitioner presentations, hearings will be opened for public comment. Community Councils will present their comments at the beginning of the hearing. 3. In order to be considerate of everyone attending the meeting,public comments are limited to two(2)minutes per person,per item.A spokesperson who has already been asked by a group to summarize their concerns will be allowed five (5) minutes to speak. Written comments are welcome'and will be provided to staff and the Hearing Officer in advance of the meeting if they are submitted prior to noon the day before the meeting.Written comments should be sent to: Salt Lake City Planning Commission 451 South State Street,Room 406 Salt Lake City UT 84111 omilk 4. Speakers will be called by the Chair. 5. Please state your name and your affiliation to the petition or whom you represent at the beginning of your comments. 6. Speakers should focus their comments on the agenda item. Extraneous and repetitive comments should be avoided, 7. Salt Lake City Corporation complies will all ADA guidelines. People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodation no later than 48 hours in advance in order to attend this meeting.Accommodations may include alternate formats,interpreters,and other auxiliary aids. This is an accessible facility. For questions, requests,or additional information,please contact the Planning Office at 535-7757;TDD 535-6220. SALT LAKE LITY PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING AGENDA In Room 326 of the City & County Building at 451 South State Street Wednesday, July 14, 2010 at 5:45 p.m. The field trip is scheduled to leave at 4:00 p.m. Dinner will be served to the Planning Commissioners and Staff at 5:00p.m., in Room 126. Work Session—Clarion Associates will present an overview of sustainability topics for "Bundle 2"of the Code Amendment Project. The Commission may also receive an update regarding the temporary land use regulation affecting the Yalecrest National Register Historic District and Westmoreland Place Subdivision. This portion of the meeting is open to the public for observation. Approval of Minutes from June 23 Report of the Chair and Vice Chair Report of the Director Public Hearings 1. PLNPCM2010-00243 - Burton Professional Office Conditional Use: A request by Brad Ashworth for conditional use approval of a professional office at 1433 South 1100 East in the RB (Residential Business) zoning district and in Council District 5, represented by Jill Remington Love.(Staff contact: Nick Britton at 801- 535-61 nick.brittonnaslcgov.com) 2. PLNPCM2010-00231 - Korean Presbyterian Church Conditional Use & Planned Development: A request by Richard Chong for conditional use and planned development approval of a church expansion at 475 East 700 South in the RME-35 (Moderate Density Multi-Family Residential) zoning district and in Council District 4, represented by Luke Garrott. .(Staff contact: Nick Britton at 801-535-6107 or nick.brittonr(slcoov.com) 3. PLNPCM2009-01338: Sustainability Development Code Changes: amendment related to accessory buildings—a request by Mayor Ralph Becker to amend the Zoning Ordinance in regards to accessory structures associated with urban agriculture (such as greenhouses) and renewable energy systems (such as small solar and wind energy collection systems) in an effort to facilitate and regulate those activities throughout the City (Staff contact: Casey Stewart at 801.535.6260 or casey.stewart@slcgov.com), 4. PLNSUB2010-00112 Chick-fil-A Restaurant Planned Development Amendment: A request by Deborah Kerr, in behalf of Chick-fil-A Restaurant, to demolish an existing restaurant and construct a new restaurant at approximately 1206 E 2100 South Street. The property is zoned CSHBD-1 Sugar House Commercial Business District. The property is located in City Council District Seven, represented by Soren Simonsen. (Staff contact: Michael Maloy at 801-535-7118 or michael.maloyCcDslcgov.com.) • The files for the above items are available in the Planning Division offices,room 406 of the City and County Building. Please contact the staff planner for information,Visit the Planning Division's website at www.slcgou.com/CED/planning for copies of the Planning Commission agendas,staff reports,and minutes.Staff Reports will be posted the Friday prior to the meeting and minutes will be posted two days after they are ratified,which usually occurs at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Planning Commission.Planning Commission Meetings may be watched live on SLCTV Channel Zy;past meetings are recorded and archived,and may be viewed at www.slctu.com tt I I I II II ! I I II SALT LAKE CITY CORPORATION PUBLIC HEARING NOTILE PLANNING COMMISSION PO BOX 145480 SALT LAKE CITY UT 84114 5480 RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED cjIA` 1f 9 l tb8 3000diZ IPJ021J 0311V1tV , ��: 1 �o r�o/•.• its Lf 040Z ZOi(lf 06bLSS9000dr�Lry f55 �, �T �1 Ot'17`a $ de l '%cr _ s[�✓ 5.-IMOU A�N11� -___a . ..1.1 C •• L:WC- r ' V� P� •:F9 t: •• fil•Tj •>`.. .• •.•:_! t-1 1-:.. ..-d .7-!t -J . -7!.r... ' 0CI S5L* JOON MEETING GUIDELINES 1. Fill out registration card and indicate if you wish to spe' agenda item you will address. 2. After the staff and petitioner presentations,hearings ,r public comment.Community Councils will present their comments at the beginning of the hearing. 3. In order to be considerate of everyone attending the me_. —.is comments are limited to two(2)minutes per person;per item.Written comments are welcome and will be provided to the Planning Commission in advance of the meeting if they are submitted to the Planning ' Division prior to noon the day before the meeting.Written comments should be sent to: Salt Lake City Planning Commission PO Box 14548o Salt Lake City UT S4111 4. Speakers will be called by the Chair. 5. Please state your name and your affiliation to the petition or whom you represent at the beginning of your comments. 6. Speakers should address their comments to the Chair.Planning Commission members may have questions for the speaker.Speakers may not debate with other meeting attendees, 7, Speakers should focus their comments on the agenda item.Extraneous and repetitive comments should be avoided, 8. After those registered have spoken, the Chair will invite other comments. Prior speakers may be allowed to supplement their previous comments at this time. 9. After the hearing is closed,the discussion will be limited among Planning Commissioners and Staff.Under unique circumstances,the Planning Commission may choose to reopen the hearing to obtain additional information, odoroket 10. Salt Lake City Corporation complies will all ADA guidelines. People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodatic later than 48 hours in advance in order to attend this meeting. Accommodations may include alternate formats, interpreters, and ora auxiliary aids. This is an accessible facility. For questions,requests, or additional information,please contact the Planning Office at 535-7757; TDD 535-6220. Planning Commission Staff Report r. SUSTAINABILITY ORDINANCE — ACCESSORY STRUCTURES FOR URBAN AGRICULTURE AND - =° - SMALL SCALE RENEWABLE ENERGY .,c„jT;' P LN PC M 2009-01338 Planning Division Department of Community Re-Hearing date: October 27, 2010 &Economic Development Applicant Request SLC Corp.,Mayor Ralph Becker Mayor Ralph Becker has initiated a request to amend the Salt Lake City Staff Zoning Ordinance to include regulations promoting sustainable urban living. Casey Stewart 535-6260 The proposed Sustainability Code Amendment project includes many aspects casey.stewart@slcgov.com and this petition is focused on regulations to specifically allow for accessory structures associated with urban agriculture uses and equipment relating to Current zone small renewable energysystems includingsolar and wind. N/A y Current master plan designation Recommendation City-wide PLNPCM2009-01338—Sustainability Ordinance for Accessory Structures Based on the findings in the staff report, it is the Planning Staff's opinion that Council District City-wide the Planning Commission transmits a favorable recommendation to the City Council to adopt the proposed sustainability ordinance text amendments Community Council related to accessory structures. 7ity-wide Affected Ordinance Sections • 21A.40 Accessory Uses, Buildings and Structures • 21A.62 Definitions Notification • Notice mailed October 15.2010 • Posted to Planning Dept and Utah State Public Meeting, websites October 27, 2010. Attachments A. Department Comments B. Public Comments C. Historic Landmark Commission Minutes PLNPCM2009-01388 Sustainability—Accessory Structures Published Date: 10'21/2010 - I - Updates On July 14, 2010, Planning Staff presented these proposed amendments to the Planning Commission. The "' .114 Planning Commission initially discussed the amendments then tabled the item so the Commission members ' would have more time to consider the amendments and to allow staff the opportunity to research some questions raised at that first meeting. The issues raised were: - Further explanation of when wind turbines are exempt from the 55 dBA noise level. - Exempt"row covers" from building coverage limits - Address proposed urban fanning accessory structure size on vacant lots - More discussion on height limits for small solar collection systems The above issues are discussed below: Wind Turbines Wind turbines manufactured today have greatly recuced sound generation than even those manufactured a few years ago. A number of studies have shown that the turbine noise could not be separated from the background noise. That being said, there are two scenarios in which turbine noise increases above norinal operating conditions; those are power outages and severe storms that involve high wind. (1) Turbines that are connected to the power"grid" increase noise output during outages because the turbine loses its power load, causing the blades to freewheel until power is restored and the "load" slows the blades. This situation is easily remedied by simply shutting the wind generator off. (2) Turbines that are designed for charging batteries may increase noise output when the batteries cannot accept more energy. This most often occurs during storms of prolonged periods of high wind. The remedy for this scenario is to transfer the excess energy to a resistive load which should be designed into the system. That will keep a"load" on the turbine preventing the blades from freewheeling. A requirement could"' placed on battery-charging systems in residential zones that the design include a resistive load for thes high wind events. Row Covers Staff noted Mr. Kyle LaMalfa's suggestion to exclude row covers from the coverge calculations for urban fanning accessory structures. Row covers are typically a layer of plastic or fabric stretched over a row to retain some warmth in cold temperatures. They may involve a simple support structure (arches) that supports the material. These are very common in gardening and are not considered accessory structures for the purpose of calculating building coverages. Staff did not deem it necessary to mention row covers specifically in the amendments given their common use, simple deployment, very temporary nature, and to avoid over-regulating. Structure size Mr. Kyle Lamalfa also raised the question of urban farming accessory structures on vacant lots and how large they could be. Staff revised the amendments to specifically address these accessory structures on vacant lots, allowing a footprint of up to ten percent (10%) of the total lot area. Staff also revised the building coverage limits for urban farming accessory structures on developed lots based on a recommendation of the Historic Landmark Commission. The allowable building coverage area was reduced slightly from the July 14th version. Height limits for small solar energy collection systems The absolute height limit would be no taller than three feet (3') beyond the allowable building height .4"1144 limit (for the type of building, either principal or accessory) of the zoning district. No solar collection' "$" system could exceed that height. A secondary height limit would be equal to no higher than twelve feet PLNPCM2009-01388 Sustatuability—Accessory Structures Published Date. 10/21/2010 -2- (12') above the roof line of the structure upon which it is mounted. This would be in the case of buildings that are lower than the allowable building height limit for the zoning district. Staff did not modify the height limits from the original proposal because they determined the proposed limits were adequate, but language was added to clarify that the height limit is based on the type of building, principal or accessory, on which the system is located. Historic Overlay Districts After the first hearing, staff and the project consultants had concerns with some of the proposed regulations for solar energy systems in Historic Overlay Districts. Staff decided to have further discussions with the Historic Landmark Commission. Since the Planning Commission's first public hearing to consider these amendments, The Historic Landmark Commission conducted a subcommittee meeting on September 14, 2010 and two public hearings (September 1 and October 6, 2010) prior to providing a final recommendation for approval focusing on solar energy collection systems in Historic Overlay Districts. The proposed amendments have been updated based on their recommendation and include clarification on when installations in the Historic Overlay can be approved administratively and the removal of the limitation of reasonable restrictions. Aside from revising the regulations for installation of small solar energy collection systems, other changes resulted in further limiting the size of accessory structures typically used in urban fainting. [End of updates] Background In November 2009, Mayor Becker initiated a petition for the purpose of amending the Salt Lake City Zoning Ordinance to encourage practices of sustainable living. The City hired Clarion Associates as a consultant on `he project, with the goal of creating appropriate zoning, subdivision and site development regulations that will ake Salt Lake City a sustainable community. A portion of those regulations pertains to facilitating the use of accessory structures in support of urban agriculture and private, small scale renewable energy generation The amendments for accessory structures relating to urban agriculture are incorporated into the section of 21A.40.050 that establishes yard, bulk, and height limitations for accessory structures. The proposed amendments for structures relating to renewable energy (solar and wind) collection and generation are recommended as new sections, essentially new categories of accessory structures. Initial Summary Following are the proposed types of accessory structures grouped by type mentioned above and a brief list of the issues typically associated with the structures in question together with the intent of the proposed amendments: Urban Agriculture (food/plant production)— cold frame, greenhouse, hoop house "Cold tame" means an unheated outdoor structure typically consisting of but not limited to, a wooden or concrete frame and a top of glass or clear plastic, used for protecting seedlings and plants from the cold. "Greenhouse"means a temporary or permanent structure typically made of, but not limited to, glass,plastic, or fiberglass in which plants are cultivated. • "Hoop house"means a temporary or permanent structure typically made of but not limited to, piping or other material covered with translucent plastic, constructed in cr "half-round"or "hoop"shape,for the purposes of growing plants. A hoop house is considered more temporary than a greenhouse. PI NPCM2009-01 iSi c,stainnhilih•—Arro,nn,Ctrn,rt,,,. D,. 1: 1, r t nn t ran,n Issues: 1. Size: Not subject to the usual coverage limits as most accessory buildings, yet still limited. 2. Height: Subject to zoning district height limit 3. Location: Prohibited in front yard; allowed in side and rear yards 4. Materials: Commonly made of either molded or thin sheet transparent plastic over a frame of wood, metal, or PVC piping. These types of structures are typically seasonal or temporary in nature but can be permanent. These structures have always been permitted in the past but have been subject to the location and building coverage limits for all accessory buildings,making it difficult to have a garage, shed, and a greenhouse. The intent of the proposed accessory structures amendments is to encourage and promote their use in urban agriculture by easing some of the typical regulatory barriers or limits often encountered with accessory structures such as limits on location, size, and number of structures. Small Renewable Energy Systems—small wind energy system, small solar energy collection system "Small wind energy system"means an accessory structure defined as a wind energy conversion system consisting of a wind turbine, a tower, and associated control or conversion electronics that has a rated capacity of not more than 100 kilowatts (kW) and that is intended to generate electricity primarily for buildings and/or uses on the same property, thereby reducing on-site consumption of utility power. Amok "Small solar energy collection system"shall mean an accessory structure that is roof-mounte wall-mounted, or ground-mounted panel the primary purpose of which is to provide for the collection, inversion, storage, and distribution of solar energy for electricity generation, space heating, space cooling, or water heating of buildings located on the same property. A small solar energy collection system shall not exceed a capacity of 100 kilowatts (kW). Issues (wind): 1. Setback: Shall be setback from lot lines a distance equal to the total height plus five feet. 2. Height: Required setback will regulate; must also comply with Federal Aviation Administration height limits. 3. Location: Subject to compliance with setback provisions. 4. Sound: Cannot exceed 55dBA for any period of time and measured at adjacent property line. The sound level may be exceeded during short-term events out of owner's control, such as severe storms for battery-charging systems or utility outages for systems connected to the power grid. The most common complaint relating to small wind energy systems is noise. With the recommend qualifiers it is anticipated that any adverse impacts will be sufficiently mitigated. Issues (Solar): 1. Size/Area: No more than 90% of roof area. Amok 2. Height: Shall not exceed by more than three feet the maximum height permitted in th zoning district in which it is located or shall not extend more than 12 feet above the roofline of the structure upon which it is mounted, whichever is less. PLNPCM2009-01388 Sustainabiliq'—Accessory Structures Published Date: 10/21/2010 -4- 3. Location: Can be located on both the primary and/or accessory buildings, or as a separate structure. More specific location requirements are proposed for systems in the Historic Preservation Overlay district. Public Participation The proposed amendments were presented and available for review at an open house on December 17, 2009 and again on April 15, 2010. The Historic Landmark Commission conducted a subcommittee meeting on September 14, 2010 and two public hearings (September 1 and October 6, 2010) prior to providing a final recommendation. Public comments received are included as Attachment B. Between January and May of 2010, staff sought comments from numerous City departments and met with representatives from the Business Advisory Board, and the Historic Landmark Commission to discuss the amendments. They have provided technical input regarding appropriate practice to regulate the proposed structures while attempting to mitigate undesired impacts on residents and local businesses. The Historic Landmark Commission recommended against excluding hoop houses, greenhouses, and cold frames from building coverage limits completely. Staff has responded by including building coverage limits specifically for those types of structures. Numerous city departments reviewed the proposed amendment and a handful returned comments. Most comments were related to the amendments for small wind and solar renewable energy systems. The comments were implemented in the proposed amendments and are included as Attachment A. Analysis The proposed text amendments focus on Chapter 21A.40 Accessory Uses, Buildings, and Structures. A finition for new terms is included, along with qualifying provisions regulating size, location, and use of the accessory structures. For ease of analysis, the amendments are presented and discussed in three different groups based on type of structure. The first group consists of structures associated with urban agriculture. The second group consists of structures associated with small wind energy systems. And the third and final group consists of small solar energy systems. PLNPCM2009-01388 Sustainability—Accessory Structures Published Date: 10/21/2010 -5- The proposed text amendments are listed below in ,reen underlined te7ct and the ordinance location precedes each section: Amok Add following new definitions to Section 62 Definitions: "Urban agriculture" is a aenerai term meanina the arowinq of plants. inciudina food products. and the raising of animals in and around cities. Urban farms and community Gardens with their accessory buildings. farm stands, farmers markets, and Carden stands are components of urban agriculture. 'Cold frame.' means an unheated outdoor structure typically consisting of, but not limited to, a wooden or concrete frame and a too of alass or clear plastic, used for protectina seedlings and plants from the cold. "Greenhouse" means a temporary or permanent structure typically made of, but not limited to, alass, plastic. or fiherolass in which plants are cultivated. "Hoop house'' means a temporary or permanent structure typically made of. but not limited to, piping or other material covered with translucent plastic. constructed in a "half-round" or "hoop" shape, for the purposes of arowino plants. A hoop house is considered more temporary than a Greenhouse. l ,irr4! enercy cv te„ means on accessorystructure defined wind energy conversion systsrn Co.ls!.ti m�rrr Y s r,-� ,�i Pi c-•n•-• c= rwind turbine. }ovor, and associated control or conversion electronics that hga rated capacity of not more than Ina kilov:cii c (kW) and that is intended to generate elertr icil\' primarily for b,_Iildinas it uses the and/or or on same property. thereby rea'ricina on-site consumption of utility power. ' ..Fall solar eneray collection system" $lcGi :mean an accessory structure that is roof-mounted, walI-mounted- or r ' tail i '- :primary purpose: w _ for L. collection. inversion. age, and ^Lna mounted panel. ''it_ pr"Irri�. t" .._. .,, which ,, la provide� r'!^__ t:._ r7ir- ii0: i ., i0"I. ra:7r'7� distribution of solar eneray for vc rt-e o'tiosac-tce . eafin Y space cooling.. or water heating of build'ncis `e/edd on the same Prc_)Pertv. A small c`'C. v.nera. ,-;II-.-tiara system .hall rot exceed a capacity of , ar) kilowatts (k\Afl. Chapter 21 A.40 - ACCESSORY USES, BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES 21 A.40.010: PURPOSE STATEMENT: (No change) 21 A.40.020: GENERAL AUTHORIZATION: (No change) 21 A.40.030: ZONING COMPLIANCE REQUIRED: No accessory use, building or structure shall be established or constructed unless a zoning certificate has been issued it complies with the zorino ordinance and proper b-ild i a permits, if recui:- s.d, have beenobi ire[: Accessory buildings associated with ke i? r it bees. livestock ore notsubiect _ `I t, - I C: animals, Ii1`c �o'. and Poultry to this chapter t-',.'.' or the buiidina cov t{c e limits of ther Dects district i-irove City Code _ _ es_ €V �C!"t+nCr but [!r_ subject to the provisions of the ._.. 'Chapter 8 /.nin;'_r. (Ord. 26-95 § 2(20-2), 1995) 21 A.40.040: USE LIMITATIONS: (No change) 21 A.40.050: GENERAL YARD, BULK AND HEIGHT LIMITATIONS: All accessory buildings permitted by this chapter shall be subject to the following general requirements: A. Location Of Accessory Buildings In Required Yards: ...t Yards:: Accessoryh. i linos v ibite-d e ' front, y - and all be 1. Front a. s. �i, u,�: . ate Gr ;Lr.,ai_ in any r_...#Ul::rc=� sidc or corner side me shall setback at least as for o the principal buiidirio when the principal bu Idinc exceeds r auired front v �k p� � ! the front setback. If an addition to residential buildings results in an existing accessory building being located in--6 PLNPCM2009-01388 Sustainability—Accessory Structures Published Date: 10/21/2010 -6- rcquircd in subscction A3b of this scction. (This i cecrtsr: was moved To the h y.., 'sloe 2. Corner Lots: No accessory building on a corner lot shall be closer to the street than the distance required for corner side yards. At no time, however, shall an accessory building be closer than twenty feet (20') to a public sidewalk or public pedestrian way and the accessory building shall be set back at least as far as the principal building. 3. Side Yards: Accessory ._uilcinas are prohibited is any reduirecl inte! :: side varc7 however, ho:� h^_se_. :reenh'"_'se_, and cold frame structures c soc}"ied solely . ith ; `O� i; '��, and/or 7fantsor- allowed an nserior side d but no. closer than ore foot 11 '1 to the corre" ondino lot line. If an addition to residential buil_iinc;s results in an `i' accessory ilrylocated� !, - _ e�:lst h;,. _1nc beina I. a side yard, the' ;'i:IS'ind. accessory 'wuiiaina shah be permitted to remain, subiecs to maintalninc your foot (4') Seaa'atior from, the side of the ciccessary buildina to the side of the residential J JildInG. rea oli e^- in subsection ;-,3I-' this. section. �.- 43. Rear Yards: Location of accessory buildings in a rear yard shall be as follows: a. In residential districts, no accessory building shall be closer than one foot (1') to a side or rear lot line except when sharing a common wall with an accessory building on an adjacent lot. In nonresidential districts, buildings may be built to side or rear lot lines in rear yards, provided the building complies with all applicable requirements of the adopted building code. b. No portion of the accessory building shall be built closer than four feet (4') to any portion of the principal building: ex:Ldin-! cold frames associated solely with c;rc;4wiila food and/a'- alert;. c. Garages on two (2) or more properties that are intended to provide accessory building use for the primary occupants of the properties, in which the garage is located, may be constructed in the rear yards, as a single structure subject to compliance with adopted building code regulations and the size limits for accessory buildings on each property as indicated herein. d. In the R-1 districts, R-2 district and SR districts accessory structures shall be located a maximum of five feet (5') from the rear property line subject to the following exceptions: i i FIE, �_"_,lc,.. ��._ . o hock• ,.._ `a eennau' , o`• cc:•id frame soclat'_.cl __.•I[11�' �''• �'!� (=+) The maximum setback from the rear property line may be increased to meet the transportation division minimum required turning radius and other maneuvering standards. (:1•2) The planning director or designee may authorize the issuance of building permits for an accessory structure with a maximum setback of more than five feet (5') from the rear property line if the property owner demonstrates that fifty percent (50%) or more of the properties on the block face have accessory structures located more than five feet (5') from the rear property line. In this case, the accessory structure may be set back from the rear property line a distance equal to the average setback of the other accessory structures on the block face. An appeal of this administrative decision shall be heard by an administrative hearing officer subject to the provision of chapter 21 A.52 of this title. ( 3) The board of adjustment may approve an alternate location for an accessory structure as a special exception based on hardships created by topography or the location of mature vegetation. 5. Accessory Or Principal Lot: No portion of an accessory building on either an accessory or principal lot may be built closer than ten feet (10') to any portion of a principal residential building on an adjacent lot when that adjacent lot is in a residential zoning district. ._,_cl:_'d facycl and/or plants, B. Maximum Coverage: 1 . Yard Coverage: PLNPCM2009-01388 Sustainability—Accessory Structures Published Date: 10'2l 2010 _' _ a. In residential districts, any portion of an accessory building. exciudinc hoop houses. greenhouses, and cold frames associated sole), with arawina food and/or plants, shall occupy not more than fifty percent (50%) of the total area located between the rear facade of the principal building and the rear lot line. Amok b. The combined coverage for all hoop houses, areenno'uses and cold frames shall not exceed percent (1 0%1 when located on vacant lots or. when located on a IGl with a principal building, shall not exceed fifteen percent (1 5%l of the total area located between the rear facade of the principal building and the rear lot line plus the side yard area between the front and rear facades of the principal buiidina. 2. Building Coverage: a. In the FR, R-1, R-2 and SR residential districts the maximum building coverage of all accessory buildings. excliudina hoop houses. areenhouses. and cold frames associated solely with arowino food and/or plants, shall not exceed fifty percent (50%) of the building footprint of the principal structure up to a maximum of seven hundred twenty (720) square feet for a single-family dwelling and one thousand (1,000) square feet for a two-family dwelling. The maximum footprint for a primary accessory structure within the SR-1A is limited to four hundred eighty (480) square feet with an additional one hundred twenty (120) square feet allowed for a secondary accessory structure. Notwithstanding the size of the footprint of the principal building, at least four hundred eighty (480) square feet of accessory building coverage shall be allowed subject to the compliance with subsection B1 of this section. ;�. The combined coveraae for all ho- p houses, ar_ nh u;ec. arts cold framesc,l, not s ' c'�ea t`tirt}v-five Pe"__. I.;�.3i/, Of the 1.�:.FEiCJin•a footprint of the piin-sir`:t; Sti"ticit tc. C. Maximum Height Of Accessory Buildings/ Structures: 1 . Accessory To Residential Uses In The FP District, RMF Districts, RB, R-MU Districts, And The RO District: The height of accessory buildings/structures in residential districts shall conform to the following: a. The height of accessory buildings with flat roofs shall not exceed twelve feet (1 2'); b. The height of accessory buildings with pitched roofs shall not exceed seventeen feet (17') measured to the midpoint of the roof; and c. Accessory buildings with greater building height may be approved as a special exception, pursuant to chapter 21A.52 of this title. 2. Accessory To Residential Uses In The FR, R-1 Districts, R-2 District And SR Districts: The height of accessory buildings/structures in the FR districts, R-1 district, R-2 district and SR districts shall conform to the following: a. The height of accessory buildings with flat roofs shall not exceed twelve feet (12'); nine feet (9') in the SR-1 A; b. The height of accessory buildings with pitched roofs shall not exceed seventeen feet (17') measured as the vertical distance between the top of the roof and the finished grade at any given point of building coverage. In the SR-1 A the height of accessory buildings with pitched roofs shall not exceed fourteen feet (14'); and c. Accessory buildings with greater building height may be approved as a special exception, pursuant to chapter 21 A.52 of this title, if the proposed accessory building is in keeping with other accessory buildings on the block face. (Ord. 26-06 §§ 2, 3, 2006: Ord. 90-05 § 2 (Exh. B), 2005: Ord. 13-04 § 1 8, 2004: Ord. 35-99 § 57, 1999: Ord. 30-98 § 4, 1998: Ord. 88-95 § 1 (Exh. A), 1995: Ord. 26-95 § 2(20-4), 1995) 21A.40.052: ACCESSORY USES ON ACCESSORY LOTS: (No change) PLNPCM2009-01388 Sustainability—Accessory Structures Published Date: 10/21/2010 -S- The following sections are new and will be added at the end of Chapter 21A.40. .•_`.I A.40. [✓0: SMALL V. .f 4R ENERGY SYaT ePA«` L•I- s`;:.ci,, 'v ;; erl„,ra . 'stems sno;h cor•^F iv with th; fohowin recuirerrieirs. l' there is any contl;:-.- b.etweeir the provision:. of this section and any other reauiremertts of the zonina.cl. site Clan, and subdivizion ordinances, the zonina administrator shall determine which reouirements ic-lr'\_ the ,`JrGi•:.. in 0".. achieve hiaherr :; :' of neiahhorhoo„^ comb atibilits-i a. Setback The:- hose of the tower shall be set back from all oroie;`Y lines, oublic ricihts-of-v.'a V. and oul,-bli utility lines a distance eaual to the total extended hei'aht plus five feet. If the small windr' L E, erC•,' sv" r e-n is o a roof, the total extended heic !•..t is canal to tie roof h 'iahi and iowe; hei ht. A tower rrc s, . allow ed Clare.. ild zr orope'ty line than its total extencle-cl heii:h` if t','.- , ilk: - - z `aroo rty own:erlst aramts written oe mission e n-tn 1 r Cir`_ T!i f _ -� t�,ISC:: hi:, interference with p;.,L-Dlic utility lines or rnbl'_. rood and rail riahts-of_sr cY. Guy wire: and other idio.•t C,e.,, ._. shall he sere;ci. at least ive ( . feet from all arope_'v lines. . I. avfsir Liei.2'-it \1''v•i!_.rc. the- total =). _ncie_. `r i ilia meet: the sound and setibac!`reciuiremeh s of this (Sec_ c, a• _ e. . there- shah be . . specific iiv ;'it limitation. to te:::. c.s itticore_ i_:v Federal A iation i;i?.i ._ ri.:±ln. , t' t...)_ ptli...-.ns per subsection II!. below., �eee .. F_ - :li lil".l Un ran ,i c :c:r c- conditions. as 1--.1C:sur cl at t, c ....._ ,v, _ ..i.. -- - - _ .., .'v'., \-•' :. _, awe-Who Ur.i. C:i the ii..._ of Tl":.. ,s.. 'si"am - ^' i`_ : ^ 4i. r for ciriv uc of : e5,5GC.A sc i` rhor. is .sir__ _ '-nt --._n_ out of v c'ti.n _ controlcontrol s,...!ch cii. !.' :; \ o',,. s an d /or r; or . onn_- r.• s tall win _ c _ .. . li L 2 i--;ini '!•' ._ _ .r.. , • r r• , ,Ill 1 _ ' .__.-.. _. .__ii- _..__--- _ . _ila,l,L'_:-:ll,JI.lillairli _._.o_—_ _ __ .. .____ . .!2_ dl.___.d.I __ _ll ._-- ----------- •: CI', , '-ti: ! t`--------- -----------,i----n.et's ------ ---- ' _-------- -------------i=----\ t2?'_. .,- :%- fell l ---- c--...-.._ ._-l'i .....H- .• -- ,.z - - - .. ill' ;.t _'[. `,. .= i:'! e _ nilers re,:.:,,::.-e: - -_ ,.- _ ,-.--.- , ,_.. c- -= _ .._-... � _...V._ _i..e-- ----J;il .__, - -' :..e it;::_ ct. .- _:;'A _. .tact ..., ': -- `_...., _.=---------_.---- t,ice o inc —.`._,. is - m etLor='l ml r _'s !I _ _-d, -- t----- ----- - _ •orT---sucn i; - iS cannot I e.sidil,.v ti" PLNPCM2009-011:1£8 Sustainability—Accessory Structures Published Date: 10/21/2010 -9- E:ecwirer Bent for enaineered Drawincs Bu ciind permit applications for smell wind enero.v sy te.ms shall be occomaonie.ci by standard cira'winas of the wind turbine structure and stamped enaineetecl arawinc's (by an engineer licensed by the State of Utah] of the- tower, base, footinc, , and/or foundation es provided by,timikk manufacturer. j. Compliance with FAA Reau[atians No small wind enerav system shall be constructed, altered, or maintained so as to proiect above any of the iraciainary airspace surfaces described in FAR Part 77 of the FAA auk-lance on airspace protection or other current FAA reaulations aovernina eirsocice Protection. i;. Comnlionce with Btjii.c':ina and Electrical Codes Small wind enerav systems and all associated components shall comply with all applicable building and electrical codes adopted by Salt Lake City and the State of Utah. UtilityE��. [��UtilityQtilfiica.G,a ton No small wind enerav system shall be installed until evidence has been submitted to the city that the relevant electric utility company has been informed of the customer's intent to install an interconnected customer-owned generator. Off-arid systems shall be exempt from this r eouirementt. 1n. Abard nmeni If a wind tinoperable co, ect consecutive theowner shall bySalt f e turbine is forsix marts.. it's. mortt�l, c' ,n.. he b: notified � <a�:�= Chv that: they must. within six. months of receivina the notice. restore their svmrem t,_ operatine condition or remove wind turbine from the tower. fthe o`h� 1 fails to restore , ��, i ner(sl � :i their syster, J one c-!n'a condition within the month time frame, then the owner shall be reouirec, at his toremovewind tur in the tower safety reason expense. r O`. ti' "7 �' i% to e' for _� J. r p s re. lam= .`�"'tsei (�'�..1., - .. Ff=oi ii_- A ^i."ll ... r` m ..LL... e. ,s n a.. encroach u7or 1 "Co Ired par'" na I fo' site. or _7ib.,� sas en the si JO c. to such rkino c r loc7dino reoc PLNPCM2009-01388 Sustainability—Accessory Structures Published Date: 10/21/2010 - 10- 1 i 4 C1.1 t. `.-r ;i•.., S` 1.`.R ::_ [e C L. 7-CT Oi' 5 k£S1 'E\' To avoid conflict with the only current ordinance for solar panels, the section below (general regulations for the foothills residential districts) is being modified as indicated: 21A.24.010.P.3.d Special Foothills Regulations—Design Regulations Mechanical Equipment: Mechanical equipment including, without limitation, swamp coolers, air conditioning equipment, heat pumps, vents, blowers and fans shall be screened from view or painted to match the building color adjacent to the equipment. Roof mounted mechanical equipment. excludiniz solar na; .'iS \hicl: arc subject to sec! on 21.'\..040,I SO. shall not extend above the highest roof ridgeline. Roof mounted solar collection panels reed rot he _- b h with the roof slope and do not project b ich they are mounted. Except as provided in the The proposed regulations: .ri;"V! - . ,te n:.• _.Y _♦..VC."io i ..f- " -- ':},1 ^.:.JmbVY with the f:J l'C7 V•.•i7'C1 i'`.c.,.:..mer,,s -tl' ','I 2 elc_ i'o i' _oil. collection ems'. it, c Historic ?r - �r)ver DiStri'Z'Sz.. Per ri-_!;: er 21 L.. -._i J'; the, historic ic`ncirrl r;: comrni sio''' n: stcif_ i-- c"' - - --- - .- tip !,. .. .;Il� _ C_iV .. lo:..,:ion _...=. he;oht to ensure comirsIlionce with the overic v dlctrict rnv u.c..ions, E..:'I,..,,,lr-- ��•- —iY C'r.Y Conr:i:t he-teenhe orcwisicos of S'ect!on i 1crfdo .1s. c ( - _o'he re-' ;i! "tents G`r' . !` rs_ ' dn'ais,.c _, cr..,II_.. r !=- -- _r_ :,"sae i'! de; ,._ t'ne :'I `1 ! of n rhooci 7 �•.� .�. _ :r, solo one C collection .';'s'en1 _„oli beloco,ted w !nin s . . ,: .=` - - - - _'r'_'c _ _. eY-ce;' tl-Je-_. strus . , _ . cu ;. ._ ri,^;J•. , • :ry ..!• _ _D "i V ..'i_ cis-err, r---..d bloco.+:_ ._.—__. o=e_ .. • _ . !_.—.. 1 cc., re: :o-_ ;a:'_ *or, feert frr,:r, ^}` rri ztiC!II '�C. c.:z.eecV �_`\` f':•_� ."l:, n:; : _ bui .-.i'':^ '.!.' tin__ e type of FILY,Ai dine; --' ,...,:ICE'. c' _, ord:..,c -. - '0 _e ,__ M;S: _ _, :•it , cooni-is, district In Y'I, ch !t ._ ("'C�1_._ Or _t!.^li c.. c ,.�_ F. ;HD:, ,_ !c i _ , :iC:VC:t' or rul nerio , I: esso f_.,;s•l �i CS •)S.__O the i!d;ilt'rse jot i � \'. _ l..', --._ li .I.- •••i' ---- Or .`.fhicti it is ('\_'.I=-_W d. cct -�-. k�_I_ i � oc'- -_ ' - _ \ �1`) clie - o I' 'i ,l sm !' _ •fig" __ P� _ — i=�..—..—_.. i _—�_--, _:-3�" Y ._�.—_ for ris—ootidt'uo —r V ;•S' PLNPCM2009-01388 Sustainabiligv-Accessory Structures Published Date: 10/21/2010 - 11 - £. OF-Street Parkin: Ana Loodina Reouiremerts solar ene J,,. collection systems shall 'tat remove encroac n upon reauired par kirto C)_ low I ci areas for other uses on the site or access t such :ar:ino I ahlno areas. Amok 2. Small Solar Collection Systems Ana! Historic Preservation Overlay Districts or Landmark Sites a. General In addition to meetina the standards set forth in this ordinance, Section! 21 A.040.180. all applications to install a small solar collection system within the Historic Preservation Overlay District shall obtain a Certificate of Appropriateness prior to installation. Small solar collection systems shall be allowed in accordance with the location priorities detailed in subsection 21.A.40.180.2.c that follows. If there is any conflict between the provisions of this subsection .21 A.40.1 80.2, and any other reauirements of Section 2 1 A.40.i 80, Small Solar Eneray Collection System. the provisions of this subsection shall take precedence. i. installation Standards The small solar enercy collection system shall be installed in o location and manner on the buildlno or lot that is least visible and obtrusive and in such a Wcty that causes the least impact to the historic intectritand characterthehistoric "luiidi structure, site or district while of h l_ t�. mainiainina efficient operation of the solar d'."vice. The system must be installed in such a manner that it can be removed and not ct;,tmaae the historic buiidinc. structure, or site it !; associated with. a. Small Solar Ccdlcotion Si femn Location Priorities In a orovina aopropriate locations and manner of '";t llaiconsiderationl' shallinclude th e rollow;nc locations in the Priority order they ore set forth below. Ile method of installation approved shall be the least visipl== from a public aht_c,-vi , r ,.-1' n!k'\'n, on-; rPa r r'. .a. i ��,ir t � compatible with t m charocter-'de ina features of the his o ... `ui nruc'u ,. s; C, - t _k, procoseci for locations 1 — which are not readilyiisi revic ec! _midis- ati'ely as set forth in Cho o 2I .. ' _ .. :h'c.'.t _ :eci .. t:m_ Proposed far locations 5 — 6. which may be visible front a public -i ht-ol..way shall; he re v Ic e by the H 3_f la_ BSc Landmark Commission in Ccco"ra'`= _ se forth Chapter 21 .A._ ..020,F,2 Historic Landmark Cornm;sd'o F r.— yard in a iocotir.)- not readily adily visible from a public riah+._ _`•.,..` E i On accessary buildinas or structures in a location not readily ... -n a pulic ichi (S) In di side yard in a location not readily visible from a public rioht-c -l''nv (t) On the principal 7iiiCl'i a location not re d_7id k visible f om a public rioht—cF_w oY 1 C.Dn the principal euiletiad i' Cr Ioc liar ti, 2t moo/ e Vts't?i -cam a DUbli i t -- but. ri:i the structures -,o` e facade. :O;h the t-an aca' of the orincipal huha compatible with thr ..r._ de ! ino -._Jt•J`es of tt._ structure. Chapter 21A.34.020.F.1.a (Historic Overlay Districts) Types Of Construction Allowed Which May Be Approved By Administrative Decision shall be amended to include: ±ti.):1 of solar enersy rat}t r:.L sio s\stem. that are not scaliiy visible iron: a nablir desc7i.,ec in and Pursuant to �.i.'. ,_on 21A.40.I fS i.._' of this title. Chapter 21A.34.020.F.2.a (Historic Overlay Districts) Types Of Construction To Be Reviewed By The Historic Landmark Commission shall be amended to include: Amok 1, %! Install tiol: of Solar ea rev colleotioa1 systems that may he readily Visible: from a public t4scrih 1 in d nu. i -,('i '1 -. Ii ! 2 t i ., ,.�1_�=__i. :_. :il�:_t , .<~s�;��la ��3 �>t�;�,l� _ _ b.-?