Loading...
01/14/2003 - Minutes (2) PROCEEDINGS OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH TUESDAY, JANUARY 14, 2003 The City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah, met in a Work Session on Tuesday, January 14, 2003, at 5:30 p.m. in Room 326, City Council Office, City County Building, 451 South State Street. In Attendance: Council Members Carlton Christensen, Van Turner, Eric Jergensen, Nancy Saxton, Jill Remington Love, Dave Buhler and Dale Lambert. Also in Attendance: Cindy Gust-Jenson, Executive Council Director; Mayor Ross C. "Rocky" Anderson; Diana Karrenberg, Community Affairs Manager; Tim Campbell, Director of Airports; Alison Weyher, Community and Economic Development Director; David Oka, Redevelopment Agency Executive Director; LeRoy Hooton, Public Utilities Director; Roger Evans, Building Services and Licensing Director; Elizabeth Giraud, Historic Preservation Planner; Lehua Weaver, Council Staff Assistant; Rocky Fluhart, Chief Administration Officer; Michael Sears, Council Budget and Policy Analyst; Russ Weeks, Council Policy Analyst; Steven Allred, Deputy City Attorney; LuAnn Clark, Housing and Neighborhood Development Director; David Nimkin, Mayor' s Chief of Staff; Laurie Dillon, Budget Analyst; David Dobbins, Housing and Neighborhood Development Deputy Director; Wayne Mills, Urban Design/Alleys Planner; Gary Mumford, Council Deputy Director/Senior Legislative Auditor; Janet Wolf, Mayor' s Director of Youth Programs; D.J. Baxter, Mayor' s Senior Advisor; John Dahlstrom, Wasatch Properties; and Beverly Jones, Deputy City Recorder. Councilmember Christensen presided at and conducted the meeting. The meeting was called to order at 5:33 p.m. AGENDA ITEMS #1. REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, INCLUDING REVIEW OF COUNCIL INFORMATION ITEMS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS. Cindy Gust-Jenson said Item A-12, a tentative Executive Session, was not needed. She said Item C-1, Citizen Comments, were scheduled to follow the Mayor' s State of the City report. See File M 03-5 for announcements. #2. INTERVIEW GENEVIEVE ATWOOD PRIOR TO CONSIDERATION OF HER REAPPOINTMENT TO THE METROPOLITAN WATER BOARD. Ms. Atwood said it was a difficult board because water was inherently difficult. She said Salt Lake City was rich when it came to water but not so rich when it came to distribution and allocation. She said a new water plant was being considered at Point of the Mountain. She said the new plant would be in the best interest of the entire County because it would allow the entire Metropolitan area to link water systems. #3. INTERVIEW DAVID FITZSIMMONS PRIOR TO CONSIDERATION OF HIS APPOINTMENT TO THE HISTORIC LANDMARK COMMISSION. Mr. Fitzsimmons said he was an architect. He said he had lived in the valley since 1983. He said he believed in what the Commission was doing. He said there was economic benefit to the neighborhoods and the community at large. Councilmember Lambert said there were complaints that the Historic Landmark process was difficult and lengthy. Mr. Fitzsimmons said the board's goal was to make the process easier. 03 - 1 PROCEEDINGS OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH TUESDAY, JANUARY 14, 2003 #4. INTERVIEW ANDREW GALLEGOS PRIOR TO CONSIDERATION OF HIS APPOINTMENT TO THE UTAH AIR TRAVEL COMMISSION. Mr. Gallegos said he worked with United Airlines when he was a student at the University of Utah. He said he became United Airlines marketing manager in San Francisco, California. He said in the 1980' s he served a term on the Utah Air Travel Commission. He said the commission promoted international travel. He said he was familiar with most of the small airports around the State. He said those airports needed to be kept in good condition. #5. INTERVIEW MEGHAN ZANOLLI HOLBROOK PRIOR TO CONSIDERATION OF HER REAPPOINTMENT TO THE UTAH AIR TRAVEL COMMISSION. Ms. Holbrook said Salt Lake City International Airport was the gateway to the State. She said they needed to be protective of the airport. She said there were at least 40 more airports in the State with small runways which people depended on. She said the main flights in and out for some of the small airports was Life Flight. #6. INTERVIEW EDWARD BARBANELL PRIOR TO CONSIDERATION OF HIS REAPPOINTMENT TO THE HOUSING TRUST FUND ADVISORY BOARD. Mr. Barbanell said this was the first year the board had been established. He said they met once a month and were trying to understand local and federal programs which helped low income housing. He said the biggest challenge was finding a reliable funding source so the housing trust fund could be self-sustaining. #7. INTERVIEW CATHERINE DUNN PRIOR TO CONSIDERATION OF HER REAPPOINTMENT TO THE BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT. Ms. Dunn said the board had good leadership. She said she had served on the board approximately 18 months. #8 . THE COUNCIL WAS INTRODUCED TO WILLIAM RAMOS WITH THE AMERICA'S PROMISE PROGRAM. View Attachment Mr. Ramos said America's Promise had five basic promises to children and youth: 1) provide caring and mentoring adults, 2) provide safe places during non-school hours, 3) provide youth with marketable skills, 4) provide them with opportunities to serve, and 5) provide them a healthy start from 0 to 18 years of age. He said through those five promises they felt children and youth would grow up to be healthy productive citizens. He said he attended a meeting of the National League of Cities. He said he had the opportunity to meet with Mayor Anderson, David Nimkin and Janet Wolf to discuss America's Promise. He said he wanted to work with the children and youth of Salt Lake City. #9. RECEIVE A BRIEFING REGARDING RECLASSIFICATIONS OF POSITIONS AT THE AIRPORT. View Attachment Tim Campbell and Gary Mumford briefed the Council from the attached handout. Mr. Campbell said the reclassifications took longer than anticipated. Councilmember Christensen asked if these positions would be included in the next budget opening. Mr. Mumford said in the past they had been included with budget amendments. All Council Members were in favor of forwarding this issue. 03 - 2 PROCEEDINGS OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH TUESDAY, JANUARY 14, 2003 #10. RECEIVE A BRIEFING REGARDING 900 SOUTH RAIL LINE NEGOTIATIONS. View Attachment D.J. Baxter briefed the Council from the attached handout. He said there had been discussion with Union Pacific (UP) about ongoing maintenance costs of equipment the City was going to install for the quiet zone. He said UP would perform regular maintenance. He said UP would not be responsible for vandalism or other damage caused by something other than the railroad. Councilmember Christensen asked where funding for the equipment would come from. Mr. Baxter said a funding source had not been identified but some of the money could qualify as Redevelopment Agency (RDA) money. Councilmember Christensen asked when a recommendation on a funding source would be made. Mr. Baxter said the proposed agreement required the City to work with UP to develop a plan for the quiet zone. He said the plan had to be approved by the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) . He said as soon as an approved plan was in place they would have a solid figure on upfront costs. Councilmember Christensen asked if he had a dollar figure in which UP would be participating. Mr. Baxter said it was under $100,000. Councilmember Christensen said compared to what the railroad had been willing to give the community, that figure seemed low. Mr. Baxter said by establishing the quiet zone, the City would be reducing UP's liability because crossings would be safer. He said UP felt improving nine crossings would not significantly reduce their liability. Councilmember Turner asked about the timeframe of the Federal Government regulations. Mr. Baxter said the regulations could be out in a few months or next year. Councilmember Turner asked if there was any advantage to waiting until the regulations came out to establish the quiet zone. He asked if UP would be responsible for the gates. Mr. Baxter said it was not entirely clear but the draft version was silent on who was responsible for maintaining the new equipment. He said if the City waited for the regulations and did not pursue the agreement, then the City ran a risk that the rules might never come around. Councilmember Buhler asked if there was risk that the City could put up the wrong kind of crossing gate. Mr. Baxter said there was but he felt the risk had been minimized. He said the FRA could not discuss the contents of a final rule but they had agreed to review the City' s proposal. Councilmember Lambert asked if the Council needed to approve the agreement. Mr. Baxter said the City could enter the agreement without Council approval. He said each City contract had a clause at the end which stated that all funds committed to in the agreement would be subject to future appropriations. He said the Council would have the discretion to consider additional funding. Councilmember Lambert said UP would perform ongoing maintenance on gate and signal equipment and they would pay for fencing. He said the City was carrying the rest of the burden. Mr. Baxter said if there was no agreement and the City waited for the Federal rule before proceeding, the situation would be the same except for vandalism issues. Councilmember Christensen asked if it was possible UP would share or accept the risk of changes in the agreement and the adoption of the FRA rules. Mr. Baxter said UP had said no. Councilmember Christensen said at some point UP needed to accept some of the risk. He said it could not be left open ended. Mr. Baxter said a time limit could be put in the agreement which stated how long the City would cover the costs. Councilmember Love said she agreed with Councilmember Christensen. #11. RECEIVE A BRIEFING REGARDING AN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT LOAN PROPOSAL RELATING TO KUTV. View Attachment 03 - 3 PROCEEDINGS OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH TUESDAY, JANUARY 14, 2003 Alison Weyher, Dave Oka and Michael Sears briefed the Council from the attached handout. Ms. Weyher said they needed direction on how to proceed. She said this was a different approach than in the past. She said there were two parts to the Channel 2 move to the Wells Fargo Building. She said Community and Economic Development had proposed lending $1.2 million from the City' s Economic Development Revolving Loan to Channel 2. She said Channel 2 would use the money to purchase needed equipment to move from their present location in West Valley City to Salt Lake City. Ms. Weyher said there had been questions about whether this was an appropriate use of the revolving loan funds. She said the loan fund was set up in 1991 with the goal to promote development to enhance the economic vitality of the City. She said the fund currently had a balance of $4, 674, 000 and was currently funded by the City Centre Building and an Urban Development Action Grant (UDAG) . She said the City Centre project still owed the City $1.9 million and the loan would mature in 2009. Ms. Weyher said they were proposing that the $1.2 million be a 15-year loan. She said there were three differences from loans previously approved by the Council: 1) the size of the loan was the largest ever made from the revolving loan fund, 2) the loan carried a 0% interest, and 3) they were proposing that a portion of the loan be paid back as in-kind payments. She said the provided handout said $600, 000 would be paid back in cash. She said Viacom preferred to pay back $500, 000 in cash with $700,000 being paid back in cash or in-kind contributions. She said the proposal was refined so KUTV would sponsor between four and six promotional campaigns on the downtown area each year for the 15 year life of the loan. She said the spots would run at the lowest rate available and would air at a two-for-one cost. She said that would be negotiated each year over the course of the loan. She said if they could not come to terms then the loan payment for that year would be made in cash. Mr. Oka said the RDA's loan would be $2.8 million. He said of the $2.8 million, $1.5 million would be interest free. He said justification for the 0% interest was that $1.5 million would help Wasatch Properties with the negotiations with Channel 2. He said Channel 2 would bring 186 jobs to downtown. He said the loan would be 15-years with reduced payments the first three years. He said the remaining 12 years would be equal payments. He said $1.3 million of the $2.8 million loan would facilitate improvements for tenants in the building and was subject to 3%. He said the RDA had agreed on $1,000 of credit towards the interest for each person brought in from outside the City. He said that would be credited against interest on the loan. Mr. Oka said the balance would be amortized over the remaining 12 years. He said Channel 2 had requested the opportunity to pay the City back by 50% when the building was refinanced. He said if the West Valley City property was sold, the $1.5 million would be paid off. He said collateral on the loan would be: 1) $300,000 in a reserve account in case of default, and 2) a second position on cash flows of the business which meant that rental income which came into the company would be dispersed into the bank and then the City would receive the balance. He said in the event of default, cash flows would be collected by the bank and any additional cash flow above the requirement would service the RDA loan. He said anything left would go back to Wasatch Properties. He said prior to entering into the agreement, staff would examine all leases, all lessees, all loan agreements and rent rolls for the payment record of tenants. He said they would receive monthly rental records and quarterly statements of cash position from the company. Councilmember Saxton said 0% interest loans needed shorter terms. She asked about Wasatch Properties. John Dahlstrom, Wasatch Properties, said they were putting up $400,000 in tenant improvements and $250,000 in commissions. He said they were being 03 - 4 PROCEEDINGS OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH TUESDAY, JANUARY 14, 2003 asked to take down the existing studio building in West Valley City. He said that would be a cost in addition to the $1.5 million. He said they needed to stabilize the West Valley City facility and carry it until it was either sold or leased. He said their out of pocket cost would be in excess of $1.5 million. Councilmember Saxton said she understood rental price for the space in the proposed building was approximately $22 a square foot. Mr. Dahlstrom said that was accurate as it related to retail space on the main floor. He said the blended rate for the entire space was around $14.25. She asked what kind of income Wasatch Properties would realize from the new tenant. Mr. Dahlstrom said $39, 000 a month. Councilmember Lambert said a $1.2 million loan, interest free for 15 years was a substantial incentive. He asked about the idea of in-kind services. Rocky Fluhart said the Administration usually did not suggest no interest loans and interest was normally included in the City's loans. He said during negotiations a position was presented to the City by the borrowers and the position was justified. Councilmember Buhler said he viewed this as an opportunity for the City and supported the deal. He suggested that when promotions were discussed with KUTV they be presented to the Council. #12. CONSIDER A MOTION TO ENTER INTO EXECUTIVE SESSION, IN KEEPING WITH UTAH CODE, TO DISCUSS PENDING OR REASONABLY IMMINENT LITIGATION, PURSUANT TO UTAH CODE ANNOTATED 52- 4-4 AND 52-4-5 (1) (a) (iii) . An Executive Session was held. See File M 03-5 for confidential tape and sworn statement. The meeting adjourned at 9:25 p.m. bj 03 - 5 ' O M I S 'The little red wagon. A symbol of childhood. It could be filled with a child's hopes and S UTAH PR ri dreams or weighed down with their burdens. Millions of American children need our help to pull that wagon along. Let's all pull together.' -Retired General Cohn L.Powell • WHEN WAS UTAH'S PROMISE. INITIATED? In April 1997, Retired General Colin Powell joined all former living U.S. Presidents in initiating America's Promise, a nationwide effort aimed at ensuring the nation's youth receive live essential promises. Six months later, the state of IJtali responded to General Powell's call for service and launched its own effort. WHAT IS UTAH'S PROMISE? �` • & t: I I Jtah's Promise is a grassroots effort that mobilizes volunteers to improve local communities. It also seeks to deliver five fun(lainen- - tal promises to Utah's children and youth: .l ` ► •r. t - PP.. A Caring Adult a parent, teacher, mentor, or coach; Safe Places to learn and to grow; A Healthy Start in life for a healthy future; Marketable Skills through an effective education; and - Opportunities to Serve and give back to the community. - America's Promise Chairman Retired General Colin Powell with Governor Michael Leavitt at the launching of Utah's Promise. How IS UTAH'S PROMISE ORGANIZED? Unlike most statewide efforts, IJtah's Promise is supported primarily by volunteers. The Utah Commission on Volunteers, a Commission of the Office of the Lieutenant Governor, provides some staff support, but 40 most of the work is accomplished by volunteers. Governor Michael O. Leavitt, First Lady Jacalyn S. Leavitt and Lieutenant Governor Olene S. Walker pro- vide the Utah's Promise initiative with leadership and direction. However, the backbone of Utah's Promise lies in residents who spearhead local community efforts and donate their time and energies. Communities that decide to participate in the Utah's Promise effort pledge their commitment to the cause by becoming a "Community of Promise." By doing this, a community determines issues, sets goals, obtains commitments and initiates efforts to improve the community. WHAT HAS UTAH'S PROMISE ACCOMPLISHED? Currently, 66 communities have become involved with Utah's Promise, 24 of which are "Communities of Promise." Most communities, as a way to provide a marketable skill to their youth, have established literacy programs. American Fork, for example, founded a Literacy Center where children and adults alike can receive reading instruction. Safe Neighborhood teams have been created, all of which have partnered with local officials to ensure safe community environments. Youth courts have been established as an alternative to the juvenile judicial system, allowing Utah youth a chance to provide service in their communities. These are only a few of the ways IJtah's Promise is making a difference in the lives of Utah residents. • How TO CONTACT UTAH'S PROMISE.? • For more information on IJtah's Promise, please contact the Utah Commission on Volunteers at 1-888-755-11TAH (8824). Outside of Utah call (801) 764-0704. C•.0 Utah's Promise AIVIE 2I_.'...PROMa4 s Fact Sheet . • Mission • The mission of America's Promise is to mobilize people from every sector of American life to build the character and competence of our nation's youth by fulfilling Five Promises: 1. Ongoing relationships with caring adults-parents,mentors, tutors,or coaches; • 2. Safe places with structured activities during non-school hours; 3. Healthy start and future; 4. Marketable skills through effective education; • 5. Opportunities to give back through community service. m Founding : America's Promise was founded after the Presidents Summit for America's Future in 1997,where Presidents Clinton, Bush, Carter and Ford—and Nancy Reagan representing Ronald Reag�a—cltallcnged the nation to make children and youth a national priority and fulfill the Five Promises.The unprecedented gathering- - sponsored by the Corporation for National and Community Service.Points of Light Foundation and United Way of America—brought together governors,mayors,community delegations,business leaders and several 'i ' thousand concerned citizens to make a commitment to ensure a brighter future for America's youth.That • . commitment was reaffirmed in 2001 by President George W. Bush when he declared, "There is no more important goal for America than to make sure every person realizes the promise of our great land.And I want , to thank the good folks of America's Promise for working tirelessly to make sure that goal reaches through- out all our country." m Collaborative Network '— = Americas Promise is a network that asks every community,organization and individual in the nation to help m fulfill the Five Promises for every young person.Using public and private funds,we generate resources, and ?C build capacity through collaboration to leverage the work of youth-serving organizations in local communi- 7C " ties fulfilling the Five Promises. Over the last five years, the Americas Promise Alliance has grown to more N than 400 national partners including corporations,foundations,youth-serving organizations,and federal and state agencies,along with more than 400 community collaborations—which we call Communities of Promise. • -ea 4 Building Capacity O Our job at America's Promise is to connect the resources of those partners with the Communities of Promise - to help facilitate unprecedented collaboration and serve youth with far greater resources than they would otherwise receive.This is essential if we are to ever close the gap that exists between what too many children z i and young people need to succeed and the reality of their daily lives_Working hand-in-hand with our part- ners,America's Promise is providing the technical assistance and training, and generating innovative tools that accelerate the delivery of more resources to as many young people as possible at the community level. o Organization m America's Promise is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization funded by public and private grants and contri- < butions. For more information, visit wwwamericaspromise.org; AOL Keyword: Americas Promise or call m .p 1-888-55-YOUTH. of909 North Washington Street,Suite 400•Alexandria,VA 22314•(703)684-4500 Fax:(703) 535-3900 AMERICAS PROMISE 114E AT.t/ANCElbntYOUTH' m COMMUNITIES OF PROMISE The more support young people receive from their community,the more likely they are to lead successful lives.Research confirms this fluting,but it also reveals that too few youth receive this support.Through America's Promise—The Alliance for Youth,more than 400 communlles have committed tofuUlumg Five Promises for youth:ongoing relationships with caring adults—parents,mentors,tutors or coaches; safe places with structured activities during nonschool hours;healthy start and future;marketable skills through effecth'e education;and opportunities to give back through community service. WHAT IS A COMMUNITY OF PROMISE? A Community of Promise is a town,city or county that commits to fulfilling all Five Promises for Local youth.In order to achieve each one,a Community of Promise: In Mobilizes locally:More than 400 communities across the nation have united to fulfill the Five Promises for young people.These communities have formed diverse grassroots coalitions encompassing the private,public and not-for-profit sectors.By working together,communities generate more resources for youth. • • Collaborates:A Community of Promise mobilizes by collaborating among all sectors of the community—corporations,not-for-profits,youth,elected officials,schools,churches,,synagogues and other partners from the public and private sectors.Collaboration increases the scale and impact of youth initiatives by snore efficiently channeling resources. • Leverages resources:Each partner provides essential resources to community efforts,such as volunteers,fluids,equipment,consulting expertise,facilities,and connections with other groups and individuals. • Buiids on each promise:The promises have a cumulative Impact Youth fare better when all Five Promises are fulfilled than when only one or two are fulfilled.And when the lives of all local youth are transformed in this way,the entire community grows stronger. Organizations and citizens can help form Communities of Promise by contacting America's Promise at 1-888-55-YOUTH or visiting our Web site at www.a»tericaspromise.arg,AOL Keyword:America's Promise. PLAN FOR SUCCESS Communities of Promise develop action plans that include seven steps for mobilizing neighborhoods and communities: • Build an energized team:The team should include local officials,youth,not-for-profits,schools and others who understand the needs of local youth and can tap community resources. ■ Establish a lead contact and community home:These serve as focal points for planning,sharing information within the leadership team and communicating to the community at large. • -more- • Identify youth needs:Determining how many local young people the community can reasonably provide each of the Five Promises is essential,as well as deciding what partners,programs and resources will fulfill each promise.Measurable goals should be set, including timelines.Partners must also commit to the number of youth who will be reached. • Secure specific contndtmentt from all focal sectors:This may mean creating new programs or expanding existing ones.Commitments should he specific,measurable and targeted to each of the Five Promises. • Connect young people:The community's resources must be matched to youth needs.One strategy is to identify or develop designated places where youth initiatives can take place.They might be schools, churches or synagogues,youth clubs,community centers or other sites where services can be delivered. • Build public interest:Initiatives can be promoted locally in a strategic manner.In order to gamer support,hold periodic summits,generate news coverage,enlist local media as Community of Promise partners,and use America's Promise support material such as the Little Red Wagon logo. • Track results:Show results by publicizing how well the Community of Promise fulfills the Five Promises to local youth overall;also highlight the specific achievements of and impact on individual youth. OUR PARTNERS RESPOND Communities of Promise throughout the nation are collaborating creatively to change the lives of their young people.For a ample: • In Knoxville,Tenn.,the Vine Middle Magnet School is one of several schools and faith sites expanding their programs to fulfill all Five Promises. A new school mentoring program brings in mentors from 100 Black Men and the Bureau of Alcohol.Knox County Health Department,the schools,and the College of Nursing partnered to expand an on-site health center that accommodated 3,000 visits by youth in 1999. Students serve meals to the homeless and read to children in child care_ A Leadership Knoxville group offers computer-aided tutoring. SALT LAKE CITY COUNCIL C L STAFF REPORT DATE January 10,2003 SUBJECT: Proposal to Reclassify Three Division Director Positions at the Airport STAFF REPORT BY: Gary Mumford REQUESTED ACTION: The proposal is presented to revise the executive compensation plan to create two additional executive positions and reclassify one executive position to a higher level. • Director of Engineering Executive 004(currently professional 615) • Director of Public Relations/Marketing Executive 006(currently professional 612) • Director of Maintenance Executive 004(currently executive 005) There are seven division director positions within the Department of Airports that report to the Airport Executive Director. Five of these division director positions are classified within the executive compensation plan and two director positions are dassified within the 10 professional employee compensation plan. The Executive Director of the Department of Airports is requesting that all seven division director positions be classified in the executive compensation plan. The Human Resource Management Division conducted job audits of these seven positions and recommended that the Director of Maintenance position be reclassified to a higher executive level position. OPTIONS: 1. Forward to a future Council Meeting for consideration. 