�.i.l��i,._ of t����. . ... PLNPCM2009-01388 Sustainability—Accessory Structures Published Date: 10/21/2010 - 12- STANDARDS FOR GENERAL AMENDMENTS A decision to amend the text of the Zoning Ordinance or the Zoning Map by general amendment is a matter committed to the legislative discretion of the City Council and is not controlled by any one standard. However, n making its decision concerning a proposed amendment, the City Council should consider the following actors: 1. Whether a proposed text amendment is consistent with the purposes, goals, objectives, and policies of the City as stated through its various adopted planning documents; Analysis: The executive summary section of the City's Futures Commission Report of 1998 states, "Vibrant neighborhoods are fundamental to the health and vitality of the city and citizens, business owners, and local government each have a role to play in creating and sustaining ideal neighborhoods." Promoting sustainability by encouraging local food production and renewable energy systems is a priority in Salt Lake City. The proposed amendments related to urban agriculture accessory structures and small renewable energy systems offer opportunities to improve and sustain the health of citizens and neighborhoods. Finding: The proposed text change is consistent with adopted policy documents. 2. Whether a proposed text amendment furthers the specific purpose statements of the zoning ordinance. Analysis: Chapter 21A.02.030 of the Zoning Ordinance states: "PURPOSE AND INTENT: The purpose of this title is to promote the health, safety, morals, convenience, order, prosperity and welfare of the present and future inhabitants of Salt Lake City, to implement the adopted plans of the city, and to carry out the purposes of the municipal land use development and management act, title 10, chapter 9, of the Utah Code Annotated or its successor, and other relevant statutes. This title is, in addition, intended to: a. Lessen congestion in the streets or roads; b. Secure safety from fire and other dangers; c. Provide adequate light and air; d. Classify land uses and distribute land development and utilization; e. Protect the tax base; f. Secure economy in governmental expenditures; g. Foster the city's industrial, business and residential development; and h. Protect the environment. (Ord. 26-95 § 2(1-3), 1995)" The proposed changes to the ordinance will further the purpose statement of the Zoning Ordinance by enabling urban agriculture and renewable energy systems in various zones throughout the City. Specifically these uses are consistent with intent statements c, d, e, g and h. By enabling the uses, individuals will be able to work more efficiently in community gardens and sell locally grown foods and products thereby lessening the need for imported foods and reducing the environmental impacts from transportation, air pollution etc. Amendments allowing renewable energy sources will enable citizens to create new sources of energy while lessening overall dependence on fossil fuels, which also decreases air pollution. The qualifying provisions for the accessory structures are designed to encourage their use yet uphold the general health, safety, and welfare of citizens by reducing or eliminating harmful impacts. These PLNPCM2009-01;SS Sustainability—Accessory Structures Published Date: 10'21/2010 modifications create qualifying provisions that will facilitate mitigation of adverse impacts on neighboring property owners and will clarify sections of the ordinance that were not clear or concise. Finding: Staff finds that the proposed changes to the Zoning Ordinance are consistent with the overall purpose of the Zoning Ordinance as stated in Chapter 21A.02.030. 3. Whether a proposed text amendment is consistent with the purposes and provisions of any applicable overlay zoning districts which may impose additional standards. Analysis: The proposed text amendments are city-wide and as such will affect properties within the Historic Preservation Overlay District. The proposed amendments propose specific requirements and limits for accessory structures within the Historic Preservation Overlay District which are consistent with and balance the purposes of preserving historic buildings, structures and the associated neighborhoods while encouraging individual properties to utilize accessory structures for urban agriculture and renewable energy. Finding: The proposed text amendment meets this standard. 4. The extent to which a proposed text amendment implements best current, professional practices of urban planning and design. Analysis: The proposed text amendments minor cunent trends in community sustainability, by providing alternatives for renewable energy and food production systems. These amendments will update planning practices that create and maintain efficient infrastructure, foster close-knit neighborhoods, create a sense of community, and preserve natural habitat. Finding: The proposed text amendment implements the best current practices in urban planning and desilr; PLNPCM2009-01388 Sustainability—Accessory Structures Published Date: 10'21/2010 - 14- Stewart, Casey From: Bentley, Alene[Alene.Bentley@PacifiCorp.com] Sent: Tuesday, June 22, 2010 5:28 PM To: Stewart, Casey '" " Subject: FW: Sustainability Code Revisions Categories: Other Casey, The set back requirement for wind power systems says there should be no interference with public utilities. Rocky Mountain Power suggests you include a stronger statement about clearance and specifically reference the Utah High Voltage Line Safety Act, which requires a working clearance of 10 feet. In addition, each section addresses "municipal code." Electric codes are national and state. We also suggest you include reference to compliance with national and state electrical clearance codes. Thanks again for the opportunity to review the code revisions. It's helpful for people to understand requirements up-front so there are no surprises. Alene �Cene Ben.tCey Rocky Mountain Power 201 South Main, Suite 2300 Salt Lake City, UT 84111 Office: (801) 220-4437 Cell: (801) 910-6527 From: Barker, Jake Sent: Tuesday, June 22, 2010 4:38 PM To: Bentley, Alene Subject: RE: Sustainability Code Revisions Hi Alone, The only thing I can think of is a statement that would reference the Utah High Voltage Line Safety Act and that a working clearance of 10 feet must be maintained. In their set back section of the wind power source, they mention that public utilities shouldn't be "interfered" with, but I think there should be a stronger statement about clearance. In addition, each section talks about complying with "municipal code", but our electric codes are national and state for clearances. Working that in would probably be nice. Thanks, Jake From: Bentley, Alene Sent: Tuesday, June 22, 2010 2:56 PM To: Barker, Jake Subject: FW: Sustainability Code Revisions Importance: High Jake, Proposed sustainability zoning ordinances T Airport Comments on: Urban Agriculture, Alternative Energy Systems, Accessory Dwelling Units, and Street & Pedestrian Connectivity ^vbmitted to Cheri Coffey from Allen McCandless ;tober 30, 2009 Title i Paragraph Number Comments Urban Agriculture D.2. a. and D.2. b. No zoning district was provided, however the A Airport district would not be an appropriate zone for Urban Agriculture activities due to potential bird attractants and safety concerns. Recommend: Do not allow Urban Agriculture in the A Airport district. Alternative Energy D.3. j. Text should be added to cover other FAA Systems, Small Wind airspace regulations as follows: Energy Systems Recommend to add: . . . Part 77 of the FAA guidance on airspace protection, or other current FAA regulations aavernina airspace protection." Alternative Energy E.3. a. 1. The airport could install a large solar array Systems, Solar Array in the future as part of the terminal and concourse expansions. The array may be ground mounted, roof mounted or a variety of installations. The ordinance, as written would not allow the airport to install any solar array between the main terminal and public right of way. Recommend: Exempt the airport from Solar Array ordinance. Alternative Energy E.3. a. 3, 4, and 5. The square footage and height of an airport Systems, Solar Array solar array could exceed these restrictions. As written, the ordinance would not allow any large solar array and would restrict the height. Recommend: Exempt the airport from Solar Array ordinance. Alternative Energy F.3.a.2. if solar collectors are installed on terminals, Systems, Solar or concourses or other airport buildings, the Collection System systems could exceed 12 feet maximum height. Recommend: Exempt the airport from Solar Collection System ordinance. Accessory Dwelling Units I (No Airport-related comments) eet & Pedestrian I A.2.a.(1) We are concerned that this draft ordinance connectivity was written for subdivisions, and streets within commercial and residential developments. The airport environment has many conflicts with this zone as Stewart, Casey From: Coffey, Cheri ofola Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2010 2:56 PM " To: Stewart, Casey; Milliner, Ray Cc: Sommerkorn, Wilford Subject: FW: Need a Shade Control Act to encourage residential solar This may play into the solar array and solar collection equipment ordinance changes. Very tirnely© From: Bennett, Vicki Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2010 1:44 PM To; Becker, Ralph; Gale, Amy Cc: Mickelson, Kaye; Chris Duerksen; Coffey, Cheri Subject: RE: Need a Shade Control Act to encourage residential solar Here is the State code that is current: 57-13-1. Definitions. As used in this act: (1) "Solar easement" means a right, whether or not stated in the form of restriction, easement, covenant, or conditions in any deed, will, or other instrument executed by or on behalf of any owner of land or solar skyspace for the purpose of ensuring adequate exposure of a solar energy system as defined herein. ,,k (2) "Solar energy system" means a system of apparatus and equipment capable of collecting and �. converting incident solar radiation into heat, or mechanical or electrical energy, and transferring these forms of energy by a separate apparatus to storage or to point of use, including,but not limited to, water heating, space heating or cooling, electric energy generation or mechanical energy generation. (3) "Passive solar system" means a system which uses structural elements of the building, to provide for collection, storage, and distribution of solar energy for heating or cooling. (4) "Solar skyspace" means the space between a solar energy collector and the sun which must remain unobstructed such that on any given clear day of the year,not more than 10 percent of the collectable insolation shall be blocked. 57-13-2. Creation of solar easement--Writing required -- Contents -- Enforcement. (1) Any property owner may grant a solar easement in the same manner and with the same effect as a conveyance of an interest in real property. The easements shall,be created in writing and shall be filed, duly recorded and indexed in the office of the recorder of the county in which the easement is granted. Such easements shall run with the land or lands benefited and-burdened and shall constitute a perpetual easement, except that a solar easement may terminate upon the conditions stated herein. (2) Any deed, will, or other instrument that creates a solar easement shall include,but the contents need not be limited to: (a) a description of the real property subject to the solar easement and a description of the real property benefiting from the solar easement; (b) a description of the vertical and horizontal angles, expressed in degrees and measured from the sitcoms, of the solar energy system, at which the solar easement extends over the real property subject to the solar , easement, or any other description which defines the three dimensional space, or the place and times of day in which an obstruction to direct sunlight is prohibited or limited; (c) any terms or conditions under which the solar easement is granted or may be terminated; (d) any provisions for compensation of the owner of the real property benefiting from the solar easement in the event of interference with the enjoyment of the solar easement, or compensation of the owner of real property subject to the solar easement, or compensation of the owner of the real property subject to the Aar easement for maintaining the solar easement; and (e) any other provisions necessary or desirable to execute the instrument. (3) A solar easement may be enforced by injunction or proceedings in injunction or other civil action. Looks like BJ is right about the easement being the only current recourse now. I will reply to him, and have also copied Chris Duerksen—our revised City Codes also only suggest that landowners negotiate voluntary easements, as the public was concerned about solar issues vs.trees. Do we want to consider taking this issue further? Vicki From: Becker, Ralph Sent: Monday, February 22, 2010 5:29 PM To: Gale, Amy Cc: Bennett, Vicki; Mickelson, Kaye Subject: RE: Need a Shade Control Act to encourage residential solar Utah has a shade control net that was passed in the 1970's arid I think is still in the State Code. (It actually was a�.ii.C, I V the first piece oflegislation, along with a solar tax credit) I worked on after writing- a law review article on solar "'eess law). You ni n heed to `jet help finding, it, but last time l checked, it \V as still iIi Inc land use code. I know , but feel free to iollov,.' up, Ralph From: BJ Nicholls [mailto:bjnicholls@comcast.net] Sent: Thursday, February 18, 2010 4:27 PM To: Mayor Subject: Need a Shade Control Act to encourage residential solar Howdy Mayor Ralph. We're looking at building a new garage and we're seriously thinking of installing a solar photovoltaic array on the building. Currently, we have good sun exposure without shade from the neighboring property. But I can't see that either Utah or the city has a solar shade control law similar to California's. The only solar law that I can find is one that allows you to join with neighbors and create a solar easement/covenant. Creating such an easement is a significant barrier to the anyone considering an investment in home solar, and a shade control act like California's would be a real boon to encouraging investment in clean home solar technology. We have a neighbor just down the hill who's recently installed an impressive photovoltaic array and passive hot water system on their new garage, and we're excited to see new solar installation contractors providing services in the city. Please take a look at the California law(pdf attached) and consider backing a city or statewide law that could dramatically lower the legal hurdles and costs for residents who'd like to go green with solar energy. Thanks and best, t3J BJ Nicholls 1149 Douglas St 2 SUSTAINABILITY — Accessory Structures COMMENT SHEET PLNPCM2009-01338 If we may contact you for further discussion about your comments, please provide us with contact information: Name "7-7:rn _Le/A.- Address (include zip code) Phone Email Written comments: ) &KG,ipA cool 5, + �iee.�� ce d4(� �/ S7`7 �.� Y`u✓r�S / / c 5 '1 ,' U '0 O - 70 �inr� CIF-- tr r.l— /eta CAA- 7Lti r 7 )S St 1t Geec.c0r;f• — L -,L t 7 o , pA„),,,q Coffey, Cheri =rom: Sommerkorn, Wilford nt: Tuesday, September 29, 2009 3:58 PM 'ssillow©gmail.com' Cc: Coffey, Cheri; Comarell, Pat; Paterson, Joel Subject: RE: Silloway application Mr. Silloway, I appreciated the opportunity to speak with you about your proposal to place solar panels on the roof of your house. I also received the photos you sent by mail which show how you wanted to do it. After reviewing your ideas closely with our staff,what we run into is the clear language in the zoning ordinance in the Foothill Zone which does not allow for solar panels to be installed on roofs unless they are parallel with the slope of the roof, and do not stick up above the crest of the roof. With the roof where you wishing to place it being flat, there is no option but to only allow for installation where the panel lies flat. That, of course, defeats much of the effectiveness of such solar panels. There is no question that given the world we live in today, this section of the zoning ordinance should be changed. We are right in the middle of a process of reviewing all our city ordinances to see how we can make them"friendlier"to sustainability principles, including for wind and solar power. This will be one of the provisions we will propose to change. However, it will take some time to work these changes through the. adoption process here, probably on the order of 6-12 months. If you desire to try to move this along quicker,you could make an application with the city to amend the text of 7 �. -`ir zoning ordinance to address this issue. We would then be obligated to move it along as a regular plication,but it may not gain you that much time in doing so, as this will still take several months to go all the way through hearing and recommendation by the planning commission and then a hearing and decision by the city council. It would also require you to pay a fee to make such an application. Sorry I don't have better news for you right now on dealing with this in a quicker maiuler,but we are bound by what is written in our ordinances. Please feel free to contact me with any other questions you may have. t�iilf Sommerkorn Director Salt Lake City Planning Division From: Stuart Silloway [mailto:ssillow@gmail.com] Sent: Monday, September 28, 2009 3:23 PM To: Sommerkorn, Wilford Subject: Silloway application Dear Mr. Sommerkorn; I wonder if you have had any additional thoughts on our application for a solar system installation. I sent you pictures of our roof line so you could more easily see what we are dealing with. I cannot believe that the regs. suggest that all flat roofs are ineligible as the panels must be slanted to make the efficiencies work. Our roof line is much higher than the top of the flat roof on which the panels would sit. nat do you think? Stuart Silloway. i Stewart, Casey From: Coffey, Cheri Sent: Tuesday, March 09, 2010 11:19 AM ` To: Stewart, Casey '' Subject: FW: Building Codes and PV panels Categories: Other Casey, This e-mail relates to solar panels and the fire fighters ability to fight fires from the roof. It is all these little details that we don't know exist. Have fun. Cheri From: Goff, Orion Sent: Tuesday, March 09, 2010 10:18 AM To: Zollinger, Renee; Cook, Kurt Cc: Coffey, Cheri; Butcher, Larry; Sommerkorn, Wilford; Comarell, Pat; Itchon, Edward; Ellis, Martha Subject: RE: Building Codes and PV panels Renee, we are the entity that issues the permits for'the systems. The ord. is not sensitive to the fire-fighting issue, i.e. where they are placed on the roof to facilitate adequate firefighter safety. (Only structural and connection issues) To i accomplish this initiative, firefighter safety, a change to the ord. and a transmittal to Council and subsequent Council { action would be required. iLet me discuss this with Frank Gray, and see who should produce the transmittal for Council. I believe the Planning Division is currently working with a consultant to amend the ord. to make it more friendly and consistent with green practices. Perhaps they should be involved with this as well as the placement of these panels on buildings is also an aesthetic issue. From: Zollinger, Renee Sent: Tuesday, March 09, 2010 9:49 AM To: Goff, Orion Subject: Building Codes and PV panels Hi, Orion, Who is the best person to give me a quick primer on what the City's requirements/codes are for solar installations,as they relate to firefighter safety? Renee 2 o[Cinger Environmental Manager Salt Lake City Corporation 451 S. State St. Room 145 PO Box 145467 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-5467 ,— (801) 535-7215 (office) (801) 750-4390 (cell) 1 Visit us at www.slcgreen.com, become a fan of our Salt Lake City Green Racebook_page or follow SLCgreen on Twitter! Tel Please consider the environment before printing this email. From: Cook, Kurt Sent: Tuesday, March 09, 2010 8:22 AM To: Zollinger, Renee Subject: RE: PV Safety for Firefighters, April 1 Webinar-Invite your local Fire Department! Thanks Renee.You are right about the urgency of the awareness and training for our safety.These solar systems pose unique and unfamiliar challenges to our firefighters considering the conditions we typically encounter during structure fire situations. I have forwarded the webinar link to all of my senior staff and Training Division for review and dissemination. Thanks again for keeping us in mind. -Kurt R. Kurt Cook Fire Chief Salt Lake City Dire Department 801-580424 2 From: Zollinger, Renee Sent: Monday, March 08, 2010 12:00 PM To: Cook, Kurt Cc: Bennett, Vicki Subject: PV Safety for Firefighters, April 1 Webinar- Invite your local Fire Department! Hi, Chief Cook, I wasn't sure if you already have a safety program focused on solar systems, so I'm passing on some information! Attached is a description of a webinar that talks about fire safety on facilities with solar photovoltaic systems, and the link to register is in the email below. Additionally, here is a link to some training videos prepared by the San Jose Fire Department: http://wvww.youtube.com/watch?v=4oaF9GV3p1U . These videos are getting a fair amount of attention in the solar community. We saw a large upsurge in the number of systems installed throughout Utah last year,and the State is launching a new solar rebate program in a few weeks that may further increase the number of systems here in the City. Do you see any need(s) to look at building codes with respect to safety issues, or are these well covered at this time? Let me know if we can support you in this. Renee %otT•nge1" `environmental Manager Salt Lake City Corporation 451 S. State St. Room 145 PO Box 145467 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-5467 2 (801) 535-7215 (office) (801) 750-4390 (cell) Visit us at www.slcgreen.com, become a fan of our Salt Lake City Green Facebook page or follow SLC_ re_cn on Twitter! Please consider the environment before printing this email. From: Muller, Hannah [mailto:Hannah.Muller@ee.doe.gov] Sent: Monday, March 08, 2010 9:31 AM To: 'Larry Sherwood'; ttleads@sandia.gov Subject: PV Safety for Firefighters, April 1 Webinar- Invite your local Fire Department! Solar America City partners, In partnership with the Solar America Board for Codes and Standards, DOE's Solar America Cities program is pleased to present a Webinar on PV Safety for Firefighters on April 1, 2010 at 2pm EDT. Please see the attached file for a description of the webinar content and presenter bios. We hope you will engage fire departments in your region to participate! Register here: https://www2.gotomeetinq.com/register/233737995 Best, Hannah Amok Hannah Muller Solar America Cities Procram Lead U.S.Department of Energy Ph:202-586-4883 Fax:202-586-8148 hannah.muller{a7ee.doe.gov DOE rs parinenny wih 2 clues Is etnkl sustainable local solar markets Leorn more of WNW.solarernericacifies.ener'oy.aov .00006, 2009 Zoning Text Amendment November 9, 2009 Task Force Meeting Members Present Jeff Bair,Cindy Cromer,Barbara Green, Jerry Green„Helen Peters,Vasilios Priskos,Dave Richards, Lon Richardson, Judi Short, Ray Whitchurch .:- Staff Present Wilf Sommerkorn Planning Director; Cheri Coffey,Planning Manager;Kevin LoPiccolo, Planning Programs Supervisor Review of Summary Notes • The members of the Task Force had no comments on the Summary Notes from the October 26, 2009 meeting???. NonConforming Uses / NonComplying Structures Without having a small neighborhood business zoning district adopted at the same time you change the non-conforming regulations,the property owner is stuck._You are closing the door on potential for expansion where right now you can expand up to 50% of the structure without going through a process. How do you address incremental expansion? People like small neighborhood walkable shops. You need to provide the ability to expand. Perhaps you can create a Special "Legal" conditional use that the Planning Commission can recognize. The use is not the issue. The standards are the issue. The expansion of the use has been abused over the years. Is there a way to use historic landmark process to address this? Perhaps you could expand if the property is in an historic district where they have commercial guidelines. The HLC could review the project if you want to expand. Those outside the historic district have to wait to expand until at some future date when the Small Neighborhood Commercial Project has been adopted and new zoning is in place. ANNIN Find guidelines that have to be met to expand or intensify. 1 (c) any terms or conditions under which the solar easement is granted or may be terminated; (d) any provisions for compensation of the owner of the real property benefiting from the solar easement in the event of interference with the enjoyment of the solar easement, or compensation of the owner of real property subject to the solar easement, or compensation of the owner of the real property subject to the ,tar easement for maintaining the solar easement; and (e) any other provisions necessary or desirable to execute the instrument. (3) A solar easement may be enforced by injunction or proceedings in injunction or other civil action. Looks like BJ is right about the easement being the only current recourse now. I will reply to him, and have also copied Chris Duerksen—our revised City Codes also only suggest that landowners negotiate voluntary easements, as the public was concerned about solar issues vs. trees. Do we want to consider taking this issue further? Vicki From: Becker, Ralph Sent: Monday, February 22, 2010 5:29 PM To: Gale, Amy Cc: Bennett, Vicki; Mickelson, Kaye Subject: RE: Need a Shade Control Act to encourage residential solar Utah has a shade control act that was passed in the 1970's and I think is still in the State Code. (It was actually the first piece of legislatio along with a sol Tax credit) worked on after writing a law el review article on solar 3cecss law). You nun' need to get help finding it, but last time I checked, It was still in the land use code. I know but feel free to ` follow Ralph From: BJ Nicholls [ma ilto:bjnicholls©comcast.net] Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2010 4:27 PM To: Mayor Subject: Need a Shade Control Act to encourage residential solar Howdy Mayor Ralph, We're looking at building a new garage and we're seriously thinking of installing a solar photovoltaic array on the building. Currently, we have good sun exposure without shade from the neighboring property. But I can't see that either Utah or the city has a solar shade control law similar to California's. The only solar law that I can find is one that allows you to join with neighbors and create a solar easement/covenant. Creating such an easement is a significant barrier to the anyone considering an investment in home solar, and a shade control act like California's would be a real boon to encouraging investment in clean home solar technology. We have a neighbor just down the hill who's recently installed an impressive photovoltaic array and passive hot water system on their new garage, and we're excited to see new solar installation contractors providing services in the city. Please take a look at the California law(pdf attached) and consider backing a city or statewide law that could dramatically lower the legal hurdles and costs for residents who'd like to go green with solar energy. Thanks and best, bJ BJ Nicholls 1149 Douglas St 2 SUSTAINABILITY — Accessory Structures COMMENT SHEET PLNPCM2009-01338 Ammo, If we may contact you for further discussion about your comments, please provide us with contact information: Name .La/„- Address (include zip code) Phone Email Written comments: _L r e.eloT CaapS. fit s� Cch_Ai� �) Sri-�e„ ✓PS 4 pi_ Al 1 .24'4 `�f© 4 ma c . /3 I" / dry ,-(40 `D t`.eer4; !/ 6/ !°+s ✓� h � rvt� JSAsk S✓ICrx tLCe%jSSl7v JG ilv�r/� c C � v� r � , "� pAcjiv p Coffey, Cheri Sommerkorn, Wilford nt: Tuesday, September 29, 2009 3:58 PM 'ssiliow@gmail.com' Cc: Coffey, Cheri; Comarell, Pat; Paterson, Joel Subject: RE: Silloway application Mr. Siboway, I appreciated the opportunity to speak with you about your proposal to place solar panels on the roof of your house. I also received the photos you sent by mail which show how you wanted to do it. After reviewing your ideas closely with our staff,what we run into is the clear language in the zoning ordinance in the Foothill Zone which does not allow for solar panels to be installed on roofs unless they are parallel with the slope of the roof, and do not stick up above the crest of the roof. With the roof where you wishing to place it being flat,there is no option but to only allow for installation where the panel lies flat. That, of course, defeats much of the effectiveness of such solar panels. There is no question that given the world we live in today, this section of the zoning ordinance should be changed. We are right in the middle of a process of reviewing all our city ordinances to see how we can make them"friendlier"to sustainability principles,including for wind and solar power. This will be one of the provisions we will propose to change. However,it will take some time to work these changes through the. adoption process here, probably on the order of 6-12 months. If you desire to try to move this along quicker,you could make an application with the city to amend the text of -'u•zoning ordinance to address this issue. We would then be obligated to move it along as a regular plication,but it may not gain you that much time in doing so, as this will still take several months to go all the way through hearing and recommendation by the planning commission and then a hearing and decision by the city council. It would also require you to pay a fee to make such an application. Sorry I don't have better news for you right now on dealing with this in a quicker manner,but we are hound by what is written in our ordinances. Please feel free to contact me with any other questions you may have. t�Iilf Sommerkorn Director Salt Lake City Planning Division From: Stuart Silloway [mailto:ssiliow@gmail.com] Sent: Monday, September 28, 2009 3:23 PM To: Sommerkorn, Wilford Subject: Silloway application Dear Mr. Sommerkorn; I wonder if you have had any additional thoughts on our application for a solar system installation. I sent you pictures of our roof line so you could more easily see what we are dealing with. I cannot believe that the regs. suggest that all flat roofs are ineligible as the panels must be slanted to make the efficiencies work. Our roof line is much higher than the top of the flat roof on which the panels would sit. nat do you think? Stuart Silloway. Stewart, Casey From: Coffey, Cheri Sent: Tuesday, March 09, 2010 11:19 AM To: Stewart, Casey Subject: FW: Building Codes and PV panels Categories: Other Casey, This e-mail relates to solar panels and the fire fighters ability to fight fires from the roof. It is all these little details that we don't know exist. Have fun. Cheri From: Goff, Orion Sent: Tuesday, March 09, 2010 10:18 AM To: Zollinger, Renee; Cook, Kurt Cc Coffey, Cheri; Butcher, Larry; Sommerkorn, Wilford; Comarell, Pat; Itchon, Edward; Ellis, Martha Subject: RE: Building Codes and PV panels Renee, we are the entity that issues the permits for'the systems. The ord. is not sensitive to the fire-fighting issue, i.e. where they are placed on the roof to facilitate adequate firefighter safety. (Only structural and connection issues) To" IN accomplish this initiative,firefighter safety, a change to the ord. and a transmittal to Council and subsequent Council { action would be required. Let me discuss this with Frank Gray,and see who should produce the transmittal for Council. I believe the Planning J Division is currently working with a consultant to amend the ord. to make it more friendly and consistent with green i practices. Perhaps they should be involved with this as well as the placement of these panels on buildings is also an aesthetic issue. From: Zollinger, Renee Sent: Tuesday, March 09, 2010 9:49 AM To: Goff, Orion Subject: Building Codes and PV panels Hi, Orion, Who is the best person to give me a quick primer on what the City's requirements/codes are for solar installations, as they relate to firefighter safety? Renee.o[[inger Environmental Manager Salt Lake City Corporation 451 S. State St. Room 145 PO Box 145467 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-5467 ,,mok (801) 535-7215 (office) (801) 750-4390 (cell) 1 Visit us at www.slcgreen.com, become a fan of our Salt Lake City Green Facebook page or follow SLCgreen on Twitter! -51 Please consider the environment before printing this email. From: Cook, Kurt Sent: Tuesday, March 09, 2010 8:22 AM To: Zollinger, Renee Subject: RE: PV Safety for Firefighters, April 1 Webinar - Invite your local Fire Department! Thanks Renee.You are right about the urgency of the awareness and training for our safety.These solar systems pose unique and unfamiliar challenges to our firefighters considering the conditions we typically encounter during structure fire situations. I have forwarded the webinar link to all of my senior staff and Training Division for review and dissemination. Thanks again for keeping us in mind. -Kurt F. Kurt Cook Fire Chief Salt Lake City Fire D .part:ment 801-5804242 From: Zollinger, Renee Sent: Monday, March 08, 2010 12:00 PM To: Cook, Kurt Cc: Bennett, Vicki Subject: PV Safety for Firefighters, April 1 Webinar- Invite your local Fire Department! Hi, Chief Cook, I wasn't sure if you already have a safety program focused on solar systems, so I'm passing on some information! Attached is a description of a webinar that talks about fire safety on facilities with solar photovoltaic systems, and the link to register is in the email below. Additionally, here is a link to some training videos prepared by the San Jose Fire Department: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4oaF9GV3p1U . These videos are getting a fair amount of attention in the solar community. We saw a large upsurge in the number of systems installed throughout Utah last year,and the State is launching a new solar rebate program in a few weeks that may further increase the number of systems here in the City. Do you see any need(s) to look at building codes with respect to safety issues, or are these well covered at this time? Let me know if we can support you in this. 12cllee Zoth:nger environmental Manager ..3alt Lake City Corporation 451 S. State St. Room 145 PO Box 145467 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-5467 2 (801) 535-7215 (office) (801) 750-4390 (cell) Visit us at www.slcgreen.com, become a fan of our Salt Lake City Green Facebook page or follow SLC reen 0010* on Twitter! Please consider the environment before printing this email. From: Muller, Hannah [mailto:Hannah.Muller@ee.doe.gov] Sent: Monday, March 08, 2010 9:31 AM To: 'Larry Sherwood'; ttleads@sandia.gov Subject: PV Safety for Firefighters, April 1 Webinar- Invite your local Fire Department! Solar America City partners, In partnership with the Solar America Board for Codes and Standards, DOE's Solar America Cities program is pleased to present a Webinar on PV Safety for Firefighters on April 1, 2010 at 2pm EDT. Please see the attached file for a description of the webinar content and presenter bios. We hope you will engage fire departments in your region to participate! Register here: https://www2.gotomeetinq.cam/register/233737995 Best, Hannah Hannah Muller Solar America Cities Program Lead U.S.Department of Energy Ph:202-586-4883 Fax:202-586-8148 hennah.muller(a�ee.doe.gcv DOE/5 periner ,g with 25 cities to b.:da sustainable local solar markets Learn more at www.solar amencacifies.eneroy.oov 3 2009 Zoning Text Amendment November 9, 2009 Task Force Meeting Members Present Jeff Bair, Cindy Cromer,Barbara Green, Jerry Green„Helen Peters,Vasilios Priskos,Dave Richards,Lon Richardson, Judi Short,Ray Whitchurch _ - Staff Present Wilf Sommerkorn Planning Director; Cheri Coffey,Planning Manager;Kevin LoPiccolo, Planning Programs Supervisor • Review of Summary Notes The members of the Task Force had no comments on the Summary Notes from the October 26, 2009 meeting???. NonConforming Uses / NonComplying Structures Without having a small neighborhood business zoning district adopted at the same time you change the non-conforming-regulations,the property owner is stuck._You are closing the door on potential for expansion where right now you can expand up to 50% of the structure without going through a process. How do you address incremental expansion?' People like small neighborhood walkable shops. You need to provide the ability to expand. -= Perhaps you can create a Special "Legal" conditional use that the Planning Commission can recognize. -- • The use is not the issue. The standards are the issue. The expansion of the use has been abused over the years. Is there a way to use historic landmark process to address this? Perhaps you could expand if the property is in an historic district where they have commercial guidelines. The HLC could review the project if you want to expand. Those outside the historic district have to wait to expand until at some future date when the Small Neighborhood Commercial Project has been adopted and new zoning is in place. Amok Find guidelines that have to be met to expand or intensify. 1 Urban Agriculture General 1. The reality is that you use less energy on a major fain' than you do in small local urban agriculture areas. This is due to economies of scale. 2. Do not over regulate especially when you cannot enforce. 3. City has really poor enforcement program. 4. The Purpose statements don't make sense. Community Gardens 1. Community gardens are helpful in building a sense of community. They are not a panacea to cure all the energy issues. 2. Distinguish between public and private. If on public property, it must be maintained by the City. You can't delegate the maintenance to a private entity on a public property. They have a different level of maintenaiae which could be a problem 3. Do not allow on public property that is'designated historic or in historic districts. 4. Don't allow in parks. The City needs all the open:recreation space it=has. 5. Ok to not require parking. 6. If allow to sell from a community garden located in a residential zone, you are basically allowing a commercial use in a residential_zone. 7. Compost Site will lead to a problem with Methane Gas. S. Community Garden as a home occupation is okif you liinit the number of people that can be on site at any one time (similar to what4e do with a hair salon or piano teacher as a home occupation). 9. Ok to have these on public lands as long.as they are not developed Open Space or the historic medians. If it i'`s a vacant lot owned by the government that is ok. Community Supported Agriculture 1. ',Don't allow CSA's in residential. It will lead to increased traffic in the neighborhoods. Accessory Stn.0 tures for Urban Agriculture. 1. Greenhouse. hoophouse is ok as long as it meets the accessory structure regulations. 6 Comments on Urban Agriculture portion of Sustainability Code Revision Project Purpose statement: Item 9: suggest that you define "organic" soil amendment and "natural" pest control. Both are open to misrepresentation. General Questions 1. Zoning District- a) Allow in all areas. Market forces should be sufficient to determine siting. b) Public property. I do not support use of street medians - they will most probably have very significant accumulation of heavy metals in the soil. Even with remediation, passing autos will constantly reintroduce them. Otherwise, Yes, OK on public property, subject to i) Discussion w. local community council, ii) long-term lease (5 years minimum, preferably with 5 renewal) c) Institutional spaces: Why not? 2. Sales from community gardens: a) Appropriate city sales licenses required b) on-site farm stands only if non-permanent structures, only if produce is from the specific garden and is not highly processed. (Goal is to allow e.g. 4004, honey sales but not apple pies.) This avoids the temptation to import produce from elsewhere and falsely sell as local produce. c) sales at farmers markets 0K 3. Sales from private gardens: a. Seasonal stands OK, as 2(b) above. 4. Impacts: a. Attempt to minimize requirement for off-street parking. (No new parking lots if possible.) b. Require mowing, rototilling, mechanical shredding, chainsaw activities etc. be during normal working hours. (i.e. not before 8 a.m.) 5. Accessory Structures: suggest that the language be written loosely enough that there is some room for adaptation. Example: it may be that hoophouses become an economically significant way to grow produce in the City. In which case, needlessly restricting a Community Garden or a CSA from fully using their lot may not make much sense. Patrick de Freitas pdefreitas@earthlink.net '" 44, 801-582-1496 J Solar Collectors or Panels refers to equipment capable of collecting and converting incident solar radiation into,thermal,mechanical, or electrical energy, and transferring these forms of energy by a separate apparatus to storage or to the point of use;and (i) includes water heating,space heating or cooling, and electrical or mechanical energy generation. 0 ZZ v __d u i arm u i t z v E c Z 0 , O [C W P L Cl G ~ o� ,+,r,— E O Z �.�,wtv6C: c 'i li 0 uUm�m C 0- F U c 0_,ri _-, r Lt CL0c z n J$ z a Q'J_.c 0 gx . sm 3 a -oUmc ic, 3 N c o e ~ v4,d U Q m a % o H a JV oaso U U T U �-- W 2 • , 1 OPEN HOUSE "''' PUBLIC COMMENT FORM ' December 17, 2009 so,• •• XT ,,,,, Sustainability Code Revision Project Planning and Zoning Division Department of Community and Economic Development Name: O ��r � {'J`- �i Cl Address: L\ \ l� \ Zip Code �<A I } Phone: `�j0 S°l r Zl `7 E-mail -) ,\< Please circle all that apply CiV Resident/Owner Practitioner Special Interest Please circle topics you are interested in Accessory Dwellings Urban Agriculture Connectivity Alternative Energy Systems Please provide your contact information so we can notify you of other meetings or hearings on this issue. You may submit this sheet before the end of the Open House, or you can provide your comments via e-mail to cheri.coffey@slcgov.com or via mail at the following address: Cheri Coffey, Planning Manager, Salt Lake City Planning Division, PO Box 145480, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-5480. Please provide your comments by Thursday December 31, 2009. Cheri Coffey 801-5,5-6188 Comments: .Responses to questions: a. What zoning districts? Everywhere b. broad application or only in specific? A: Residential areas are most important to reexamine these restrictions Definitions: 1. "Community garden" should also mention that community gardens can include domestic livestock, can be used for public events, for educational purposes, and for sales of produce or other related items. "cold frame" can also be made of metal or plastic "Greenhouse" can also be made of wood,metal, straw bale, or masonry. They can be heated by passive or active solar or with electricity(or with indoor compost or worn'bins). Should coldframes, greenhouses, and hoophouses be exempt from Accessory Structure regulations? 1. Location of structure on lot: - all three should be allowed to be 1' from rear property line - all three should be allowed to be l' from principal structure 2. Structure size: all cold frames, all hoop houses, and greenhouses that are under 10'x10' with no electricity or plumbing should be allowed to cover more than 50% of yard. OPEN HOUSE PUBLIC COMMENT FORM December 17, 2009 • IY7tI5�/ IIi1I—i?. \ �II e e T Sustainability Code Revision Project Planning and ZoninjDivision Department of Community and Economic Development Name: t1�a�� S Address: I Cf. Le F I� LA G 4 Zip Code S.L Phone: e-ci `Y 03 "3 cl E-mail S ti. ge (2- vt.si (-/ )I,Aso Please circle all that apply City Resident/Owner Practitioner Special Interest Please circle topics you are interested in Accessory Dwellings Urban Agriculture Connectivity Alternative Energy Systems Please provide your contact information so we can notify you of other meetings or hearings on this issue. You may submit this sheet before the end of the Open House, or you can provide your comments via e-mail to eheri.coffey@slcgov.com or via mail at the following address: Cheri Coffey, Planning Manager, Salt Lake City Planning Division, PO Box 145480, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-5480. Please provide your comments by Thursday December 31. 2009. Cheri Coffey 801-535-6188 j Comments: ST cv•-•-) l(.,� S n r+ e Pam.- - u1 c?-V `r t^ TS � / 1 �,,�, pJ p^ j� r I ,� cJ L� C�1 asp h l 9 �`�c``�� �" + V�✓� I / C c ei✓J 67- fr-e i/, ,� S � c t U Y ivy- Tr e co G,.. J .D(c_iAr 2 IIII 1 Cn Yg n e f At 5--0 "—°- (-3 ter Cam- J ti, 1/L wl� 0;-f-7 to L` J w r 'Q C. - S —�- + ., rej I ' D LA r U je S-C H ;r c Y 6 Vv„ ' r w 71-17, AA,-Q- —St c 0„, racr-t-- () I (., 0 h U e .7 z i i V2_ { , t '^ p‘eC A.,,, ,;,-ems s L,.-/L �- - tt_c2_0_ )c if- LA— I,,En c C ? C s"? 0 GQ-c-L:A „r--- "L, e/Ln v 1 J '�� l 1�l7 � r 0. r A Got rr-- ,--„2,1- e.-14-Le_ r- A LA �► paw �4f�`, _. co.r `�� ' irre posts 7Th s(,( eco uk (1 a , a r t►- �� C i 1^ 5 T* OPEN HOUSEsers. ' , PUBLIC COMMENT FORM 4 , iga. December 17, 2009 - MILT rn ITT— ' If inn .,,,, '' Sustainability Code Revision Project Planning and Zoning Division Department of Community and Economic Development Name: � . Address: I I n --��..,,��,-�,h: -170 • Zip Code S-1/(O) Phone: / - - E-mail I(ll1 SS/ ' / /.;% C, (• t., � ' Please circle all that apply City Resident/Ownei j Practitioner Special Interest Please circle topics you are interested in .Accesso_ry Dwellings Urban Agriculture Connectivity<Alternative Energy Systems Please provide your contact information so we can notify you of other meetings or hearings on * this issue. You may submit this sheet before the end of the Open House, or you can provide your comments via e-mail to cheri.coffey@slcgov.com or via mail at the following address: Cheri Coffey, Plamung Manager, Salt Lake City Planning Division, PO Box 145480, Salt Lake City, UT 841 14-5480. Please provide your comments by Thursday December 31, 2009. Cheri Coffey 801-535-6188 • Comments: ". ll, 2 ,.: i,1,' ' 5,, lGl111111,,<<.il � lor,; ,�_ l„S �,1, �,t.5,�/ir, ( ������� //_(!e. 4� December 17,2009 RE: Salt Lake City Planning Division Sustainabiliry Code Review As Salt Lake City works to identify zoning ordinances to work toward sustainability the opportunity to collect public comments is important. Sugar House is one area in Salt Lake City that has immediate needs for more sustainable zoning ordinances. As chair of the Sustainability Committee for the Sugar House Community Council (SHCC) I am excited to take this opportunity to provide the planning division with clear feedback regarding the outlined goals stated by Salt Lake City. Currently many of Salt Lake City's zoning and subdivision ordinances hinder efforts to achieve a more sustainable footprint by individuals and businesses. The need to amend standing regulations in relation to the 10 identified areas has been long apparent. In order to work toward achieving a smaller footprint on our environment we welcome the review of current ordinances that hinder those efforts. The issues we face in Sugar House are not unique to the city, but in many ways the distinctive character of our neighborhoods and businesses lend itself to a magnified impact by the constant development occurring in our borders both on the commercial and residential front. The SHCC Sustainability Committee supports changes in the code to give incentives to development to incorporate greener building practices and long term sustainability goals. One of the primary obstacles for both new and existing structures is the incorporation of alternative energy sources. The city should be encouraging the use of solar energy conversions and we should take advantage of smaller scale electricity grids to lessen our dependence on coal driven energy. Technology is rapidly giving us more choices in terms of energy production, use and conservation. We will not achieve sustainability without a commitment to these principles. Alternatively urban agriculture has been a long ignored cornerstone of sustainability. In Sugar House we are looking at trying to establish a community garden or farmer's market to help keep our food more local. The success of the downtown farmer's market only illustrates the need to refocus our attention to neighborhood localities to reduce the need to travel long distances to take advantage of these markets. One component to urban agriculture that is not mentioned in the outline is the issue of water collection. Using culinary water for all outdoor uses is a waste of a natural resource. Changes to the regulations need to be visited to ensure that opportunities to harvest rain water on small scales are not only legal,but promoted. We are interested in learning about the calculated impact this may have on groundwater tables and other possible impediments to its implementation. Additionally, the issues of street and pedestrian connectivity take on paramount importance in the Sugar House area. The master plan has long called for a realignment of Wilmington Ave and Sugarmont to promote more walkability and efforts have long been underway to connect the trail from the Jordan River to Parley's Historic Nature Park. The master plan centers on the premise of being pedestrian friendly and yet we have so many obstacles to overcome. A serious problem we encounter with increased traffic congestion and heightened danger to pedestrians is the role of parking requirements from Salt Lake City on any new developments. Other cities, such as Portland place a maximum number of parking stalls for new developments and yet we place a minimum. While parking is important for any business district it does nothing to wean us off our vehicles and creates an expectation of parking in front of every store we want to visit. The parking stall regulations have only served to divide the Sugar House business district by encouraging people to drive to each separate location. The Sustainability Committee encourages the planning division to seriously review the relationship between parking and developments to promote sustainability. Clearly the issue of increased traffic creates air pollution issues along with the hindrance to pedestrian activity. We look forward to being part of a city that is working toward creating a more sustainable future for its residents. While most people may not see the connection the Sustainability Committee of the Sugar House Community Council understands that much of the obstacles we face are centered in the planning and zoning ordinances inherited from a time when sustainability was not on anyone's radar. We hope that you will consider the concerns raised in this letter in addition to what you have outlined as you move forward with creating recommendations for the city council. Sincerely, Sustainability, Chao S ugai: House Community Council , OPEN HOUSE l .' , \\\ . PUBLIC COMMENT FORM ►��-ti = ,///,-q . December 17, 2009 1.T li __ , nil„!, Ii�A(1 Sustainability Code Revision Project Planning and Zoning Division Department of Community and Economic Development Name: :.',k_ ': i \ :,_ . „. , ) Address: ' ( (-. ' 1 ( 7 v .,‘ i , v , (--- --)L ( , L% � 7-`�f D j Zip Code Phone: �:(-7,-) ( 0 ! — E-mail L t 11 V'�--'c-{, _(C--- ,l c, ( vv� ( < << J �_ Please circle all that apply Ti Resid net/Owner) Practitioner Special Interest Please circle topics you are interested in Accessory Dwellings ban AgricuTfi e--., Connectivity ' ternative t;nergy ystS� ter is. Please provide your contact information so we can notify you of other meetings or hearings on this issue. 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OPEN HOUSE ,, PUBLIC COMMENT FORM � �,. . i.,,-- December 17 2009 �,--,,,, - '�= i: ,r Tom: ,,,,, nm ,,,,, Sustainability Code Revision Project Planning and Zoning Division Department of Community and Economic Development �' �/ C� ; `, ih ,Name: (� ( ; I n / /� i SC/,,` 1 ) ( ,11 ill Col t�li u, v � Z Address: • ` ( �(C� / c- 7 C- q c L i 4 L l^,,�:� _ C,„)� -,1 C t i— Zip Code H. 11 i Phone: 1 C 1 . E-mail C�i � L L c 11 4•= - > C —1 Please circle all that apply City ResidentcOwner .Practitioner Special Interest 2 J Please circle topics you are interested in Ac essory Dwellings' (Urban Agriculture Connectivity Alternative-Energy Systems Please provide your contact information so we can notify you of other meetings or hearings on this issue. You may submit this sheet before the end of the Open House, or you can provide your comments via e-mail to cheri.coffey@slcgov.com or via mail at the following address: Cheri Coffey, Planning Manager, Salt Lake City Planning Division, PO Box 145480, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-5480. Please provide your comments by Thursday December 31. 2009. Cheri Coffey 801-535-6188 Comments: .Responses to questions: a. What zoning districts? Everywhere b. broad application or only in specific? A: Residential areas are most important to reexamine these restrictions Definitions: 1. `Community garden” should also mention that community gardens can include domestic livestock, can be used for public events. for educational purposes, and for sales of produce or other related items. "cold frame" can also be made of metal or plastic "Greenhouse" can also be made of wood,metal, straw bale, or masonry. They can be heated by passive or active solar or with electricity(or with indoor compost or worm bins). Should coldframes, greenhouses, and hoophouses be exempt from Accessory Structure regulations? 1. Location of structure on lot: - all three should be allowed to be 1' from rear property line - all three should be allowed to be 1' from principal structure 2. Structure size: all cold frames, all hoop houses, and greenhouses that are under 10'x10' with no electricity or plumbing should be allowed to cover more than 50% of yard. Ask AmokvessaemeNomaj Commissioner Harding noted that the evidence in front of the Commission suggested the use of internal muntins would be supported and felt the Commission should point to evidence to the contrary to bolster ,mw,, their argument. Commissioner Oliver noted she felt the argument allowing muntins on a building because muntins exist on a streetscape to be fallacious. She noted that muntins were tied to the style of a building and the era which it was intended to reflect. She stated that there was insufficient evidence on the streetscape to evaluate the Trudell home and the Commission therefore needed to expand their definition into the wider neighborhood to find buildings which reflected a similar architectural style to understand if muntins were appropriate. She noted that if the Commission did so,the answer was that they were not. Commissioner Funk stated there were only two buildings on the block face which had internal muntins. There was no further discussion of the motion. Commissioners Bevins,Funk,Hart,Haymond, Vice Chairperson Oliver and Commissioner Richards all voted,"Aye". Commissioners Davis and Harding voted, "Nay". The motion carried, 6-2. Mr. Nielson noted that any appeal to LUAB needed to be submitted within ten days. PLNPCM2009-01338. Sustainability Development Code Changes for Accessory Buildings — (Unfinished Business) a request by Mayor Ralph Becker to amend the Zoning Ordinance in regards to accessory structures associated with urban agriculture(such as greenhouses) and renewable energy systems (such as small solar and wind energy collection systems)in an effort to facilitate and regulate those activities throughout the City. Discussion will focus on location priorities for new solar collection systems in the Historic Preservation Overlay District. This is a Citywide policy issue which will affect all Council Districts. (Staff contact: Casey Stewart at 801-535-6260, casev.stew art(d slcuov.com.) Mr. Stewart noted he was back before the Commission with revisions to the draft amendments to address the concerns raised by the Commission in their subcommittee. Mr. Stewart noted the subcommittee raised the following issues; 1. Allowed building coverage area for greenhouses,hoop houses, and cold frames was too large. Mr. Stewart noted that staff had reduced the amount of coverage allowed in the maximum coverage section beginning on page 3 of the staff memo, from twenty to fifteen percent of the total area behind the building. 2. Color of wind turbine towers should be limited to earth tones. Mr. Stewart noted that the original language had been changed to limit color to browns, grays, greens and other earth tones. 3. Wind turbine tower drawings should be stamped by a Utah certified engineer. 4. Clarify that renewable energy systems must comply with both city and state electrical codes. 5. When wind systems are abandoned, notice to the property owner shall be made by the city. Mr. Stewart noted that besides these changes, language was also inserted to address concerns regarding pegs or foot holds on turbine towers. , 6. Remove the reasonable restrictions' limits relating to solar collection systems where mitigation could result in additional expenses exceeding$2,000 or a reduction in efficiency exceeding 20%. 7. Allow for administrative Certificate of Appropriateness and more installation flexibility when solar panels are proposed in locations not visible from the public way (location priorities 1-4). Mr. Stewart noted that this prioritization arose from the Commission's previous discussion. 8. Require full HLC review for solar panels proposed for locations that are readily visible (location priorities 5 and 6). Mr. Stewart noted that the language had been altered to denote that these items would be reviewed by the Commission. 9. Incorporate existing policy statements for solar panel installation into the amendments. Mr. Stewart stated staff had inserted the prioritization hierarchy into the Policy Document where the installation of solar panels was concerned as a guideline to tie policy to the code more closely. Mr. Stewart noted staff sought a positive recommendation to the Planning Commission regarding the proposed amendments for urban agriculture and solar collection systems. Questions from the Commission 7:23:11 PM Commissioner Funk noted that in the code amendments,21A.40.050, General Yard, Bulk and Height Limitations, seemed to indicate that an accessory structure could be placed in a non-required front yard. Mr. Stewart noted that this was correct. Commissioner Funk stated that she did not agree with this revision and felt accessory structures should be placed behind the front facade of the building. Ms. Coffey noted that there was language in the ordinance which accomplished that and a similar requirement could be added to these proposed amendments. Commissioner Hart noted that on page 11 of the draft document, noted that item 6 in the location priority would allow solar panels on the front facade which she found troubling. Mr. Stewart noted that new technology was allowing for shingles to be used for solar applications. Mr. Stewart noted the Commission's thought in the last meeting had been such that with improving technologies, the Commission could review applications for placement of these systems on the front facade and determine if they were allowable on a case by case basis. Commissioner Richards noted that part of the previous discussion was that technology was advancing quickly;however, not all products would work on the front facade, which is why the Commission had decided during previous discussion that numbers 5 and 6 in the priorities list should go through a full review before the Commission. Ms. Coffey noted that people were interested in a brief approval process and therefore,hopefully, most people would place these systems in a less visible location. Commissioner Richards stated he believed the edits to be an improvement. "ol,Em 1-, <. .. Mr. Stewart reviewed a sample accessory building calculation for the Commission. , Chairperson Lloyd noted there would be several ways to calculate allowable coverage, including an overall lot coverage limit as well as a percentage of the rear yard and a percentage of the principal structure and the most restrictive limit would be used. Public Comment 7:36:24 PM Cindy Cromer; 816 East 100 South, noted that the Commission should note that sustainability should not trump all other ordinances. She stated that due to changing technology,the policy document should note that technology was evolving and the Commission would consider new developments as they arose. She noted that the Commission should request an update after the Planning Commission reviewed the documents. Sandra Hatch, 1141 Michigan Avenue,was present to speak. She noted that her son was soon to be an Environmental Design graduate and felt that these ordinances were very important to bring sustainable technologies to the forefront in neighborhoods like the Avenues. Ms. Hatch inquired if the Commission would regulate hoop structures and row covers. Mr. Stewart noted that for row covers no permit would be required and yard coverage would not be affected. Seeing no further public comment, Chairperson Lloyd moved the item to Executive Session. Executive Session 7:41:36 PM , Ms. Coffey noted that staff had received a comment about row covers,however staff felt regulating row covers was overregulation,as row covers were very temporary. Commissioner Richards noted that the Commission had been concerned that if coverage limits were not placed on hoop houses,people might use them for storage rather than their intended use. He noted that language regarding the Sustainability Ordinances trumping all other ordinances had also been revised to give the Zoning Administrator authority to decide which ordinances should prevail. Commissioner Funk noted she was concerned the length of time given before the City acted upon turbine abandonment to be too liberal, as it appeared property owners would be given 18 months to resolve any issue. Mr. Stewart clarified that the language required resolution within 12 months. Commissioner Funk noted this was better. Commissioner Funk noted that under small solar collection systems, numbers 1 and 3 might be clarified by combining the two together. Commissioner Funk noted she believed that landscaping bonds did not work, and the language should be removed from the document. She also identified some grammatical errors in the Policy Document. Ms. Coffey noted that some sections of the Policy Document had not been reviewed since 1984 and while the bonds section had not been part of the current revision, review of the overall document was forthcoming. There was further discussion of bonds by the Commission. Chairperson Lloyd inquired if the Commission found it appropriate to forward a recommendation at this time. Commissioner Davis noted that he would like to see it after the Planning Commission. Mr.Nielson noted that this request did not work with state code, as the Planning Commission was required to make a recommendation one way or the other to the City Council. Commissioner Funk inquired if the Planning Commission would setup a subcommittee to examine the suggested changes. Mr. Stewart that the Planning Commission had seen the code amendment and had made some suggestions, however,he did not believe they would form a subcommittee on the issue. Commissioner Richards noted he believed the document would be tweaked at some point in the future, as it involved changing technologies, and it seemed evolved enough at this time to forward a positive recommendation. Vice Chairperson Oliver inquired if staff could brief the Commission on any further developments with the code amendments. Ms. Coffey noted that staff could do this in November if the Landmark Commission forwarded a recommendation. In the case of Petition PLNPCM2009-00138, Vice Chairperson Oliver made a motion to forward a favorable recommendation to the Planning Commission to recommend that City Council adopt the proposed sustainability ordinance text amendments relating to Accessory Structures. Commissioner Harding seconded the motion. There was no discussion of the motion. Commissioners Bevins, Davis, Funk, Harding, Hart,Haymond,Vice Chairperson Oliver and Commissioner Richards all voted, "Ave '. The motion carries unanimously. PLNHLC2010-00530. Gaddis Certificate of Appropriateness for Minor Alterations a request by Benjamin and Erica Gaddis, for minor alterations to a single-family residence located at approximately 777 East Fifth Avenue in the Avenues Historic District. The request is to: 1) obtain approval to legalize a partially finished wooden shed, and 2) add solar panels to the roof of the wooden shed. The portion of the request for the solar panels could not be approved administratively since the action does not meet the adopted policies of the Historic Landmark Commission regarding installation of solar panels. The property is zoned SRl-A(Special Development Pattern Residential) and is located in City Council District 3, represented by Council Member Stan Penfold. (Staff contact: Maryann Pickering at 801-535- 7660, mar\'ann.uickerinc;a slcaov.com.) Vice Chairperson Oliver recused herself from the case, citing a conflict of interest in the case as the next door neighbor of the applicant. Mr.Nielson noted they could change the order of the agenda by vote. 6:42:30 PM Commissioner Funk moved to change the order of the agenda to proceed to the following case, PLNPCM2009-01338, and wait until that item ends to determine whether or not to consider PLNHLC2010-00489 at that time.Commissioner Richards seconded the motion. There was no discussion of the motion. All voted "Aye". The motion carried unanimously. Mr. Paterson stated that staff was attempting to track down Mr. Stewart to present the next item. Mr. Leith left the meeting at this time to attempt to contact his applicant. PLNPCM2009-01338, Sustainability Development Code Changes for Accessory Buildings —A request by Mayor Ralph Becker to amend the Zoning Ordinance in regards to accessory structures associated with urban agriculture(such as greenhouses) and renewable energy systems (such as small solar and wind energy collection systems) in an effort to facilitate and regulate those activities throughout the City. Discussion will focus on location priorities for new solar collection systems in the Historic Preservation Overlay District. This is a Citywide policy issue which will affect all Council Districts. (Staff contact: Casey Stewart at 801.535.6260 or casev.stewart(t slcnov.com.) Staff Presentation 6:45:07 PM Mr. Stewart noted that the Mayor had initiated a petition to develop a Citywide Sustainability Code. Mr. Stewart stated a consultant had been hired to work on the issue and then the code had been broken into smaller portions, and his portion involved agricultural accessory structures relating to urban agriculture as well as renewable energy systems such as small solar and wind energy collection systems. Mr. Stewart stated that the Planning Commission had reviewed the code and tabled the item for further investigation of the wind energy collection ordinances. He noted that questions had arisen at that time as to how the Historic Overlay Zone would affect the regulations on some of those structures. He noted he had included the Clarion Associates Discussion Paper for the Commission regarding their hierarchy of locations produced in 2009. He noted that staff requested direction regarding solar collection systems. Mr. Stewart reviewed the priorities proposed in the Discussion Paper: 1. Solar panels should be installed below the ridgeline of a pitched roof when possible or setback from the edge of a flat roof. 2. Solar panels should be located so as not to change a historic roofline or obscure the relationship of a historic roof to character defining features such as dormers or chimneys. 3. Should be installed in a manner which does not damage or obscure the character defining features 4. Should be located on the rear or sides of a pitched roof. Locating solar panels on a front pitched roof of the primary facade is inappropriate. 5. Should be mounted parallel to the plane of a pitched roof and have a low profile. 6. Should be installed in a location on the roof so as not to be readily visible from public streets, Mr. Stewart then reviewed the six priorities laid out in the proposed text amendment language. 1. In a rear yard in a location not readily visible from a public right-of-way (except an alley). 2. On an accessory building or structure (such as a garage), in a location not readily visible from a public right of way(except an alley). 3. In a side yard in a location not readily visible from a public right-of-way(except an alley). 4. On the principal building in a location not readily visible from a public right-of-way(except an , alley). 5. On the principle building in a location that maybe visible from a public right-of-way, but not on the structure's front façade. 6. On the front facade of the principal building in a location most compatible with the character defining features of the structure. Mr. Stewart noted that staff had done some research regarding the Secretary of the Interior's Standards regarding these types of systems. He stated that items proposed for the front facade of the principal building were traditionally denied. He noted that staff originally proposed that item six be removed from the location priorities and that consideration of systems on the front facade not be allowed. Mr. Stewart noted that installation standard number two on page eleven of the staff report indicated that additional restrictions put in place by the Historic Overlay should not reduce the effectiveness of the system by more than twenty percent or exceed$2000. He noted that staff was of the opinion this was an overly complicated and hard to measure standard, and staff recommended removal of that language. Ms. Coffey noted that the Commission might want to recommend meshing their current policy regarding solar panel systems with the proposed hierarchy. Questions for Staff from the Commission 6:54:48 PM Chairperson Lloyd inquired of Ms. Coffey if it would make more sense to propose that sections of the Commission's current guidelines be inserted into the text amendment or to refer to the standards directly. Amok Ms. Coffey noted that it would be easier for the sake of clarity to insert sections of the current guidelines into the amendment. She noted that staff could make these changes easily. Commissioner Funk noted she did not appreciate the economic amount in the ordinance as these numbers were subject to change as new developments emerged and it needed to be not quite as specific. She stated that solar technology was evolving so quickly, there might come a time when appropriate materials would become readily available for the front facade of a residential home, such as recently developed shingles. Commissioner Richards noted that he originally considered dropping standards 5&6 which would allow for panels on the front of the house. He noted that the language also indicated that a panel could be erected at a height of 12 feet above the roofline. Chairperson Lloyd inquired if the language distinguished between solar photovoltaic systems and solar thermal collection systems. He stated that many solar thermal collectors were being treated in the same manner as skylights and were not always specifically precluded from the principal facade of a structure. Mr. Stewart noted that the language did not distinguish between the two. Chairperson Lloyd noted that performance levels also varied greatly between the two systems. He noted that the Commission might want to further investigate particular systems and their relative appropriateness as suggested by Commissioner Funk. Commissioner Richards noted that the thermal systems would always require a certain amount of bulk as they required fluid to move through them whereas the photo voltaic systems were essentially batteries and could become very thin over time. Chairperson Lloyd stated that then it became a question of the appropriateness of the type, appearance and thickness of a system. Vice Chairperson Oliver noted language could be added to require that a system be flush with the roof or provide less than a 3 inch projection over the roofline. Commissioner Richards noted it could also be changed to state that requests front facade placement be reviewed on a case by case basis. He stated that they wanted to be positive and embrace the technology, but didn't want to set a precedent by specifically precluding systems on the front facade when they might be allowable in certain applications in the future. Commissioner Richards noted they might also look at the issue more like a conditional use request. Ms. Coffey noted that under the proposed General Provisions section, "...If there is any conflict between the provisions of this subsection and any other requirements, the provisions of the subsection shall take precedence." She stated the Commission might consider removal of that language if wanting,to review particular issues on a case by case basis. Commissioner Bevins inquired if the applicant would have to prove if all other locations were not feasible. Commissioner Richards noted they could delineate the issue and delegate certain applications to staff; particularly those in the rear, on an accessory structure or at the rear of a principal building and not readily visible from the street. Chairperson Lloyd noted that the principal building would almost always be the best placement for a collection system as it was normally the tallest and most free of shade or other obstructions. Ms. Coffey noted that there was a current case where the applicant proposed to place panels on a shed that was somewhat visible from the street. She stated that this case might be a proof for the concept that if a system was placed on a shed or other structure beside the primary building, more latitude might be given as to what could be allowed. Chairperson Lloyd noted that this seemed reasonable. Vice Chairperson Oliver noted that section 2(c), items 1-4 read to her that projecting panels would be allowed if not placed on the principal facade or readily visible from the street. Commissioner Funk noted that section 1(a), item 2 would allow a panel to project 12 feet above a roofline, which seemed undesirable and obnoxious in any zone,historic overlay or not. Chairperson Lloyd noted that this language would only allow that if the roof was 12 feet below the zoning cap. Mr. Stewart noted that this was intended to allow for a better collection angle on accessory structures such as garages. Commissioner Funk noted that they could take out numbers and make determinations more by the appropriateness of the application. Mr. Stewart noted that incorporating the Commission's current guidelines into the text could eliminate some of those issues with the regulations within the overlay. L.._..F,d,ri.--:'i. Ms. Coffey noted that the issue was part of a public hearing and inquired if the Chair wished to open the „, tok meeting to public comment. Chairperson Lloyd opened the floor to public comment. Public Comments 7:15:42 PM Cindy Cromer, 816 East 100 South,noted that aside from everything else,the City's existing guidelines for solar collection systems were better written than the proposed amendment. She stated that there was a huge amount of force coming from Clarion regarding the Sustainability Ordinance. Ms. Cromer stated that while important, the Sustainability Ordinance should not trump all and there had been no response from Clarion to objections for over a year. Executive Session 7:18:18 PM Commissioner Funk inquired if the Wind Collection Systems were up for discussion. Mr. Stewart noted that anything in the text amendment was open for discussion. Commissioner Funk noted that page 8, 1(a), indicated, "...if the small wind energy system is on a roof, the total extended height is equal to the roof height and the tower height", and requested clarification. Commissioner Richards noted that he believed that regulation was meant to determine how far from the property line the wind tower must be located. Commissioner Funk stated other concerns, including: Section D. Appearance, Color and Finish, which stated that a tower had to remain the original applied manufacturer's finish and added that bright, luminescent or neon colors as determined by the City are prohibited. She noted the second portion seemed unnecessary. Section H. Access, stated that any climbing foot areas or rungs below 12 feet of a free standing tower shall be removed to prevent unauthorized climbing. She stated that the language regarding unauthorized climbing seemed unnecessary also. Section M. Abandonment, stated if a wind turbine is inoperable for six consecutive months the owner shall be notified that they must, within six months of receiving the notice, restore their system...She inquired who would enforce this and how would one determine what was inoperable. Commissioner Davis noted if someone had invested the money to put up a wind turbine, they had a strong economic incentive to keep it operating and didn't know many people who would let it fall into disrepair. Chairperson Lloyd noted he felt the language helped to provide the City some control over enforcement of the issue. Commissioner Funk noted that as technology evolved wind turbines might also become obsolete and remain as monoliths and the owner should be responsible for removal. Mr. Stewart stated the language did place financial burden of removal upon the owner. ,,4.w11h, = 1 Chairperson Lloyd stated the Commission felt historic neighborhoods within the City to be some of the most sustainable communities and full of people likely to be interested in renewable energy. He stated he would like to see language regarding the inherent worth of historic neighborhoods in regards to sustainability. He noted that because of the embodied energy,building materials, lot density, living patterns historic districts contributed to making Salt Lake City a sustainable city. Commissioner Davis noted the Commission had to be open to renewable forms of energy in historic districts because that sustainable tradition should be promoted. He stated that if energy prices increased tenfold and it was difficult to utilize alternative energy forms because a property owner lived in a historic district, it would create a disincentive to live there. Commissioner Funk concurred with Commissioner Davis but noted that she still did not believe that sustainability should always trump the preservation ordinance. Chairperson Lloyd inquired what staff required of the Commission. Mr. Stewart noted staff was ultimately looking for a recommendation for the proposed amendments to forward to the Planning Commission. Ms. Coffey stated that if it was too difficult to recommend the proposed ordinances, the Commission could make recommendations without formally approving of the draft ordinance. Chairperson Lloyd noted the Commission could note general approval then, but provide specific recommendations to staff. Commissioner Funk noted she felt it was difficult to sift through the entire amendment in one hearing and recommended that the Commission form a subcommittee to examine the issue and offer amendments. Ms. Coffey noted she would prefer that the entire group vote on recommendations made by a subcommittee or through individual comments. Commissioner Davis concurred with Commissioner Funk and felt the issue required further examination. Mr. Stewart noted that if the Commission agreed with parts of the ordinance such as the section on accessory structures, the Commission might forward a recommendation on that portion. Commissioner Funk noted she was not entirely comfortable with that part of the amendment either as it proposed that an accessory building might be as large as fifty percent of the principal structure and that seemed excessive. Commissioner Richards noted he had been disheartened by the previous response to comments made by the Zoning Amendment Project Committee. Ms. Coffey noted that this ordinance was now in the hands of the Planning Staff and they would be making the proposed text changes. Motion 7:39:45 PM Commissioner Funk moved to create a subcommittee to review petition PLNPCM2009-01338 and make recommendations back to the Planning Commission. Commissioner Richards seconded the motion. Amok There was no discussion of the motion. All voted "Aye". The motion carried unanimously. Commissioners Funk, Bevins,Richards and Davis volunteered for the subcommittee. Commissioner Richards inquired if staff could provide updated copies of the proposed ordinance for review before the subcommittee meeting. 7:42:00 PM Vice Chairperson Oliver was excused from the meeting at this time. The following item was moved from earlier on the agenda to the end in order to allow time for the applicant to appear. Mr. Leith confirmed that the applicant was present to participate. PLNHLC2010-00489, 661 Green Street Certificate of Appropriateness for Minor Alterations —A request by James Olsen, contractor, on behalf of owners Diamond Property Management, for alterations to a series of 10 single story apartment buildings located at approximately 661 & 662 Green Street, Salt Lake City(inc. Nos. 665, 666, 669, 670, 673, 674, 677, 678, 679 & 680). The request is for new additions replacing existing additions to the rear of the properties,and to rebuild the front porches. The property is located in the Central City Historic District and the RMF-30 (Low Density Multifamily Residential) zoning district, in City Council District 4, represented by Luke Garrott. (Staff contact: Carl Leith at 801- 535-7758 or carl.leithraslcuov.com.) Staff Presentation 7:42:16 PM ,,, ,, Mr. Leith continued his staff presentation from earlier noting that Green Street at that point was part of a pedestrian walkway and 10 of 12 original units still existed. Mr. Leith noted that the buildings were in poor condition, the front porch and stairs in disrepair and the proposal would replace those stairs and front porches, extend new rear additions by 4' and would add a gable form roof to improve the current internal layout of the apartment units. He noted that the applicant proposed to use a fiber cement siding and due to the prominence of the rear of the structures from 700 South, staff would rather see a wood siding applied. Mr. Leith noted that staff recommended the Commission approve the request requiring details to be agreed upon with staff, alterations including: 1. Front porch and stairs 2. Rear addition design and cladding 3. Rear addition deck and stairs 4. Window framing to new additions 5. Rear doors to new additions Questions for Staff from the Commission 7:47:33 PM Commissioner Bevins inquired where the rear addition deck would be located. Mr. Leith noted the rear addition deck referred to the landing at the top of the rear stairs. Chairperson Lloyd inquired if alterations would include foundation work as well. Mr. Leith noted that foundations would be rebuilt and would let the applicant answer further. SALT LAKE CITY PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING In Room 326 of the City&County Building 451 South State Street, Salt Lake City, Utah Wednesday, July 14, 2010 Present for the Planning Commission meeting were Chair Babs De Lay; Commissioners Charlie Luke, Angela Dean, Michael Fife, Michael Gallegos, Susie McHugh, Matthew Wirthlin, and Kathleen Hill. Commissioner Matthew Wirthlin and Vice Chair Frank Algarin were excused. There field trip prior to the meeting was cancelled. A roll is being kept of all who attended the Planning Commission Meeting. The meeting was called to order at 5:45 p.m. Audio recordings of the Planning Commission meetings are retained in the Planning Office for an indefinite period of time. Planning staff members present at the meeting were: Wilford Sommerkorn, Planning Director, Nick Norris, Programs Manager; Casey Stewart, Principal Planner; Michael Maloy, Principal Planner; Nick Britton, Principal Planner Paul Nielson, City Attorney; and Angela Hasenberg, Senior Secretary. Field Trip Notes (Taken by Nick Norris) Planning Commissioners visited the 425 E. 70o South. Commissioners were given an overview by staff. Questions were asked regarding parking, landscaping and lot size and building size. Planning Commissioners visited 1433 S. 1100 E. Commissioners were given an overview by staff. Questions were asked about parking requirements and lighting. Planning Commissioners visited 1206 E. 210 S. Commissioners were given an overview by staff. Questions were asked about building orientation, Sugarhouse Business District design guidelines and appeals process. Report of the Chair and Vice Chair Chairperson De Lay stated that there was nothing to report. Report of the Director Mr. Sommerkorn stated the City Council passed the temporary zoning regulations for the Yalecrest and Westmoreland neighborhoods, in order to look at the potential for declaring those areas in the overlay preservation zone. The council also received a briefing on the historic preservation plan, and the Historic Landmark Commission met, and made a recommendation for prioritizing potential future designation of historic districts, which would come before the Planning Commission and then forwarded with a recommendation on to the City Council. Public Hearings 1 Carl Hewlin spoke, he was a property owner on Sego Avenue,was concerned about the traffic on Sego, stating that he stated that he would like to have the entrance on Sego closed at all times because there is a gate there now, and it was never opened. He stated that there isn't really a sidewalk, and would like there to be one. 6:22:0o PM Close of Public Hearing Comments from the Commissioners: Commissioner McHugh stated that the concern about the gate would be taken care of, as there won't be access or extra traffic. She also noted that it isn't the Church's obligation to put in a sidewalk. Commissioner Woodhead questioned whether there would even be room for one. Chairperson De Lay asked if with the City's rules and regulations,would there have been a requirement for a sidewalk. Mr. Britton responded that to his knowledge there was not,and that transportation and engineering both reviewed the plan and did not require it. Mr. Chong,the applicant stated that they investigated the need as well, and found that Sego is a special area called"the court," and on the street they added two rows of pavers as an improvement to act like a sidewalk path for the court. It was also part of the roadway,the residents share. Their contention is AlII" that landscaping would be better than a sidewalk. 