2. Set a date for a public hearing-Each year in May,the Council holds public hearings prior to adopting employee compensation plans. Changes to the staffing document that result in a current year budget impact are generally made at the time of a budget amendment,which requires a public hearing. On occasions in the past, the Council has amended the executive staffing schedule of the executive compensation plan without holding a public hearing. 3. Defer consideration until the next scheduled budget amendment-Although the Department of Airports is not requesting additional appropriations,there is an ongoing budget impact 4. Defer consideration until the annual budget process-Consideration of reclassifications in conjunction with the annual and biennial budgets allows for • reclassifications to be considered along with all other budget issues. 5. Do not forward the proposal for consideration. MATTERS AT ISSUE: • • Job duties of the three positions: a. Director of Airport Engineering-The Airport Engineer directs the airport's capital improvement program including the new development program,which is more than a$1 billion program to replace the terminals,concourses,and change land-side roadways and parking. The Director of Airport Engineering supervises 48 employees. Following a job audit,Human Resource Management recommends the pay grade be reclassified to an executive pay plan grade of 004. The midpoint or market rate of the current and proposed pay grades is almost the same. There are some advantages of the executive pay plan for the employee such as severance pay, but the disadvantage for the employee is the at-will status rather than merit status. The current employee is willing to make the change to the executive pay plan. b. Director of Public Relations and Marketing-This position supervises 9 employees and is responsible for implementing and directing air-service marketing and public relations including media relations,advertising,marketing,public relations campaigns,air service analysis,publications and special events. The Executive Director of Airports is proposing to combine the Director of Marketing position with the Director of Public Relations position. The vacant Director of Marketing position (currently pay grade 612)will be down graded resulting in a savings of about $10,000 annually. c. Director of Airport Maintenance-The Director of Maintenance oversees maintenance operations of the airfield,grounds,and facilities including runway snow removal and capital improvement maintenance projects. There are 228 full- time-equivalent positions within the Airport Maintenance Division,more employees than any of the other six divisions within the Department of Airports. In response to the initial request to reclassify two of the division director positions,the Human Resource Management Division conducted a job audit of all airport division directors for consistency. The Human Resource Management Division recommended that the Director of Airport Maintenance be reclassified to a higher level executive position. • Budgetary Impact-The Department of Airports estimates that the three reclassifications will cost an additional$14,000 annually($24,000 in additional salary and benefit costs with an offsetting$10,000 savings from reducing the pay classification of the vacant marketing position). • Appointed At-Will Status-The reclassification will move two positions from merit status to at-will status. This change will allow the executive director more discretion in replacing incumbents that do not meet expectations. • Recruitment-In the event division director positions becomes vacant,the executive compensation plan allows the Executive Director more flexibility in offering appropriate compensation following a national search to find qualified candidates who have relevant aviation industry experience. • • • Retention-National airports and consulting firms are constantly seeking aviation administrators and can sometimes offer compensation packages in excess of what the existing classification for this position allows. The Executive Director of Airports would like greater flexibility in negotiating reasonable compensation for individuals in this position. • Consistency within the Department of Airports-The proposal to add two additional executive positions will provide consistency within the organization(i.e.,all seven division directors will be classified within the executive compensation plan). • Number of Executive Positions-Past Councils have generally preferred to limit the number of executive positions in City government. There are currently 47 executive positions with 6 of these in the Department of Airports. The following table shows the midpoint or market rate of each division director position (current and proposed). AIRPORT DIVISION DIRECTORS REPORTING DIRECTLY TO THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR PROPOSED AND CURRENT PAY GRADE CLASSIFICATIONS Directors Repotting Directly Number of Director's Pay Plan&Grade Midpoint'Market Rate to Executive Director Employees FTEs �3i A.„ $ 'aYY`1^ss';g�ze ;�/, .:L X' d'}a -� 1y'&:4:, 7�"5� ,��gGf �•tI 1�� 3�� � ', '€ ten. _ ;y-:: ,, .' . _ �.s,."4r.� " >_;a, k:': `:. � »`�s: c ,�-y „�,` y e;I i £I=s zs7="`'+3 Y�j„ , . a = z ` mot A r;;V-7,4"-"H i':eat s Director of Operations 207 Executive Pay Plan grade 003 $97,481 c'p rrss��, - .z=t`a4 a, %. .J c ' . , #:,; ,Y` t?}< ,�aa+�r`x;, rly,'f} -i eeri �' gm; a;':zm. ad< ' $x =.�a a�5` a .r;,��a. ti2�,'.r.' ``: :_ Director of Finance& 20% Executive Pay Plan grade 003 $97,481 Accounting Director of Administration& 38 Executive Pay Plan grade 003 $97,481 Commercial Services Director of Planning, 10 Executive Pay Plan grade 004 $88,742 Environmental and Capital Program • Director Of Community and 9 Pr9110941 paY-gr de:": $77,877 ;a_, Public Relations o Pay Ilan grade.806 u 6 oay`q $7b,797 • Prof-ssienel"Pay Plan grade 612 cc: Rocky Fluhart,David Nimkin,Tim Campbell,Brenda Hancock,Vic Blanton,Jamey Knighton,DJ Baxter NOV 2 2 2002 ✓ COUNCIL TRANSMITTAL TO: Rocky J. Fluhart DATE: November 15, 2002 Chief Administrative Officer FROM: Timothy L. Campbell, A.A.E. Executive Director SUBJECT: Reclassification of Engineering Director Position STAFF CONTACT: Timothy L. Campbell DOCUMENT TYPE: Ordinance to Amend Executive Compensation Plan RECOMMENDATION: To amend the Executive Compensation Plan to reclassify the Engineering Director-Airport to an at-will position, Executive Level 004. BUDGET IMPACT: Estimated at $8,000 annually. Funds are available in the • current budget to accommodate this change. BACKGROUND/DISCUSSION: The Director of Airport Engineering plays an integral role in establishing the overall vision and strategic plans for the development of the Airport's facilities. Consequently, the individual that fills the position must be responsive to the direction provided by the Airport Executive Director. It is important that the employee in the Engineering Director position understand and accept the overall philosophies of the administration, is committed to serving the interests of the City, and is willing to follow the guidance provided by the department executive. It is essential that the Executive Director for Airports have the ability to appoint professionals to this position. The existing classification does not allow for the degree of discretion that might be needed to ensure proper management of the Airport's development programs. The Airport Engineering Director is accountable for directing the airport's comprehensive facilities development programs, and the airport's capital improvement program. Typically, the director of any one of these individual programs could be at an executive level. However, when these responsibilities are combined, there is a disparity between the job requirements and the job classification. Another important concern is that of market consistency. Airport management is a very competitive,highly specialized discipline. This is certainly true with respect to airport engineering and capital program management, in which a broad range of specialized • knowledge and skills are required. In the event this position becomes vacant, a national search to find a qualified replacement would be imperative. Given industry market • conditions, it would be difficult to find competent candidates, who have adequate aviation industry experience, at the current classification grade. Presently, the lure from private sector employers as well as from other national airports is a genuine threat to retaining the airport's most capable administrators. This is particularly true in this case. National consulting firms are constantly seeking highly competent aviation engineers and can offer compensation packages far in excess of what the existing classification allows. This places the Department of Airports at a distinct disadvantage when trying to retain skilled engineering administrators in our mission- critical positions. It is necessary to have greater flexibility in negotiating reasonable compensation for individuals in this position. 10 • iiii Job Title: DIRECTOR OF ENGINEERING -AIRPORT • Job Code Number: 001236 FLSA: Exempt EEO CODE: 1 Pay Level: 004 JOB SUMMARY: Under the general administrative direction of the Executive Director of Airports, performs responsible professional and administrative work to direct and coordinate the Engineering functions of the Salt Lake City Department of Airports (SLCDA). Directs and manages the programming, design, and construction of the Airport's capital improvements program. THIS IS AN APPOINTED AT-WILL POSITION TYPICAL DUTIES: 1. Directs and supervises a staff of professional personnel assigned to the Engineering Division. Responsible for personnel actions and administrative matters as they apply to the operation, performance, and accountability of the Engineering Division. 2. Prepares the operating budget for the Engineering Division. Responsible for budget compliance and status throughout the Division. 3. Develops and directs policies, procedures, and processes for the implementation of capital improvement projects. Develops project scopes and design standards:to ensure compliance with federal, state, and • local regulations related to civil airports. 4. Coordinates the development of capital improvement projects with airport tenants and other SLCDA Divisions to ensure that projects are designed and constructed with minimal disruption to airport operations. Responsible for ensuring that projects are completed in a safe and orderly manner. 5. Responsible for large, multi-faceted construction projects from initial planning and scoping through final construction. Directs, coordinates, and manages the activities of design professionals, technical consultants, and contractors. Responsible for establishing and maintaining schedules and budgets on capital improvement projects. Ensures that projects are constructed in compliance with governing codes and regulations, contract requirements, and sound engineering principles. 6. Directs the hiring of professional consultants to perform complex analysis and design. Responsible for establishing scopes of work, negotiating contracts, establishing fees, and approving pay requests. Reviews, evaluates, and approves consultants'work products to ensure compliance with the Airport's needs and objectives. 7. Responsible for procuring professional and contractor services as related to Airport capital improvement projects. Ensures that procedures for soliciting and procuring professional services comply with City's procurement policies. Oversees the construction bidding process to ensure compliance with City's procurement policies regarding construction services. Oversees compliance with contractual agreements for professional and construction services. • 8. Coordinates with other city, state, and federal agencies as necessary for compliance with governmental regulations and guidelines related to the programming, design, and construction of Airport capital improvement projects. 