6:28:11 PM Motion: Commissioner Woodhead made the motion that regarding PLNPCM2o10-00231 and PLNPCM2o10-00422 Korean Presbyterian Church Conditional Use &Planned Development, based on tonight's hearing,the finding on the staff report, and the testimony tonight, the she moved that the Planning Commission approved the conditional use request and planned development request for the expansion for the Korean Presbyterian Church at 425 E. 7th S. with conditions 1-4 and additional condition 5,that the church install a fire gate over the Sego Avenue exit and condition 6,that the church add minimum forty percent glazing on the north elevation. Commissioner Gallegos seconded the motion. Vote: Commissioners Gallegos, McHugh, Luke,Woodhead, and Hill all votes"aye",Commissioners Fife and Dean voted no,the motion passed. PLNPCM2009-oi338: Sustainabilitv Development Code Changes: amendment related to accessory buildings—a request by Mayor Ralph Becker to amend the Zoning Ordinance in regards to accessory structures associated with urban agriculture (such as greenhouses) and renewable energy 5 systems (such as small solar and wind energy collection systems)in an effort to facilitate and regulate those activities throughout the City. Chairperson De Lay recognized Casey Stewart as staff representative Commissioner Woodhead disclosed that she sent a copy of the ordinance and the other urban farming ordinance to Kyle LaMalfa from the People's Market. Mr. Stewart stated that the application was related to,but not the same as, other applications brought before the Planning Commission.This item deals with the Sustainability Ordinance,but specifically, accessory structures. Structures related to urban agriculture and plant production,such as green houses,hoop houses, and cold frames. Small renewable energy systems such as wind and solar are included. Mr. Stewart noted that the definitions were included in the ordinance. Mr. Stewart stated that the issues that surround this type of structure were height,size, location, and materials. Size: the intent was to make it easier to construct this type of structure by removing the limits. Leeway is given to the area that could be covered by this type of structure. Wind Systems: Typical issues involve set back, height,location color and sound. Sound is the prevalent issues. Limits on decibel output of the structures could be utilized, and limiting the height indirectly,in other words,to set back the structure to the property line equal to its'height plus five feet. In essence, the bigger the property,the taller the structure could be. Solar Systems: Typical issues involved size, area, height and location. It is proposed that if it's located on the roof of the structure that it not take up more than 90% of the total roof area. A solar system can be allowed on the primary structure as well as the secondary structure. Specific provisions proposed for when the project is in a historic overlay district.There were separate location requirements for those proposed. 1. It should be in the rear yard,not visible or 2. It should be located on a side of the structure, not visible. It must be reviewed by the Landmarks Commission for approval. Mr. Stewart gave a PowerPoint presentation that illustrated the look and the definition of green houses, hoop houses and cold frames. Commissioner Woodhead asked if these structures would all require building permits. Mr. Stewart replied that it would depend on the size, subject to building code. He stated that it would typically be 120 sq ft or less do not require building permits. Commissioner Woodhead stated that seemed that a lot of structures such as cold frames and hoop houses are temporary structures that had been thrown over their raised beds; it seemed to her that a permit would be unnecessary. Commissioner Dean asked how the City would enforce maintaining the use for a greenhouse, and not into living space. Mr. Stewart stated that the permit limits the use to producing food. 6 Commissioner Fife asked if an accessory building can be connected to the main building. Mr. Stewart cited the provision that stated that no portion of the accessory building shall be built closer. than four feet to any portion of the principle building,excluded are cold frames. The Commissioners discussed wind devices and sounds. Mr. Stewart asked for additional direction for the next presentation. 6:53:54 PM Public Hearing: Kyle LaMalfa a resident of Poplar Grove and founder of People's Market spoke. He stated that he is an urban farmer himself and sells his produce at the People's Market. He discussed accessory structures, stated that he supports the ordinance and is glad that it was codified and that the City supports the use of sustainable space. His objections were: row covers are not mentioned and he felt that they should have been,they were another strategy for extending the season. He would like to them treated as a non accessory structure. He stated that 2o% of the space was too small, and would like an increase to 5o% on a non occupied space,and an increase to 30-40%on occupied space. He added that he felt that needing a permit for a hoop house was unnecessary. His argument was that they are temporary structures and therefore should not need permitting. 6:58:4a PM Close of Public hearing Commissioner McHugh stated that she was inclined to table this item for more information on wind structures. Commissioner Woodhead agreed, and stated that she would be interested in more discussion on Mr. LaMalfa's ideas. Mr. Stewart responded that there had been consideration given to Mr. La Malfa's ideas, that 20% any open lot would be a substantial building,the intent is not to cover the entire lot with a building. He stated that hoop houses need a size requirement so that in the instance of one breaking apart and blowing away would be a bad scenario. He suggested that perhaps leaving the size where the building code is at i2oft.would be the best idea. He also stated that a definition of a row cover could be included. Commissioner Fife asked if coverage could be limited to greenhouses and have unlimited coverage on things such as row covers. Mr. Stewart stated that he agreed with that idea. Commissioner Woodhead suggested tabling the item. 7:02•24 PM Motion: Commissioner Woodhead made the motion that petition PLNPCM2ooq-o1338 The Sustainabilitv ordinance accessory structures for urban agriculture and small scale renewable energy. 7 that based on the information on the staff report,and questions raised in the public hearing,that we table this matter for decision at the first meeting in August, 2010,without further public hearing. Commissioner McHugh seconded the motion. Vote: Commissioners McHugh, Dean, Luke,Woodhead, Hill,Fife all voted aye, Commissioner Gallegos was dismissed. The motion passed unanimously. 7:02:49 PM PLNSUB2o10-00112 Chick-fil-A Restaurant Planned Development Amendment: A request by Deborah Kerr,in behalf of Chick-fil-A Restaurant,to demolish an existing restaurant and construct a new restaurant at approximately 1206 E 2100 South Street.The property is zoned CSHBD-1 Sugar House Commercial Business District. Chairperson De Lay recognized Michael Maloy as staff representative. Mr. Maloy stated that Deborah Kerr from Chick-Fil-A would be able to answer questions. The petition was described as a"planned development amendment"located in Sugarhouse fronting 2100 South in the Hidden Hollow area.This project would take the place of the Lonestar Steakhouse , which a was approved as a planned development by the Planning Commission in 1997. The current proposal was to demolish the existing building and rebuild the site. One recommendation from staff was that this amendment is not in substantial compliance with the original approval.The conditions of the approval were restated, and this would clearly be a demolition of an existing building that was constructed concurrent with the prior approval and that was the reason it needed to come before the Planning Commission,have a public hearing and go through the standards of the planned development process. Mr. Maloy gave a PowerPoint presentation. He noted that the project went before the Sugar House Community Council, as well as the land use committee. He added that there was a letter from the Community council that summarized their response to this item. Mr. Maloy described the plans for the former planned development, and showed the current site plans for Chick-Fil_A. A concern is the orientation for the building. Chick-Fil-A had indicated that their intention is to maintain the trail access and easements would all remain in effect. Mr. Maloy noted that a major objective of the developer was to try and impact the site as little as possible, and the primitive landscaping and the landscape islands that were there and were quite mature would be untouched by the project. The orientation issue toward the parking lot and drive-thru were major concerns. Mr. Maloy stated that it seemed that the project had wide public support,but the orientation of the building was the major concern from staff and the community. The drive-thru was a major concern. Mr. Maloy stated that he suggested approval but noted that there were specific design guidelines that were addressed in the staff report, such as: the building would be brought up to the street, the primary entrance of the building would be oriented towards 2100 South, and that the drive-thru would be relocated to away from 2100 South and be either behind the building or to the side of the building. 8 SALT LAKE CITY PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING In Room 326 of the City&County Building 451 South State Street, Salt Lake City, Utah Wednesday, October 27, 2010 Present for the Planning Commission meeting were Chair Michael Fife, Vice Chair Angela Dean Commissioners Drown, Luke, McHugh, and Hill. Commissioners De Lay, Gallegos, Wirthlin and Woodhead were excused. A field trip was held prior to the meeting Planning Commissioners present were: Fife and Luke. Staff members in attendance were Joel Paterson, Nick Norris and Elizabeth Reining. A roll is being kept of all who attended the Planning Commission Meeting. The meeting was called to order at 5:45 p.m. Audio recordings of the Planning Commission meetings are retained in the Planning Office for an indefinite period of time. Planning staff members present at the meeting were: Wilf Sommerkorn, Planning Director; Joel Paterson, Planning Manager; Nick Norris Planning Manager; Doug Dansie, Senior Planner; Casey Stewart, Senior Planner; Elizabeth Reining Principal Planner and Angela Hasenberg, Senior Secretary. Field Trip Notes (Taken by Joel Paterson) Planning Commissioners visited the area impacted by the Zoning Map Amendment. Planner Elizabeth Reining provided an overview of the proposed zoning map amendment. The Commission asked questions about potential uses. The Commissioners also visited the Apollo Burger site located at 143 N Redwood Road. Staff provided an overview of the proposed project. Note: Due to technical difficulty, the time indicated is one hour earlier than the actual time recording. 5:25:16 PM PLNPCM2oo9-01338: Sustainability Development Code Changes (Tabled from July 14, 2010): a request by Mayor Ralph Becker to amend the Zoning Ordinance in regards to accessory structures associated with urban agriculture (such as greenhouses) and renewable energy systems (such as small solar and wind energy collection systems) in an effort to facilitate and regulate those activities throughout the City. Chairperson Fife recognized Casey Stewart as staff representative. Mr. Stewart stated that the Commission first considered the proposed amendments in July of 2010, and tabled it in the Public Hearing that was held to allow more time to review. The Commission also requested more information. Mr. Stewart said that he compiled the additional information and in the meantime, the Historic Landmark Commission had discussed the impact on Historic Overlay Districts and had come up with a final recommendation of approval that had been included in the proposed amendments. Mr. Stewart addressed the concerns the Planning Commission had in July. The first concern was wind turbine noise and when they would be exempted from the noise level limit. After research, Mr. Stewart found two situations that could potentially cause noise issues: 1. if there was power outage and the wind turbine was tied to a grid. This would take the load off the wind turbine which would cause it to free wheel and could generate noise. 2. Prolonged wind events. The solution for both instances would be to turn the turbine off. Mr. Stewart noted that those two occurrences were anticipated now, and if a system is purchased and installed, the issue would remedy itself. Another concern was row covers, an item used very commonly in gardening. Staff felt that row covers were so common that they did not want to work them into the ordinance, and they would not count against coverage for accessory structures. Urban Farming structures on vacant lots had an ordinance which stated that if a structure is on a vacant lot, the limit would be 10% of the total lot area. Staff feels that was an adequate size, if one took a 5,000 sq ft lot and took 10%, the size of the structure would be 500 sq ft. Mr. Stewart presented pictures that represented the height limit for solar systems. Mr. Stewart stated that it was staff's recommendation that the ordinance be approved. He also noted that the Historic Landmark Committee voted to approve as well. Commissioner Mc Hugh asked if a home designated as historic could possibly have a panel. Mr. Stewart said that it would be possible upon review by the Historic Landmark Commission. Mr. Stewart gave examples of different types of solar paneling. Public Hearing Steven McCready and Bob Powell representing Green Power Generation spoke. They discussed their product. They discussed what would happen if the power would go out, and what would happen if there were high winds. Commissioner Drown inquired about how many wind turbines would be required for a 2400-5000 sq ft home. Mr. Powell responded that they would need three. Close of Public Hearing Motion: Commissioner McHugh made the motion in regard to PLNPCM2oo9-01338: Sustainability Development Code Changes, based on the findings of the staff report that they forward a favorable recommendation to the City Council to adopt the proposed sustainability ordinances text amendments related to accessory structures. Commissioner Hill seconded the motion. Vote: Commissioners Luke, Drown, McHugh, Hill, and Dean all voted "aye". The motion passed unanimously. ,,,, � ,````�4'17I 1/0, L Petition Initiation T a ,� Rea u est ,00 Planning Division Community&Economic Development Department To: File From: Cheri Coffey, AICP Planning Manager Date: November 18, 2009 Re: Sustainability Regulations- Bundle 1: Amendments to Zoning Ordinance relating to Accessory Structures PLNPCM2009-01338 As part of the Sustainability Regulations- Bundle 1, the Planning Staff is processing amendments to the Zoning Ordinance relating to Accessory Structures in order to incorporate the applicable elements of the regulations that have been developed by Clarion Associates. This petition will include the following concepts from Bundle 1 project: o Hoophouse o Greenhouse o Coldframe o Small wind energy systems o Solar collection systems 0 Page 1 Remarks: Petition No: PLNPCM2009-01338 By: Planning Division Sustainability Regulations — Bundle 1: Amendments to Zoning Ordinance relating to Accessory Structures Date Filed: November 18, 2009 Address: City Wide MEMORANDUM DATE: January 27,2011 TO: City Council Members FROM: Russell Weeks RE: Briefing:Status of Branch Library Projects CC: Cindy Gust-Jenson,Beth Elder,David Everitt,Helen Langan,Jennifer Bruno,Mike Beckstead,Frank Gray,Gordon Hoskins,Wilf Sommerkom,Gina Chamness,Kay Christensen,Janice Jardine This memorandum pertains to a briefing at the City Council work session on February 1 on the status of projects to build two branch libraries,one in the Glendale area in City Council District 2 and the other in the Marmalade/West Capitol Hill area in City Council District 3. According to the letter from Salt Lake City Public Library Librarian Beth Elder to Mayor Ralph Becker and the City Council,the Library Board of Directors would like advice in particular on which of two potential sites in the Glendale area should be the site on which a new branch library is built. Utah Code section 9-7-404,titled(Library)Board Powers and Duties,says in part:"The library board of directors may,with the approval of the city governing body:...purchase,lease,or sell land,and purchase,lease,erect,or sell buildings for the benefit of the library." The Public Library System has worked toward building two branch libraries since 2009.In June 2009,the City Council adopted the following motion: Councilmember Love proposed a substitute motion and Councilmember Garrott seconded to adopt Proposal 5:Increase revenue by$560,000 for current library operations,build one new library with a sales tax bond,fund planning for Glendale library and fund planning process for Marmalade library at a tax rate of.000057 with the addition of a legislative intent statement indicating the Council's intention to fund,plan and build the libraries. Councilmember Christensen called for a roll call vote,which motion carried all members voted aye except Council Members Martin and Christensen who voted nay.' The Library Board established steering committees for each of the two projects,and the committees have met numerous times to further each project.It should be noted that the Glendale Library Steering Committee commissioned an architectural program for the new branch,and the Board of Directors adopted a motion in December 2010 to accept the program document.It should be noted that the accepted document contained both proposed sites as potential locations for a branch library.2 The architectural program document indicated that the site known as the North property,because previous owners were named North,is identified as Site F near California Avenue and Concord Street(1250 West).The other site—Site L—was a new option put forward since the Glendale Branch Steering Committee had taken surveys among the community? The Marmalade Library Steering Committee has focused most of its attention on potential sites for a branch library and held an open house at the Main Library on January 25.If the steering committee 1 selects a site soon, it still probably would commission a programming document similar to the one for the Glendale Branch Library that the Library Board adopted in December. ISSUES/QUESTIONS/DISCUSSION o The Administration has indicated that it does not have a formal recommendation to make about its preference for locating the new branch library in Glendale. o When the City Council adopted the motion in 2009, it assumed a sequence in which a new branch Library—the Glendale Branch Library—would be built by issuing a sales tax revenue bond. The bond has not been issued.The adopted 2010-2011 budget for the Salt Lake Public Library System included a statement in which the Library Board said it would request a property tax increase in Fiscal Year 2011-2012 to build the Marmalade Branch Library and in Fiscal Year 2012-2013 seek additional revenue to operate both new branches. Given that: • Would the City Council support having a second public process on the location of the Glendale Branch Library or support the use of additional resources to identify new criteria and expand the public process to consider a wider geographical area than the one considered in the architectural program document? • How long would it take to ascertain public opinion about building a new branch library in the area near the Jordan River and the 900 South railway corridor? • Is it possible that the Marmalade Branch Library might be built before the Glendale Branch Library?What effect, if any,might that sequence have on funding the two projects and operating the two libraries? o It should be noted that the City Council in 2010 approved a$233,732 request by the Salt Lake City School District to fund a Community Learning Center adjacent to Mountain View Elementary School, and the School District has applied for an additional $500,000 in Fiscal Year 2012 Community Development Block Grant Funds.Mountain View Elementary School is located at 1380 South Navajo Street(1357 West), roughly a block west of Site F.4 o It also should be noted that the audited financial statements dated June 30,2010, for the Salt Lake City Public Library indicated that the Library System had about$5.9 million in unreserved fund balance. The sum remains close to the 18 percent maximum limit of total budgets allowed by Utah law for municipal unreserved fund balances.The Library System's past practice has been to allocate at least a portion of unreserved fund balances for capital projects. The City Council may wish to ask if they that practice might involve the two branch library projects. It should be noted that the City Council has set a goal of the City maintaining 10 percent of total budget for its unreserved fund balance, and Utah law requires a 5 percent minimum unreserved fund balance for municipalities. City Council Meeting Minutes,June 16,2009 2 Map: Glendale Branch Library Architectural Program and Site Recommendations;November 18,2010;CRSA,Page 55 3 Glendale Branch Library Architectural Program and Site Recommendations,Page 58 4 City Council Staff Report,January 18,2011,Item A-9,Page 6. 2 LIBRARY LOCATION ISSUE POINTS FEBRUARY 1, 2011 1. The property is not large enough to provide for requested accessory outdoor recreational activities. The Public Library System and the City could close Concord Street to traffic in front of the proposed branch library for larger outdoor events. The street south of the Chapman Branch Library is closed to traffic for similar events under current City practice. 2. A water line through north side of property could impact design. The line in question is a storm water line. Replacing the line with one installed at a 45-degree angle or a 90-degree angle would eliminate the potential effect on designing the branch library. 3. The side street location means property is not as visible as if it were on a major street. That may be correct in some respects. However, one still could see the new branch library because the institutional property east of 1200 West Street stands farther back than the site where a new library would be located. Moreover, the side street poses less of a safety problem for children because the proposed site does not need to be accessed by walking along California Avenue. 4. The lot shape (a long rectangle) will require a unique building design. The lot is large enough to accommodate a one-story building. 5. Residents on east side of block have expressed concern about the view from their back yards. A canvass of residents on the east side of 1200 West Street indicates unanimous support for the location. r The Site 4A �bl . a a -4i 4 F eels s r= , �.� I . F ..c,..,. ..-ono tt 6_-_,rt F� , The Glendale Library programming process explored • x- `f r� t r'.4 ; r �` e.r.;..x • twelve different sites for the new library. The sites are ,r I - - ' rd' tom R sc t��r,, '6° rHf �i`t' t i identified by letters A through L. 9', . . '",, -+ A.11 X t-'dn' r' ' to 4 ; ''. t Sites A through G were presented to the Glendale tii,_<. . �,, `. .a Y i is E, '' ;, �, *d • •' :4...' community for input.Sites K and L were added later in a ,�i,i, ` + ' _ 4 r,,:,, the process to respond to challenges discovered with r s a `4 r� r .. - . T. s' other sites and to explore new opportunities and potential �e �wz�a , / . :i synergies. s `s N.`.*iy 11 fsy c* • P The site analysis process included the development of ,*' ' J5'X••<r a�., L several possible layouts for specific sites to determine site •I��-y�:` ti"'3, ,`r' a•.� ' '` U ±r '� ` Li potential and limitations and to explore parking capacity. 4` ". + •,='� a' A-x �' .7', �` . _ - _ At this time,a final site has not been selected.Several y r t 2, . k t _ opportunities exist for the location of the library throughout l` �. . ,. = .,,*-A#4! �` ■j the community.There are many factors that are critical to • . x • r �' residents that must be carefully considered before the site . . • 1 `L' '�" ' -sv,v.• ;' • ' ... is finalized such as maintaining open space,easy access, , i-', '• f s� �;. it/Ir ` ,- ,_ , and convenient location. I f' I,\ ,4,,9 .l4. ,z . . 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VI Nail o ill "'IL 7 Ati _ ko _ .- la .. 1110• i . ni,;, . , ., . The City Library THE SALT LAKE CITY PUBLIC LIHPAKY S,STLM Date: January 26, 2011 To: Mayor Ralph Becker and City Council Members From: Beth Elder, Director, Salt Lake City Public Library Re: Glendale and Marmalade Library Updates Community input for the programming of the Glendale Library was gathered from May, 2010- August 2010. Local architectural firm CRSA facilitated sessions with hundreds of community members in a large number of venues from schools to community council meetings to parks and festivals. They gathered input on services to be offered at the library and site preferences. The programming document was presented to the Library Board in November,2010 and approved at the December, 2010 Library Board meeting. At this point, the Glendale Library Steering Committee has narrowed the potential site for a branch library to two locations. One has been under consideration since early in the process and is known as the North property—named after the family that owned it—near California Avenue and Concord Street. The other is a property very recently advanced for consideration located near the Jordan River and the 900 South rail corridor that Union Pacific Railroad turned over to the City as part of the Grant'Tower agreement. In late 2010, the Glendale Library Steering Committee was alerted to the acquisition of the rail corridor property at approximately 900 South and 1000 West by Salt Lake City Corporation. The property is on the northern edge of the area studied by the Steering Committee. The Steering Committee met with Frank Gray of the City's Community and Economic Development Department, who informed the Committee of the potential future development corridor along 900 South, the possibility of a future streetcar line and the potential positive adjacencies of a library to the International Peace Gardens and Jordan Park. It was suggested the Committee consider this possibility Several Committee members were concerned about the impact of building near the river and the implications for open space. Others were interested in the possibility of bringing the neighborhoods of Glendale and Poplar Grove together with a shared library facility. Still others were concerned about the impact to the Chapman Branch Library,just a few blocks away. After discussion, the Committee decided to seek advice from the Council and the Mayor. The Committee asked me to convey the following: Given the original parameters of the service area, the Glendale neighborhood, the Committee supports selection of the site known as the North property, at approximately California and Concord Street. However,if the Mayor and Council wish to expand the parameters of the service area to include both Glendale and Poplar Grove, the Steering 1 Library Anderson-Foothill Chapman Day-Riverside . Sprague Corinne&Jack Sweet :ast 400 South 1135 South 2100 East 577 South 900 West 1575 West 1000 North 2131 South 1100 East 455"F"Street ouIc Lake City Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Salt Lake City l Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Utah 84111 I Utah 84108 Utah 84104 Utah 84116 Utah 84106 Utah 84103 T.801-524 8200 T:801-524-8200 T:801-524-8200 1:801-524-8200 T:801-524-8200 T:801-524-8200 Hearing impaired:801-364-4669 F 801-322-8181 F:801-322-8180 F:801-322-8182 F:801-322-8183 F:801-322-8184 F:801-322-8194 c • Committee could initiate an additional community process to determine if there is community support for the 900 South rail corridor site. For your consideration, here are the pros and cons for the North Property and 900 South sites. North Property Pros • Centrally-located to Glendale residents (geographical boundaries of 900 South-1700 South and 900 West-Redwood Road) • Property is available (possibly requiring a zoning change) • Development of the site will mean neighborhood blight will be addressed, demolition can proceed immediately • The site is in the middle of a dense residential neighborhood making the library walkable for many residents • California Avenue is a major east-west arterial and a major conduit for infrastructure (electrical, fiber, water, etc.) • Proximity to schools (Mountain View Elementary,Riley Elementary, Glendale Middle School, Dual Immersion Academy) • Good access, safely walkable for schoolchildren on side streets • Property is of an adequate size to accommodate a building of 20,000 square feet (if needed) and the required parking • Block of Concord Street where library would be located has a full block both sides of unused street parking (no residential) • Library will provide a catalyst for further development on California Avenue • Community input process indicated preference for this general area • Community Council members indicated preference for the site • No one on the Glendale Library Steering Committee is opposed to the site Cons • Property is not large enough to provide for requested accessory outdoor recreational activities • Water line through north side of property could impact design • Side street location means property is not as visible as if it were on a major street • 1.or shape (long rectangle) will require a unique building design • Residents cast of proposed site have expressed concern about the view from their back yards 900 South Property Pros • Site would be centrally located to both Glendale and Poplar Grove, if this were to be determined as the scope off the service area • New library could provide amenities in proximity to Poplar Grove residents not currently available at the Chapman Library (community meeting room, enhanced technology, parking, ADA accessibility) • Large property with room for accessory outdoor recreational uses • A strong destination point if a streetcar line were to be built • Potentially focuses any development on one corridor/crossing of the Jordan River rather than multiple • Potential Activation of the International Peace Gardens/Park • Grounds would be cared for by library maintenance which could improve river corridor • Would provide a strong trailhead point for access to the Jordan River trail • Potential for a combined Library/Nature Center • Better use of the property than housing, commercial or industrial • Site is close to one school, Parkvicw Elementary Cons • An additional public process would be required that could delay opening a branch library by several months • Streetcar line may not be built in the foreseeable future • .Access is complicated with several dead-end streets on west side of property and no access across the river currently from the end of 900 South • library would be only a few blocks from Chapman. Finding accessory or compatible uses would be difficult. Chapman is a well-loved historic building. • Site requires infrastructure • May inspire opposition amongst those who advocate for Jordan River preservation, open space • Could have deed restrictions which could delay project • Would require the addition of a new bridge; some are opposed to new bridges across the Jordan River • Site may be too far from concentration of residents on 1700 South where there is a large population of low-income residents A hybrid option may exist to build the Glendale Library on the North property but consider a future renovation of the Chapman Library to bring more modern library services to the Poplar Grove community. Marmalade library update The Marmalade Steering Committee has been engaging the public for several months regarding site preferences for the Marmalade Library. The public process has included presentations at community council meetings, school gatherings and an open house held January 25. The Steering Committee will continue to gather feedback until March 1. There has been some discussion with the RDA regarding the potential site at 300 West/500 North and what would be necessary for the library to participate in a joint agreement should this site be preferred by the public. We will have further information for the Council as the public process nears completion on March 1. ' %' • • • • • • • • • • • • • i. — ......"40111C- 2 :. ..... . . . . . 2 qi•., rr i ` 1t 1- di -41 • � � ' _ Alin, N. N. • Itil 4 it l J I \ ,II# + Z O m rgli° C33 cr ■ G)____..,,.., c CD CDco c3.' r; 0 CO CID 1--, 3 , —151ill No j. ..CD 3 0 CD n r. ,, N Cie)c_ ,_, �� i Al I • AO ‘. ofie* a I r ' in-- . 00. .C\ iv i • ( • lb • • Acknowledgements • • • Mayor Ralph Becker Glendale Library Steering Committee • Salt Lake Cit', Mark Alvarez, Chair • Duane Bourdeaux • Director Beth Elder lla Rose Fife • bait Lake City Public Library Rosemarie Hunter Adriane Juarez • Salt Lake CityPublic LibraryBoard Joanne Lovejoy • Richard Kaufusi Jeremy King • Hugh Gillilan, President Lex Traughber • Ella Olsen,Vice President Mark Alvarez. Secretary • John Becker • lla Rose Fife Consultant Team Helen Rollins Wally Cooper, AIA • Heather Simonsen CRSA John McKonkie. AIA • Kevin Werner 649 East South Temple Laura Hanson,AICP Salt Lake City, Utah 84102 Sara Sfaffanson • 801 355 5915 Donald Buaku • Salt Lake City Council www.crsa-us.com Robert Holman Fran Pruyn • Carlton Christiensen-District 1 Nancy McKendrick • Van Turner-District 2 7097 Breeze Hill Road • Stan Penfold-District 3 West Jordan, Utah 84081 Luke Garrott-District 4 801 699 5832 • Jill Remington Love-District 5,Vice Chair • JT Martin-District 6, Chair Robert"Archie"Archuleta • Soren Simonsen-District 7 Community Liaison • Luis Eduardo Grajeda Mark Alvarez • Translation • • ...and special thanks to the Glendale community • 7 • • O • • • • • • • 0 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • n o0 CD CD C o(I) -0 C 3 0 3 EON O) • • • • • • • • • • • oe • • • • • • • • • 000 © oa • • Program Summary• • • We Now Know • It is recommended that the library and other community facilities coordinate calendars and community spaces to maximize the services and facilities in • the community. • Glendale talked and we listened.This program document is a snapshot of who Glendale is, where the neighborhood is heading, and what the • community needs in a new public library. Here is what they said and what from Glendale s urban form: • we now know. • Many Glendale residents do not drive,so the library should be a walkable destination and capitalize on transit routes. • • There are four existing neighborhood activity centers,each with a different • The Process Leading Up character.The library should be sited to strengthen these centers and stimulate reinvestment in the neighborhood. • from Glendale's demographics • The Jordan River is an important feature in the neighborhood and is tied • closely both with the settlement of the Salt Lake Valley and the migration of • Glendale is a diverse neighborhood and the library needs to reflect this wildlife. • diversity. • The library should highlight the Jordan River,while protecting its sensitive • • Many different languages are spoken and collections should reflect them ecosystem and minimizing loss of open space. • Glendale has more children under 18 than any other neighborhood of Salt • The activity of the neighborhoods is dispersed;therefore,there is no • Lake City, and the library should be geared toward kids. single focal point for the Glendale neighborhood and it lacks a true civic, • • Many parents work long hours and the library should have extended hours commercial,or community center.The library can be the foundation for a to ensure children have a place to study or socialize. new center and landmark for the neighborhood. • • The library can help uplift the community and promote literacy and education • The large population of children means that supply of bicycle parking space • to increase educational attainment. at the library should be generous. • • Good urban planning and city design,specifically in primarily pedestrian rom library usage statistic oriented,suggests that a public entrance from the street is critical. • • • The Glendale Library is likely to circulate between 250,000 and 350,000 items annually. • Programs, attendance, and the number of library visits to the new Glendale • • library are expected to be very high. Considerations for the Future • rrum a community facility inventor. • • There are a number of other community facilities within the neighborhood, from current trends in libraries' • and the library should complement rather than compete with them. The way we perceive libraries is evolving along with the information age.• • Libraries continue to provide a focal point for the community as a place of gathering and sharing. • • There is a need for additional large community gathering spaces,as well as spaces for activities such as publishing and production, hands-on activities, • and media viewing. ▪ Collections within libraries are changing and spaces must plan for • adaptation. • • • o • • Program Summary •• • • One commonality between the library of today and the library of the past The Site • are the types of activities that take place there. Human behavior remains a constant. from community input • • Incorporating compatible activities that relate to patrons'favorite activities at • Glendale residents discussed their preferred location for the new library, • the library can strengthen the viability of libraries for the future. and showed strong interest in site G, located along 1700 south and • Designing for activities rather than collections may provide more longevity to • approximately 1100 West. Reasons given were available space and the spaces that define our libraries. proximity to homes,and and other community destinations. • • Providing programming and services at the library that are widely available • Site E came in as the second favorite possible location. Resident's • from other sources does not strengthen the need for libraries. Providing preference for this site included its central location, proximity to schools,and experiences that are hard to recreate otherwise will redefine the way we • think about resources.This has more to do with volume of information,a easy access. place for people to gather,and services that are unique. • We know from this exercise that Glendale residents prefer a library location • • Considering the ideal environment for individual activities will help to provide in a walkable distance from their home,and near existing community • these activities. destinations(schools, parks, Jordan River). • from comparing traditional vs new spaces: from site analysis: • • Libraries will constantly be evolving to stay current with changing technology Several sites were eliminated from further consideration because of: low • • Patrons come for information and enjoyment. interest from the community,feedback fromt he Glendale Community • The building needs to create an inviting atmosphere similar to a"living room" Council,feedback from the Glendale Library Steering Committee,feedback • • type of feel. from Salt Lake City's Planning Department,and a variety of constraints or • Designated eating zones will contribute to a welcoming environment. drawbacks identified by the consultant team(see site map on page 35). • Involving library staff and the community throughout the entire design • Sites D, E, F, K,and L were retained for further consideration. • •• process will ensure the greatest satisfaction with the new building. Sites A, B, E, F, H, I,and J are located along busy roadways and a library • Technology evolves quickly.The building must be flexible in order to easily would have a more urban feel and setting. • accommodate future technologies. • Sites C and D are located in primarily residential areas and a library would • Spaces that flow and/or open up to adjoining spaces will provide flexibility. have a more neighborhood feel and character. • • Careful planning along with future considerations is essential. • Sites G, K, and L are all located in open space areas along the Jordan River, and the library would have a more park-like setting and character. • • Sustainable technologies will reduce energy use and serve as a model for • There is more flexibility with larger sites and space for additional • efficient building design. programming, but are less conveniently located for the community. • • Smaller sites may require a two story building,either above or below ground, to maximize parking and outdoor spaces.A two-story building will require • careful planning to contain operational costs. • • • • • • • • • Program Summary • • • • Smaller sites have less flexibility for layout and limit expansion and • The building is estimated to be 20,000 square feet in size.At the discretion additional programming. of the library,this figure may be adjusted,and the program adjusted if the • • Sites within neighborhoods would put additional traffic on quiet site selected for the future library does not allow for the full size,or if the • neighborhood roads. services needed can be accomplished in a smaller space. • • One way circulation can maximize parking and traffic flow,but requires a more connected or larger site. ,e Commu • • Sites along major roadways may be dangerous for pedestrians crossing the • Glendale identified eight activities as priorities for the design of a new library: • street. • Access to major roadways may be controlled and limit locations for curb cuts • Outdoor-connecting • and driveways. • Computing • • Creating • from site parking capacity analysis: • Eating • Salt Lake City zoning requires one parking stall per 1,000 SF of library • Socializing • space. • Sharing • • Most sites could accommodate the minimum number of parking stalls for a • Learning 20,000 SF library. Playing • • The Day-Riverside library provides parking for approximately 60 cars,and •• these parking spaces are often full at peak visitation times. • Many of these activities overlap in definition and function.Consideration • Only sites A,B,G,K,and L can accommodate parking similar to the Day- should be given to how each of these activities can be accommodated Riverside library. independent of each other to best meet the needs of the community. • A more centralized and walkable location,along with the availability of 1_11 transit,can reduce parking needs. • On-street parking could provide additional parking at most sites. • • • What to Include • from thr IPn a':a'ihrari R1gvr no Cnm ftee • • This document is to clearly describe the needs and wants of Glendale • • without being prescriptive of what the design solution should be so that the original intent is conveyed and achieved. • It is expected that the selected design team will incorporate as much of the • community's requests as possible. • • 13 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • SD CD ge CD- -0 o*c . 6 „," OD g O Dar- CCD o. 7:5 0_ 0) • • • • • • o • • • • • 0000 • • • • • • • • © © 3333 • ( 0 1 • • Introduction • • This programming process has been unique. It started with an °6v7 • introduction to the Salt Lake City Public Library's organizational mission -_M • and vision. This included the Library's long-term strategic goals, specific Emphasize • goals for the Glendale Branch Library programming and design process, Unique ideny o • and a philosophical discussion about the growing role of a library in a community. Librarynerate Newest • I ec no ogles Asin and Convenient • A profile of the Glendale community helped illustrate the needs of the -YTh • future library patrons, and highlighted the rich diversity that the library Meet Libra must embody. Service Need • BudaVc Crent • An intensive community engagement process sought to ask the Glendale Use Outdoor Spaces elgAmenities • community to help create their own library. Goals of the Col • The community conversations began by asking a broad, open-ended Optimize Flexibility • invitation: "Tell us about your library." This broad visioning exercise in overall Uesign Project pArcakr,• generated a colossal list of activities and functions that the new library L?, • could or should include. a�a�alys Be ADA Compliant • As more information was collected, similarities began to emerge and c�nc • consistent ideas surfaced again and again. The next step of the process s_u g & c� gETle-lidiestr ilcaon • was to zero in on these priorities and community values and to more 8n_ mn- uQget �5 clearly define the activities and functions that the library could include. >QIJ • oco 2 • With a list of community priorities and values in hand, the final step was n- n- • to translate those priorities into a new kind of architectural program. The program had to successfully convey a vision for the new Glendale • Library. This vision must capture the spirit and diversity of the Glendale • community, clearly articulate the community's priorities for the library, These are the goals identified by the Library Board as expected encourage creativity and thinking about possibilities beyond the traditional outcomes for the Glendale Library. These goals will guide the • development of the Library and are critical to accomplishing the • role of a library, and start a conversation about the design of the new Library's vision for this new branch. library. • • • • 04, • • Salt Lake City LibraryStrategic Plan 2009 -2012 • • The City Library has chosen six community outcomes to provide a focus for developing services,collections and programs.Along with community partners,staff • has developed a rich array of initiatives and experiences to help achieve these goals. • Enjoying Life Ensuring Early Literacy • People make time for entertainment to 4t Every child has an equal chance to succeed. • s I lighten up,enjoy life and unlock creativity. The youngest children have expansive early • literacy and early learning opportunities. • 1 1111i v • - lik 441* • aise 4.1it$4 '- N A i I • • 110 Exploring New Ideas r • ' ' '♦�. ''il Accessing Technology • The community openly explores ideas and ,' Everyone in the community has access to • engages in conversation,discussion and -31 ,. / j f o '-i computers and the skills to use them. dialogue,especially about ideas they may •/ , 1 II �J:-14111 I , • never have encountered before. I — . _ - • • - i f :• - i ., ' E. _...1 • / r / �• r: �. • — • • • Bridging Divides . ,,. A 4 Creating Local Solutions • The community finds ways to bridge the ' Everyone shares a sense of responsibility • east/west racial/cultural and socio-economicfil• for the future.The community works �; TWA divide to strengthen our City. together to address challenges and • , : - generate innovative solutions to create j N' I ; • and sustain the best place to live,and • then makes it happen.Our focus will be on • / �` \ sustainability and City,State and National r ` ;' urban initiatives. • • • • • • • Who Are We? Ili The Glendale neighborhood is one of Salt Lake Other Pacific Islander City's most diverse neighborhoods. While the City 1. • Two or more races 1.9% has a majority of white residents, Glendale's minority • Race & Ethnicity 2.3%% American Indian population nearly equals its white population. The Black or African &Alaska Native Hispanic or Latino ethnic population at 34.9% far • American 0% exceeds that of the entire City at 21.9% 3.6% • Some other race It should be noted that the US Census Bureau • 6.2% identifies race and ethnicity as two different identifiers. • People of Hispanic or Latino cultures are categorized Salt Lake City as an ethnicity or cultural group, rather than as a • Source:U.S. 2006-2008 census race. For example, someone could be both African • African- American as well as Hispanic. White • 80.7% Glendale residents of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, • South or Central American descent may be included in any of the seven racial categories included in US • Black or African Census data. American American Indian • • 3.5% &Alaska Native • Asian 2.3% 5.5% • • • • Two or more races 6.7% • ° • Native Hawaiian& O r Pacific Islander • 8.7% • • • Some other race White • 18.2% 55.2% Glendale ll_ Glendale • Source:U.S. 2000 Census Hispanic or Latino • 34.9% • Source:U.S. 2000 Census • 19 • • • • Who Are We? •• Languages Spoken • • • • = • C'CS • - - • Pacific—Island Italian c� • Arabic , .glish E E , an • Portuguese°guess oatian Source.U S 2000 Census • Chinese French i Hungar • KoreanIIOther-Germanic •• • Serbo-Croatian • pan ' s • • German • • This graphic illustrates the languages spoken in the the Glendale • neighborhood, with those spoken most frequently illustrated with • larger font sizes. • Primary languages spoken are English followed by Spanish. Other • Pacific-Island languages, Vietnamese and Serbo-Croatian follow behind as languages that would likely be heard in the community. • • • 20 • • • • Or 0 4 • • Who Are We?• Foreign Birth LI • .- 1_ • 44— • _ Q • EI-SaIvadon > • .=4 0 Eastern-Africag � C ‘E, Polynesia • •• Taiwan y,_ W CD Venezuelallor-trim-AfricaG° . = Source.U.S. 2000 Census � co Yu oslavia Peru Cambodia g . Thailand ._ exico • E Cl) Ind= as . 7onesia • ;s.:4, . • g • Bosnia...Herzegovina • • This graphic illustrates the countries from which foreign-born • Glendale residents originated. Countries cited most frequently as • place of birth are illustrated with larger font sizes. • Glendale residents come from all over the world. There is a direct • correlation between the prominent populations of foreign born and languages spoken other than English. • • • 21 • • 0 • WhoAre We? : II • Age & Gender I ' ' '' ,_, • I I •• 1 I • I II II • . I t Females Males • Glendale has a healthy growing population as seen in Utah • the pyramidal shape of the graph. The young population @.nd uo with a large proporation of children has a median age • of 26.7. The median age of Salt Lake City is 31.6 in so to 84 comparison. The city's largest populations are in their 75 to 79 • 20s, which is not unusual for a college town. • 70 to 74 Glendale's average household size is 3.6 and the 65 to 69 • average family size is 4. Both of these averages are • larger than those for the citywith a household size 60 to sa 9 - Females Males of 2.5 and average family size of 3.3. 55 to 59 • Salt Lake City 50 to 54 • 45 to 49 • 40 to 44 • 35 to 39 • 30 to 34 • 25 to 29 • 20 to 24 • 15 to 19 • 10 to 14 • 5to9 • Under 5 • Females Males Source U S 2000 Census • • • 22 • • • • ( f ) I • • WhoAreWe? 10th Grade 7th& .8 Grade • 9th Grade 1.9% 1.8% 11 th Grade 21% No Schooling Completed • Educational Attainment 2.2% ' '° Doctorate Degree • Master's Degree 2.6% Professional School Degree 0.5% Nursery-6th Grade • 1.5% 3.1% Some College • Professional - --- 22.7% No Schooling Completed Doctorate Degree School Degree 0.2% • 27% 3.7/0 12th Grade 4.0% • 10th Grade ---- --- Associates Degree • 3.1% 6.1% • Master's Degree Bachelor's Degree 8.0% 20.7% • 7th&8th Gra. • 4.4% • 9th Grade • 4.9% Salt Lake City High School Graduate Source:U.S. 2000 Census • 32.0% 11th Grade• 4.9% .IN • • Half of Glendale residents have a high school dipoloma • with some college experience. Salt Lake City overall has a high level of education with a majority having • Bachelor's Degree some college experience or a bachelor's degree. In both • 5.3% instances, more women than men graduate from high school and attend some college. • Nursery-6th Grade • 8.1% • Some College 12th Grade 18.8% • 8.4% • Glendale • Source:U.S. 2000 Census • • 23 • • Who Are We? • Household Income • • • • , • Glendale has a lower median • income than the city as a • whole. The largest income group for Glendale makes • between $20,000-25,000. • 111PIn 2010, Glendale residents E l l<-,.00?I3'' work primarily in the services, • manufacturing, and construction industries. • • • • • o 6 o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0' O o 0 0 0 • f- O O` M N f- O O) CO �— O O) 1� Q) O 00 ti's as CO (6 4 co cd 4I t '.' II � � Ge � � � � � koGlendale • Median Household Income:$34,997 Salt Lake City •II Median Household Income:$36,944 • Source:U.S.2000 Census • 24 • • • • ( • 01) • • Who Are We? Native American •• Elementary School Demographics O her • • • Asia!: 3% • Black • 5% • _.. • ` ` ' i '44111\ • if • •` White • 19% • • Hispanic • 1 65°% • • Services Students Percentage • Elementary Totals 2,315 100% • Limited Proficiency 1,375 59% Non Limited English Proficiency 940 41• %Economically Disadvantaged 2,039 88% • Non Economically Disadvantaged 276 12% • Regular Education 2,051 88.6% • S.-vial Education 264 11.4% • Source:Salt Lake Cdy School Discict October 2009 Database.Cluster 0 • • • • • • • Who Are We? • Library Circulation • • • 2010 Statistics System Main Chapman Day-Riverside • Circulation 3,800,287 2,071,832 192,628 317,724 Juvenile Materials Circulation 917,145 466,289 39,419 92,560 • Collection Size 964,193 607,336 54,856 77,158 • Juvenile Collection Size 224,000 106,000 16,000 24,000 • Visits 3,700,000 (est) 2,400,000 (est) 120,000 (est) 193,160 • Weekly Hours Open 378 70 60 64 • • • Library Patronage • 2010 Statistics System Main Chapman Day-Riverside • Computer Sessions 570,419 377,442 49,149 62,383 • Computer Time Used (Hours) 433,627 308,909 22,335 52,072 • Community Meetings 3,176(est) 2,136 172 1056 • Programs 2,162 967 269 209 • Attendance 82,228 45,359 5,187 5,186 Children's Programs 1,393 392 211 • Children Attending Programs 36,810 21,522 3,320 3,757 • Source.Salt Lake City Public Library 2010 Statistics • •J C• , Ut • of o eA • 1L - • • • • 26 • • • • ( 0 i • • Who Are We? • Community Needs • • • * • Qa��- roc ��o` p �aoN roc �cp • 1..,...„, �`� oa Goy r 'o G �y o��°�� p c, °c G Q •s °C` 0�5 �(� iz,V�� c ��ei �Jar •,:coc • " : N4o J`O �`� 0 �� •N� 5 g`' FQ e' cc‘a ArtAk k ''--- -\e'0-1\. 0<bc,`''' c`().1\. „,; (10c,`'. \-V‘)0A4. e0A4. Q;55/1 •cs ° CP zsi . A'. \ of<o�. co A" ��° poo• c•g�. c•g�. mac• . ;&A4. O b�. </o�. o co° Ikv• Meeting- under 20 people 1 1 1 1 2 • Meeting- under 50 people 3 1 1 1 • Meeting- under 100 people 1 1 • Computer Lab 1 2 1 • Classroom - under 30 people 1 1 2 • Classroom -30+ people 1 2 1 1 Office spaces 5 4 1 • Gallery/Exhibit 1 1 • Performing Arts 1 • Health & Fitness/Gym 2 1 • Dental Services 1 • Day Care 1 • Multi-purpose Space 1 • Recording Studio 1 • • Inventory of CommunitySpaces • *Fee-based • **Fee-based,free or reduced fee for non-profit uses • 27 • • • • • • GatheringInformation • • . • Glendale Neighborhood &Activity Centers Ii4, iEisrctic11rat=i'th-±i .•••: r- '- '-�► ,, The Glendale neighborhood can be divided into three general areas: north of f 1 • California Avenue,south of California Avenue,and along 900 West. The oldest • homes in the neighborhood are found in the areas along or near 900 West. q ��; tiff mum! it •.y: 3`-- ;(r t 0 E • Many of these date to the 1920s or earlier. The Sorenson and Unity Centers, leFri ..0, _car p .'r tI' located on the corner of 900 West and California Avenue, marks one of three ! A _ �, j activity centers in Glendale. This is a community and service oriented activity - ® Q p a Q 't. � ,' r '� i • center. D;fe fir` • . g i '4t L M`..a At the close of the Second World War, a boom of development occurred in the °�•" q • area west of 9th west and north of California Avenue. This new wave of growth n ° ►• zl -'' U established what is now known as the Glendale neighborhood of Salt Lake s M•• _ • City. A large round about, or circle, identified the center of the neighborhood. 1: 1 I +$ Much of the activityin Glendale occurred near the current Glendale Plaza. : • ''•. e _ J This was the site of a movie theater and shopping opportunities that made this �+�.,�, ,�,�,�.'-.,• � —( c�¢ ,aem_ ca •: area a true neighborhood destination. The area around the Glendale Plaza still �' , Q u �. _� • contains a successful shopping market, as well as a charter school,a church, • g .�� „.......,,„—a " • Q... .....: . .. and a few other small businesses. This area serves as the commercial activity ` •Q n j �•- • center for the Glendale neighborhood. n Q l • In the 1960s, 70s and 80s,continuing development occurred in the Glendale p n p • neighborhood south of California Avenue. This area includes three schools, p ;:' • P. t`, ,_ Q • some limited shopping and dining opportunities,two churches, and a proposed ',t ..11$ community center associated with Mountainview Elementary School. Located n(� • C iron /(C:7 t�`C3=3(: 7 in the geographic center of the Glendale neighborhood,this area is quickly �` "1�'L"' "',�`�G' ,•-• . UJ1 ` • becoming the center for the community. '1. -- • A final community activity center coincides with the Hartland Community Glendale Neighborhood • Center and the Pebble Creek Apartments along 1700 South and Redwood Road. This rent controlled apartment complex is home to many refugees and f--+ Major Route ResldentialArea : Community Node • recent immigrants to the United States. The University Neighborhood Partners f°�"`A Existing Trail Civic Area • Community Anchor • `,r..� Potential Trail operates several programs from a space here and works with several other ii Green Space • River community organizations to provide services to this population. Qooau, Old Railroad Corridor ® Commercial Area SALT LAKE CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEM (CC///A • 28 • • • • ( s • • • GatheringInformation • • • The new library should complement and support the existing activity centers in • the Glendale neighborhood and work to strengthen the neighborhood's identity. y , • Mobility Network f_ ,. • The Glendale neighborhood's northern boundary is generally identified by an r • abandoned railroad corridor at approximately 900 South and 1700 South serves • ;� . as the southern boundary. The eastern edge of the community is Interstate • 15,and some suggest 900 West. Redwood Road serves as the western • boundary. Each of these boundary lines serves as an important connector for the neighborhood. California Avenue,which runs east to west,divides the • neighborhood in nearly equal halves. Navajo Street and 9th West provide the • primary north-south vehicular connections. • Glendale has a very young population and many residents either cannot or do • not drive. It is therefore critical that the library capitalize on existing pedestrian • accommodations,which include:the Jordan River Parkway, bus transit lines, potential trail alignments in the rail corridor and other easements. It is also • important for the library to be located in a place that is easily accessible by most • Glendale residents with a short walk. • Open Space and Recreation Network . .�,• x • The Glendale neighborhood is in many ways defined by the Jordan River wJ ':� j�, corridor,which flows from south to north in the eastern half of the neighborhood. 7 • This corridor provides critical riparian habitat to many species of birds and fish. • Preservation of these areas is of key importance to the community. • The Jordan River Parkway is a paved pathway extending through the majority • of the Salt Lake Valley. This section of the path includes bridges over the river, • parks along its edge,and has been a focal point for many community service • projects. • There are four public schools within the neighborhood, each of which provide • developed open space and playgrounds. These are typically fenced areas, and are not always available for public use. • • 29 • • • • • Gathering Information • • Community Outreach • • IheNw A :- ', • UencIale p\R - w • i rary \�-, gas: ®� he •, PRE • • J y\ I tO \ , ram �1 / . :: i� • �`- ., �ns! • 1� `N. _' Outreach by the Numbers • • 3 elementary school assemblies • Help Us Wrrte the Story! 3 posters at gathering places • Attend a Community Event: 3 community workshops • 4 community organization interviews • May 22,2010 June 22,2010 13 communityevents Sorenson Unity Center Partners in the Park Annual Community Fair Kickoff Event 19 mobile outreach visits • 1:00-5:00 pm 6:00-8:00 pm 1383South900West 1060 South 900 West 48 invitation letters to community leaders • 2 And don't forget to go online: 150 library activity surveys returned • • www.glendalelibaryslcoom 450 website cards distributed • ‘?1 ,000 coloring books given away • Share Your Ideas for the 2,500 website visits • new Glendale Library! 3,500 process participants • ` 4,100 flyers distributed An example of an invitation to community - • events.Printed in both Spanish and English • 30 • • • • Ir 4 • • • Gathering Information • • Community Outreach . • Our Library is All About... • Glendale!This library is all about the people of Glendale, and not just the • demographics. Residents and community members have been vocal about what • they want and hope for in a new library.The process of gathering this information started with a large outreach effort in the community that included community Flel ■ • events,workshops, and public meetings. Recognition was given to the need for • alternate forms of input for those with limited English proficiency.All information was available in Spanish as well. Engaging the public in the analysis of all theStory! • potentially available sites within the community resulted in a handful of options • that are quite favorable.Additionally, participants expressed their opinions on Visit our Website Today • what should and should not be included in the library itself.This information was gathered through small group discussions, interviews, and surveys. Some glendalelibraryslc.com • opinions were gathered graphically by placing stickers adjacent to favorite • activities. Others were more quantifiable through the use of the surveys. • Evolution of the Information Gathering Process in the Community: w to it • h. • 1. Consider activities associated with a library aescnbir • 2. Write down the important activities you want in your library a Ii istcria! • 3. Choose a preferred location for your library 4. Narrow down the most important activities • 5. Summary of the community's priorities Visits nuestra pagina hoy • 6. Rank those activities as a Must Have, Should Have,or May Have giendalelibrarysic.com • 7. Prioritize Must, Should, May activities on a larger scale exercise 8. Group similar priorities into one of eight categories • 9. Consider what these words+a library could represent • Cards given to the community to encourage • participation and direct them to the website. • • . • 31 • • ! • • Gathering Information _ MM. - • Community Outreach Events - -• ' • ♦ _ � � •• Mtn.'�!View Elementary • • 2 1 , .�� - 1 • 3t . • AO 8,200 _� � > ♦ Mayors Education Summit — INA a 1.0' I • - - 41114, ... ... 100 Mr�, 1 • i e e May It 2010 I Hartland Comm only Canter 1 • 1 s. a , .4,42.44,, ... , ,, 1 - I -i % ,; ,g/ o, i,-,„ ... Riley Elementary — ♦ >� ♦ June 2. 2010 goo May 10,2010 May Elementary School= as. Iwo — wag • I' • ,I CommunaVy Workshop#1 •♦` , I ♦ a" • • .t to .,,, MIN==NMI=MN MENEM 0 or 141 Olt — % N I i i . : .;4.'"r , IIII I I V1 .III • • 1 • • ♦ Alk V. ♦ ♦� dr� Ai , • June 4, • • May 22,2010 Northwest Recreation Center 32 Sorenson unity Center Fair • if., ( 0 • • I• •` �\ ,� I • • it � gig ♦ ♦ II f "„wii • —.— ,� • PLC June 22,2010 ` - • , •TS it .1'.; f Community Workshop#3. ♦ __ • n,, �. # ♦ ♦ August 28,2010•, ' ♦` Sorenson Dayz ♦ • ,di" �� _ J - , I ^< a :. • June 4 2010 1r • I Partners in the Park kp . . ,--4 I, .7 1 • I • ikla+,••-^sd ;, • , , June 26 2010 • -,�r Nest Side Environmental Fair I • t ♦ ` e August 3,2010 A, % aft, "II IN= MO ♦ Night Out Against Crime • ` ' I go � � • • • • • June 15,2010 _ ; -_� V+ w �j I ♦N. ' Community Workshop#2 t I' -, - 4. \ lartt.. 1► 1 • • / = 1 • 1 I June 25,2010 • ♦ Centro Crvioo Fair .r: • ♦ ♦le oft ♦ June 30,2010 • Mayors Education Summit#2 33 • • • • • Gathering Information • Community Outreach Exercises • • • 1 Consider activities associated with a library • • III • • •. .. • : • • Iff: : E. •®. : � 1• 1,*" • • • . ••• 2 Write down the important activities you want in your library • • wow •• • - 4 To determine the highest priorities, community members • were first asked to consider different types of activities • that could be associated with a library. Ai The same activities often rose to the top. _ • • J • +` ter. 1 ; ..! • • Residents also took time to write on a temporary graffiti • wall to describe some specific things that were important • to them. • • • 34 • • • • i • • GatheringInformation • • Community Outreach Exercises a . • 3 Choose a preferred location for your library ,K ' pi + ' ni • — aor at ' c �' AI 4r. He r �'_'7 + _ • � 4 II ici 1r .., .... _ '4110A5L1--:•2-L•4. '..., • ,. 1 �r• • J16 if w 4 •• • At each community event, residents were asked about . , -,,,,; ,,. : V ' • their preferred location for a new library building. Their .- la s t-} ` �• recommendations were tallied along with the reasons for • " T :r �< • their choices. i ' ' 1• , r 1 _. III Walkability, prominent visibility, proximity to their homes, `. �. ; ' - D _.__„ • i ■o , and a central location to the community were some of the ..a. c; t ii • higher priorities. _ 'v,'' v. 11" • �' ST: � I 0 w 0 250 500 , Y i,SItt _ * Potential Site Where Do You Want Your Library? • yu:.: ,aler la nueva bibliofeca? SITE A SITE B SITE C SITED SITE! SITE P SITE O SITE 11 SITE I SITE) • b • I• • Y • SALT LAKE CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEM k • 35 • • • 0 GatheringInformation � • Results of Community Input • ® a • In step 1, the community was provided %�i 1n • with a chart containing photos representing41 many different activities. People were 1!!'�' • asked to place a star next to the activity *V" ,,,'", • they found most important. These eight '"'' °C1 photos and activities were the highest t t V •� : ,. ' �, f • ranked. . ' _ f • - .44 Socializing PYing Canputing • • 4 Narrow down the most important activities • • /1,1111111,11:111ti • �� • A� • > -Mk - ,, 44,.......,„ ,,.„ „,. " , ._ • • Eating Sharing ti ` • AL 1:.''..x?t,•,L.-:.:::--. e.,-,...„ ,, ,,,, ,... v,,,,i& ...... .... -..10,4„, • 40e ' :Ir' ''' . • -- 7'*,4."::::::-:-..:,,,-,,,.. ,.. / 40, • ‘\\ _ \. .. a ie`'" N 6:?Sd- � N1 —, • • , _ '' fn / '' -" qi.,"",e'V'P.- krt. ... .„1„. lir .... 4... 4. ,, ..,,,,,,,,..52:7: :::......5, ,..„, s,.. ..,,;.„,...... — s': iiiiii4 -- . It:::::.;.0.,,,,,,tv....,.,.., • .... ...,,-,:. --Alkr ,.. , , __, ,,,:,,,,..::„.....\\ rrr • Connecting Learning Creating • 36 • • • I EP CAD v ' _n 01 ( ) __ cn X � O SurfingQ 0 games 2 c� CD Playing � m � •o �' o �. CD g Escape Hands-on 0 Diverse o o 3 = Outdoor" =� classes Computers E spaces B a ,‹ cn. , O flexible 3. B v Quietiiii 'r Creating 3 0 Oa -s. Journalism �'�D Gathering� Events v 0 gathering Computer N. Meeting N O festival( (-) o Q D Movable = o fD 0 u -'�. Arts 2 N.Eating rn (D o World p hod O N -8 *P. XI @' 0 Writing studios Eco—garden Eiactities� o Literacyo' Cultural Beautiful Multi-purpose `� D, c, languages Patio F j Intimate writin Food P '0 < Internet `" `" gliterature -' 0 Music Basketball ° .= c r) b co generation area o D O Cafe Small m v r3 3 stages -aJ Q Tutoring ' -< Games ��� � vendors exchan e ,QP D?6 g garden Information )g m °' c ,_N , =- Different educationlab0 v m �' Studying center • Helping Du ° Dreamingo P g play ; cultures co Q`� Wireless c Nature CD " a ° drop Adaptable 3. Inviting Fun Performance ? - o W �. Performing o co ,n °; gi cb a0 00 3 c o' �anewspapers3 Street Native Exploring S N a Exhibits c y . sa III . • • GatheringInformation • , Community Input ••Sece`' `'�' •' • e / ems/ e/ 1e\/ ge/ • �a,/ \al/e ewe,\ 6 Rank activities as a Must Have, • Should Have, or May Have 1Newstand for magazines&newspapersF 56%+ TM. + * �Kiosco para revistas y periddicosI • Publishing/Writing&Journalism Center I-43%+ "" -I- 'TM i Centro para la Publicacikn/Escritura y Periodismo • IReading&Quiet Spaces F 88%+ - + '* H Espacios Tranquilos y para LeerI • Tutoring 59% 'TM TM. Tutoria Distinguishing priorities from possible considerations is critical if F — + — + — H I • Classes 47% Clases • the new library is to reflect the Glendale community. Participants Meeting Rooms F 52%+ — + - H Habitacidn para reuniones • Conversation Spaces/Lounge H 48%+ v. + "TM, H Espacio para conversaciones/comedor I • • determined the importance of each item requested by ranking I- — + TM. + -* -I I World Map F 69%+ TM" + " Mapa Mundial • their own wish list into the categories of must, should, and may. Event Spaces F 45%+ TM. + TM. H Espacios para Eventos • were proposed byparticipants at Wireless Internet 83% Internet inalambrico • The list of items on the survey P PP P - + + Exhibits/Gallery F 52%+ TM. + '®* H Exposiciones/Galeria • each of the communityoutreach events. �, • Catering Communal Kitchen F — + �+* + 38% Cocina comunal/Servicio de comidas Movable Furnishings F 41%+ 9. + a* H Muebles Movibles Fish/Animals 46% Pescados/Animales • Through each of the events, and the survey, residents of F — + + Outdoor Spaces 69% Espacios al Aire Libre • Glendale made it clear that there are numerous functions that Diverse Literature Selection F 66%- + TM. + . H Literatura Diverse I • must be included in their library. Beyond elements that describe Open&Airy F 67%+ TM. + H Abierto Dio Ventilado • Sculpture Garden/Fountain F 42%+ "* + TM. H Jardin de Esculturas/Fuente I • a library's core functionality— things that have to be included Community Garden F 43%+ 30 + — Jardin Comunitario •• to make it work—their requests included a community garden, Food Cart Vendors I TM. + TM. +38% H Carritos Vendedores de Comida I places for arts and crafts, and acafe/coffee shop. Information/Reference ServicesF 73—%+ "' + TM Informvistas aci6n/Servicios de Referencia I • Views F _* +40% + TM.— H Vistas I Media Center I-70%+ TM. + TM1 Centro de Medios I Games 57% • Because most of the items on the list made the "must have" I + TM. + TM. Juegos -I I Cafe/Coffee Shop/Restaurant 41% TM Cafe/Cafeteria/Restaurante • category, percentages can still be used to compare with "should" Outdoor Space&Events F 49%+ — + — Espacio al Aire Libre y Eventos and "may"as well as within each category. Welcoming,Social Atmosphere F 68%+ wi* + 3TM H Acogedor,Ambiente Social Y" grY H + - + H I • Vending Machines F TM. TM. TM. -I- 37% H Maquinas Expendedoras Children's Library F 94%+ _ + '* H Biblioteca para Ninos • • Children's Play Space F 74%+ _ + "* HH Espacio de Juegos para Ninos • Arts&Crafts Spaces 64% TM. . Espacios para las Artes y Manualidades Staff who speak different languages H 77%+ '°" + °f Personal que hable Diferentes Idiomas • • Computer Lab H 86%+ ' + = H O* Laboratorio de Computo Day Care H* 37% 2.. Guarderia • Public Art F 45%+ - + "" Arte Publico Media Studios b* 34% r„ Estudios de Medios Book Exchange 1-61%+ — -I- H Intercambio de Libros • DVDs&Music to check out F 81%+ "* + "'=* DVD y MOsica para tomar Prestados Stage,Auditorium,Movie Nights F +59% 7. H Escenario,Auditoria Noches de Pelicula I • Fun 77% + 7, HDiversion Mobile Library H 42%+ * + '°" Biblioteca MOvil - • Adaptable&Flexible Spaces 51% "TM "TM Espacios Adaptables y Flexibles Self-Check Out H 59%+ + H Autoservicio para Tomas Libros • Telescope F 40%+ , + n H Telescopio I _ Video Games "* v. 40% video Juegos H "* Community Patio/Front Porch F 40%+ + — Patio Comunitario/Terraza al Fuente Slide F n* + +38%i Diapositives ' Books for Adults to check out H 81%+ s + — H Libros para adultos I - • ` Books for Teens to check out 87%+ + _Libros para jovenes • 38 , • • • • • GatheringInformation • • Activity Prioritization • 7 Prioritize Must, Should, and May activities on a larger scale exercise . • '"- % lir • Ideas collected through the community outreach process were used to generate a list of hundreds 1` � • of activities and amenities that could be integrated into the new library. The next step was to w identify the community's priorities and to determine which items to drop from the list. • IP A P , • To this end, two exercises were crafted: • 1) A handout survey listed the most frequently occurring activities and ideas, and three columns to indicate priority: must have, should have, and may have. At seven ``� • neighborhood events, community members indicated their priorities for the new library. • 2) A second exercise was conducted at the second community workshop. This same list of Residents filled out and returned over 150 • activities and amenities was produced on a stack of green cards, with one activity listed library activity surveys, indicating which • per card. At the workshops, participants sorted the cards into three groups indicating their activities or library amenities were of highest importance:must have, should have, and may have. importance to them. • • • Glendale LibraryServices • ‘ ). f ~ J \ tom. / • rr • •f \\\* Must Have Should Have111"1" May Have • , ' Se Debe Tener ) SeDeberIaTener Se Puede Tener • \V°• • Publishing Center - ..... . ... -----------///.// • Centro pare la PublicaciOn `.„, • • 39 • • • • Gathering Information • • Activity Prioritization • 8 Group similar priorities into one of eight categories • • • Computers Media Center Writing &Journalism Activites • Computadoras Centro de Medios Actividades de Escritura y Periodismo • • Information/Reference Services Open &Airy Cafe/Coffee Shop/Restaurant • Informacion/Servicios de Referencia Abierto y Ventilado Cafe/Cafeteria/Restaurante • • Games Classes Publishing Center • Juegos Clases Centro para la Publicacion • Tutoring Wireless Internet • Tutoria Internet Inalambrico CoiiipUti n • g • • Next, all Must Have activities or amenities were grouped together • into categories of like kind. These activities naturally fell into the • eight categories that were narrowed down in step 4: outdoor- • connecting, computing, eating, sharing, playing, socializing, creating, and learning. • These eight categories formed the basis of further refinement of • the library program elements and have become the organizational • structure for this programming document. • • • • • 40 • • • • • What's Glendale's Answer? • 9 Consider what these words + a library could represent Community Responses • • Outdoor-Connecting+Library= Computing+Library= Eating+Library= Socializing+Library= • • Meeting areas • Don't lose the books • 5-star cafe • Multi-purpose auditorium • • Operable glass walls • Job searches and assistance with • Bakery • Stage, movie nights, history • Easy maintenance applications, resume production, • Shiver shack - snow cone(out- • Flyers with information and • • Summer Camps software side) library services,greeter • • Graffiti wall = 'positive vandalism' • Welcoming, information, "greet- • Inexpensive • Help local businesses=entrepre- • Playground with swings,slide er", bilingual, know what product • No vending carts neur spirit • • Dinosaur models you are selling,guide people= • Coffee shop near newsstand - • Naming rights • • Tree house or'tree house feel' customer service leased space,can access from in • Barnes and Noble is too loud and • Safety for children • Internet,gaming>groups and outside,can keep their own in your face' the library is an at • • Garden with nice grass • Video games=wii, big screen hours and provide security traction in itself • Informal seating with shade;fluid, • 100%computing,the whole • Does not need to be a café • Does not need to be a café • organic, library should be digital,changing After school snacks • Internet service - not always • • Hardscaped plaza,with garbage technology available at home cans • Access to information (research & • Place to work on group projects • • Tiny farm and ant hill accidental) • Magazines and books for kids - • • Labeling native plants=educa- • Quiet and noisy areas but main- cartoons,graphic novels tional tain visual connection • My Space,twitter,facebook, • • Xeriscape,desert plants • Open - throughout library skype • • Cultural themes in garden: • User guide,suggestions, privacy, • Video games - kids will never Beyond nationality,celebrate age appropriate leave • cultures within ethnic groups • Recording studio • • Like Red Butte Garden • Visual Basic classes and software • Amphitheater computer programming • • Shade -trees, pergolas,canopies • Glass room - see nature from the • library= learning • • Plants inside the library • Water canals for relaxation • • A greenhouse • • • • • • 41 • • • • What's Glendale's Answer? • 9 Consider what these words + a library could represent (cont.) Community Responses • • Playing+library= Learning+Library= Sharing+ library= Creating+Library= • • Curriculum based collections/ • Books and media - popular • Culture • Hands-on activity(like a children's • programs - Utah history and 4th books for different age groups, • Exhibits - historical,science museum) • grade, multiple languages Twilight series • Studies - ethnic,gender,Chicano, • A place to create content and post • Events and programs • Children's books in different others information - tools and software • • Library pet - some liability, let us languages • 23 different dialects • Ability to record music and film feed them • A big reading area • Translation software - bable fish • • Love sack - bean bag, individual • Leadership workshops • • Interactive things • How-to classes - maintenance, • Coffee by place for kids,train jobs,vocational • table • Traditions,cuisine • • Day care - older siblings watching younger,create jobs • What's Glendale's Answer? • wro,�,Mwmow� a�a, • Outdoor-Connecting+ Library = • Al awe fibre+Biblioteca= • Computing + Library = • Informatica+Biblioteca= Eating + Library = • Comida+Biblioteca= • Socializing + Library = • Socialization+Biblioteca= Playing + Library = • Jugando+Biblioteca= • Leaming+ Library = • Aprendizaje+Biblioteca= Sharing + Library = • Compartiendo+Biblioteca= • iir Creating + Library • Creacion+Biblioteca= • • '"2 • • Si • ( 0 • • • Process LeadingUp Summary '-.: - - --- - . . 'All • We now know.... • from Glendale's demographics: from Glendale's urban form: • • Glendale is a diverse neighborhood and the library needs to reflect this • Many Glendale residents do not drive,so the library should be a walkable • diversity. destination and capitalize on transit routes. • • Many different languages are spoken and collections should reflect them. • There are four existing neighborhood activity centers,each with a different • • Glendale has more children under 18 than any other neighborhood of Salt character.The library should be sited to strengthen these centers and Lake City,and the library should be geared toward kids. stimulate reinvestment in the neighborhood. • • Many parents work long hours and the library should have extended hours • The Jordan River is an important feature in the neighborhood and is tied • to ensure children have a place to study or socialize. closely both with the settlement of the Salt Lake Valley and the migration • The library can help uplift the community and promote literacy and of wildlife.• education to increase educational attainment. • The library should highlight the Jordan River,while protecting its sensitive • ecosystem and minimizing loss of open space. • from library usage statistics: • The activity of the neighborhoods is dispersed;therefore,there is no single focal point for the Glendale neighborhood and it lacks a true civic, • • The Glendale Library is likely to circulate between 250,000 and 350,000 commercial,or community center.The library can be the foundation for a • items annually. new center and landmark for the neighborhood. • Programs, attendance,and the number of library visits to the new • The large population of children means that supply of bicycle parking • Glendale library are expected to be very high. space at the library should be generous • • Good urban planning and city design, specifically in pedestrian oriented from a community facility inventory: neighborhoods,suggests that a public entrance from the street is critical. •• • There are a number of other community facilities within the neighborhood, • and the library should complement rather than compete with them. • • There is a need for additional large community gathering spaces,as well as spaces for activities such as publishing and production, hands-on • activities,and media viewing. • • It is recommended that the library and other community facilities coordinate calendars and community spaces to maximize the services and • facilities in the community. • _ the Glendale community. • • 43 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • i m o 00 r+ (r) (1) (1) (D CID -N o C 0 CDo cr c�Wz � � • • • • e e e e e O O e O e e • • . • • • e0 0 0 0 O • • Considerations for the Future • • • • A quick glimpse at libraries over the last few decades shows a pattern of radical bookstores has opened new possibilities to the public that have been well change. Libraries are no longer solely a place for whispering, nor are they a received. Consequently libraries are beginning to include more activities such • repository just for books. However,they continue to maintain a place of great as eating, listening, viewing,and playing because the activities themselves have • significance within a community. In many ways,they are the community. Without more longevity than the collections. acknowledging what libraries are becoming,opportunities may be lost to design • appropriately for the future. Focusing on the activities we enjoy in libraries rather than collections provides a • solid basis for design.This change in focus provides continuity to the trends of • Collections of Activities the information age that appear to be changing regularly.While the methods are different,the needs associated with the activities haven't changed much, at least • Perhaps the biggest indicator of what libraries are becoming is the change in as long as people like to read,discover,and share. • how they serve the community.Traditionally, libraries have housed a collection of books where individuals could read and study.The advent of the information • age has added other types of media to these collections of books and reference Collections of Programs and Services • materials. Not long after music records and tape cassettes became available for check-out in libraries,they were replaced with VHS cassettes and CDs. The information age has not only revolutionized how we access information, • These have since been supplemented with DVDs, and even handheld electronic but where. While cafés and coffee shops have been an attractive amenity that • devices where content is either downloaded and stored,or is streaming live from have recently appeared in many bookstores,they have not been viable enough • another server.As technology races forward,these collections are becoming to lure many book-lovers and music-shoppers away from their homes to make obsolete in shorter and shorter periods of time after their introduction. Defining personal purchases. Internet search engines such as Google,or comprehensive • libraries only by the collections they hold,suggests that our libraries will never be databases like Amazon,are regularly used by librarians because they are the • the same again, not if they are constantly changing. most effective tools available.These tools are fast,effective, and user-friendly —so much so that many library patrons use these tools without having to go • Another way of describing what libraries are becoming is to analyze what the to a library at all.Thinking of libraries as a primary source of information in the • library of today has in common with the library of the past.Appearances may information age is fatal, at least to the existence of libraries. Instead, by asking • change, but the behavior associated with libraries remains more constant.The the questions,"What types of activities are better provided at a library than activities are enabled by collections more than they are a response to them. anywhere else?"and,"What programs and services can libraries offer that • Regardless of the types of media or collections that are housed in a library, enable these activities?",we might discover some clues as to where libraries are • people like to learn.Whether the source is a book, a magazine,or a blog is less heading. important.The activity of learning is an integral part of libraries. Other activities • such as browsing, reading,and leisurely-sitting are also desirable activities that Many sources of information available to internet searches are non-authoritative. • people prefer to do at libraries. When libraries are designed to accommodate Blogs,wikis,and other posts are becoming increasingly popular as ways to share larger groups of people, sharing, meeting,and collaborating become more information.When these can be viewed anywhere with a handheld electronic • significant.Changes in the retail sector incorporating food and music in device, such as a phone,a library becomes less important to sharing information. • • 47 • • • • • Considerations for the Future • • • -�"""� --- ' Z One exception are those who do not have a personal handheld device,or a • �• ..►N.' - _ • -..- personal computer of any kind.Yet, if libraries can remain an access point for { __ ?� the public to find information,why not consider libraries as a place where content • _ can also be created bythe public.With a small shift in focus, libraries can be a • ili --- - _, • � , - place of two-way sharing-a place where information can be received,and a 11--- :i•. place where non-authoritative information content can be generated and posted • ,- on sites such as YouTube, blogs,and social networks. • ,� r:y� - �, - - • Ideal Environments • It "For what are we designing this library?"is a critical question to answer if the • Glendale Library is to remain viable in spite of media changes. Designing for • specific collections of media may be comparable to fashion and changing • trends in apparel. Focusing on the ideal environments for activities and human needs, rather than collections, may add longevity to libraries that house a rapidly • changing tenant.The focus becomes the library patron,and not the things that • are available at the library.Acknowledging this shift makes it easier to design for • the right user-the patron, not the collection. Instead of creating the optimum way to display books,the emphasis can be placed on the ideal environment • for patron browsing-finding a way to make the browsing experience more • enjoyable, and something that is harder to do anywhere else other than a library. • ... ir • ,.., . ... .,.. iii,,,\, 1 • tiI , ,.. ., , ,....... , „ _. . \ ..„, . , . ii, ty„,„1 u - - , • .