9. Assists in developing the capital improvement program for the SLCDA. Provides direction regarding scope development, engineering concerns and requirements, and cost projections for future development. . 010. Advises the Airport Board, Executive Director, and other members of the Airport Leadership Group regarding technical engineering matters. Provides related briefings and reports as needed. 11. May act in the capacity of Executive Director or Deputy Executive Director of Airports when so authorized. 12. Performs other duties as assigned. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: 1. Graduation from an accredited college or university with a Bachelor's degree in Engineering and seven (7) years professional experience in the design and construction of airport facilities. Experience must include at least four (4)years in a civil airport or aviation administrative capacity. 2. Certification as a Professional Engineer by the State of Utah, or registration as a Professional Engineer in another state or jurisdiction (out of-state Professional Engineers must be registered by the State of Utah within six months of employment). 3. Thorough knowledge of engineering principles, codes, requirements, and regulations relating to a civil airport. 4. Ability to review and approve difficult and complex engineering computations, estimates, design documents, and specifications; use computers, express ideas clearly and concisely and relate well with IIthe general public, co-workers, and subordinates. 5. Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing with individuals of varied professional backgrounds. Ability to represent the SLCDA in public forums to present, negotiate, and advocate airport policies regarding engineering related issues. 6. Ability to plan and direct the work of professional staff in developing, designing, and managing the construction of major construction projects. WORKING CONDITIONS: 1. Light physical effort. Comfortable working conditions handling light weights. Intermittent sitting, standing, and walking. 2. Constant exposure to stressful situations as the result of human behavior. 3. Required to work non-traditional hours. A ten (10) year personal, criminal, and employment background check is required by the Salt Lake City Department of Airports and Transportation Security Administration regulations for this position. The above statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of work being performed by persons assigned to this job. They 0 are not intended to be an exhaustive list of all duties,responsibilities and skills required of personnel so classified. All requirements are subject to possible modification to reasonably accommodate individuals with disabilities. Approved by: Tim Campbell Date: 4/3/02 Title: Executive Director Department:Airports HR Approval: Revised Job: ® Updated language within job description NOV 2 2 2002 • COUNCIL TRANSMITTAL TO: Rocky J. Fluhart DATE: November 15, 2002 Chief Administrative Officer FROM: Timothy L. Campbell, A.A.E. Executive Director SUBJECT: Reclassification and Consolidation of Director of Public Relations and Director of Marketing Positions STAFF CONTACT: Timothy L. Campbell DOCUMENT TYPE: Ordinance to Amend Executive Compensation Plan RECOMMENDATION: To amend the Executive Compensation Plan to move the Marketing and Public Relations Director positions into a combined Director of Public Relations/Marketing-Airport position at the Executive Level 006. • BUDGET IMPACT: Estimated savings of$10,000 annually. Funds are available in the current budget to accommodate this change. BACKGROUND/DISCUSSION: The recently vacated Director of Marketing position provides an opportunity to consolidate the Public Relations and Marketing positions into a new position of Director- Public Relations/Marketing-Airport. The position would be classified as an appointed at-will position at pay level 006. The new position would be responsible for comprehensive marketing and public relations, and developing and implementing a full range of professional services and programs. Some of these programs include: media relations, advertising, marketing, public relations campaigns, air service analysis, publication production and special events coordination. Consolidation of the positions will provide improved coordination of the overall marketing program and public relations to insure that a coordinated message is delivered. Placing these duties under one individual will create a synergy that will result in improved use of consultants and outside resources that will serve both a marketing and public relations purpose. • The individual in this position will play an integral role in establishing the overall vision and message for the Department and will be a member of the senior staff at the airport. • The individual that fills the position must be responsive to the direction provided by the Airport Executive Director. It is important that the Executive Director for Airports have the ability to appoint individuals that fill a senior level position such as this. Consolidating these two senior management positions will result in personnel savings. The vacancy created by the consolidation will be reclassified to a lower level position that will support the newly created Director position. Savings should approximate $10,000 annually. S • • Job Title: DIRECTOR—PUBLIC RELATIONS/MARKETING -AIRPORT • Job Code Number: FLSA: Exempt EEO CODE: 2 Pay Level: 006 JOB SUMMARY: Under the supervision of the Executive Director, is responsible for comprehensive marketing and public relations. Develops, implements and directs a full range of professional services and programs including media relations, advertising, marketing, public relations campaigns, air service analysis, publication production and special events coordination for the Salt Lake City Department of Airports. THIS IS AN APPOINTED AT-WILL POSITION TYPICAL DUTIES: 1. Directs the staff of the Department of Airports public relations and air services marketing programs. Responsible for personnel actions and administrative matters. Manages and directs the implementation of work programs and annual budget. Administers contracts for a variety of services, directs and coordinates consultants. 2. Compiles, analyzes, and prepares quantifiable airport and air service data for use by the Airport to pursue potential air service opportunities for passengers and cargo. Represents the Airport in activities relating to Air Service Development and with tourism agencies and other organizations. Prepares and distributes relevant information relating to the Department of Airports for use by those agencies and organizations. Prepares economic impact analysis of airport activities and participates in and oversees customer research projects. 3. Identifies and pursues opportunities for increased service to Salt Lake City by researching airline routes and participation with agencies and groups in the development of enhanced air service in Salt Lake City. Supports airline initiatives to retain and attract air service. 4. Responsible for media relations. Serves as the Department's contact for local, national and international media. Responds to requests for specialized information, coordinates interviews/release of information and performs research on behalf of the media. Issues press releases, coordinates press conferences and handles the media in emergency response situations. Acts as the Department's spokesperson. 5. Responsible for the Department of Airports communication materials. Researches, writes, prepares, edits and oversees publication of the annual report, quarterly newsletter, informational brochures/flyers and a broad range of other publications. Coordinates photography, interviews, statistics and other necessary information. Develops and directs radio, television, film and newspaper advertising campaigns. Prepares and delivers presentations, writes speeches and coordinates presentations for others. 6. Establishes and maintains associations and contacts with national, state and local representatives to ensure the Department is properly represented in the aviation industry as well as with the general public. Interacts with City Department Heads, Mayor's Office and others. Directs, develops and organizes VIP • and dignitary hosting, groundbreakings, convention welcomes, the performing arts program and a wide range of special events. 7. Serves as a liaison to the community and a representative on a variety of committees such as those of the Convention and Visitors Bureau, Ski Utah, Utah Travel Council, and Salt Lake City Corporation. • r 8. May act on behalf of the Executive Director of Airports. • 9. Performs other related duties as required. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: 1. Graduation from an accredited college or university with a bachelor's degree in public relations, marketing, communications, business administration, economics, aviation management, or related field and six (6) years experience in air service or related marketing activities, with at least two (2) years supervisory experience. Education and experience may be substituted on a year-for-year basis. 2. Thorough knowledge of standards, practices, and methods used regarding marketing, economics and air service activities. Knowledge of applicable federal, state, and local legislation and regulations related to aviation. 3. Ability to relate well verbally and in written media with a variety of audiences. 4. Thorough knowledge of principles and practices of local, national and international media, marketing, public relations, advertising, publishing, graphic arts, filming and production. Excellent oral, written and graphics communications skills and the ability to effectively respond to issues in a broad range of topics. 5. Demonstrated proficiency in use of computer programs including word processing, spreadsheets and graphics/presentation programs. • 6. Ability to develop and maintain effective work relationships with individuals from diverse backgrounds and at various levels in the organization. WORKING CONDITIONS: 1. Generally comfortable working conditions. Exposure to elements expected in an airport environment. 2. Exposure to stressful situations as a result of human behavior, time-constraints, and or multiple demands and priorities. 3. May be required to work non-traditional hours and travel nationally and internationally. A TEN YEAR PERSONAL, CRIMINAL AND EMPLOYMENT BACKGROUND CHECK IS REQUIRED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF AIRPORTS AND FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION FOR THIS POSITION. The above statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of work being performed by persons assigned to this job. They are not intended to be an exhaustive list of all duties, responsibilities and skills required of personnel so classified. All requirements are subject to possible modification to reasonably accommodate individuals with disabilities. Approved by: Date: Title: Department: • HR Approval: Revised Job: ® New Job:® Replaces: ire v 4 4 LUUL • COUNCIL TRANSMITTAL TO: Rocky J. Fluhart DATE: November 15, 2002 Chief Administrative Officer FROM: Timothy L. Campbell, A.A.E. Executive Director SUBJECT: Reclassification of Maintenance Director Position STAFF CONTACT: Timothy L. Campbell DOCUMENT TYPE: Ordinance to Amend Executive Compensation Plan RECOMMENDATION: To amend the Executive Compensation Plan to change the classification of Director of Airport Maintenance from 005 to 004. BUDGET IMPACT: Estimated at $8,000 annually. Funds are available in the current budget to accommodate this change. BACKGROUND/DISCUSSION: The Director of Airport Maintenance plays an integral role in establishing the overall vision and strategic plans for the development and maintenance of the Airport's facilities. This position has over 200 employees reporting to the Director of Maintenance and is the largest single division at the airport. The responsibilities of Director of Maintenance include: airfield grounds maintenance of over 8,000 acres of grass and landscaping and the removal of some 680,000 tons of snow from 1,033 acres of runways, aprons and roadways; facilities maintenance of 3.2 million square feet of buildings; fleet maintenance of 600 vehicles and pieces of essential equipment; maintenance of 15,000 runway and taxi lights and 10 million feet of underground power cables feeding the lights with high voltage current regulated circuitry. The Director of Maintenance has been integral to the implementation of the award winning CVG vehicle program. The existing classification understates the value of the position to the Airport. Airport management is a very competitive,highly specialized discipline. This is certainly true with respect to airport maintenance management, in which a broad range of specialized knowledge and skills are required. In the event this position becomes vacant, a national search to find a qualified replacement would be imperative. Given industry market conditions, it would be difficult to find competent candidates, who have adequate aviation industry experience, at the current classification grade. • Presently, the lure from private sector employers as well as from other national airports is • a genuine threat to retaining the airport's most capable administrators. This places the Department of Airports at a distinct disadvantage when trying to retain skilled maintenance administrators in this mission-critical position. It is necessary to have greater flexibility in negotiating reasonable compensation for individuals in this position. Job Title: Director of Airport Maintenance • Job Code Number: 000138 FLSA: Exempt EEO Code: 1 Pay Level: 004 JOB SUMMARY: Under the direction of the Director of Airports, plans, organizes and directs the maintenance functions of the Department of Airports including airfield, facilities, fleet management, and the warehouse system for Salt Lake City International Airport, Tooele Valley Airport, and Salt Lake Municipal Airport II. This is a highly skilled position that ensures employees within division receive necessary training to maintain adequate skills to keep pace with the Department's growth and demands. THIS IS AN APPOINTED POSITION AT THE WILL OF THE MAYOR. TYPICAL DUTIES: 1. Directs and supervises a staff of professional and technical personnel assigned to the maintenance operations for the airfield, grounds, facilities, and fleet management. Responsible for personnel actions and administrative matters as they apply to the day-to-day operations of the Maintenance Division. 