- ,,, lw dir a • • 48 • • • • • Traditional vs. New Spaces • • • Imagine the traditional library filled floor to ceiling with books. Every once in a while the shelves • open up to reveal orderly tables and chairs for quiet study and reading. Staff are available behind the circulation desk to help find a book or answer any questions.A colorful rug with floor pillows • and simple toys helps to distinguish the children's area from the rest of the library. Children sit • fd AI j • reading their books and are allowed to play quietly. • � +, 0 0 • Imagine the modern library with its small stacks scattered through large open spaces. Patrons i 0if 0iii 0 1• surf the internet,download audiobooks, and search the libraries databases on the library's 1I Mdoe �O'computers or their own laptops using the library's wireless connection. Kiosks act as a new • It • form of circulation,allowing for patrons to check out movies or to quickly download audio books - 4, • onto a flash drive. Seating is readily available throughout the library not just for reading but for ��.. conversation and eating as well.Areas blend together as the patron moves through the spaces. _ y • Staff spaces are integrated into the public space for easy access.Teen's find refuge in a space I �,'`" .wrr i'• L. • designed just for them.The children's area is a new world ready to explore and play in with its - -Y • creative furniture and tables full of crafty activities.The open architecture facilitates the free flow of ' 'Ip'�,,if ilk thoughts and the whole library is a vibrant buzz of interaction. 1. I, 1itf 1. V t • ,r: • These two ideas of what a library is may seem completely different but they do have some very .-_-arr. • important qualities in common.The need and desire for information and distraction. In a tradtional .. , ti\/ Ilk ; .. library these needs and desires were primarily fulfilled with a huge collection of books. In our \ j� --* �. • modern society, information and distraction comes in a variety of electronic packaging.Techno- ' ! 'S` - • savvy patrons prefer the ease and flexibiltiy of technology.The traditional library typology has r pi 1 y ;.. .__._ found itself quickly evolving along with technology to keep up with patron needs.That rapidly E1 II u • changing technology requires a library that is open and flexible. Spaces should be able to easily } • adapt to rapidly changing needs. , I F -.7 .. ,,, • Technology is not the only focus of the modern library. Creating spaces that are comfortable and — l : a • enjoyable are just as important to patrons and will encourage them to stay longer.A living room i 1 type of atmosphere has been found to be very inviting. Furniture can be anything from bean bag • chairs to lounge chairs. Designated eating zones will also allow patrons to feel welcome. • Perhaps the most important concept of the modern library is community and librarian participation <: throughout the entire design process.They are the ones who will be using the space and their • ideas can be very valuable in capturing the vision of the local community. • 49 • • ell • • Traditional vs. New Spaces •• The Evolving Library • Changing Technology . , • • Evolving libraries today and in the future will increasingly include more digital media. Books ..;•;;. ;�+ • will still exist and play a valuable role in libraries but they will not be the sole source of — _�-� „,,, information and entertainment that they once were. Books will be complemented by digitalelm — ``"�? media and the two together will provide a richer experience for library patrons.TechnologyIt; -— that exists todayand that could be included in a librarysettingare a books, CDs DVDs, • internet,video games, and other interactive media.There are also a variety of digital - �`171° • gadgets to house digital media from Kindles to iPods to interactive kiosks like redbox. • it 1,1 1 La. �.'. ,r s • Flexibility r • Technology changes so rapidly that it is important to plan ahead and design spaces that can • - easily accommodate it. Large open spaces are easily adaptable.An evolving library must '�"� '" • be reconfigurable and flexible.A meeting room provides privacy to those using it but it could • also open up with ease to adjoining spaces to accommodate larger events. Space for more movable furniture will be required as more and more people acquire digital devices. During • warm seasons the library could open up to the outdoors to increase its square footage. • There are many possibilities for flexible space configurations,even in small structures. 1___Irl I - •Environmental Im act .� --y There are a variety of technologies and techniques that can be included to reduce a new ri---ri i� I_ I` �_ • library's environmental impact. Passive heating and cooling, daylighting, and material � - • selection can reduce the new building's environmental footprint. Other technological n,; ' " ° 'I .p- ' ,. • strategies include a variety of options for energy production, water reuse, and waste i I MB • management. Not only should these technologies be included as part of the building's 0_ -, ,r ,' operation but it can also be incorporated into a learning exhibit in the library. People , 1. • could learn how the library generates its own power or captures rainwater to water the • landscaping. Patrons could take this knowledge and try to apply it to their own properties. = • Maximum flexibility is essential to the future and sustainability of the evolving library. • Renovations to accommodate unanticipated technology are not only costly but demolition • and construction waste fill up landfills.The library can be an example of adaptive reuse for many generations with careful planning and design. • • 50 • • • • • • • • • Considerations for the Future Summary . ..,._ , .„ • We now know.... , . • . . . , . • from current trends in libraries: from comparing traditional vs new spaces: • • The way we perceive libraries is evolving along with the information age. • Libraries will constantly be evolving to stay current with changing • • Libraries continue to provide a focal point for the community as a place of technology • gathering and sharing. • Patrons come for information and enjoyment. • • Collections within libraries are changing and spaces must plan for • The building needs to create an inviting atmosphere similar to a"living adaptation. room"type of feel. • • One commonality between the library of today and the library of the past • Designated eating zones will contribute to a welcoming environment. • are the types of activities that take place there. Human behavior remains • Involving library staff and the community throughout the entire design a constant. process will ensure the greatest satisfaction with the new building. • • Incorporating compatible activities that relate to patrons'favorite activities • Technology evolves quickly.The building must be flexible in order to easily • at the library can strengthen the viability of libraries for the future. accommodate future technologies. • • Designing for activities rather than collections may provide more longevity • Spaces that flow and/or open up to adjoining spaces will provide flexibility. to the spaces that define our libraries. Careful planning along with future considerations is essential. • • Providing programming and services at the library that are widely available • Sustainable technologies will reduce energy use and serve as a model for • from other sources does not strengthen the need for libraries. Providing efficient building design. experiences that are hard to recreate otherwise will redefine the way we • think about resources.This has more to do with volume of information,a • place for people to gather,and services that are unique. • • Considering the ideal environment for individual activities will help to provide these activities. • • • • • • • • . .-_ how to design a libraryfor the future•• 51 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • C-) CD r o -IWalkability (1) (I) 5 o e3R- ap< 5.20 CD O CD 00 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 40004 • • • • • 1, 1 111) (4) n • •• Th e Site r :j5ry : _� �, �Y,, : . ,�. . :� • The Glendale Library programming process explored t , �r+ • • twelve different sites for the new library. The sites are °-. "' '` •:. t mt.j , .• • •' 8 �, identified by letters A through L. iw 1, ;B ` B .••••,..a,( . " -. ' -;, , • • Sites A through G were presented to the Glendale • ' -- 7 •-•. ��', Si �o ' ' ' ;� community for input. Sites K and L were added later in I _ '1.•• . ''• ` s'. ° ''' 1 _ -+ • the process to respond to challenges discovered with 1 t :' ,e.. �.� -� • :' ' )r 0.( 74-7, `' ; a• • other sites and to explore new opportunities and potential I • ..V.�.: • L • - , • • synergies. ^ _Jo.,. © _ '��; • The site analysis process included the development of '- • • 3 + • several possible layouts for specific sites to determine site =• ` El [a potential and limitations and to explore parking capacity. r ., �,� • At this time, a final site has not been selected. Several • . .4 opportunities exist for the location of the library throughout i Q =3j _ ". :"=%tr ), ` • the community.There are many factors that are critical to • • x .. • residents that must be carefully considered before the site • _ • •t '" ``'- '''- • is finalized such as maintaining open space,easy access, t, x>; f �; - :� IT and convenient location. r { , -.y • • ,+ + �" 41 ill Potential Site Where Do You Want Your Library? • `'(� 'A G LJonde fe yG,t.,, pone,la nueva bib,41 '4v ) i .. ' ¢ .1\ / SITE A SITE B 917E C 817E D SITE E SITE F SITED SITE H SITE I SITE J um or s g. 10 iiiNA Ge 0-I': �H 'I' • a Y_ SALT LAKE CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEM .� • 55 • • • • • Site Selection Process • • Site Comparison Table • Program Community Input on CRSA • Slte Pros Cons Zoning&Acerage Transportation Recommendations Library Location Recommendations • A • Easy access from • No sewer system CC(Commercial Corridor) On bus route Sufficient space 1.2%recommended Disregard Redwood • Busy roadway 5.3 acres • • Large site • Less central location Comments: • • Infrastructure nearby • Low on community • Close to home • On bus transit line preference for location • • Near rail corridor and potential trail/transit • B • Easy access from • Busy roadway CC(Commerical Corridor) On bus route Sufficient space 1.2%recommended Disregard • Redwood • Less central location 3.8 acres • Large site • Low on community Comments: • • Infrastructure nearby preference for location • On a busy street • • On bus transit line • Near rail corridor and • potential trail/transit Cl • Close to housing • Existing use and struc- CB(Community Business) On bus route Limited size 18.5%recommended Further consideration • • Close to school tures 1.5 acres • • Safe area • Not visible Comments: • Neighborhood anchor • Displace businesses • Near 4 schools • • Central location • C2 • Close to housing • Existing use and struc- CB(Community Business) Near bus route Limited size Wasn't an option when Further consideration • Close to school tures 3 acres community surveys • • Safe area • Less visible taken • • Neighborhood anchor • Super Mercado only • Store may move viable commerce • • Displace businesses D • Open to Jordan River • May require lot con- R-1/7,000(Single-family Near bus route Limited size 1.2%recommended Further consideration • • Access to trail solidation and property Residential) • • River great amenity purchase 1.4 acres Comments: • • Good visibility • Less visible • (no reasons • Great visual impact on • Not on transit line given) • community • Close to community • facilities • Close to housing • • Central location • • Central to all schools • ., • • • • • Site Selection Process • • Site Comparison Table (cont.) • Program CRSA • Slte Pros Cons Zoning&Average Transportation Recommendations Community Input Recommendations E • Library owned property • Small lot CN(Neighborhood Corn- On bus route Limited size unless lots 26.7%recommended Further consideration • • Good visibility • Require purchase of ad- mercial) consolidated • • Close to housing ditional property 0.6 acres Comments: • Close to school • Near 4 schools • • Lift station&sewer • • New water line • Central location Easy access• • Telephone/fiber optics under sidewalk • • Possible lot consolidation • Unites north and south • Glendale • • Close to all neighbor- hood schools • F • Vacant lot • Less visible R-1/7,000(Single-family On bus route Limited size 12.4%recommended Further consideration • • Lot available • Not a noticeable visual Residential) • Close to school impact on the commu- 1.1 acres Comments: • • Close to housing nity • Near 4 schools • Unites north and south • Street parking • Improve area by • Glendale • Would need to purchase removing aban- • • Close to all neighbor property from doned housing hood schools • Easement through prop Easy access • erty-would need to be • addressed in design • G • Large space • Recent improvements OS(Open Space) On bus route Sufficient space 32.3%recommended Disregard -would require paying 20 acres • back the federal govern- Comments: • ment • Large open area • Room for parking • • Existing commu- • nity destination H • Next to Sorenson& • Less visible PL(Public Lands) On bus route Limited size 5.3%recommended Disregard • Unity Centers • Not a noticeable visual 1.5 acres • City owned property impact on the commu- Comments: • • Good size nity • Good bus route • • Community garden • Too far from neighbor- • Near school hood • Near Sorenson • Restrictions exist Center • -- • • • • • Site Selection Process • • Site Comparison Table(cont.) • Program CRSA • Slte Pros Cons Zoning&Acerage Transportation Recommendations Community Input Recomn • I • Not visible R-1/7,000(Single Family On bus route Sufficient space 0%recommended Disregard • Too close to DABC Residential) • 2.7 acres Comments: • (no reasons given) J RMF-35(Moderate Denisty On bus route Too small 1.2%recommended Disregard • Multifamily Residential) • 0.6 acres Comments: (no reasons given) • K • Close to community • High infrastructure costs OS(Open Space) Near bus route- Sufficient space New option since corn- Further consideration • • Along Jordan River • No infrastructure 4.52 acres long walk munity surveys taken • Jordan River Park- • Loss of open space • way provides Class I • Less visible pedestrian access • Would increase traffic in • • Near other community quiet neighborhood amenities(i.e.park) • Less central location • • Lots of space and • Not on transit line • flexibility in site layout/ design • • Ample space for • parking • City-owned property • L • Along old railroad • Loss of open space R-1-5000 Near bus route- Sufficient space plus ad- New option since corn- Further consideration • corridor,with potential • Less visible short walk ditional available space munity surveys taken for future trail and/or • Would increase traffic in north of the railroad • transit line quiet neighborhood Potential street tracks • Along Jordan River • Not currently on transit car parkway • • Jordan River Park- line,but short walk • way provides Class I • Small parcel with limited pedestrian access space for parking • • Near other community • Street car proposal • amenities(i.e.peace • Peace Garden expan- gardens) sion • • City-owned property? • Could include Bell Tower • S. • • • • • . • Site Selection Process • • • Salt Lake City Zoning Glendale Library • Parking Requirements Spatial Requirement Analysis Library #Parking Stalls 12,000 SF Library 20,000 SF Library • Size(SF) Min Stalls 60 Stalls Min Stalls 60 Stalls • zoning 1 per 1,000 SF Building Footprint 12,000 12,000 20,000 20,000 • 12,000 12 Parking 5,760 28,800 9,600 28,800 20,000 20 Sidewalk/Plaza 2,000 10,000 3,000 10,000 • Landscape 7,750 38,800 12,600 38,800 • Total Area 27,520 89,600 45,200 97,600 . . • Branch Library Site Parking Capacity Analysis • Parking Summary Site Area Site Area 12,000 SF Library 20,000 SF Library • Library #Parking Stalls Site Acreage Square Feet Min Stalls 60 Stalls Min Stalls 60 Stalls • Anderson 32 A 5.3 230,432 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Chapman street only B 3.8 164,221 ✓ ✓ V ✓ Day Riverside 58 C 1.5 64,033 ✓ ✓ • Sprague shared D 1.4 61,420 ✓ ✓ • Sweet 24 E 0.6 25,265 • E+ 1.1 48,786 ✓ ✓ • (with consolidated parcels) • F 1.1 48,352 ✓ ✓ • G 20 871,200 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ • H 1.5 66,646 ✓ ✓ I 2.7 119,354 ✓ ✓ • J 0.6 27,442 • K 4.5 196,891 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ • L 3.4 147,651 ✓ ✓ ✓ • . • • • 0 • • The Site Summary • We now know , ,,-- • . ,. , • from community input: • There is more flexibility with larger sites and space for additional programming, but are less conveniently located for the community. • • Glendale residents discussed their preferred location for the new library, • Smaller sites may require a two story building,either above or below • and showed strong strongest interest in site G,located along 1700 south ground,to maximize parking and outdoor spaces.A two-story building will and approximately 1100 West. Reasons given were available space and require careful planning to contain operational costs. • proximity to homes, and and other community destinations. • Smaller sites have less flexibility for layout and limit expansion and • • Site E came in as the second favorite possible location. Resident's additional programming. • preference for this site included its central location, proximity to schools, • Sites within neighborhoods would put additional traffic on quiet and easy access. neighborhood roads. • • We know from this exercise that Glendale residents prefer a library • One way circulation can maximize parking and traffic flow, but requires a • location in a walkable distance from their home,and near existing more connected or larger site. community destinations(schools, parks,Jordan River). • Sites along major roadways may be dangerous for pedestrians crossing • • Open space is an important value for the community. the street. • • Access to major roadways may be controlled and limit locations for curb • from site analysis: cuts and driveways. • • Several sites were eliminated from further consideration because of:low interest from the community,feedback from the Glendale Community from site parking capacity analysis: • Council,feedback from the Glendale Library Steering Committee, • Salt Lake City zoning requires one parking stall per 1,000 SF of library • feedback from Salt Lake City's Planning Department,and a variety of constraints or drawbacks identified by the consultant team(see site map space. • on page 35). • Most sites could accommodate the minimum number of parking stalls for a • • Sites D, E, F, K,and L were retained for further consideration. 20,000 SF library. Sites A, B, E, F, H, I,and J are located along busy roadways and a library • The Day-Riverside library provides parking for approximately 60 cars, and • • would have a more urban feel and setting. these parking spaces are often full at peak visitation times. • • Sites C and D are located in primarily residential areas and a library would • Only sites A, B, G, K,and L can accommodate parking similar to the Day- have a more neighborhood feel and character. Riverside library. •• • Sites G, K, and L are all located in open space areas along the Jordan A more centralized and walkable location,along with the availability of • River, and the library would have a more park-like setting and character. transit,can reduce parking needs. • • On-street parking could provide additional parking at most sites. • thepros and cons of each site• • 61 • • • 4 * * * * 4 •410 #110,ti • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 3 ark nm- 0 CD Cn CD r+ Cn Q ( = C. 5• CD • • • What to Include • • • • This program may differ from other architectural programs because there is a suggests words or possible meanings that define an overall concept or gist of • stronger emphasis on activities rather than spaces.The intent of this document what has been requested. is to be less prescriptive in a specific outcome, and more descriptive in what the • community of Glendale hopes for,which is a creative solution to their needs. • It will be left up to the design team to find solutions that incorporate as many More of Must, Should, and May • requests as possible from the information gathering phase. With each activity summary is a list of specific considerations that evolved from • the information gathering process with the community.These items are grouped • Capturing the Gist of What is Important as things that must be included, as well as things that should or may be included depending on the creativity of the design team to accommodate the wishes of • In addition to traditional space summaries,this program focuses on activity the community.This way,the intent of the community is not abandoned with a • summaries for eight activities the community of Glendale identified as their premature solution that meets some needs but not all. priorities. Each of these activities is broader than a single action and often• overlaps with each other.The purpose of focusing these activities individually Following these activity summaries are typical space summaries that provide a • is to isolate the needs and interests that are associated with them in order to more specific definition of what must be included in the library. • find the ideal space for those activities. Rather than solely looking at important adjacencies of spaces, it will be important to consider adjacencies of activities. Space Diagram Legend • Which activities are compatible, and which will need to be separated?Which • sub-activities, or smaller activities within a larger grouping, have similar F, a�. ,i characteristics?The eight activities identified are: '' ) u • ) =Views °^ado • • Outdoor-connecting • Computing =Spaces • • Creating • • Eating • • Socializing =Organizing Element • Sharing • • Learning • • Playing I • The following pages have activity diagrams that should first be considered =Strongly Consider Space&Connection • separately as though the library were being designed around that activity alone, . ism. = Recommended Connection and then to see how one diagram overlaps and enhances another. Each page • ---- = Necessary/Ideal Connection • • • 0 (-) • • Outdot d 0 0 s Qr— •Connect landscaping relaxing garden atmosphere surroundings • scenery PLANTS sunlight fresh-air transition expressive gathering • I climate learningBEAUTY explore views fun color shade p • Ideal environment for activities • • This area will be focused on people of all ages. A'''' • Focus on outdoor and indoor areas for gathering, playing, and \\ / • 1 relaxing. Community An •Garden • Provide transitions between indoor and outdoor spaces, Outdoor staff Views • blending the line between the two. % Area . - _ • Specific activities&components 7 • Entry Plaza/ Staff Adult • Learning gardens Patio i • Indoor&outdoor gathering spaces I QUA �� 2 • • Playground \ % — ( View `D • • Reading/computer areas Eati Meeting /��� • • Eating •-\ fl/ Room Children . l/ • Sculptures/fountains o • • Green roof ' Pariang Eating + / / • • Parking .►� ��, Outdoor Extension • Extension of O with Playground Meeting Room, / •• Plaza,a outdoor ViewsPerforming •/ `L.., , _v • - lam • • -- ---- • • • 1 0 # i 0 • • • • things that things that things that • MUST SHOULD MAY • be included be included be included • • • Garden that teaches patrons about plants and • Designated outdoor performance space. • Amphitheater for a variety of performances and • what can grow in this climate. • Small interactive fountain that people can play in. functions. • • Patio space for gatherings and eating.Connect • Playground off the children's library. • Graffiti wall. • to indoor gathering and eating spaces. May also • Green roof garden that is accessible. • Front porch that has furniture and a community feel. serve as a performance space. • Community garden that teaches patrons how to • Small water canal to play and cool off in. • • Outdoor seating with furniture that is durable and grow their own garden. • Small greenhouse that grows food or exotic plants. • easy to maintain.They need to be located in both • Operable glass walls that bring the outside into • Outdoor gazebo for reading and interaction. sunny and shady areas. the library and vice versa. • Skateboarding area. • • Storage space for furniture that is accessible • Permeable parking lot surface that allows water • Parking lot for 70 to 80 cars. • from outside to accommodate large and small through. gatherings. • Bell tower. • • Bike racks that are easy to get to and maintain. • • Water catchment system that can supplement the • sprinkler system.Also consider other grey water options. • • Planting in the gardens/open space that • transitions into the library as well. • Provide a variety of shading from trees to a • pergola/trellis. • • As much natural lighting as possible into the building with an open and airy feeling. • • Parking lot for approximately 20 cars. \\'I, • • Ability to close the Library while the eating and / �� • meeting spaces can remain open for community (- ��` use. /.'''N- • • • • • 67 • • • Ili • • • ■ • ideas communication technology entertainment knowledge [11 n SKILLS information data connection expression possibilities learning exploring FUN ex lorin resources research network access • • Ideal environment for activities This area will be focused on people of all levels of technical II abilities. • AN Rooms for Viewing, Server Creating,and Editing-May • Focus on areas that support a variety of technologies and Automated Room Duplicate as Small Study media. Check-in Rooms • pPhh'P'0(hh1JterProvide a place where people can access computers, Internet,and audio/visual technologies. app • • Media and program applications should be simple,flexible, Cow on '� • and support activities and learning. ( - a'�0°r it PP 9 - Seating 1 • Look for opportunities to introduce computing in other • appropriate places throughout the library. Large Group \ Public Viewing ' Viewing/Gaming May Double as eQ� ' .- Computers and technology is a large focus for this new library Eating Area i ^� • and will have a great impact on space,for the present and in Views • the future. - -% �D\ .Crr=�� • • Specific activities&components , - I Group Use tr `v r • / , I (3-5) / • Language learning programs cafe "7 ,' • • Classes to teach basic computer skills Tables , • Video game hang out area • • Flexible and easily adaptable spaces - _ _ - - • • Computer gaming • Technology assistance • • Wireless connection • • AN area • • • • • e 0 0 • • • things that things that things that • • MUST SHOULD MAY • be included be included be included • • • Computer lab as well as computers spread • Learning lab for teaching a variety of technical • Glass-sided room(s)dedicated to video games that • throughout the library. Incorporate a variety of classes. can hold a small group of people. • computer programs that people can learn and • Audio-visual rooms for small group viewing and • Rooms for group computing and gaming. • use.The space needs to be flexible and easily listening. • GPS to triangulate materials between check-in and adaptable as technology rapidly changes. • Video and educational game space with a large shelving. • • Functional furnishings that are comfortable for screen. • Large, interactive touch screen world map. • laptop/e-book/audio-visual use and viewing. Permanent interactive displays that enable • Automated check in that could also have a glass • Provide abundant outlets. Provide secure purposeful play and learning. wall for people to watch it at work. • wireless internet. • Secondary areas for video and television • • Mobile device and laptop check-in/out and programming. storage space for recharging. • Technology station where patrons can check out a • • Production studio for audio and video recording flash drive for sharing and printing. • and editing,family history and story telling. • Include displays aimed at younger patrons at main • • Adequate server capability to support electronic check out and reference kiosks collections. Electronic collections could be • accessed from home. • • Space for checking out DVDs similar to the Redbox model. • • Large LED screen displaying events, classes, • and announcements • Self check-out equipment throughout the • building. • • Automated check-in. • • Media drive-through returns. Li • . � • 7 • • • 69 • 0 • S • • • rCe at i n • content opportunity expression media INVENT generate communication ideas compose produce fashion IMAGINE explore learn intention • • Ideal environment for activities • This area will be focused on those interested in exploring and III expressing their creative side. Controllable Views May n� • be Desirable:Inspiring, Focus on active and quiet areas for all ages. not just isolated Q� X � • Provide a place where people can find inspiration and express / • their creative energy. •0 • u • Look for opportunities to incorporate patron creations and • experiences throughout the library. Exhibiting • \� Display44 • Specific activities&components Could Double asb�y 01117;fro Throughou • t Wall `.1 • • Craft/art room • Music r \ • • Creative writing >_ Pei in • • Opportunities for learning •\ ( ■ Making • Community exhibits Q .`° �, y Non-Authoritative ta erCn�t- • Variety of classes Views ' May Duplicate as Small • • Graffiti wall �� / �- ► ay Double Craft Room Study Rooms for creative • j� ), ludy as Meeting can Double Writing«S Extension of �' Room as Study Time • ` Meeting Roan ,' Room • -4,-, Backdrop ' _ _ _ - - • Connection to Small Outdoor • Amphitheater (1111/ 0 • • things that things that things that • • MUST SHOULD MAY • be included be included be included • • • • Arts&crafts space with plenty of storage. • Separate arts&crafts space for children. • Small stage and auditorium. Exhibit spaces throughout the library for patron • Flexible space that is dedicated to the • Small amphitheater for outdoor performances and • creations. demonstration of specific creative arts.Topics get-togethers. • • Classroom spaces. could rotate weekly or monthly.The idea is to • Writing center with publishing resources. • Performance space with flexible seating. give people the opportunity to walk in anytime • • Small room for a recording studio for the and try something new. • production of both audio and video. • Space with a drawing wall(chalkboard paint). • • Quiet writing space. • Music room or space with a piano. Recording/production studio that has • opportunities for expansion as technology • evolves. • • • • • • • • • \Cf:/ • • f) y (r • • 71 • • ID • • • • •Eat ■ I n g enjoyment gathering comfort cooking satisfaction FOOD cultures connections • tasting smelling experience sample SHARE potluck appreciate learn indulge • • Ideal environment for activities Could Double as • Demonstration This area will be focused on food sales and demonstrations. n • T / • Focus on active areas for all ages. — _ . — ` p//�j/ • i Provide a place where people can purchase,eat,and prepare ,' paOng and Kids N Plaza / • food. 1 ' Q Views / •' _ _ . • Food sales spaces should be accessible before and after . —_ ` i• Plaza Entry or • library hours. ( Secondary Entry • Look for opportunities to allow food throughout the library 1 • without it causing any damage to materials, equipment, and2 Prep meting Room F0°d vending furnishings. • ♦ • ♦ outdox • Specific activities&components Eating and Sung l Eating • • Cooking classes and demonstrations • • Café, coffee shop • • Interior and exterior eating spaces • Community gatherings and potlucks , — • • Snacks • o Q� — • Views ' `. ; Computing l% • Outdoor 1 Eating / • • 72 • • • ell I 4 • • • • • things that things that things that • MUST SHOULD MAY • be included be included be included • • • Demonstration/catering kitchen that can open • Areas for vending machines. • Areas for food cart vendors. • up both into the library and outside in order to • Additional tenant space for various eateries. • Edible garden that can be used in conjunction with • accommodate various group functions.Access • Provide visual cues for appropriate places to eat cooking classes. • door from outside as well. Containing smells will in the library. • Hang out space for kids after school where they be important. can get healthy snacks at a reasonable price. • • Tenant space for a café or coffee shop that are • accessible before and after the library closes. Vendor spaces should not be cost prohibitive. • • Designated eating area with seating and tables. • Bookstore model. • Functional movable furniture that is easy to maintain and keep clean. • • Outdoor spaces with tables and chairs for eating. • Needs to be easy to maintain and keep clean. • Storage space for furniture that can be used • during various functions. • • Clearly designated eating spaces. • • • • 1 • ••• 9...,, ,,s, ‘ • • 73 • • • / • • • S I ■ I • meeting community exchange influential together mingle NEIGHBORS • I I I identity co-operation listen friends associate share accepting entertain UNITY culture inclusive assemble understanding • • Ideal environment for activities • These areas will support both the planned and spontaneous • interactions of all ages. _ • Focus on active and semi-active areas for people of all ages. / _ , • • Spaces should accommodate casual interactions to large Sharing ; , •` • gatherings. /• r )i _ E / • Socializing is a big part of what makes a community. Find - - - 4 \ i • Informal i opportunities to create moments for interaction throughout the GatheriigIReception t Seating Areas \ • , library. Space-Could Double , - _ - - • as Meeting Room •\ + • Small Gathering ,' -- _ I ,1 tp Specific activities&components 7 \ - • • Community bulletin board Entry . • Performance spaces Patio/Plaza small • Flexible, movable furnishings \ i Garnering • • Gathering spaces _ _ • Eating areas • • Graffiti wall Graffiti WallWFA • • Active library with quiet spaces Small Meeting Rooms_ • • Staff who speak different languages 0 4 Couki Double as AN • Views Rooms W • \ • • • • • • 0 0 i • • • things that things that things that • MUST SHOULD MAY • • be included be included be included • • • Indoor/outdoor lobby space for gathering at • Exhibits or galleries for the community to share • Stage and auditorium. • community events their art and/or culture. • Amphitheater for outdoor performances and get • • Event or performance spaces that accommodate • Large multipurpose room that can be used for togethers. • a large audience. dances,concerts, and movies. • Flexible areas where people can meet without • Community patio or front porch with seating and • Quiet space with a fireplace. needing to schedule the space. • shade for people to meet and socialize. • Area that creates a fun and pleasant environment • Areas for specific age groups. Senior,Adult,Teen, • • Entry,which could incorporate the front porch to meet and mingle. Children. idea,that is covered and easily accessible from • Event or performance spaces that accommodate Include rotating displays that share the culture of • the parking lot and street. up to 150 people. the community. • • Large meeting spaces that seat 200 people. • Large meeting spaces that seat 150 people. • Large meeting spaces that seat 20 to 30 people. Meeting rooms should be easily configurable to Meeting rooms should be easily configurable to• accommodate various group sizes with specific accommodate various group sizes with specific • needs.Audio-visual equipment should be user- needs.Audio-visual equipment should be user- • friendly. friendly. • Small meeting spaces that seat 5- 10 people. • • Small gathering spaces in the open throughout • the library. • Movable furnishings that are easily maintained. • More seating than stacks. • • Graffiti wall. Can be a wall for spray painting or a chalkboard wall that can be erased easily. • • Maintain open sightlines for safety. • • Browsing shelves to give a community feel. • Reception space for private events. • • Social spaces that may be accessible after the .0I0h + —� • library closes. lam/ ? ZI.C.; • • • 75 • • o • r1 • • • S gqiving diversity contribute exchange UNITY talents communicate teac • awareness • h a r i n listen discover inform CONNEC I inclusive expressing understanding CULTURE • g • Ideal environment for activities • This area will support both the planned and spontaneous • interactions of all ages. • ' `Focus on active and semi-active areas for people of all ages. /- ` • • Spaces should accommodate casual interactions to large - - �� Garden it — gatherings. / P� ` • I r Pry / . �' • Books and other media that support and encourage sharing. /��, �� „ _ • Look for opportunities to incorporate"sharing"throughout the ` \ VeNS U 40,,71,' • library. - c • / • C�jd• Cold Da& Sharing is a big part of what makes a community.Find Exdraxge "a' • opportunities to integrate these activities throughout the library. rho Roman% :'Dernonerratinn. °Pen' '' • Functions • Specific activities&components as ; '' • • Exhibit spaces -- • • • Meeting rooms • • Classes and workshops(arts&crafts,writing,creative ALShill • arts) 9 I • • Performance space(dance,poetry,storytelling) Colabaatn • Functional furnishings , • • Variety of books and media in different languages Cain Double -- • • Lectures Double • • • z • • • • r o• • • things that things that things that • • MUST SHOULD MAY • be included be included be included • • • Event or performance spaces that accommodate • Exhibits or galleries for the community to share • Small stage and auditorium. • a large audience. their art and/or culture. • Small amphitheater for outdoor performances and • • Small gathering spaces in the open throughout • Tables and seating that can be stored away yet get togethers. the library. easy for patrons to access if necessary. • Flexible areas where people can meet without • • Movable furnishings that are easily maintained. • Arts&crafts room with supplies and storage. needing to schedule the space. • • Area specific for watching video programming or • Newsstand for magazines and newspapers from • Resource center that provides research help and • listening to audio recordings. a variety of different cultures and countries. direction. • Computers with multi-lingual applications. • Cultural elements showing where people in the • Secondary areas for video and audio. • • Studio space for recording music,family community come from. • Rotating displays that share the culture of the • histories, and stories. • Area that creates a fun and pleasant environment community. • Arts&crafts space. to meet and mingle. • • Multi-lingual signage throughout. • Large meeting spaces that seat up to 150 people • • • • • • • I1 77 • • • • • • r n ■ knowledge training determine roues exploring study classes fl TEACHING skills wisdom understand comprehend homework hear applying grasp RESEARCH discovery education analyze reading • Ideal environment for activities • This area will support learning, study,and research for a 111 variety of ages. • Focus on active and quiet study areas of various sizes. • Spaces should accommodate electrical and internet \ . • Computing • connections. i • r Interpretive rr , Have a large variety of books and other media that are easily � " . , ' III accessible. ` — — . ` ` � _ / • Look for opportunities to incorporate learning activities Ookthroughout the library,for example, hands-on exhibits. , Study aQuiet Study/ •Tutoring • Learning can be playful. Look for opportunities to integrate -_- • "learning"and"playing"activities and spaces. • Lectures Presentations Study 41, S Specific activities&components Area • • Homework help • • Quiet/Study area • • Group study area 0+ • Classes(life/job skills, E.S.L.,etc.) Q yews 4 • • Workshops • • Functional furnishings • Variety of books and media in different languages /c=311t:%`\ 5 • Librarians that can help find materials �, \y • Access to scanners, printers, copiers • • << • • '. 