2. Develops and directs policies and procedures to implement a comprehensive maintenance program to optimize investment and maximize useful life of facilities. Directs the establishment of cost effective, preventive maintenance program for all facilities, grounds and equipment. 3. Develops and implements standard maintenance operating policies and procedures and safety regulations in compliance with Federal, State and Local government, as well as compliance with • FAA standards. 4. Develops and oversees applications of state-of-the-art related technology to ensure quick and efficient maintenance operations of a civil airport. 5. Coordinates with airlines, general aviation tenants, deputy directors of other operating divisions of the Department of Airports in all maintenance related activities. 6. Prepares proposed operating budget for the Maintenance Division. 7. Directs warehouse functions including inventory, ensuring parts and material availability to meet the demands of employees and contractors. Ensures annual inventory is conducted appropriately and implements internal controls to evaluate warehouse needs. 8. Advises the Airport Board, the Director of Airports and other division directors about maintenance matters. Provides special reports as necessary. 9. Directs Maintenance Capital Improvement Program and makes recommendations to the Director of Airports for other capital improvements in the division. 10. Establishes and maintains productive working relationships, and serves as liaison with contractors, vendors,tenants, and the general public. 11. Coordinates with other division directors and provides support in all new construction and remodeling projects; provides insights during planning and construction stages of all airport-related projects. . 12. Coordinates with other division directors in all emergency and disaster preparedness planning, training and actual emergency situations. 13. May act in the capacity of Director of Airports in his absence. 14. Performs other duties as necessary. SUGGESTED QUALIFICATIONS: • 1. Graduation from an accredited college or university with a Bachelor's degree in Public Administration, Maintenance Management, Aviation Management, Engineering or related field and seven (7) years of increasingly responsible experience in maintenance management. Three (3) years of experience in a civil airport or aviation environment is strongly desired. Related experience may be substituted for education on a year-for-year basis. 2. Thorough knowledge of principles of organization, management and public administration related to maintenance of a civil airport. 3. Ability to establish effective working relationships with representatives of public and private agencies. 4. Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing with individuals of varied professional backgrounds. 5. Knowledge of computer applications, word processing and computerized maintenance management programs. 6. Ability to establish and maintain maintenance programs utilizing sound business management principles. 7. Possession of a valid Utah Driver's License. WORKING CONDITIONS: • 1. Light physical effort. Comfortable working positions. Handling light weights, intermittence sitting, standing and walking. 2. Considerable exposure to stress as a result of human behavior. A TEN-YEAR CRIMINAL AND EMPLOYMENT BACKGROUND CHECK IS REQUIRED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF AIRPORTS AND FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION FOR THIS POSITION. The above statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of work being performed by persons assigned to this job. They are not intended to be an exhaustive list of all duties, responsibilities and skills required of personnel so classified. All requirements are subject to possible modification to reasonably accommodate individuals with disabilities. Approved by: Tim Campbell Date: December 5, 2000 Title: Department: HR Approval: K. Anderson Revised Job: ® New Job:® • ' C ' * ROSS C."ROCKY"ANDERSON (ri: r� 1 • MAYOR ».. ]�� j v V l ! SALT LAKE 2002 OFFICE OF THE MAYOR (99 TO: Rocky Fluhart, Chief Administrative Officer DATE: January 9, 2003 FROM: D.J. Baxter, Senior Advisor to the Mayor SUBJECT: Cost Implicns of Phase 1 Union Pacific 900 South Agreement STAFF CONTACT: Baxter, 535-7735 RECOMMENDATION:That the City Council receive a briefing on the potential cost implications of a tentative agreement reached between the Administration and Union Pacific regarding mitigation measures on the 900 South rail line. DOCUMENT TYPE: Briefing/Discussion BUDGET IMPACT: The tentative agreement reached carries a potential budget impact of $500,000-$2,500,000 in one-time costs, and an unpredictable potential impact in ongoing costs. DISCUSSION: The Administration has negotiated a tentative agreement with Union Pacific regarding mitigation measures that could be implemented to reduce some of the impacts of the 900 South line's freight rail operations on the surrounding community. The text of the tentative agreement is attached. This briefing is intended to acquaint the Council with the terms of the agreement, and the potential costs that the City may undertake by executing the agreement. The Administration has not identified a source for these funds,but some components of the agreement may qualify for Redevelopment Agency funding. The main points of the agreement are as follows: • Union Pacific and the City will design and implement a quiet zone along the 900 South line from 700 West to Redwood Road, and a Gateway-area quiet zone along the main line from 500 North to 200 South. We will work together to gain approval of the quiet zones by the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). Once the quiet zones are approved by the FRA and crossing improvements are installed by the City, the trains will no longer blow their whistles except in emergencies. UP will perform ongoing maintenance on gate and signal equipment. The City will pay all maintenance costs of non-gate equipment, and will also bear costs associated with repairing damage to equipment installed by the City, if the damage is caused by the actions by any party other than UP. This would include vandalism, cars accidentally running through gates, etc. 1111 451 SOUTH STATE STREET,ROOM 306,SALT LAKE CITY,UTAH 84111 TELEPHONE:801-535-7704 FAX 801-535-6331 • Union Pacific will divert special trains carrying high-level nuclear waste away from the 411 900 South line unless ordered by a court or the federal government to use that line. • Union Pacific and the City will develop a plan for installing fencing along the line to discourage children from crossing the tracks except at signalized crossings. UP will pay for the fencing, and the City will maintain it. • Union Pacific's trains will not exceed 30 m.p.h. along the line. If they decide to run trains faster in the future, they will consult with Salt Lake City first. • Union Pacific assured us they would provide crossing guards at the track crossings at Emery and Navajo for the last several months. The City will undertake this responsibility. The primary cost impacts are associated with the quiet zones and fencing equipment. In both cases,the parties will work together to develop a plan and share costs of installation according to the terms of the agreement. Although our Engineering and Transportation Divisions have begun work on what would likely be needed for the 900 South quiet zone, we do not yet know the extent of the costs, as any plan must receive approval from the Federal Railroad Administration before it can be implemented. Given the preliminary information developed by City divisions,however,we can provide a range of likely costs. If we can implement with the least-expensive measures,primarily un-mountable medians, such as those used by UTA at many TRAX crossings, our cost would total approximately$500,000. If,however, the FRA requires us to install quadrant gates at all nine crossings on the line(a worst-case scenario) the costs of IIIII installation would likely approach$2.5 million. The safety measures needed for the Gateway quiet zone have already been determined, and designed, and RDA staff has worked with UDOT to secure state approval. RDA funds have already been earmarked for these measures. There is also an ongoing cost impact associated with the quiet zones. The agreement calls for Union Pacific to perform all ongoing maintenance of any signal equipment installed at the crossing. All other ongoing costs, including maintenance of off-site signal lights or bells, signage, street improvements(medians), or vandalism to any of the equipment installed by the City will be the City's responsibility. Because we do not know what equipment will be installed, or how often it might be damaged, it is impossible to predict the costs that might be associated with this provision. It is worth noting that if the City were to wait for the release of FRA's final rule on the use of locomotive horns, we might be able to avoid some of these ongoing maintenance costs, as it is possible the final rule will place responsibility for these costs on the railroad. If we wait for the final rule,there is a risk that the FRA might not release the rule for some time, leaving the City with neither the authority nor an agreement to implement a quiet zone. Although we have been told by FRA that release is likely to occur soon,the rule has been many years in the making, and could conceivably take many more years before finalization. To account for the possibility that the final FRA rule might assign costs to the railroad, we have requested an • 1/10/03 900 South Phase 1 Agreement-Council Briefing 2 amendment to the agreement that would allow for the assignment of costs according to the II/ provisions of the rule, if and when it is released. The other provision of the agreement that carries a potential financial impact is the requirement that the City maintain the new fencing installed along the 900 South line. Under the agreement, Union Pacific and the City will jointly develop a fencing plan to reduce pedestrian trespass on the railroad's property, focusing on areas where school children are likely to cross the tracks. Union Pacific will pay to install the fencing, and the City will assume responsibility for ongoing maintenance and repair. Again, the cost impact is difficult to estimate, as we have not yet agreed on the type or extent of the fencing to be installed,and we cannot predict the frequency with which repairs will be needed. This briefing is an attempt to apprise the Council of the existence of cost impacts, and in the case of the quiet zones, a rough estimate of the potential costs. However, the agreement does state in very clear terms, and we have discussed with Union Pacific verbally, that all such agreements with the City are subject to approval of funding by the City Council. Therefore, all parties understand that when the time arrives to appropriate funds for implementation of the agreement's terms, the projects are subject to the Council's discretion regarding allocation of funds. III • 1/9/03 900 South Phase 1 Agreement-Council Briefing 3 AGREEMENT RE 900 SOUTH . THIS AGREEMENT is made this day of ,2003,between SALT LAKE CITY CORPORATION,a municipality and political subdivision of the State of Utah("City"),and UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY,a corporation of the State of Delaware("Union Pacific"). RECITALS: A. City and Union Pacific are parties to pending litigation relating to Union Pacific's use of a rail line in Salt Lake City between Redwood Road and 700 West known as 900 South and shown on Exhibit A attached and by reference made a part of this Agreement(the"900 South Line"),namely,Salt Lake City Corporation v. Union Pacific Railroad Company,Case No.02-4080 in the U.S.Court of Appeals for the 10`h Circuit,and Salt Lake City Corporation v. United States of America,Case No.02-9526 in the U.S.Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit. B. City and Union Pacific have reached agreement on certain issues involved in or relating to the litigation and Union Pacific's use of the 900 South Line,and wish to memorialize that agreement. AGREEMENT: For and in consideration of the mutual covenants and agreements contained in this Agreement, City and Union Pacific agree as follows: Section 1. Quiet Zone. (a) Whistle Sounding Requirements. Union Pacific agrees to support City's efforts in obtaining Utah Department of Transportation("UDOT")approval pursuant to Utah Code Annotated Section 56-1-14 of a City ordinance under which the required distance for whistle sounding for the grade crossings on the 900 South Line shall be decreased to 900 feet. City agrees to promptly seek enactment,and seek UDOT approval of,the ordinance. (b) FRA Quiet Zone Interim Order. City and Union Pacific will work together to develop a mutually agreeable plan for crossing improvements to the 900 South Line and the downtown Gateway area to serve as the basis for petitioning the Federal Railroad Administration("FRA")to establish the 900 South Line and the downtown Gateway areas as quiet zones. After the plan is developed,Union Pacific agrees to petition the Federal Railroad Administration("FRA")for interim orders creating quiet zones for the 900 South Line and the downtown Gateway area pursuant to 49 U.S.C. Section 20153. City agrees to cooperate with and assist Union Pacific in obtaining such FRA interim orders,including enlisting the support and assistance of UDOT. 1. The 900 South Line is defined as Union Pacific's rail line,running east-west and located just south of 900 South Street in Salt Lake City,from 700 West to Redwood Road, inclusive. The quiet zone shall apply to all crossings along the line in this defined area. 2. The downtown Gateway area is defined as Union Pacific's main line,running north-south from 600 North to 200 South inclusive. The quiet zone shall apply to the following at- grade crossings along the line in this defined area: 500 North,400 North,300 North, South Temple/600 West, 100 South,and 200 South. (c) Proposed FRA Quiet Zone Rule. Promptly after the proposed FRA quiet zone rules published at 65 Fed. Reg.2230(January 13,2000)become effective,City agrees to designate the 900 South Line and the downtown Gateway area as quiet zones,and to file with the FRA for acceptance of the quiet zones. • N:\My Documents\UP\Settlement\Phase 1 Agreement 12-12-02-FINAL.doc 1 City also shall enlist the support and assistance of UDOT. Union Pacific agrees to support and assist the City in preparing and progressing the quiet zone applications. • (d) Sequencing of Petitions. The petitions/applications under(b)and(c)above for 900 South and the downtown Gateway area shall be filed as a joint petition/application for the proposed quiet zones unless it is determined that combining both quiet zones in one petition/application will jeopardize the quiet zone for 900 South. If such a determination is made,separate petitions/applications will be filed and the filing sequence will be in the order perceived as the most favorable for FRA approval of the 900 South quiet zone. (e) Compliance with Conditions to UDOT Approval/FRA Orders. City and UP agree that the cost and expense of any conditions to obtaining the UDOT approval and FRA orders referred to above in Section 1,including,without limitation,crossing improvements,shall be borne by City,and that work toward implementing the quiet zone conditions will proceed only upon approval of funds by the Salt Lake City Council. After the necessary improvements shall have been determined and designed,and the City and Union Pacific shall have established a mutually agreeable procedure for payment by the City to Union Pacific for the cost and expense of any such improvements that,by their nature,may be installed only by Union Pacific,Union Pacific will order the necessary materials for such improvements within thirty(30)calendar days of receipt of payment from City,and,after delivery of the materials,shall prioritize the work of installing such improvements so that such improvements shall be installed,tested,and fully functional as soon as reasonably practicable. Notwithstanding the foregoing,if the parties determine it would be more economical for City to order the materials for the improvements to be installed by UP,such materials shall be ordered by City and not by UP. (f) Maintenance. City shall bear responsibility for maintaining in a fully functional condition all signage and street improvements required as supplemental safety measures to implement the quiet zones. Union Pacific shall bear responsibility for maintaining in a fully functional condition all crossing signals and crossing gates installed as supplemental safety measures in the quiet zones,except that City will reimburse Union Pacific fully for any repair or replacement of crossing signals or gates resulting from damage or destruction to City-funded signals or gates caused by the acts of anyone other than Union Pacific. City shall not be responsible for maintenance,repairs,or replacement of railroad crossing equipment due to ordinary wear and tear. Any equipment(such as,by way of example but not in limitation,directional horns,traffic signals and enforcement cameras)that is interconnected to, but not an integral component of,UP's signal equipment,shall,for purposes of this Section 1,be deemed to be a street improvement. Section 2. Transportation of Nuclear Materials. Union Pacific agrees that it shall not transport over the 900 South Line spent nuclear fuel,as defined in 40 CFR 191.02(g),.or transuranic radioactive waste,as defined in 40 CFR 191.02(i),carried by special manifest trains to Yucca Mountain or any other temporary or long-term storage facility,unless such transportation is due to emergency,or is required on the 900 South line by specific directive of the United States Government or order of a court of competent jurisdiction. Union Pacific agrees not to initiate or support any request for such order. For purposes of this Section 2,the term"emergency"means the occurrence of an event such as a landslide,mudslide, derailment,labor strife or other substantial damage to or blockage or disruption of another rail line of Union Pacific,such that the shipmenf of the nuclear materials in question will be significantly delayed unless the 900 South Line is utilized for their transport. Section 3. Speed Limits. Union Pacific represents that current track conditions,equipment and operating standards do not allow trains on the 900 South Line to exceed thirty(30)miles per hour because of the curve off the rail line to Provo just north of Roper Yard,and that this speed limitation is reflected in the current Union Pacific General Orders(timetable). Union Pacific will not initiate any upward revision of this speed limitation without first providing the Salt Lake City Mayor and City Council at least ninety(90) days' advance written notice and making representatives available to meet with the Mayor and City Council to discuss the justification for the proposed change. • N:\My Documents\UP\Settlement\Phase 1 Agreement 12-12-02-FINAL.doc 2 Section 4. Fencing. City and Union Pacific will work together to develop a mutually agreeable plan for appropriate fencing and other barriers(such as Jersey barriers at closed crossings)for portions of the right of way of the 900 South Line. Within thirty(30)days after the plan is developed,Union Pacific shall • advance to City all funds necessary to purchase and install all fencing/barriers,except for barriers needed to effectuate street closures,which shall be installed at the City's expense. Upon receipt of such funds,City agrees to install,repair or replace fencing/barriers in accordance with the plan. City shall be solely responsible for maintaining the fencing/barriers at its cost and expense. Section 5. Crossing Guards. Union Pacific agrees to reimburse the City for the cost of crossing guards at Navajo and Emery Streets through December 31,2002. City agrees to hire or contract for such crossing guards and,effective January 1,2003,to bear the entire cost and expense of such crossing guards at least through July 1,2006,or whatever period of time City deems necessary to establish safe rail crossing habits among school children,whichever is longer. Section 6. No Admission of Liability. This Agreement is entered into pursuant to settlement discussions between the parties concerning the Litigation and Union Pacific's use of the 900 South,and is not and shall not be deemed an admission of liability with respect to any matter relating to the Litigation or Union Pacific's use of the 900 South Line. Section 7:Funds Subject to Appropriation. Any obligation by City to expend funds or incur costs and expenses under this Agreement is subject to applicable law and appropriation by the Salt Lake City Council. Section 8. Representations. UP represents that it has not: (a)provided an illegal gift or payoff to a City officer or employee or former City officer or employee,or his or her relative or business entity;(b)retained any person to solicit or secure this Agreement upon an agreement or understanding for a commission, percentage,brokerage or contingent fee,other than bona fide employees or bona fide commercial selling agencies for the purpose of securing business;(c)knowingly breached any of the ethical standards set forth in the City's conflict of interest ordinance,Chapter 2.44,Salt Lake City Code;or(d)knowingly influenced, and hereby promises that it will not knowingly influence,a City officer or employee or former City officer • or employee to breach any of the ethical standards set forth in the City's conflict of interest ordinance, Chapter 2.44,Salt Lake City Code. IN WITNESS WHEREOF,Salt Lake City Corporation and Union Pacific Railroad Company have caused this Agreement to be duly executed by their authorized representatives as of the date first above written. SALT LAKE CITY CORPORATION By: Its: ATTEST AND COUNTERSIGN: CHIEF DEPUTY CITY RECORDER UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY By: Its: N:\My Documents\UP\Settlement\Phase 1 Agreement I2-12-02-FINAL.doc 3 I '... L .1 . c,-: A , 11 5 11 lir 1 11 8 I i • Exhibit A - i WHITE P - %-.111 . r ' ri LIP 117,2 L 0, is . . ...... TEMPLE 1 ___ ., ..illi lin. I I III li I Ai t i • • 11111Wrief61. 1111111111171ifirfill Mall Mr Iiinn 1 . ;;:puip• iT• ninimmis mum , . If '''' '.° i r "s7a migi; ,c,... INE4timi. ! Erg, ••..'rlyn . illi ......,..,:. -11. ic 1 v / 1 ,• 2•0,v,....,Ex,rm. tol,„ i . 'MI /071 II in *'' • IF : .• ., ..-_. . , LIV/1.0141 1 ..''''. ' i '4'1 ir L I'''''7.17t '. -4, .,'''./*----1Z•10.4f ir-1 -- P. i ' Ll' 'rill IL _ . ._. SHE" =.!• rrma A k:1;?;I .1. ..i ' '• . / .11 [11 L ii 1 :"*Pi EE-R P ' il IWW 1:11:11:i imi--1 ;) 1211 114E '41 ---------- ' , L . ........,.n41,-,11.:1 ........,i____ 0 ___ .....-....•L. ..,..,L..: ,;,-, __......_ -- .. -- i---1 _,ii--- ;.!,.Q0----. .-- .....,- itteiZI," 7 .-- 1 -- rim' ----.-- •----- nr-- ,., , .3 . 1 MP ..,• (... 1 r MEW MIN 1111 ., , zo.,:•'; FiLiji=mg. : ... minnommt,orn79 iiii mil *it',//c \- -i\v.:,,,Ill , . • 11;t 1Z, L__ I -' i Dr _.,. IL' \\ i 1B !MEI NEM 1E1 lay D IC If] 7.4-,jiTo: . ,. 141111 • - 4 "-r--,-.1 ' 1„,iii ...,. i . =7,•1..a ..... . :=I: ! A . 1 . II i. , f---1 final 7.i., t.":41 .„. S is,.. . ,., ,, 'WV. ,,,,,, N:= ifo,,,7 .. . __ . . . . ,.. , 1 : ' ...... _ 5 imag] . liE,,.i 1 ii 1. , : _ . 1, . ._..m.it7. 1 till P .._ ._ .....- NM= MEI . ... . .... Fzi9F-- LITE=,..., OR ENTE. NIFPW41 Mil 1 PE M flETT1 17E1 f-1 -il In i ii ;„.. . - -„. ••__11 II NI II::11:!IF III 111.1111,11../A .L'. ':41111: "I' . - 4— 900 South Rail Line r.mil aimpU is I i , .._..._..... ... Volt 1 olimilw,i,i%,J.:-;:a7/.r4174 pirr-----= - EACE e..-ThT,4Thj ,1 .imarc num ; --- - I II MIN Gil-wi I I I . _ . . u li, A 1111114111[I i ; '. • / / E=MANErmi Et Ttt- I ,‘,. . ..,.. ?•-----F - i *IA 41F0 tt.74 , .. 4.1_,... .. „ 1 ' - ' 111"7111. •,a',2 IL. ..... .r.r.',.' ;1",....: -,-• :7 : lir'l!MIR I* 1 nr.84111; lir El r-vi amIamai ..., . A i. ...,..W;, ii ,, ,\ jai 1 Pii *MN". .. .. ..„. -4 --.. LAIIPMIK,„•.., \...41...ti - IH.Hdl---4 - ,,P2Trtie441," - i-'I Eli pimr....,... 0==. ma I RIP NI 1 i,li . :.,...„...,,,,,_:, r.E.• P.m I--N \. ::!!.,g,t; '. .• g;III ' , .... i • . ..... I, itia . iv= d1111115T 1111 . -..r. Eh ‘, 11 1 ‘*viv. 4' 117411;1 litA 1-( , '= GLENDALE PAR =imp. Es .7. 16 ti Li, 11101111111" _ II pr.__ , i . .• • 1 . Al WSW C .., .. FM MIK Ma 1 I V' ..t. 1,410. 11., .. . . ' 1 a"'''.. .'7—11(41'.11111. ..M. • UT I: 110411 ' 7, . .. . _ •101.11/1• r *Ng HIM_ :1 ! .' •r 1 - 7 c •,!r,.. ,e!...."