4 • • • things that things that things that • M U S T SHOULD MAY • • be included be included be included • • • Reading and quiet spaces throughout the library. • Variety of collections. • Writing center where patrons can be coached on • • Small classrooms that seat 10-15 people. This • Functional furniture,which is also easily their writing techniques. • room could also be used as a study area. maintained,that can accommodate various study • Science and math center that can offer tutoring and • Large classrooms that seat 20-30 people. and research activities. a variety of learning experiences. • • Tables and seating for study, research, • Area that creates a fun and pleasant environment • Large reading room with fun movable seating. • homework,and homework assistance. to study,do homework, and receive homework • Flexible areas that can accommodate one-on-one • • Information and reference services that can assistance. tutoring with less distraction. provide research help. • Music room or space with a piano. • Resource center that provides research help and • • Area specific for watching video programming or • Shelving for up to 50,000 books and AN direction. • listening to audio recordings. materials in English and other languages. • Secondary areas for video and television • Computer lab that is available for research,job programming. • and computer skills training. • Technology station where patrons can check out a • • Computers throughout the library for research flash drive, mobile device, or laptop. and finding library materials. • Rotating displays with interesting topics to stimulate • • Print/copy/fax area that can all be done on one ideas and learning. • machine. • Copy center with access to faxing, printing, • • Study or tutoring spaces. copying,and scanning. • English Language Learners(ELL)collections. • • Shelving for at least 40,000 books and AN • materials in English and other languages. • • OK • . • • • 79 • • 1 ot • • • Play • learning discovery activity introducing entertain teaching , CREATIVITY i observing_ participating fun laugh spontaneous dreaming applying CURIOSITY exploring fantasy experimenting invent developing imagination • • Ideal environment for activities • This area will be focused on children but will not be limited to • their needs and interests. • • Focus on an active area for children. ,' - ` ` Computing 1 • Provide a place where adults and other family members feel ' /• • comfortable playing with their children. , • Books and other media to support activities. , ` Homework i Creating iJ• Look for opportunities to introduce"playful" in other appropriate places throughout the library. imtera�ve �, • Learning ractiv ties - • Large Meeting- C Specific activities&components cnildren'sPrograms �= \ • • Story-time Creating/ • • Interactive learning activities and displays / Story Time Hangout • • Hanging out area • • Computer gaming • Technology assistance • • Craft area J '"' outdoes • e • Creative . Space • views outdoor Playground / ` ._ • • 8: • ( 1 4 • • • things that things that things that • M U S T SHOULD MAY • • be included be included be included • • • Area for story-time reading/programming to • Secondary area for story-time that can • Area for story-time reading/programming to • accommodate a group of 50 kids. accommodate smaller groups accommodate a group of 50-100 kids and parents. • • Storage space for story-time/programming • Story-time cabinets/programming materials that • Shared space with a large meeting room for materials. can be integrated into the story-time program. programming. • • Area for playing/storing interactive games and • Seating for adults who are attending story-time • A unique entrance to a story-time room that is a • activities. with their children. separate room from the children's area. • • Tables and seating for interactive games that are • Permanent interactive displays that enable • Area dedicated to interactive displays and flexible. purposeful play and learning. discovery that is more typically associated with • • Tables and seating for projects. • Fun and playful furniture,which is also easily a children's museum if the interactive elements • • Area, or areas,with seating for 20-30 children to maintained,that enhance the interactive support the"specific activities and components" hang out after school. activities. described in this section. • • Area specific for watching video programming/ • Area that creates a fun and pleasant environment • Fun seating that is integrated with and part of the • gaming that can be separated from the children's to do projects. interactive displays and activities. area. • Area that can accommodate the storage, and • Flexible areas that can accommodate one-on-one • • Computers specific for children,flexible for possibly distribution,of snacks. tutoring with less distraction. • individual and small group use. • A specific area for craft-related activities that can • Resource center that provides ideas that may help • • Self-check out equipment in the children's area. be separated from the rest of the library.This children with their studies. • Shelving for at least 40,000 books and AN area should maintain some visibility to other • Secondary areas for video and television • materials in English and other languages. parts of the library so parents and caregivers can programming. • keep an eye on their children. Storage space and • Vending machines with some healthier options for plumbing for sinks should also be included. snacks. • • Music room of space with a piano. • Technology station where children can check out a • • Shelving for up to 50,000 books and AN flash drive for sharing and printing. • materials in English and other languages. • Shared space with the craft room and another multi-purpose function for the library. • • Displays aimed at younger patrons at main check • out and reference kiosks \ft & illi • -.11\r • • • • • Space Summaries • Tab e of Contents • • Children's Area Child-5d Making Area AA-4c Books on CD/DVD • Child- la Reference Perches AA-4d Fiction • Child-1 b Reference Storage Teen Area AA-4e Non-Fiction • Child-1 c Stack-end Computer Reference TA-1 Reference Perches AA-4f Language Collections • Seating Seating AA-4g DVD/CD/Music • Child-2a Public Seating General TA-2 Public Seating General AA-4h Reference Collections • Child-2b Public Seating Study Browsing AA-4i Graphic Novels/Manga • Child-2c Unique Seating Space TA-3a Periodicals • Technology TA-3b Teen Collections Play Areas • Child-3 PAC Play Areas AA-5 Gaming • Browsing TA-4 Gaming AA-6 Community Garden • Child-4a Book Displays • Child-4b Board Books Adult Area Child-4c Picture Books AA-1a Reference Perches Meeting Areas • Child-4d Books on CD/DVD AA-1 b Reference Storage MA-1 Building Entry/Art Gallery • Child-4e Fiction AA-1c Stack-end Computer References MA-2a Meeting Room • Child-4f Non-Fiction Seating MA-2bMeeting Room Storage • Child-4g Language Collections AA-2b Public Seating Study MA-3 Small Study Room • Child-4h DVD/CD/Music AA-2c Outdoor Patio • Child-4i Periodicals Technology • Eating Areas Play Areas AA-3 PAC • Child-5a Entry Browsing EA-1 Warming Kitchen • Child-5b Playground AA-4a Book Display EA-2a Cyber Café Eating Area • Child-5c Interactive Play Areas AA-4b Periodicals EA-2b-Cyber Café Kitchen • • • ,32 • • • • r ‘ • • • • • • Staff Support Building Support- continued • SS-1 Information Perch BS-6Telecom Room • SS-2 Self Service Check-out BS-7 Janitor's Closet • SS-3 Reserves/Holds BS-8 Outdoor Equipment Storage • SS-4 Public Copy/Print Area BS-9 PV Solar Electric Room • SS-5Staff Work Area BS-10 Trash Sorting • SS-6 Librarians Work Area BS-11 Vestibule • SS-7 Staff Office SS-8 Staff Lounge • SS-9 Staff Break Room Overall Criteria • SS-10 Staff Entry • SS-11 Staff Restroom • SS-12 Staff Lockers • SS-13 Car Drop Box Room • SS-14 Staff Storage • SS-15 Donations&Discards • • Building Support • • BS-1 Women's Restroom • BS-2 Men's Restroom • BS-3 Family Unisex Restroom BS-4 Electrical Room • BS-5A Mechanical Room • BS-5B Boiler Room • • • • • • • • Glendale Library111 • Program Summary • • Mark Room Must SF Quantity Total • Child Children's Area Space • Child-la Reference Perch 88 2 176 'Shaded Area's SF includes Circulation • Child-1b Reference Storage 75 1 75 Child-1c Reference Stackend 8 2 16 • Child-2a Public Seating General 595 1 595 • Child-2b Public Seating Study 250 1 250 • Child-2c Unique Seating Space 150 1 150 Child-3 PAC 420 1 420 • Child-4a Book Displays 2,400 SF Collections %of collections 0.43 • Child-4b Board Books 144.00 1.00 144.00 Includes bagged books 0.06 %of Childrens Area • Child-4c Picture Books 384.00 1.00 384.00 0.16 includes circulation Child-4d Books on CD/DVD 120.00 1.00 120.00 0.05 • Child-4e Fiction 576.00 1.00 576.00 0.24 • Child-4f Non-Fiction 576.00 1.00 576.00 0.24 • Child-4g Language Collections 360.00 1.00 360.00 0.15 • Child-4h DVD/CD&Music 216.00 1.00 216.00 0.09 Child-4i Periodicals 24.00 1.00 24.00 0.01 • Child-5a Entry 200 1 200 1 Total • Child-5b Playground 4,500 SF Outdoors • Child-5c Interactive Play Areas 15 3 45 Child-5d Making Area 1273 1 1273 • Total Children's Area 5600 5600.00 • TA Teen Areas • TA-1 Reference Stackend 8 2 16 *Shaded Area's SF includes Circulation TA-2 Pubic Seating General 336 1 336 Collections are 0.52 • TA-3a Periodicals 48 1 48 %of Teens Area • TA-3b Teen Collections 450 1 450 includes circulation • TA-4 Gaming 100 1 100 • Total Teen's Area 950.00 950.00 • • • • • ( 14 • • • Glendale Library • • Program Summary • Mark Room Must SF Quantity Total • Adult Areas AA-1a Reference Perch 88 2 176 *Shaded Area's SF includes Circulation • AA-1b Reference Storage 25 1 25 • AA-1c Reference Stackend 8 5 40 • AA-2a Public Seating General 690 1 690 • AA-2b Public Seating Study 150 1 150 AA-2c Outdoor Patio 600 SF Outdoors could be split into two Should this be enlarged to have programs? • AA-3 PAC 818 1 818 2,000 SF Collections % of collections • AA-4a Book Displays 100.00 1 100.00 0.05 _ 0.49 • AA-4b Periodicals 100.00 1 100.00 0.05 %of Adult Area AA-4c Books on CD/DVD 100.00 1 100.00 0.05 includes circulation • AA-4d Fiction 420.00 1 420.00 0.21 • AA-4e Non-Fiction 440.00 1 440.00 0.22 • AA-4f Language Collections 260.00 1 260.00 0.13 • AA-4g DVD/CD 400.00 1 400.00 0.20 ' AA-4h Reference Books 20.00 1 20.00 0.01 • AA-4i Graphic Novel/Manga 160.00 1 160.00 0.08 • AA-5a Gaming 150 1 150 1 Total • AA-6 Community Garden 2000 SF Outdoors Total Adult's Area 4049.00 4049.00 • 2000.00 • MA Meeting Areas • MA-1 Building Entry/Art Gallery 1 200 • MA-2a Meeting Room 1 1663 Code will allow 200 occupants in this room MA-2b Meeting Room Storage 1 172 Will fit Grand Piano • MA-3 Small Study Room 3 360 Doubles as recording rooms •• I III: Total Meeting Areas 2395 1.3 3113.5 • 85 • • • • • Glendale Library • • Program Summary • Mark Room Must SF Quantity Total • miiiima_reas • EA-1 Warming Kitchen 1 150 • EA-2 Cyber Café Eating Area 1 220 Vending in area-eating area shared by restaurant owner&library • EA-2b Cyber Café Kitchen 1 280 Total Eating Areas 650 1.3 845 • • SS Staff Support Space • SS-1 Information Perch 1 100 SS-2 Self Service Check-/Out 1 160 • SS-3 Reserves/Holds 1 135 • SS-4 Production/Copy/Print Area 1 70 • SS-5 Staff Work Area 1 854 SS-6 Librarians Work Area 1 170 • SS-7 Staff Office 2 240 • SS-8 Staff Lounge 1 150 • SS-9 Staff Break Room 1 200 • SS-10 Staff Entry 1 40 SS-11 Staff Restroom 1 60 • SS-12 Staff Lockers 1 72 • SS-13 Car Drop Box Room 1 50 • SS-14 Staff Storage 1 80 SS-15 Discards&Donations 1 50 • Total Staff Support Space 2431 1.3 3160.3 • • • • • • 86 • • • • • Glendale Library • Program Summary • Mark Room Must SF Quantity Total • BS Building Support Space • BS-1 Women's Restroom 1 235 BS-2 Men's Restroom 1 235• BS-3 Family/Unisex Restroom 1 60 • BS-4 Electrical Room 1 80 • BS-5A Mechanical Room 1 500 • BS-5B Boiler Room 1 178 BS-6 Telecom 1 80 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 87 • • • Glendale Library • • Children's Area Child-1a Reference Perches • Must have: 1 FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • Custom desk or purchased desk with a A reference desk that can be together or ACTIVITY: Reference Perches • transaction counter-must break apart in split apart either part should be easily QUANTITY: (2) • sections and be movable,prefer lower counter moved to different parts of the library. It HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- heights in this area with eye level close to should sit at least two (2) staff at any given Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • children time. Information desk in children's area. NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • • (2) Computers NUMBER OF VISITORS: All Child patrons • (2)Bar Code Scanners ARCHITECTURAL: • • (2) Printers-small WALL( )S : Sound AbsorbingAREA: 88 SF each, 176 SF for both-• (2) Desk Chairs FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing Includes circulafion space • • (2) Trash Receptacles CEILING: Sound Absorbing OTHER: Should be able to view entire . CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum Children's Area for safety reasons. • Should/May have: MILLWORK: Could be custom, needs to be • NA movable and to break up in parts, needs • space to display items RELATIONSHIPS: • ELECTRICAL • OUTLETS: (1)per desk floor mounted+ Entry to Children's Area Children's Area additional outlets at possible locations for • Reference perches • 5% LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level • 40 Foot Candles @ floor level TELEPHONE: (2) Desk Reference • Playing DATA: (5) Hard outlets, Wireless Perches Reference • 25% • SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code Storage OTHER: Provide buzzer at desk to alert • ji. staff in work room • SECURITY: Locking Drawers • Children's Collections MECHANICAL: • HVAC: Separate zones to help with high • activity and seasonal changes • PLUMBING: NA VENTILATIONS: NA • • O 4 • • Glendale Library • • Children's Area Child-lb Reference Storage • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(SI: • • Storage Cabinets or shelving Reference storage for reference perches. ACTIVITY: Reference Storage • Should be in a central location for planned QUANTITY: (1) • areas of reference perch locations HOURS IN USE:10 AM to 9 PM,Mon- Thurs,10 AM to 6 PM,Fri&Sat • NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:Staff Only • Should/May: WALL(S):Sound Absorbing AREA:75 SF-Includes circulation space • NA FLOOR(S):Sound Absorbing OTHER:NA • CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT:Maximum • MILLWORK:Could be in open area or in room,If cabinet 2'-3'deep and wide as • possible-(long&narrow shape) RELATIONSHIPS: • ELECTRICAL • OUTLETS:Yes,one on each wall of room • Children's Area LIGHTING: Standard • Reference TELEPHONE:NA DATA:NA I: s� SMOKE/FIRE ALARM:Per Building Code Reference OTHER:NA Storage Reference • Perches • SECURITY:Locking Door • MECHANICAL: • HVAC:Separate zones to help with high Children's Collections activity and seasonal changes • PLUMBING:NA • VENTILATIONS:NA • • • 89 • • r • • • lendale Library ,,Ix hildren's Area Child-1c Stack-end Reference Shelving • • Must EQUIPMENT& FURNITURE: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (1) Computer at stack-end for referencing Self-service reference computer for ACTIVITY: Stack-end Reference • Children's Collections-must have space for collections, stand-up only(should be QUANTITY: (2) • pencils&writing notes adjustable or low enough for kids &adults HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- in wheelchairs) Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS: All Child Patrons • WALL(S): Sound Absorbing AREA: 8 SF each or 16 SF for both- Should/May: FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing Includes circulation space • • NA CEILING: Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA • CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: Custom or purchased stack end panel 1 _ • RELATIONSHIPS: • ELECTRICAL • OUTLETS:yes LIGHTING: Standard • Children's Area TELEPHONE: (NA) • DATA:yes, hard outlet • Reference SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code 5% OTHER: NA Stack-end • Reference Reference • SECURITY: Visible from Reference Shelving Perches • Playing Perches 25% • MECHANICAL: • HVAC: Separate zones to help with high -- ". activity and seasonal changes Children's Collections • PLUMBING: NA • VENTILATIONS: NA • • • • • • • ( • • • • Glendale Library • • Children's Area Child-2a Public Seating General • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (6) Groupings of semi-circular seating that has Seating in Children's area, softer area ACTIVITY: Public seating in Children's • built in collection storage Area • (1) Big screen wall mounted TV-largest possible QUANTITY: (1) • (This will connect to PAC to mount large graphic HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- • art work for all patrons to see) Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • Seating must be comfortable, need seating to relax and ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA enjoy life WALL(S): Sound Absorbing NUMBER OF VISITORS: 18-24 • FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing AREA: 595 SF-Includes circulation space • CEILING: Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA • CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • Should/May: MILLWORK: Could be custom and part of • Have moveable/flexible architectural features in room • RELATIONSHIPS: • ELECTRICAL - OUTLETS: NA Entry to Children's Area • LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level • Children's Area 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Reference TELEPHONE: NA DATA: Wireless • 5% SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code Public • OTHER: NA Seating • SECURITY: Visible from Reference • Perches • MECHANICAL: Children's Collections • HVAC: Separate zones to help with high • activity and seasonal changes • PLUMBING: NA • VENTILATIONS: NA • • • • • • • • Glendale Library • • Children's Area Child-2b Public Seating Study Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(SL • • (4) Womb Chairs or chairs of similar shape Seating in Children's area for quiet study ACTIVITY: Public seating for study in • • (2) Tables and for doing homework Children's Area • • (4) Chairs QUANTITY: (1) HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- • Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA Should/May: WALL(S): Sound Absorbing NUMBER OF VISITORS: 6-8 • • This area could have moveable glass type AREA: 250 SF-Includes circulations ace • panels separating it from other library areas FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbingp OTHER: NA • Bolt lamps to table, if table option is used CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: NA • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS: Yes • LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level Entry to Children's Area 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Children's Area TELEPHONE: NA • Reference DATA: Wireless • 5% SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code OTHER: NA Public • Seating Reference • Playin SECURITY: Visible from Reference Study Perches • 25%g Seating Perches MECHANICAL: • HVAC: Separate zones to help with high activity and seasonal changes Children's Collections • PLUMBING: NA • VENTILATIONS: NA • • i ( • • Glendale Library : . • Children's Area Child-2c Unique Seating Space • — s Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • Custom or purchased fun unique seating space, Seating in Children's area ACTIVITY: Fun Unique Seating Space • must be fun for children to find somewhere to sit QUANTITY: (1) HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- • Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • Should/May: ARCHITECTURAL: - NUMBER OF VISITORS: 4-6 • NA WALL(S): Sound Absorbing AREA: 150 SF-Includes circulation space • FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA • CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: Could be custom and built-in • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • — — OUTLETS: NA LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level Entry to Children's Area • 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Children's Area TELEPHONE: NA • Reference DATA: Wireless SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code • ° OTHER: NA Unique • Seating • SECURITY: Visible from Reference Space Perches • • MECHANICAL: • HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Children's Collections activity and seasonal changes • PLUMBING: NA • VENTILATIONS: NA • • • • • • • • Glendale Library .- .._ ..._,_ . • Children's Area Child-3 Public Access Computers (PAC) • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (20)min. Flat Screen Computers Public Access Computers for children ACTIVITY: PAC for Children's Area • • (7) Tables, moveable with wire channels QUANTITY: (1) • • (20)min. Chairs for Youth HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- • (3)Adult Chairs Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat 0 • (4) Trash Cans NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • • (2)Printers ARCHITECTURAL: " NUMBER OF VISITORS: 20+ • WALL(S): Sound Absorbing AREA: 420 SF-Includes circulation space Should/May: FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: Computers should link to display • • Could be shaped into a serpentine curve computer screen on large wall mounted TV w/Public Seating area CEILING: Sound Absorbing p g • Could be circular spaces around trees. CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum listed in Child-2a • • MILLWORK: Could be custom, needs to be movable and to break up in parts • RELATIONSHIPS: • ELECTRICAL • OUTLETS: NA Entry to Children's Area LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level • Children's Area 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • TELEPHONE: NA • Reference DATA: Wireless 5% SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code PAC • OTHER: NA Children's • Collections • Playing SECURITY: Visible from Reference 25% ,_ ting ;i Perches • • MECHANICAL: Reference - HVAC: Separate zones to help with high • activity and seasonal changes • PLUMBING: NA • VENTILATIONS: NA • ( • • • • Glendale Library ..__..,_ _ ,, _ ,.,„.., ,. . . • • Children's Area Child-4a Book Displays • • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • Locking Display Cases Book Displays in children's areas will be ACTIVITY: Book Displays • placed in middle of shelving and on stack QUANTITY: (1) ends. HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- • Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • Should/May: ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS: All Child Patrons • NA WALL(S): Sound Absorbing AREA:Area planned for in middle of • FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing shelving and other architectural features • CEILING: Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA • CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: Slat Wall • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS: NA LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level Entry to Children's Area • 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Children's Collections TELEPHONE: NA DATA: Wireless • Books on CD PeriodicalsBoard Books ° 1% o SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code • si° 6�° OTHER: NA Book • DVD/VHS/CD Displays Reference • 9% SECURITY: Visible from Reference Perches • MECHANICAL: • 15% • Language HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Children's Collections activity and seasonal changes • PLUMBING: NA Fiction VENTILATIONS: NA • 24% • • • • 0 • • • Glendale Library „ A - .... Children's Area Child-4b Board Books • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • 36"high narrow adjustable shelves custom end Browsing and storage for board books;part ACTIVITY: Board Books • panels-with top shelf display of collection will be on display, which is QUANTITY: (1) • continually rotated HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA 0 ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:All Child Patron; • WALL(S): Sound Absorbing AREA: 144 SF-Includes circulation space Should/May: FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA 0 • Could have added shelf supports with metal rods CEILING: Sound Absorbing • to hold books face out CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: NA • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS: NA • — LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level Entry to Children's Area Children's Collections 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • TELEPHONE: NA • Books on CD Periodicals Board Books DATA: Wireless 5% 1% 6% SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code OTHER: NA Board • DVD/VHS/CD • Reference Books • 9% SECURITY: Visible from Reference Perches • Language MECHANICAL: • 15% HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Children's Collections • activity and seasonal changes Fiction PLUMBING: NA • 24% VENTILATIONS: NA • • • • • 0 • If 0 • • ,„.......... • Glendale Library ..., .,,._ _.,.�., ._... �, • • Children's Area Child-4c Picture Books • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • 48"high shelves/stacks with custom end panels, Browsing and storage for picture books ACTIVITY: Picture Books • Needs custom counter top for displaying items QUANTITY: (1) on HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- • Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS: All Child Patrons • WALL( S): AREA: 384 SF-Includes circulation space Absorbing Should/May: Sound• May incorporate colorful spaces FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA • • May have a mural painted by grade school CEILING: Sound Absorbing • children CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum 1 • • Shelves may be imbedded into wall space to MILLWORK: NA open up more space for play areas • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS: NA • LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level Seating Areas 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Children's Collections TELEPHONE: NA • Periodicals DATA: Wireless • Books on CD 1% Board Books SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code s/° 6% OTHER: NA Picture • DVD/VHs/cD Children Books Reference • 9% SECURITY: Visible from Reference Play Areas • Perches • Language MECHANICAL:• 15% HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Children's Collections activity and seasonal changes • PLUMBING: NA • Fiction 24% VENTILATIONS: NA • • • ---- • • • • • Glendale Library • Children's Area Child-4d Books on CD • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • 66"high shelving/stacks with rods for bagged Browsing and storage for books on CD ACTIVITY: Books on CD • books, custom end panels QUANTITY: (1) • • 66"high shelves stacks with top shelf display, HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- custom end panels Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS: All Child Patrons • WALL(S): Sound Absorbing AREA: 120 SF-Includes circulation space Should/May: FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA • • NA CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: NA ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS: NA S LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level Children's Seating Areas 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Children's Collections TELEPHONE: NA • Books on CD Periodicals Board Books DATA: Wireless • 5% 1% 6% SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code OTHER: NA Books on DVD/VH5/CD CD Reference • 9% SECURITY: Visible from Reference Perches • Language MECHANICAL: • 15% HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Children's Collections • activity and seasonal changes PLUMBING: NA • Fiction VENTILATIONS: NA 24% • • • 98 • • • I 0 0 • • Glendale Library • • Children's Area Child-4e Fiction • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • 66"high shelves/stacks with custom end panels Browsing and storage for fiction books ACTIVITY: Fiction Book Collection • QUANTITY: (1) HOURS IN USE:10 AM to 9 PM,Mon- • Thurs,10 AM to 6 PM,Fri&Sat • NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • Should/May: ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:All Child Patrc • NA WALL(S):Sound Absorbing AREA:576 SF-Includes circulation spa, • FLOOR(S):Sound Absorbing OTHER:NA • CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT:Maximum • MILLWORK:NA • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS:NA • LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level Reference 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Children's Collections TELEPHONE:NA • Books on CD Periodicals Board Books DATA:Wireless 1%I SMOKE/FIRE ALARM:Per Building Code • s% 6i OTHER:NA Fiction • ovo/VHS/co Books • 9% SECURITY:Visible from Reference • Perches MECHANICAL: • 15%ge HVAC:Separate zones to help with high Children's Collections • activity and seasonal changes • PLUMBING:NA • Fiction VENTILATIONS:NA 24% • • • • • • • • Glendale Library . . . . . .. .,.. _ - , • Children's Area Child-4f Non-fiction • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • 66"high shelves/stacks with custom end panels. Browsing&storage for non-fiction books ACTIVITY: Non-fiction Collection • QUANTITY: (1) • HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • Should/May: ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:All Child Patrons • • Could have grade school children paint pictures WALL(S): Sound Absorbing AREA: 576 SF-Includes circulation space of non-fiction subjects in this area FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA • • Seating in this area should be able to view larger CEILING: Sound Absorbing • books to explore new ideas CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: NA • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS: NA • LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level Children's' Seating Areas 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Children's Collections TELEPHONE: NA • Books on CD Periodicals Board Books DATA: Wireless 5% 1% 6% SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code S OTHER: NA Non-fiction • DVD/VHS/CD :e Books Reference • 9% SECURITY: Visible from Reference • Perches • Language MECHANICAL: • 15% HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Children's Collections • activity and seasonal changes PLUMBING: NA • Fiction VENTILATIONS: NA 24% • • • 100 • • i • • • Glendale Library • • Children's Area Child-4g Language Collections • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • 66"high shelves with custom end panels Browsing and storage for Special ACTIVITY: Special/Language Collections • Collections/Spanish and language books QUANTITY: (1) HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- • Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • Should/May: ARCHITECTURAL: - NUMBER OF VISITORS: All Child Patrons • NA WALL(S): Sound Absorbing AREA: 360 SF-Includes circulation space • FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA • CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: NA • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS: NA LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level • 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Children's Collections TELEPHONE: NA • Books on CD Periodicals Board Books DATA: Wireless 1% ° SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code • 5�° 6�° OTHER: NA Language • DVD/VHS/CD Reference Collections • 9% SECURITY: Visible from Reference Perches 0 • Language • MECHANICAL: • 15% HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Children's Collections activity and seasonal changes • PLUMBING: NA Fiction VENTILATIONS: NA • 24% • • • • • I • • • Glendale Library • • Children's Area Child-4h DVDNHS • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • 66"high shelving/stacks with top shelf display, Browsing&storage for children DVDNHS ACTIVITY: DVDNHS collection • custom end panels or other shelving types that &Music CD's QUANTITY: (1) • allows for face out direction of AV materials HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS: All Child Patron; • WALL(S): Sound Absorbing AREA: 216 SF-Includes circulation space Should/May: FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: Only(1)person should be able tc • • NA CEILING: Sound Absorbing look at a shelving section at one time. • CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: NA • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS: NA • LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level Children's Seating Areas 40 Foot Candles @ floor level lb Children's Collections TELEPHONE: NA Books on CD Periodicals Board Books DATA: Wireless • 5% 1% 6% SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code OTHER: NA CDNHS • DVD/VHS/CD Collections Reference • 9% SECURITY: Visible from Reference * " Perches • • Language MECHANICAL: • 15% HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Children's Collections • activity and seasonal changes PLUMBING: NA • Fiction VENTILATIONS: NA • 24% J% • ( k • • Glendale Library • • Children's Area Child-4i Periodicals • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • Area to store and display periodicals. Items must Browsing&storage for children magazines ACTIVITY: Periodicals • be displayed face out. and journals QUANTITY: (1) HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- • Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • Should/May: NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS: All Child Patron. • • Could be a low table with storage below. AREA: 24 SF-Includes circulation space WALL(S): Sound Absorbing • FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA • CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: NA • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS: NA Children's Seating Areas LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level • 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Children's Collections TELEPHONE: NA • Periodicals DATA: Wireless Books on CD Board Books SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code Children's 6% • 5% 1% OTHER: NA Periodical • DVD/VHS/CD Collections Reference • 9% SECURITY: Visible from Reference Perches • MECHANICAL: • Language• 15% HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Children's Collections activity and seasonal changes • PLUMBING: NA • Fiction VENTILATIONS: NA 24% • • • • 0 • • • Glendale Library • Children's Area Child-5a Children's Entry • 111 Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • Fun area for kids of all ages to enter into the Interactive fun area for kids to enter in to ACTIVITY: Entry/play area • children's area, could be built-in with children's activity and browsing areas QUANTITY: (1) • changing features, etc. Should use many of HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- children's five senses. Should be fun and Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • initiate interaction-use lots of color. NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS: All Child Patrons • WALL(S): Sound Absorbing AREA: 200 SF-Includes circulation space FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA • Should/May: CEILING: Sound Absorbing • • NA CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum MILLWORK: Custom-built in • • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS: NA LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level • 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Children's Area TELEPHONE: NA • DATA: Wireless Reference • 5% SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code OTHER: NA Children's • Entry Reference • Playing SECURITY: Visible from Reference Seating Perches • 25% _ 18% • MECHANICAL: • HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Children's Collections activity and seasonal changes • PLUMBING: NA • VENTILATIONS: NA • • • • • • • 1 0 • • Glendale Library • • Children's Area Child-5b Outdoor Playground • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • Sculptural playground equipment that will Outdoor Area for children to play ACTIVITY: Entry/play area • excite children of all levels to climb and QUANTITY: (1) • explore-could be one large element or HOURS IN USE:10 AM to 9 PM,Mon- several smaller ones. Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM,Fri&Sat • • (2-3)Benches for parents to sit NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:All Child Patrons WALL(S):Fence surrounding playground. AREA:4,500 SF • Should/May: trees and plantings that are suitable in OTHER:NA • • May have a sun&heat protection over parts children areas-no berries or poisonous • of the play area&for seated parents with plants,or flowering plants that attract bees. • babies watching older children on play Place flowering plants in low traffic areas or equipment non-seated areas. ___ • • May be close to the adult patio FLOOR(S):Recycled tires or wood chips RELATIONSHIPS: • CEILING: NA • CEILING HEIGHT:NA Family Restroom MILLWORK:NA • Children's Area • Reference ELECTRICAL I • o% a% OUTLETS:Yes-outdoor LIGHTING: Exterior building lights&poles Outdoor • 411 TELEPOTHER:HONENA :NA Playground Reference • DATA:Wireless Perches SMOKE/FIRE ALARM:NA • • • SECURITY:Gate/Fence Children's Collections • MECHANICAL: • HVAC:NA • PLUMBING:NA VENTILATIONS:NA • • • • ( • • • Glendale Library • Children's Area Child-5c Interactive Play Areas • Must have: 1 FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (2-3) Wall or floor toys Interactive fun areas for kids to play can be ACTIVITY: Interactive Play Areas • dispersed throughout children's collections. QUANTITY: (1) • HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat 0 NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS: NA • Should/May: WALL(S): Sound Absorbing AREA: 15 SF each or 45 SF together- • (1) Puppet Theatre-moveable, pop-out, or FLOOR(S): Soft/Sound absorbing Includes circulation space could fold into wall CEILING: Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA • • Movable stage platform-slightly elevated, CEILING HEIGHT: NA • could be incorporated into the story time MILLWORK: NA area. _ • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: OUTLETS: Yes, floor mounted • LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level Making Area 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Children's Area TELEPHONE: NA Reference • DATA: Wireless t 5% SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code OTHER: NA Children's • Interactive • SECURITY: Visible from Reference Play Areas • Playing Seating Perches 25% • 18% • k. MECHANICAL: I • ,. -.. HVAC: Separate zones to help with high activity and seasonal changes Children's Area • PLUMBING: NA • VENTILATIONS: NA • • • • 1 S 4 • • Glendale Library • • Children's Areas Child-5d Making Area • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (50)Floor Cushions Area for kids to do programmed and non- ACTIVITY: Making Area • • (12)36"Sq.Tables-folding&movable programmed activities,i.e.storytelling,etc QUANTITY: (1) • • (48)Child's Stacking Chair Must be flexible to accommodate a number HOURS IN USE:10 AM to 9 PM,Mon- • (4)Adult stacking chair of different activities Thurs,10 AM to 6 PM,Fri&Sat • • (1)Projection Screen ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • (1)Mobile Projector WALL(S):Sound Absorbing;provide NUMBER OF VISITORS:8-50 • • (2)Paper roll holders(up to 8 paper rolls marker boards for children where possible NET AREA:1,273 SF-Includes circulation • each) FLOOR(S):Hard Surface/Washable/sound space • • (1)Toy Box w/out lid absorbing OTHER:Storage cabinets/counters must • Should/May: CEILING: Sound Absorbing be a minimum length of 25 Linear Feet • • Portable tackable panel on wheels(or CEILING HEIGHT:Maximum collapsible)w/acoustic properties could MILLWORK:Storage for supplies could be • separate this area from other children's mobile and made of Plexiglas for children to RELATIONSHIPS: • areas when there is a programmed activity view contents.Provide drawers for large papers,and slots for art projects to dry. Children's Entry • ELECTRICAL • Children's Area OUTLETS:Yes,floor mounted,some at • Reference counter height LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level • s% 40 Foot Candles @ floor level Making • I) TELEPHONE:NA Area • DATA:Wireless Family Drinking SMOKE/FIRE ALARM:Per Building Code Restroom Fountain • OTHER:NA • SECURITY:Visible from Reference • Perches MECHANICAL: Children's Collections • HVAC:Separate zones to help with high activity • and seasonal changes PLUMBING:(2)Art Sinks,(2)child height hand • wash sinks •: VENTILATIONS:NA • • • • • • lendale Library • Teen Area TA-1 Stack-end Reference Shelving _ ; , • Must have: FUNCTION(S)_ FEATURE(S): • • (1) Computer at stack-end for referencing teen Self-service reference computer for ACTIVITY: Stack-end Reference Shelving 41 collections, must have space for pencils&writing collections, stand-up only(should be QUANTITY: (2) • notes adjustable or low enough for kids&adults HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- in wheelchairs) Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS: All Teen Patrons • WALL(S): Sound Absorbing AREA: 8 SF each for a total of 16 SF- Should/May: FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing Includes circulation space • • NA OTHER: NA CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: Custom or purchased stack end panel • RELATIONSHIPS: • ELECTRICAL • OUTLETS: Yes LIGHTING: Standard • Teen Area TELEPHONE: NA • Reference DATA: Yes, hard outlet • 2% SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code OTHER: NA Stack-end • - Reference Reference • SECURITY: NA Shelving Perches • MECHANICAL: • 3 HVAC: Separate zones to help with high • activity and seasonal changes PLUMBING: NA Teen Collections • VENTILATIONS: NA • • i • 0 • • Glendale Library • • Teen Area TA-2 Public Seating General • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (9)min.Seats for teens-mixed up in the Seating in Teen Area,furniture should be ACTIVITY: Public Seating in Teen Area • following variations: easily moved by patrons or staff. QUANTITY: (1) a. Booth Seating HOURS IN USE:10 AM to 9 PM,Mon- • b. Large Desks/fables Thurs,10 AM to 6 PM,Fri&Sat • This area should not have bean bags,love sacks, NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • couches orchaises. ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:9+ WALL(S):Sound Absorbing AREA:336 SF—Includes circulation space • Should/May: FLOOR(S):Sound Absorbing OTHER: • • Have a physical area for wire grid panels or wall CEILING: Sound Absorbing • space for teen art exhibits. CEILING HEIGHT:Maximum • MILLWORK:NA • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS:Yes for lamps LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level Periodicals • 40 Foot Candles @ floor level,if • Teen Area incorporated track lighting for art exhibits • Reference TELEPHONE:NA 2% DATA:Wireless • SMOKE/FIRE ALARM:Per Building Code Public • OTHER:NA Teen Seating • Collections SECURITY:Visible from Reference I . Seating Perches I . 35% I . MECHANICAL: Reference Perches HVAC:Separate zones to help with high I . activity and seasonal changes I . PLUMBING:NA VENTILATIONS:NA I . I . I . • • • • • • Glendale Library • • Teen Area TA-3a Periodicals • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • Provide storage for face out display Area to display current journals and ACTIVITY: Periodicals II • Provide 66"high shelves for(1)year of back magazines for teen browsing. Storage for QUANTITY: (1) • issues back issue of journals. HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- Should/May: Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • • NA ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:All Teen Patrons • WALL(S): Sound Absorbing AREA: 48 SF-Includes circulation space FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA • CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: NA • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS: NA LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level • 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Teen Collections TELEPHONE: NA • DATA: Wireless • Periodicals SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code 10% OTHER: NA Periodicals • Eating Area Reference • SECURITY: Visible from Reference Perches Perches • • MECHANICAL: • HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Teen Seating Areas • activity and seasonal changes PLUMBING: NA • VENTILATIONS: NA • • • o • • • Glendale Library • .. • Teen Area TA-3b Teen Collections • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • Shelving/stacks w/custom end panels, 66"high Book browsing and storage for Teen Books, ACTIVITY: Teen Collections • • Trash Can paperback&hardback QUANTITY: (1) HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- • Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • Should/May: - NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • NA ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS: All Teen Patrons WALL(S): Sound absorbing AREA: 450 SF-Includes circulation space • FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA • CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: NA • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS: Yes LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level Teen Seating • 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Teen Collections TELEPHONE: NA DATA: Wireless • Periodicals SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code • 10% OTHER: NA Teen • Collections Reference • SECURITY: Visible from Reference Perches Perches • • MECHANICAL: • HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Teen Periodicals activity and seasonal changes • PLUMBING: NA • VENTILATIONS: NA • • • • • -0, • • • Glendale Library _ u_ . ... . ., . Teen Area TA-4 Gaming Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • Comfortable Lounge Chairs w/table arms- Area for Teen Gaming ACTIVITY: Gaming movable QUANTITY: (1) • (1)Large Screen wall hung TV to hook up to HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- laptops for mutual gaming Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • (1) Trash Can NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA 0 NUMBER OF VISITORS: 3-6 NOTE:All Furniture should promote good posture; ARCHITECTURAL: AREA: 100 SF-Includes circulations ace 0 viewing screens should be at eye level. WALL(S): Sound AbsorbingP FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA • Should/May: CEILING: Sound Absorbing • • May have a graffiti wall CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: NA OTHER:NA ' RELATIONSHIPS: • ELECTRICAL • OUTLETS: Yes LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level • Teen Area 40 Foot Candles @ floor level 0 Reference TELEPHONE: NA • 2% DATA: Wireless,plus hard outlets SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code Gaming OTHER: NA Reference • Perches SECURITY: NA Seating • 35% MECHANICAL: • HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Teen &Adult Collections • activity and seasonal changes PLUMBING: NA VENTILATIONS: NA • 112 -__ II: • 1 • 0 • • Glendale Library • • Adult Area AA-la Reference Perches • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • Custom Desk or purchased desk-must break Reference desk that can be together or split ACTIVITY: Reference Perches • apart in sections and be movable-counter apart. Either part should be easily moved QUANTITY: (1) heights must accommodate standing&sitting- to different parts of the library.It should sit HOURS IN USE:10 AM to 9 PM,Mon- • part must be low to assist patrons in wheelchairs, at least two(2)staff at any given time. Thurs,10 AM to 6 PM,Fri&Sat • Should have lightweight slots for bins to attach to unit. Should not be raised chunky blocks Information desk for adult area. NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • • (2)Computers ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:All Child Patrons • • (2)Printers-small WALL(S):Sound Absorbing AREA:88 SF each or 176 for both- • (2)Bar Code Scanners FLOOR(S):Sound Absorbing Includes circulation space • • (2)Desk Chairs CEILING: Sound Absorbing OTHER:Should be able to view entire area • • (2)Trash Receptacles CEILING HEIGHT:Maximum for safety reasons. • • (2)Pencil Sharpeners MILLWORK:Could be custom,needs to be movable and to break up in parts,needs • Should/May: space to display items RELATIONSHIPS: • • NA ELECTRICAL • OUTLETS:(1)Per desk floor mounted+ Entry to Adult Collections Adult Area additional outlets at possible locations for • perches • Playing Reference LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level 4% 6% 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • TELEPHONE:(2)Wireless Reference • DATA:(5)Hard outlets,Wireless Perches Reference • SMOKE/FIRE ALARM:Per Building Code Storage OTHER:Provide buzzer at desk to alert • staff in work room Book Displays • SECURITY:Locking Drawers • MECHANICAL: • HVAC:Separate zones to help with high • activity and seasonal changes • PLUMBING:NA VENTILATIONS:NA • 1 • • • • • • ..Glendale Library _ .�. _.. .. ._ ,.Y r,. �:.�. . . , . -. . --.,. .�. ._ �, io • Adult Area AA-1 b Reference Storage Must have: FUNCTIONIS►: FEATURE(S): • • Storage Cabinets or shelving Reference storage for reference perches. ACTIVITY: Reference Storage • Should be in a central location for planned QUANTITY: (1) • areas of reference perch locations HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS: Staff Only • WALL(S): Sound Absorbing AREA: 25 SF-Includes circulation space Should/May: FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA • NA CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: Could be in open area or in • room RELATIONSHIPS: • ELECTRICAL S OUTLETS:yes LIGHTING: Standard • Ad u It Area TELEPHONE: NA • DATA: NA • Playing Reference SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code 4% 6% OTHER: NA Reference Reference • .,-, Storage Perches • SECURITY: Locking doors • MECHANICAL: • HVAC: Separate Zones to help with high • activity and seasonal changes Collections PLUMBING: NA 0 VENTILATIONS: NA • • • • Glendale Library • • Adult Area AA-lc Stack-end Reference Shelving • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (1)Computer at stack-end for referencing adult Self-service reference computer for ACTIVITY: Stack-end Reference Shelving • collections,preferably adjustable to assist collections,stand-up only(should be QUANTITY: (5) standing and seated wheelchair adults,must adjustable or low enough for kids&adults HOURS IN USE:10 AM to 9 PM,Mon- • have space for pencils&writing notes in wheelchairs) Thurs. 10 AM to 6 PM,Fri&Sat • NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:All Adult Patrons WALL(S):Sound Absorbing AREA:8 SF each for a total of 40 SF- • Should/May: FLOOR(S):Sound Absorbing Includes circulation space • • NA CEILING: Sound Absorbing OTHER:NA • CEILING HEIGHT:Maximum • MILLWORK:Custom or purchased stack end panel • RELATIONSHIPS: • ELECTRICAL OUTLETS:Yes• LIGHTING: Standard • Adult Area TELEPHONE:NA • Playing Reference DATA:Yes,hard outlet 4% SMOKE/FIRE ALARM:Per Building Code • 6% OTHER:NA Stack-end • Reference Reference • SECURITY:NA Shelving Perches • MECHANICAL: • HVAC:Separate zones to help with high • 411, activity and seasonal changes PLUMBING:NA Adult Collections • VENTILATIONS:NA • • • • • • • • • Glendale Library • Adult Area AA-2b Public Seating Study • • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (6)min. Seats for adults-mixed up in the Seating in Adult Area, place away from ACTIVITY: Public Seating for quiet study • following variations: noisy library areas. Furniture should be in Adult Area • a. (2)Lounge chairs w/end table, lamp, trash easily moved by patrons or staff. QUANTITY: (1) can&recycle trash can HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon • - b. Table, w/(4) upholstered chairs and reading Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • lamps, trash can&recycle trash can ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA Should/May: WALL(S): Sound Absorbing NUMBER OF VISITORS: 6 • • This area could have moveable glass type FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing AREA: 150 SF-Includes circulation space • panels separating it from other library areas. CEILING: Sound Absorbing OTHER: • CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: NA • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS: Yes at lamps • LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Adult Area TELEPHONE: NA • DATA: Wireless • Playing Reference SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code 4% 6% OTHER: NA Public u;R Seating • "" SECURITY: Visible from Reference Study Perches • • MECHANICAL: • HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Adult Collections • activity and seasonal changes PLUMBING: NA • VENTILATIONS: NA • • 0 • • • • Glendale Library • • Adult Area AA-2c Outdoor Patio • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (5) Outdoor tables w/umbrellas Outside seating area for Adults ACTIVITY: Outdoor for patrons to read or • • (20) Outdoor Chairs-Stacking to enjoy outdoor space • (1) Trash can QUANTITY: (1) • • (1)Recycle Trash can HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- • Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • ARCHITECTURAL: - NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA Should/May: WALL(S): NA NUMBER OF VISITORS: 20+ • S : Concrete/Brick/Stone AREA: 600 SF FLOOR • Sun&weather protection ( ) OTHER: NA • • Could double as story time space for children's CEILING: NA • programs CEILING HEIGHT: NA • • Furniture could be bolted to ground in permanent MILLWORK: NA locations • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS: Yes-outdoor LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level Eating Areas • 40 Foot Candles @ ground level • Adult Area TELEPHONE: NA • Playing Reference DATA: Wireless 4% 6% SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code • OTHER: NA Outdoor • Patio Community • SECURITY: Fence surround Garden • MECHANICAL: • HVAC: NA • PLUMBING: NA Children's Playground VENTILATIONS: NA • • • • • • • 0 • • • Glendale Library • • Adult Area AA-3 Public Access Computers (PAC) • Must have:_ FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (25-45) Flat Screen Computers Public Access Computers for Adults& ACTIVITY: PAC for Adult's Area • • (7) Tables,moveable with wire channels Teens QUANTITY: (1) • • (25-45) Chairs HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- • (8) Trash Cans Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • • (3-5)Printers NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • • (1) Color Printer NUMBER OF VISITORS: 25-45 ARCHITECTURAL: • WALL(S): Sound Absorbing AREA: 818 SF-Includes circulation space FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: Should/May: CEILING: Sound Absorbing • • Could have paper trash dispenser at each CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • computer MILLWORK: Could be custom, needs to be movable and to break up in parts • RELATIONSHIPS: • I ELECTRICAL • OUTLETS: One per computer LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level • Adult Area 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • TELEPHONE: NA • Playing Reference DATA: Wireless,plus hard outlets PAC 4% 6% SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code Adults • i;� OTHER: NA &Teens Reference SECURITY: Visible from Reference • Perches • • MECHANICAL: Adult Collections HVAC: Separate zones to help with high • activity and seasonal changes • PLUMBING: NA • VENTILATIONS: NA • ( 0 0 • • Glendale Library • • Adult Area AA-4a Book Displays • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (4-6)Custom units that display books on top and Area to display new books and best sellers, ACTIVITY: Book Displays • are able to store additional copies below,units additional items could be displayed on QUANTITY: (1) should be movable. Displays should provide for stack-end panels. HOURS IN USE:10 AM to 9 PM,Mon- • face out shelving at eye-level. Thurs,10 AM to 6 PM,Fri&Sat • • Additional displays will be at stack-end shelving NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • 1 ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:All Adult Patrons WALL(S):Sound Absorbing AREA:100 SF-Includes circulation space • Should/May:NAFLOOR(S):Sound Absorbing OTHER:NA • NA • CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT:Maximum • MILLWORK:Slat Wall • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS:Counter height at display to • plug-in electrical items/must be hidden Entry to Adult Area Adult Collections LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level • 40 Foot Candles @ floor level Books on CD Book Display TELEPHONE:NA • Graphic/Manga 5% 8% 5% DATA:Wireless • Periodicals SMOKE/FIRE ALARM:Per Building Code Book • s% OTHER:NA High Traffic Displays Reference • Adult Areas Perch Fiction Language SECURITY:Visible from Reference • 21% 13% Perches • • MECHANICAL: Adult Seating Areas Reference�- HVAC:Separate zones to help with high • 1% ii. activity and seasonal changes • Non-fiction PLUMBING:NA • 22% VENTILATIONS:NA • • • • • • lendale Library ;Adult Area AA-4b111111 Periodicals •• Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • Newspaper display units for current newspaper Area to display current journals and ACTIVITY: Periodicals • issues-Plexiglas cubes should not be used newspapers for public browsing. Storage QUANTITY: (1) • • Shelving for current journals and back issues. for back issue of journals. HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • Should/May: ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:All Adult Patrons • • NA AREA: 100 SF-Includes circulation space WALL(S): Sound Absorbing • FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: NA • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS: NA • LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level Copy/Production Area 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Adult Collections TELEPHONE: NA • Book Display DATA: Wireless • Graphic/Manga Books on CD 5% 8% 5% SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code OTHER: NA Periodicals • Periodicals Eating Area Reference • 5% SECURITY: Visible from Reference Perches Fiction Perches • 21% Language 13% • MECHANICAL: • HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Adult Seating Areas Reference activity and seasonal changes • 1% PLUMBING: NA • Non-fiction VENTILATIONS: NA • 22% • • 120 • • • 1 0 0 • • Glendale Library • • Adult Area AA-4c Books on DVD/CD • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • Stacks/Shelving with Bins for DVDs&CDs, Book browsing and storage for Books on ACTIVITY: Books on DVD/CD • 66"high w/top shelf display and empty bottom DVD/CD,area to download music and QUANTITY: (1) shelf,custom end panels-Shelving should be books onto MP3 players or other digital HOURS IN USE:10 AM to 9 PM,Mon- • flexible to change into different configurations devices. Thurs,10 AM to 6 PM,Fri&Sat • • (2)Computers NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • • (1)Tables ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:All Adult Patrons • • (4)Chairs WALL(S):Sound Absorbing AREA:100 SF-Includes circulation space • (1)Trash Can FLOOR(S):Sound Absorbing OTHER:NA • CEILING: Sound Absorbing • Should/May: CEILING HEIGHT:Maximum • NA MILLWORK:NA • • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS:Yes,one at each computer • LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Adult Collections TELEPHONE:NA Books on CD Book Display DATA:Wireless,hard outlet at each • Graphic/Manga 5% 1 8% 5% computer • SMOKE/FIRE ALARM:Per Building Code Books on • Periodicals5% OTHER:NA DVD/CD Reference • Perches Fiction Language SECURITY:Visible from Reference • 21% 13% Perches MECHANICAL: Adult Collections • Reference i HVAC:Separate zones to help with high • 1% Ilj, activity and seasonal changes • Non-fiction PLUMBING:NA • 22% VENTILATIONS:NA • • • 0 • • Glendale Library - ., • • Adult Area AA-4d Fiction Collection • I Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • Shelving/stacks w/custom end panels, 72"high Book browsing and storage for Adult Fiction ACTIVITY: Fiction Collection • • Trash Can Books QUANTITY: (1) • HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • ShouldlMav: NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • • NA ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS: All Adult Patrons • WALL(S): Sound absorbing AREA: 420 SF-Includes circulation space FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA • CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: NA • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS: Yes • LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Adult Collections TELEPHONE: NA • Book Display DATA: Wireless • Graphic/Manga Books on CD o 8% 5% 5/° SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code OTHER: NA Fiction • Periodicals Collection Reference 5% SECURITY: Visible from Reference Perches Fiction • Language Perches 21% • 13% MECHANICAL: • HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Adult Collections Reference activity and seasonal changes • i% PLUMBING: NA • VENTILATIONS: NA Non-fiction • 22% • • • • 0 • I 0 0 • • IrendaleLibrary• Adult Area AA-4e Non-fiction Collection • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATUREISI: • • Custom stacks/shelving with custom end panels, Book browsing and storage for Adult Non- ACTIVITY: Non-fiction Collection • 72"high fiction Books QUANTITY: (1) • Trash can HOURS IN USE:10 AM to 9 PM,Mon- • Thurs,10 AM to 6 PM,Fri&Sat • NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA Should/May: • • NA ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:All Adult Patrons WALL(S):Sound Absorbing AREA:440 SF-Includes circulation space • FLOOR(S):Sound Absorbing OTHER:NA • CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT:Maximum • MILLWORK:NA • ELECTRICAL ' RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS:NA LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level• 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Adult Collections TELEPHONE:NA Books on CD Book Display DATA:Wireless • Gra phic/Manga 5% I 8% s% SMOKE/FIRE ALARM:Per Building Code • Periodicals OTHER:NA Non-fiction • s% Collection Reference • SECURITY:Visible from Reference Perches Fiction Language Perches • 21% 13% • MECHANICAL: • HVAC:Separate zones to help with high Adult Collections activity and seasonal changes Reference.../....----- • 1% Illih PLUMBING:NA • Non-fiction VENTILATIONS:NA • 22% • • __. __ • • • • • lendale Library .�. • I dult Area AA-4f Language Collections Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • Custom stacks/shelving with custom end panels, Book browsing and storage for Adult ACTIVITY: Language Collections • 66"high Language Collections QUANTITY: (1) • • Trash can HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • Should/May: NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • • NA ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:All Adult Patrons • WALL(S): Sound Absorbing AREA: 260 SF-Includes circulation space FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA • CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: NA ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS: NA • LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level 40 Foot Candles @ floor level 0 Adult Collections TELEPHONE: NA • Book Display ! DATA: Wireless • Graphic/Manga Books on CD 5% 8% 5% SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code Periodicals OTHER: NA Language 5% Collections Reference • SECURITY: Visible from Reference Perches • Fiction Language Perches 21% • 13% MECHANICAL: • HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Adult Collections • activity and seasonal changes Reference 1% PLUMBING: NA I • Non-fiction VENTILATIONS: NA • 22% • — • _____ • I 0 0 • • Glendale Library • • Adult Area AA-4g DVDICD Collections • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • Stacks/shelves with top shelf display, 66"high Book browsing and storage for Adult DVDs ACTIVITY: DVD/CD Collections • with custom end panels &Music CDs,area to download music and QUANTITY: (I) • Trash can books onto MP3 players or other digital HOURS IN USE:10 AM to 9 PM,Mon- • • Shelving should be flexible to change into devices Thurs,10 AM to 6 PM,Fri&Sat • different configurations NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • • (2)Computers ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:All Adult Patrons • (1)Tables WALL(S):Sound Absorbing AREA:400 SF-Includes circulation space • • (4)Chairs FLOOR(S):Sound Absorbing OTHER:NA • CEILING: Sound Absorbing • Should/May: CEILING HEIGHT:Maximum • • NA MILLWORK:NA • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS:NA LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level • 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Adult Collections TELEPHONE:NA Books on CD Book Display DATA:Wireless • Graphic/Manga 5% 8% 5% SMOKE/FIRE ALARM:Per Building Code • Periodicals OTHER:NA DVD/CD • s% Collections Reference • SECURITY:Visible from Reference Perches Fiction Language Perches • 21% 13% • MECHANICAL: • HVAC:Separate zones to help with high Adult Collections Reference activity and seasonal changes • 1% PLUMBING:NA • Non-fiction VENTILATIONS:NA • 22% • • • 0 f • 0 • Glendale Library • Adult Area AA-4h Reference Collections • • - I Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • Stacks/shelves, 72"high with custom end panels Book browsing and storage for Reference ACTIVITY: Reference Collections • • Trash can Materials QUANTITY: (1) • HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • Should/May: NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • • Dictionary Stand ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS: All Adult Patrons • Atlas Stand AREA: 20 SF-Includes circulation space • WALL(S): Sound Absorbing p FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA • CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: NA • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS: NA • LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level Production/Copy Area 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • Adult Collections TELEPHONE: NA • Book Display DATA: Wireless • Graphic/Manga Books on CD ° 8% 5% 5�° SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code • Periodicals OTHER: NA Reference 5% Collections Reference • SECURITY: Visible from Reference Perches • Fiction Language Perches 21% • 13% MECHANICAL: • HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Adult Collections • Reference activity and seasonal changes 1% PLUMBING: NA • Non-fiction VENTILATIONS: NA • 22% • • 26 • • • • 0 • • • . • j Glendale Library • • Adult Area AA-4i Graphic Novel/Manga Collection • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • Stacks/shelves, 84"high with custom end Book browsing and storage for Graphic ACTIVITY: Graphic Novel/Manga • panels, top shelf display Novels/Manga Collection. Area will be Collection • Trash can shared by Adults & Teens. This collection QUANTITY: (1) • helps patrons learn English as a second HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- • language. Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • Should/May: NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • NA ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS: All Adult Patrons • WALL(S): Sound Absorbing AREA: 160 SF-Includes circulation space • FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA • CEILING: Sound Absorbing CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: NA • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS: NA • LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level • Adult Collections 40 Foot Candles @ floor level Book Display TELEPHONE: NA • Graphic/Manga Books on CD 5% DATA: Wireless Graphic • 8% ° SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code Novel/Manga • Periodicals 5% OTHER: NA Teen Area Collection Reference • SECURITY: Visible from Reference Perches Fiction1% • 2 Language Perches 13% • MECHANICAL: • - HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Adult Collections • Reference activity and seasonal changes 1% PLUMBING: NA • Non-fiction VENTILATIONS: NA • 22% • • • • 0 • • • Glendale Library • • Adult Area AA-5a Gaming • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • Comfortable Lounge Chairs w/table arms- Area for Adult Gaming ACTIVITY: Gaming • movable QUANTITY: (1) • (1)Large Screen wall hung TV to hook up to HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- • laptops for mutual gaming Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • I • (1) Trash Can NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • NUMBER OF VISITORS: 6-8 Includes circulationsace • NOTE:All Furniture should promote good posture; ARCHITECTURAL: AREA: 150 SF- viewing screens should be at eye level. WALL(S): Sound Absorbingp FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: NA • Should/May: CEILING: Sound Absorbing 0 • NA CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum • MILLWORK: NA OTHER:NA • RELATIONSHIPS: • ELECTRICAL • OUTLETS: Yes LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level • Adult Area 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • TELEPHONE: NA Playing Reference •DATA: Wireless, plus hard outlets 4% 6% SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code Gaming • ,, OTHER: NA Reference Perches • SECURITY: NA MECHANICAL: • HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Adult Collections activity and seasonal changes • PLUMBING: NA • VENTILATIONS: NA • • 1 0 0 • Glendale Library • • Adult Area AA-5b Community Garden • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • Low Decorative Fence around area Outdoor area for community garden,for all ACTIVITY: Gardening • ages QUANTITY: (1) • HOURS IN USE:All hours in the day NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • NUMBER OF VISITORS:Entire Glendale • ARCHITECTURAL: Community Should/May: WALL(S):NA AREA:2,000 SF • • Decorative Entry Gate FLOOR(S):NA OTHER:NA • CEILING: NA • CEILING HEIGHT:NA • MILLWORK:NA • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: ' • OUTLETS:NA LIGHTING: NA • TELEPHONE:NA • Adult Area DATA:NA • Playing Reference SMOKE/FIRE ALARM:Per Building Code • 4% 6% OTHER:NA Al Community • SECURITY:NA Garden Outdoor • Patio MECHANICAL: • HVAC:system NA • PLUMBING:Water tap,Drip irrigation • Playground VENTILATIONS:NA • • • • 1 • • • r. • • Glendale Library • • Meeting Areas MA-la Building Entry/Art Gallery • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (2)Large Community Bulletin Boards Public Area before library services,should ACTIVITY: Building Entry/Art Gallery • • (2-4)Benches bean artistic feature of the building QUANTITY: (1) • • (1)Trash Can HOURS IN USE:10 AM to 9 PM,Mon- • Art Exhibits-Custom/Stationary Thurs,10 AM to 6 PM,Fri&Sat • NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:All Library Should/May: patrons • • May have custom Red Box like DVD Loan WALL(S):Sound absorbing,Provide picture System rail on all available walls surfaces at(2) NET AREA:200 SF • y heights OTHER:NA • FLOOR(S):Hard surface,easily cleaned • CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT:Maximum ' MILLWORK:Built-in or purchased RELATIONSHIPS: • SPACE DIAGRAM: changeable exhibits for community artwork. Vestibule • ELECTRICAL • , 1__= OUTLETS:(1) •aced Boo, LIGHTING: Moveable Spot lights to • — highlight different art installations Arty -- r — TELEPHONE:NA Building • — DATA:Wireless Entry/Art Meeting Rm • SMOKE/FIRE ALARM:Per Building Code Gallery OTHER:NA • • SECURITY:NA • MECHANICAL: Restrooms • HVAC:Separate zones to help with high • activity and seasonal changes • PLUMBING:NA VENTILATIONS:NA • • • • 0 • I 0 0 • • Glendale Library • • Meeting Areas MA-2a Meeting Room • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (200)stacking chairs Meeting room for library,storytelling, ACTIVITY: Meeting Room • • (12)Fold-up Tables,moveable children programs,Wedding Receptions, QUANTITY: (1) • (1)Movable Lectern/Podium Book Clubs,Community Meetings,Recitals, HOURS IN USE:10 AM to 9 PM,Mon- • • (1)Projection Screen Computer Lab,etc. Thurs,10 AM to 6 PM,Fri&Sat • • (1)Ceiling Mounted Projector NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • • (1)Sound System ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:Shown seating • (2)Bulletin Boards 140,code will allow 200+occupants • • (1)Large Trash Can WALL(S):Marker boards at room front NET AREA:1,allow p Large Recycle Trash Can w/chart rails,Movable Walls,Sound (1)• 9 y Absorbing OTHER:NA • • (1)Grand Piano(Stored in storage room when FLOOR(S):Sound Absorbing • not in use) • Should/May: CEILING: Sound Absorbing • Could have a small Child size door from CEILING HEIGHT:Maximum • Children's Area MILLWORK:NA RELATIONSHIPS: • ELECTRICAL Warming Kitchen • SPACE DIAGRAM: OUTLETS:(1)on each wall,plus extra floor • mounted ones at room front,provide floor • mounted type for computer lab function. LIGHTING: Spots lights at room front for • I concerts,dimmable&tiered lighting Meeting O. r TELEPHONE:NA Children's Room Meeting Rm • DATA:Wireless Area Storage SMOKE/FIRE ALARM:Per Building Code • OTHER:NA • — • SECURITY:Locking doors 1111111 Restrooms • MECHANICAL: • HVAC:Separate zones to help with high • activity and seasonal changes PLUMBING:NA • \/CAITII ATIMIC•MA • • • • • • Glendale Library • • Meeting Areas MA-2b Meeting Room Storage • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (4) Chair Dollies-each one should hold 30+ Area to store items for meeting room when ACTIVITY: Meeting Room Storage • chairs not in use. QUANTITY: (1) • • (1)Recharging&Storage Cabinet for mobile HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- computer lab Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • • Piano(when not in use in meeting room) NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS: Staff Only • WALL(S): Sound Absorbing NET AREA: 172 SF Should/May: FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing OTHER: Locking door • • NA CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT: 9' • MILLWORK: Shelves for smaller item SPACE DIAGRAM: storage such as microphones, etc. • RELATIONSHIPS: • ELECTRICAL • OUTLETS: (2), plus outlets for recharging Meeting Room _=� cabinet • LIGHTING: Standard • = TELEPHONE: NA DATA: Wireless SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code Meeting • OTHER: NA Room p • Storage SECURITY: Locking Door • • MECHANICAL: . HVAC: Standard Air Exchanges ,r PLUMBING: NA Small Study Rooms • mnrn VENTILATIONS: NA • I„I„ II I„I„ I, „ „ , •I„I„ I, 1Jiuu 1L • • __-_- _ • • • • ( 0 0 • • Glendale Library • Meeting Areas MA-3 Small Study Room • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (6)Stacking Chairs Area for tutoring,or small groups to study, ACTIVITY: Small Meeting Room • • (1)Table-Flip-top&movable rooms will double as a production studios QUANTITY: (3) • (2)Marker Boards HOURS IN USE:10 AM to 9 PM,Mon- • • (1)Trash Can Thurs,10 AM to 6 PM,Fri&Sat • • (1)Recycle Trash Can NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:(6)can seat up Should/May: WALL(S):Sound Absorbing,Large window to(8)by building code • NA for staff to monitor room NET AREA:120 SF •• FLOOR(S):Sound Absorbing OTHER:Reference perches should be • CEILING: Sound Absorbing able to view room for safety reasons. CEILING HEIGHT:9' Needs to be as sound proof as possible for • MILLWORK:NA production functions. • RELATIONSHIPS: • ELECTRICAL OUTLETS:(1)on each wall,provide Reference Perches • SPACE DIAGRAM: additional outlets at wall for mobile • production equipment • LIGHTING: Standard TELEPHONE:NA • I ii DATA:(4)hard outlets-one on each wall, Small • ^ Wireless Study • 1II 1MI SMOKE/FIRE ALARM:Per Building Code Room OTHER:NA • OMB • .f el— SECURITY:Visible from Reference Perches • MECHANICAL: Adult Collections • HVAC:Standard Air Exchanges • PLUMBING:NA • VENTILATIONS:NA • 1 •• • • . • • Glendale Library „, .:_, _. • Eating Areas EA-la Warming Kitchen • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (1) Warming Oven Warming kitchen for caterers to bring ACTIVITY: Warming Kitchen • • (1)Refrigerator prepared foods and heat them. QUANTITY: (1) • • (1)Dishwasher HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- • (1)Microwave Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • • (1) Trash Can NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • • (1)Recycle Can ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS: 1-3 • WALL(S): Washable cleanable surfaces NET AREA: 150 SF FLOOR(S): Hard surface, easily cleaned OTHER: NA • Should/May: CEILING: Washable • • Could have a door that opens from outside CEILING HEIGHT: 9'-0" • building and another door that opens into MILLWORK: Built-in cabinets, washable meeting room • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: OUTLETS: Yes- GFI at counters by sink • LIGHTING: Standard Warming Kitchen TELEPHONE: (1) Wall Phone • SPACE DIAGRAM: DATA: Wireless • SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code • OTHER: NA Building • SECURITY: NA Entry/Art Meeting • Gallery Room • MECHANICAL: 0 o HVAC: Standard Air Exchanges 00 PLUMBING: (3) compartment sink, hand • - wash sink `)° VENTILATIONS: NA Restrooms 5 1 • • ( 0 0 • _ • Glendale Library • Eating Areas EA-2a Cyber Café Eating Area • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (4)36"SQ Tables Eating Area shared with restaurant leaser. ACTIVITY: Eating Area • • (2)24"x 36"Tables When café kitchen closes space is still QUANTITY: (1) • (16)Slacking Chairs I utilized by the library. HOURS IN USE:10 AM to 9 PM,Mon- • • (I)Trash Can Thurs,10 AM to 6 PM,Fri&Sat • • (1)Bulletin Board NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • • (2)Vending Machines ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:NA WALL(S):Washable cleanable surfaces NET AREA:220 SF • FLOOR(S):hard surface,easily cleaned OTHER:NA • ShouldlMav: CEILING: Washable • • Area may open up to an outside plaza/patio CEILING HEIGHT:9'-0" • • Area could be by art gallery/entry MILLWORK:Could have some built-in bar counters • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS:All walls-plus at built in SPACE DIAGRAM: counters Outdoor Patio • LIGHTING: Pendant light fixtures above • tables,or eating surfaces-should enable • table configurations to change TELEPHONE:NA • ' DATA:Wireless Eating • SMOKE/FIRE ALARM:Per Building Code Art Gallery Area Periodicals OTHER:NA • e• L',__ • S 1 SECURITY:NA • 1 • MECHANICAL: HVAC:Separate zones to help with high Restrooms • activity and seasonal changes • PLUMBING:NA VENTILATIONS:NA • • • • • 0 • Glendale Library r._. .. , . .. r... .. _ • Eating Areas EA-2b Cyber Cafe Kitchen • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (1) Oven Cyber Café Kitchen for caters to bring ACTIVITY: Cyber Café Kitchen • • (2) Under counter Refrigerators prepared foods and heat them. Space may QUANTITY: (1) • • (3) Coffee Makers be leased out to outside vendor. Area HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- • (1)Juice Dispenser should be able to be closed separate from Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • • (1) Microwave the library. NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • • (1) Ice machine — NUMBER OF VISITORS: NA • (1) Recycle Trash Can ARCHITECTURAL: NET AREA: 280 SF 0 • (1) Refrigerated food display cabinets WALL(S): Washable cleanable surfaces OTHER: NA • • (1) Cash Drawer FLOOR(S): Hard surface, easily cleaned • • (1) Computer CEILING: Washable • (1) Credit Card Machine/printer CEILING HEIGHT: 9'-0" • Should/May: MILLWORK: Built-in cabinets, washable, • built in storage for supplies • NA ' RELATIONSHIPS: • ELECTRICAL • SPACE DIAGRAM: OUTLETS: Multiple in kitchen, GFl at Separate building entry counters by sink LIGHTING: Standard 0 TELEPHONE: (1) Wall Phone ' - DATA: Wireless. (1) Hard wall outlet Cyber • - SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code a OTHER: NA Cafe • Kitchen 0 • i ., w o SECURITY: NA • MECHANICAL: HVAC: Standard Air Exchanges • PLUMBING: NA Cyber Cafe Eating Area •4- 1, 9 VENTILATIONS: NA • • • • • • • + 0 • • Glendale Library • Staff Support SS-1 Information Perch • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • Custom Desk or purchased desk-must break Visitor assistance,place for patrons to pay ACTIVITY: Information Perch • apart in sections and be movable fines,issue library cards,check outs(Pods, QUANTITY: (1) • (1)Computer Laptops&Kindles,assist with lost&found HOURS IN USE:10 AM to 9 PM,Mon- • • (1)Credit/Debit Card Machine items Thurs,10 AM to 6 PM,Fri&Sat • • (1)Cash Drawer or Cash Register NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • • (1)Rar eceipt ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:All Patrons • (1)Receipt Printer NET AREA:100 SF • • (1)Desk Chair WALL(S):Sound absorbing • (1)Trash Receptacle FLOOR(S):Sound Absorbing • • (24)Shopping baskets CEILING: Sound Absorbing • • (1)Pencil Sharpener CEILING HEIGHT:Maximum • • (1)Cabinet for Kindle checkout&recharging MILLWORK:Could be custom,needs to be • (1)Cabinet for Laptop checkout&recharging movable and to break up in parts • • (1)Cabinet for/POD checkout&recharging RELATIONSHIPS: • • (1)Box for lost&found items ELECTRICAL • Should/May: OUTLETS:(2)Floor Mounted,plug molds Main Entry • May have a small ATM in this area for Kindle/IPOD and laptops recharging • LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • SPACE DIAGRAM: TELEPHONE:(1)Mobile Phone • DATA:(5)Hard outlets,Wireless Information • I SMOKE/FIRE ALARM:Per Building Code Staff Perch Book • J= I°/r —, OTHER:Provide buzzer at desk to alert Workroo Holds I . — staff in work room • SECURITY:Locking hidden cash drawer • secure and inaccessible to public Production Area • - Kindle MECHANICAL: • HVAC:Separate zones to help with high activity and seasonal changes PO D • laptops PLUMBING:NA • \/CAITII ATIf kIC•MA 11 • • • • 0 • Glendale Library • • Staff Support SS-2 Self Service Check-inlOut • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (5-6) Self Service Checkout comprised of Patrons Self Service station to check ACTIVITY: Self Service check out • Computer/Printer/Laser/Bar Scanner/Receipt materials out, disperse throughout library QUANTITY: (1) • Printer HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- • (5-6) Credit/Debit Card Machines Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • • (5-6) Trash Receptacles NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: 1-2 at each • • Custom Desk Stand-up access-one should ARCHITECTURAL: station • be ADA height WALL(S): Sound Absorbing, durable NUMBER OF VISITORS:All Patrons FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing NET AREA: 160 SF • Should/May: CEILING: Sound Absorbing OTHER:AV material check out security is • • NA CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum problematic and options should be • MILLWORK: Custom explored • ELECTRICAL RELATIONSHIPS: • OUTLETS: (4) Floor Mounted • LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level 40 Foot Candles @ floor level • SPACE DIAGRAM: TELEPHONE: NA • DATA: (4) Hard outlets floor mounted, • Wireless — SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code Self Service • - o OTHER: NA Check Out • — r-„ — 1 1 , 1 ;i I _ SECURITY: NA • l ii l • — MECHANICAL: • — �1I 7 — HVAC: Separate zones to help with high Information/Check-out Perch activity and seasonal changes • ' ' ' ` I PLUMBING: NA • o — VENTILATIONS: NA • — r--i 7 — • • • • 0 • ( O 4 • • Glendale Library • • Staff Support SS-3 Reserves/Holds • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (8)min.single face sections, Area to house all holds for library patrons. ACTIVITY: Reserves/Holds • shelving/stacks-7 openings QUANTITY: (1) HOURS IN USE:10 AM to 9 PM,Mon- • Thurs,10 AM to 6 PM,Fri&Sat • NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF VISITORS:All Patrons Should/May: WALL(S):Durable NET AREA:135 SF • • NA FLOOR(S):Sound Absorbing • CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT:Maximum • MILLWORK:NA OTHER:Provide space for additional book • trucks as additional storage is needed. RELATIONSHIPS: ' • SPACE DIAGRAM: ELECTRICAL Main Entry • OUTLETS:Yes • LIGHTING' 70 Foot Candles at desk level • 40 Foot Candles©floor level TELEPHONE:NA ,s. • DATA:NA Reserves/ • - SMOKE/FIRE ALARM Per Building Code Holds • - . OTHER:NA • SECURITY:Provide secure area/drawers • for CDs/DVDs • MECHANICAL: Circulation Pod • HVAC:Standard Air Exchanges • PLUMBING:NA • VENTILATIONS:NA • 1 •• • O • • Glendale Library _ . . . _.. ... ... ,... Staff Support SS-4 Production Area • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (1) Coin Operated Color Copier-Must be Area for public to make all copies of printed ACTIVITY: Production Area • easy to use materials. QUANTITY: (1) • • (1) Hole Punch HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- • (1) Color Printer ARCHITECTURAL: Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri& Sat • • (1) Scanner NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: NA • WALL(S): Durable, Sound Absorbing NUMBER OF VISITORS:All Patrons FLOOR(S): Sound Absorbing NET AREA: 70 SF • ShouldlMav: CEILING: Sound Absorbing • • Glass walls around area for staff visibility and CEILING HEIGHT: Maximum OTHER: NA monitoring of space MILLWORK: Custom counters w/storage • • Area could house lost&found items if by cabinets above and below working counter. • information perch Provide storage for paper supplies . • Area does not need to be a room with walls, OTHER: Isolate area away from quiet areas could be just an area of the library. Provide adequate counter RELATIONSHIPS: • space for locking storage of paper cutter • SPACE DIAGRAM: and photocopier supplies. Collections • ELECTRICAL • OUTLETS: (2) Dedicated outlets for • ' Copiers, 3-4 for printers &Scanners, (2) general Duplex+34"AFF Production • LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level Area Periodicals • 40 Foot Candles @ floor level TELEPHONE: NA • — DATA: (2) for copiers+ (1)general 34"AFF • SMOKE/FIRE ALARM: Per Building Code • r in H H OTHER: NA SECURITY: Locking door MECHANICAL: HVAC: Standard Air Exchanges • PLUMBING: NA • VENTILATIONS: NA • • ( 0 ...1 • • Glendale Library • • Staff Support SS-5 Staff Work Area • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • Work Area: Checking,Processing,and sorting up to 3,500 ACTIVITY: Staff Work Area • • (3)Standup work counters items each day.Cataloging&Ordering,books QUANTITY: (1) • (3)Stools are sorted&shipped. Book drops to sorter HOURS IN USE:10 AM to 9 PM,Mon- • • (3)Computers need to be as close the library entry. Thurs,10 AM to 6 PM,Fri&Sat • • (3)Bar Code Scanners NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: 3-4 • (3)Receipt Printers ARCHITECTURAL: • • (25)Book trucks WALL(S):Durable,Sound Absorbing NUMBER OF VISITORS:NA FLOOR(S):Sound Absorbing NET AREA:854 SF • • (8)Soft Drop Depressible Book Drops CEILING: Sound Absorbing OTHER:(2)drops are needed for public at • • 4'Wx4HM tack board bo CEILING HEIGHT:Maximum library entry-(1)for books the other for AV • (30)Mail HMexes forerd MILLWORK:Custom or Systems Furniture materials. • • (30)Mail boxes employees-Custom integrate OTHER:Isolate away from quiet areas of • w/Millwork or systems furniture library. A door is not needed from the library • Pneumatic Book Sorter area. Provide as much storage as possible, • • Pneumatic Carts overhead cabinets should be above all work RELATIONSHIPS: • • Pneumatic Book Sorter Computer surfaces. One desk needs computer screened • from other employees. Book Deliveries Desk Area: • • (1)Future Fax ELECTRICAL • • (1)Desk top Copier OUTLETS:(10)Duplex,(2)Quads,Outlets for • (1)Computer recharging pneumatic carts • • (1)Safe LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level Staff Work • • (1)Printer 40 Foot Candles @ floor level Public Entry Area Staff • (1)Pedestal TELEPHONE:(4) Entrance • • Provide custom shaped desk and work surfaces DATA:(1)per computer • • (1)Pencil/Center Drawer SMOKE/FIRE ALARM:Per Building Code • • (1)Desk Chair OTHER:Alarm from Circulation Pod for staff assistance • Should/May: Car Drop Room SECURITY:Locate Burglar/Alarm controls here • • Pneumatic sorter possibly could be viewed by • public. MECHANICAL: HVAC:Standard Air Exchanges • PLUMBING:NA • VENTILATIONS:NA • • • • • • Glendale Library IIIIIIMIMMIIIIIMII • • Staff Support SS-5 continued Staff Work Area • SPACE DIAGRAM: • • 1 • • II I li I , • Ll ii • i_i • I_ • ; .. Sod drop bodes;; ;; ; _ • s . I II II I LI- Am • � ' • — I II II I- Iwo _ _ • <\'\'• 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111p111 II — I • — — li■ • Mg Mil — • o --I,--I Book Trucks ; •I - • I II II II II II I, I, II I I 1 III I I I I I_ _I • "I�III II-I �� � �� I� I� I I �_� _II_III III III 11 '11 ICI_�II_II——i I DeliveryBins- dbl high • II II II II I II ii ii II II II I • r—y— —it——i�—it—ir- --I-_r—ir iI i • I I I I I • I I • • • ( 0 v • • Glendale Library • • Staff Support SS-6 Librarian's Work Area • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • • (5)Computers Area for librarians to order books,prepare ACTIVITY: Librarian's Work Area • • (5)Pedestals programs,review books,and to do paper QUANTITY: (1) • • (5)Center/Pencil Drawers work.Telephone Communication Center HOURS IN USE:10 AM to 9 PM,Mon- • (5)Desk Chairs - Thurs,10 AM to 6 PM,Fri&Sat • • (5)Book Trucks ARCHITECTURAL: NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS: (5) • WALL(S):Durable,Sound Absorbing with NUMBER OF VISITORS:NA Should/May: corner guards NET AREA:170 SF • • NA FLOOR(S):Sound Absorbing OTHER:NA • CEILING: Sound Absorbing • CEILING HEIGHT:Maximum MILLWORK:Custom or Systems Furniture • OTHER: Isolate away from quiet areas of • library. Provide as much storage as RELATIONSHIPS: possible • SPACE DIAGRAM: Staff Work Area • • ELECTRICAL OUTLETS:(6)Duplex LIGHTING: 70 Foot Candles at desk level • L 40 Foot Candles @ floor level TELEPHONE:(4) Librarians • Work Staff —— DATA:(4) Area Entrance • SMOKE/FIRE ALARM:Per Building Code OTHER:NA I • 10 10 Ito I SECURITY:NA • Staff Lounge • MECHANICAL: HVAC:Standard Air Exchanges • PLUMBING:NA • VENTILATIONS:NA • • • • • • • Glendale Library r _ • Staff Support SS-7 Staff Office • • Must have: FUNCTION(S): FEATURE(S): • Work Area: Library Manager&Assistant Manager's ACTIVITY: Staff Office • • (1) Computer Offices QUANTITY: (2) • • (1) Desk Chair HOURS IN USE: 10 AM to 9 PM, Mon- • (1) Book Trucks ARCHITECTURAL: Thurs, 10 AM to 6 PM, Fri & Sat • • (1) File Cabinet W