..... A S • • 111) 40 SALT LAKE CITY COUNCIL STAFF REPORT DATE: January 13, 2003 SUBJECT: Salt Lake City,Revolving Loan Fund loan to KUTV STAFF REPORT BY: Michael Sears, Budget & Policy Analyst CC: Cindy Gust-Jenson, Rocky Fluhart, David Nimkin, Alison Weyher, David Dobbins, Ed Rutan and Dave Oka Document Budget-Related Policy-Related Facts Miscellaneous Facts Type Facts Briefing $1,200,000 loan This proposed loan specifics are Proposal is for a$1.2 Document from the still being researched.The million loan from the Revolving Loan Administration is proposing City's Revolving Loan Fund of Salt Lake that the loan to KUTV come Fund and$2.8 million City to KUTV from the City's Revolving Loan from the Redevelopment Channel 2. Fund. The Council may set Agency of Salt Lake City. criteria for this loan that are The requested loan different from the Revolving terms are not yet • Loan Fund. finalized. KUTV Channel 2 is considering relocating from West Valley City to downtown Salt Lake City at a cost of approximately $5,000,000. KUTV initially requested a grant from the City to assist with the move. The Administration is proposing that the City Council approve a $1,200,000 loan to KUTV Channel 2 for the relocation to the new Wells Fargo building on Main Street. KUTV is also seeking a$2,800,000 loan from the Redevelopment Agency of Salt Lake (RDA). The Administration has proposed that the City use the Revolving Loan Fund as the source of funds for the requested loan. The transmittal from the Administration details the specifics of the proposed loan to KUTV. This zero interest rate loan form the City is proposed to be repaid with $500,000 cash over time and with in-kind services for promotional campaigns valued at $700,000. The Administration is still researching the best way to transfer money into an account for the purpose of making the loan. Additional information regarding to necessary legislative steps will be presented during the January 13, 2003 briefing. MATTERS AT ISSUE/POTENTIAL QUESTIONS: • Is it possible for the Redevelopment Agency to loan all the money necessary to relocate KUTV? • Is it possible to grant KUTV the money necessary for their relocation? From the RDA? From the City? 410 • What are the specifics of the in-kind portion of the loan? Does the in-kind portion consist of replacement of current public services or is it ovec,and above the current KUTV activities? • What is the collateral to secure the loan? For the RDA? For the City? Does a possible 2nd or 3rd place on a mortgage on existing property eliminate more risk of non-payment than securing the loan with cash flow generated at the Wells1111 Fargo building? • Has the City helped similar businesses and what has been the result of those partnerships? The Administration is seeking support for' the proposed loan and an indication of acceptable loan terms, as the specifics of this loan are negotiated. At a future Council work session briefing the Administration will provide a resolution or budget amendment request for the Council to consider. • • Are you thinking about "Utah -tProin e 1/k serving? &.bout everyovie cowan,g'togeth,e'r to- Stop Thinking. vnak&the caves- vvwwttty& better Call 1-888-755-UTAH TAH S place. You,can/ become.a,catalyst P ROMISE for positive/ands Lc Additional Questions? • Build the Character Want to know more? • and Competence of Utah's Youth Visit our Web site at SERVE www.utahspromise.org F vtd'n.ew a vide creat'we ways,to- m-tale/Mate cwt.& • Local resources-Les a.clu;evivig,the UTAH'S PROMISE goal,. We,are your partner & d. I oh Commission on Volunteers stand. y ou 527 Nest 4,00 North Suite 3 . p Urem,UT v057 accoiM octant 801.764 '7 4 work" TOIL FREE: 1.888 51". 1TAH -a Governor Olen S.Walker 'FAA:801.764 502 O0..11° www.ittahspro • .org 0 — BACKGROUND& (----- , . ORGANIZATION 5 PROMISES c • In April 1997, Retired General Colin Utah's Promise seeks to deliver live • Powell joined all former living U.S. fundamental promises to Utah's chit- Powell _ `\ Presidents in initiating a nationwide effort: dren and youth.They are: 1� Americas Promise, The Alliance for Youth. 1 Caring Adults L - 1 parents,teachers,mentors,coaches • Six months later, the state of Utah �— responded to General Powell's call for service and launched its own effort,Utah's 9 Safe Places GET INVOLVED IN YOUR Promise. (Pictured below: Founding . 0 to learn and to grow COMMUNITY Chairman,ReL General Cohn Powell with Governor Michael O.Leavitt at the launch- Communities that join the Utah's Promise ing of Utah's Promise.) (.1 Healthy Start team pledge their commitment by becoming a. in life for a healthy future "Community of Promise." They map assets, • While the Utah Commission on determine issues, set goals and initiate efforts to Volunteers, an office of the Lieutenant 4 Marketable Skills improve the community. Governor, provides staff support, most Many communities provide caring adults by work is accomplished by volunteers in through an effective education partnering with mentoring programs, after- communities throughout Utah. Local school clubs and faith-based organizations. Volunteer Centers provide additional Opportunities to Serve Safe neighborhood councils partner with local resources and AmeriCorps Promise kJ and give back to the community officials to ensure safe communities. Fellows help deliver the Five Promises. Some Communities of Promise ensure theikk youth have a healthy start by sponsoring heal' RECOGNIZE A lairs and promoting immunizations. i As a way to provide marketable skills to their VOLUNTEER youth, many establish literacy programs, Individuals and groups throughout encourage job shadowing and co-sponsor career • 4`; Utah deserve to be recognized for out- fairs.Schools and Universities of Promise have �L _ >�j� ``; standing service. For this reason,vari- also made the commitment. r ous service awards are given to spot- Communities encourage youth to serve by Es light those who are bringing Utah's establishing youth courts and encouraging youth Promise to life.Nominate a volunteer service learns to participate in local projects on ' who has impacted your life by going to national days of service. \illi_ These are only click Awards. a few of the ways Utah's Promise is making a difference. America's Promise THE PROMISE LETTER FALL 2002 VOLUME 6 • NUMBER 4 . HE TRUE SPIRIT OF THE SEASON The holiday season is a very special time.The focus is on family gatherings,reaching o u B MISSION out in gratitude to friends and neighbors and giving profound thanks for the many blessings we enjoy.Nowhere is this spirit of caring and sharing more evident than TO MOBILIZE PEOPLE FROM among Mr.Theodore Rice's first grade art students at Mary Church Terrell Elementary EVERY SECTOR OF AMERICAN School in Washington,D.C.Earlier this year,we asked the five-and six-year old • students in Mr.Rice's class to help create a holiday card illustrating what Thanksgiving LIFE TO BUILD THE CHARACTER means to them.The young artists put crayon to paper and drew heartwarming AND COMPETENCE OF OUR eictures of happy families,sturdy homes and shared values such as love and respect. NATION'S YOUTH BY FULFILLING Our students practice peace and love every day and we are all very thankful for the time we share together at our wonderful school,"shared Mr.Rice. FIVE PROMISES. But unfortunately,for many children and youth across the country there is no relief from the hardships of daily life this holiday season.Millions of our nation's young THE 5 PROMISES: people are living in poverty,lacking health insurance and are confronted daily by hazards O CARING ADULTS such as drugs,crime,and violence. © SAFE PLACES It is up to all of us—the members of the Alliance for Youth—to continue our work to © HEALTHY START •elp connect these children,and all children,to the fundamental resources of caring O MARKETABLE SKILLS adults,safe places,a healthy start,marketable skills and opportunities to serve.Not only are these the tools that create opportunities for success,they are the Five Promises that © OPPORTUNITIES America's Promise strives to fulfill for every child. TO SERVE With sincere appreciation we would like to take this opportunity to thank the ' _ members of the Alliance for their relentless work to fulfill the Five Promises for children and youth.And in the true spirit of the season,the staff of America's Promise,along with the students of Mary Church Terrell Elementary,wish you all the joys of this holiday season.■ IN THIS ISSUE • Premiere of The Young Leader • Alaska youth celebrate II Make a Difference Day • HOPE worldwide in Los Angeles • - I " . Foster children benefit from the Five Promises Checklist 4114 ., , .. , • z�. T� ':4 ANdERIC&PROMISE L• ` .' THE Au uAuce lbRYo mf 411111\111 : .,,• . . ,ram •+' ../ ' ' _ .mot- Le. • • 0 0 FLORIDA FAITH GROUPS SHINE A Gov.Bush addresses the attendees at the opening LIGHT ON MENTORING plenary. Florida Governor Jeb Bush recently hosted a conference in Orlando 400444614 2902 1 ! t highlighting faith-community mentoring programs.The conference, SeD an extension of his Front Porch Mentoring Initiative, convened faith groups from around the state to share best practices and create connec- tions between individual initiatives.The attendees heard Gov. Bush outline his vision for mentors to be central in the lives of Florida's young people, as well as confirm his belief that all children need and deserve caring adults in their lives. Bernie DeCastro,Executive . • America's Promise Chairman Harris Woffordjoined Gov. Bush in Director of the Florida Faith Based Association,presents encouraging the attendees to create faith-based and nonprofit partner- an award to Gov.Bush and ships throughout their communities. In his remarks,Wofford praised his wife Columba. thecongregations for their work and reminded the audience that faith s has always been a distinctive and central part of grassroots movements for positive social change in America. lobir '' During the two-day conference,America's Promise unveiled, Faith n IP in the Five, a new congregational guidebook which offers faith groups a systematic approach to making a practical difference in the lives of young people.This step-by-step guide was designed for congregations To reserve your free copy of Faith in the Five,contact that are just becoming familiar with America's Promise, and leads Rev.Mark Farr at MarkF@americaspromise.org or call them through the process to becoming a Congregation of Promise 1-800-365-0153. and linking with a Community of Promise.■ CAROLINE'S PROMISE GROOMS • LEADERS OF TOMORROW Several years ago, educators in The Leaders of Tomorrow steering committee recently enlisted Caroline County,Virginia realized several partners to facilitate the inaugural program for 40 Caroline that their small, rural community County High School students. With the help of the Rotary Club of offered few leadership development Caroline, the high school's Interact Club will be strengthened over the opportunities for young people. next year. In conjunction with local government authorities, students Lacking the funds necessary to prop- erly address the void, Caroline's will also form a Youth Advisory Council.The council will advise Caroline's Promise directly on issues concerning youth, and the chair- Promise teamed up with Caroline person will serve on Caroline's Promise Steering Committee. County Public Schools and Currently, the students are working to develop an incentive Employment Resources Incorporated program that will encourage other young people to volunteer in (ERI)—a local organization that the community. helps students transition from school "We are pleased that we have the opportunity to be a part of this to work—in hopes of finding important educational and workforce development program,"says resources to implement Leaders of Andrea Kenny,Vice President of Employment Resources Tomorrow.A program based on Incorporated. "Service-learning projects and community service are Apollonia Gray,Vice President of the service-learning, Leaders of Tomorrow integral components in this leadership program. Our goal is to devel- caroline High School Interact Club, teaches participants the virtues of op leadership opportunities that will be sustainable by the community reads the minutes at a recent meeting. civic involvement,and helps develop for years to come."• leadership skills through an intensive character education curriculum. To access service-learning tools, resources and ideas,visit Caroline's Promise leaders felt this innovative program would not www.learningindeed.org.To find out how you can develop a only encourage civic involvement among county youth, but could also Leaders of Tomorrow program in your community,contact help build the infrastructure of the Promise effort. In March 2002, Andrea Kenny at ackenny@eri-va.org. • Caroline's Promise set out to find funding for the idea and then applied for and received a $25,000 grant from Sears, Roebuck and Company though America's Promise. A M E R I C A ' S PROMISE — THE ALLIANCE FOR YOUTH 2 • n from rt Hood's M!LW A U K E E BUILDS BRIDGES FOR Division lshows local elementaryl school y children some of the army's latest FOSTER CHILDREN communications tools. Soldiers from Fort Hood's Dental Command brief local parents on proper dental care for infants as part of the �� "Adopt a School"program. Transitioning to adulthood can be perilous even with all the advan- " r tages of a traditional home. Imagine the additional challenges that I a"= RIP"' face young people who emerge from our nation's foster care system. {;, On top of the usual responsibilities of independence—housing, ",P _' ,; employment and transportation—the University of Wisconsin- ` ' ;+ Madison has found that many foster children have to overcome peri- •*- odic episodes of homelessness, dependence on public assistance,past t ' 5--;4 incarceration and physical abuse. ' But officials from Milwaukee County,Wisconsin, are striving to -HMI help foster children create a road map to navigate this arduous jour- ney. By adapting an online version of the Five Promises Checklist, the K!L L E E N MARCHES FORWARD WITH ' Bureau of Milwaukee Child Welfare hopes to provide a uniquely effective tool for foster parents, case workers and young adults who FORT HOOD 2010 AND THE FIRST need access to Independent Living services. Drawing upon the outcomes and life skills for successful foster care INSTALLATION OF PROMISE transition identified by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Bureau drafted a Checklist that directs users to the most critical actions and helpful resources for this population. For example, case managers In 1994, the Commanding General at Fort Hood Army Base,located on the outskirts of Killeen,Texas, instituted a program called Fort working with 15-18 year olds are encouraged to "help youth learn how to find housing through the newspaper and phone book,by driv_ Hood 2000 to encourage military parents to become more involved in ing around town or reviewing renters guides.Also practice filling out their own children's schooling and recruit base personnel for commu- rent applications with them."According to Bureau Director Denise nity service.The program provides soldiers with time off from their Revels-Robinson, "This tool is designed to open new doors for foster regular duty in order to engage in volunteer projects with the youth faparents, care givers and young adults looking for the resources and of Killeen. opportunities to build successful lives."■ Over the last eight years, Fort Hood 2000 has grown into some- thing much more than a just weeldy duty. Recognizing this evolution The complete Checklist will debut in January 2003.To learn in April 2002, Commanding General B.B. Bell and Judge Raul more about the process that Milwaukee County employed to Villaronga from Greater Killeen Area's Promise created the new Fort create this innovative tool,or to receive a copy,please contact Hood 2010 project"to preserve the American way of life...not limited Mike Kenitz at kenitm@dhfs.state.wi.us to the combat zone, it includes the day-to-day battlefield of our cities and towns...[because] our hopes and dreams rest on the coming generation." Three representatives from Fort Hood now serve on Promise V�ITH THE c committees and military personnel interact daily with Promise pro- grams.As part of the"Adopt a School" program, Fort Hood officers �*S 0* and soldiers tutor local students within eight independent school dis- tricts on a weekly basis; Fort Hood Military Police instruct D.A.R.E. �� / / �� courses within the local middle schools; and base buildings have t� / � housed drug-free and alcohol-free events for students from the two local high schools. Afilli. / / Fort Hood and Greater Killeen Area's Promise are leading the charge for community-military installation partnerships. However, _ they are not alone in this pursuit. Military installations across the nation are successfully implementing numerous child, family and f i community service programs, and are looking for opportunities to Itt .1 collaborate with local community groups. ■ BUREAU OF MILWAUKEE CHILD WELFARE To learn about programs and resources that a nearby military STATE OF WISCONSIN installation provides or supports,contact the installation's com- munity relations office or school liaison officer,or link to your local installation's Web site via the following general links: • Army: www.ar•my.mil/installations/Map.htm Navy: www.chinfo.navy.mil/navpalib/bases/navbases.html Marines: www.usmc.mil/ Air Force: www.afmill THE 5 PROMISES: CARING ADULTS SAFE PLACES HEALTHY START MARKETABLE SKILLS OPPORTUNITIES TO SERVE 13 • �► ees ! J se O s. FORD MOTOR COMPANY: DRIVING TECHNOLOGY • TO YOUR COMMUNITY OF PROMISE Coanksmm to a Ford Motor Company Fund g people contribution, (2)I ,/,/2�j/9�'J/ 4 Communities of Promise are helping young people suc- �L(//b �j teed by connecting the power of the Five Promises to the power of the Internet.■ The following 59 communities are driving • technology through Promise Stations: AMARILM,^w0'S PROMISE INonna,u",.am ss"f,�xNax. -�• 141•#Allegheny County's Promise,Pa. Killeen Promise,Texas Amarillo's Promise,Texas Knoxville's Promise,Tenn. _ • Anchorage's Promise,Alaska Lakewood's Promise,Wash. m' ,1111 Anderson County's Promise,Tenn. Las Vegas'Promise,Nev. Arizona State's Promise Lawrence Douglas County's 'y'T(7'-" "'°""°""°,—' Atlanta's Promise,Ga. Promise,Kan. """" "' � > ffilBedford's Promise,Va. Macon's Promise,Ga. Bristol's Promise,Tenn. Miami's Promise,Fla. Campbell County's Promise,Tenn. Montcalm's Promise,Mich. Caroline's Promise,Va. Northeast Kingdom's Promise,Vt. Capital Area's Promise,Mich. Oakland's Promise,Calif. More than 50 additional Communities • Cedar Valley's Promise,Iowa Ohio County's Promise,W.Va. of Promise are currently working to Central Yavapai's Promise,Ariz. Oklahoma Ciry's Promise,Okla. build their Web presence.To find out Charlotte's Promise,N.C. Orlando's Promise,Fla. how your Community of Promise can get its own Promise Station,call Chattanooga's Promise,Tenn. Oswego's Promise,N.Y. 1-800-365-0153. Cleveland's Promise,Ohio Ottawa's Promise,Kan. Visit www.americaspromise.otg/ Congress Height's Promise, Penn State's Promise,Pa. PromiseStarions/iodex.cfm for the most Washington,D.C. Pensacola's Promise,Fla. current listing of Promise Stations Crawford County's Promise,Wis. Philadelphia's Promise,Pa. throughout the Alliance. Dallas South Promise,Texas Salt Lake County's Promise,Utah Dickinson County's Promise,Mich. Sioux Falls'Promise,S.D. Erie's Promise,Pa. Southwest Louisiana's Promise,La. Fairfax County's Promise,Va. Southern York County's Promise,Maine Fauquier County's Promise,Va. Surry County's Promise,N.C. Finger Lakes Health's Promise,N.Y. St.Joseph County's Promise,Mich. Fulton County's Promise,N.Y. Tempe's Promise,Ariz. Greenville/Greene County's Promise,Tenn. Tri Cities'Promise,Mich. Haskell County's Promise,Olda. Volusia/Flagler Counties'Promise,Fla. Hillsborough's Promise,Fla. Washington County's Promise,Tenn. Jackson Counry's Promise,Mich. Waushara's Promise,Wis. Kansas City's Promise,Mo.and Kan. • A M E R I C A ' S PROMISE — THE ALLIANCE FOR YOUTH woe. ,?Y a...- y , • t. • RESOURCE ROUND-UP y' --` •Thanks to a generous one-time contribution by Ford Motor •William B.Vaughan, President and CEO of Vaughan Furniture Company, representatives from Metro Detroit's Promise and the Company presented a$25,000 check to America's Promise Vice Metro Detroit United Way were afforded the opportunity to attend President Kevin Kase on October 17 during the International the America's Promise Regional Training Forum this past September Home Furnishings Market conference in High Point, N.C. For in Las Vegas,Nev. Vaughan, the donation kicks off what will be a yearlong commit- ment to raising visibility and funds to help fulfill the Five • Sears, Roebuck and Company's support provided the following Promises.Vaughan Furniture Co., manufacturer of the Young communities with grants of$25,000 to help sustain and grow their Ages Collections for tots through teens,has been creating fine collaborations: Montgomery,Ala.; Orlando, Fla.;Waterloo/Cedar wood furniture since 1923.■ Valley, Iowa; Salisbury,Md.;Waterville,Maine.; Saginaw, Mich.; Las • Vegas,Nev.; Finger Lakes, N.Y.; Penn State's Promise, Pa.;Allegheny County, Pa.; Caroline County,Va.; Lakewood,Wash.; Ohio County/Wheeling,W.Va. YOUTH COMPACT PARTNERS ANSWER THE PRESIDENT'S CALL The members of the Youth Service Compact, an alliance of organizations dedi- catedto engaging youth in community service, originally convened in 1999. ! year , young The spirit of this agreement was recently revitalized, in part, by President Bush's people serving and leading call to service and his desire to start the campaign with young people. On September 30,Youth Service Compact partners reconvened at a half-day as active citizens will be meeting in the Indian Treaty Room of the Old Executive Office Building in the common expectation Washington, D.C. Sixty representatives from America's Promise National Partners and leading youth service organizations participated in an intensive and common experience •dialogue to create a common vision and strategy for engaging more young peo- of every young person in ple in service and leadership. This group, convened by America's Promise and the National Collaboration America, with support for Youth in partnership with USA Freedom Corps,has agreed to pursue a set of from all sectors of the joint initiatives, including: mapping the youth civic engagement landscape, expanding strategic reward and recognition opportunities, identifying and community expanding models for local cross-sector partnerships, collecting and disseminat- —excerpt from the Youth Service Compact ing effective practices, engaging young people as equal partners, and helping all schools and students discover the power of service-learning. • To review and sign on to the Youth Service Compact,log on to www.youthservicecompact.org. LOS ANGELES' PROMISE BUILT ON HOPE H VPE worldwide At the Presidents' Summit for America's Future in 1997, HOPE caring adult volunteers,providing 1.8 million hours of service to 3.9 worldwide made a commitment to America's Promise to educate million children in more than 100 cities across the nation. parents on the importance of immunizing their children. At a September Town Hall meeting in Los Angeles,America's In 2001, HOPE worldwide expanded its commitment, and Promise Chairman Harris Wofford described HOPE worldwide's Los pledged to engage 150,000 caring volunteers in one million hours of Angeles chapter as a"pioneer" in building programs for children and service with one million children and youth, and to fulfill at least one youth,especially around the third Promise—a healthy start. David of the Five Promises in the 100 cities where HOPE worldwide oper- Chaney, Government Liaison for HOPE worldwide, commented, ates.Additionally, HOPE worldwide revolutionized its partnership by Spledging to establish 10 Communities of Promise by galvanizing their "The presence and support of America's Promise and Senator Wofford,who has committed his entire life to the service of others, existing community partners into action around the Five Promises. will move HOPE worldwide Los Angeles, the L.A. Community of Today, five years after their original commitment, HOPE worldwide's Promise and HOPE worldwide national forward in great ways." ■ volunteers have mobilized 392,000 THE 5 PROMISES: CARING ADULTS SAFE PLACES HEALTHY START MARKETABLE SKILLS OPPORTUNITIES TO SERVE 1 5 1 h t - IYoungr, . , to The Young Leader,a newsletter designed by the America's Promise artnership Team(YPT)to share the stories of young people past and present who are leading us towards a better world and a brighter future. With this purpose in mind,we invite you to share how we can make The Young Leader work for you: write letters to the editor or to the advice column,and keep sending in your feed- back.And remember the mission of The Young Leader is to engage the nation's youth so be sure to share copies of this insert with your peers and proteges! ilai.1.40141404, . .. „..m','_,icaspromise.ot.,,. Dear Young Leader: When They Were Young: `1 The YPT wants to help you!Alumni members of the Youth Partnership Team will answer all your leadership and service wh en hen you drop them a line at theyoungleader@americaspromise.org. caspromue.org. ' never e c e an invention that V. I did not think about in terms of Young Selected questions and answers will be featured in P future issues of the The Leader. ' service it might bring to others." .11.11 Did you know that Thomas Edison: •faced many challenges in his childhood,including losing much of his hearing by age 12? Guide to Growth Book Review: •was influenced by a caring adult—his mother— The Contrarian's Guide to to devote his life to service? •was just 15 years-old when he began developing Leadership inventions that would profoundly aid mankind? As the name suggests, •was only 22 when he earned the first of his The Contrarian's Guide 1,093 patents? to Leadership by Steven Sample does not offer . C O N T el the usual leadership tenets.Instead,through A R(A Nt S vivid anecdotes,Sample .1111. illustrates his"outside of MI the box"philosophy. Young leaders will enjoy the easy writing style,and benefit from the practical suggestions for building one's own leadership potential. • A M E R I C A ' S PROMISE — THE ALLIANCE FOR YOUTH 6 " LEADERSHIP IS ACTION , NOT POSITION . " —Davey Crockett Creating Change: Q What is Musical Angels? At Musical Angels is a nonprofit organization that provides music therapy to sick Musical Angel Laura Lisowski children via public performances and raises funds for pediatric care and research at nearly 30 of children's hospitals throughout the United States. Q Who are the"angels"? A:Angels are volunteer youth musicians with at least three years of orchestral P experience or five years of recital experience. s i Q:How did you come up with the idea for Musical Angels? A:After observing musicians earning money by performing in public markets, • L Ar I decided to play my violin at a local grocery store to raise money for charity. After three holiday seasons,1 raised almost$3,000 for the children's hospital Laura Lisowski,a 15-year-old in my hometown and decided to expand my efforts. from Seattle,Wash.,combined her love of music with her com- Q:What made you get involved in community service? mitment to service to create At By word and example.My parents,extended family,church,and school all Musical Angels.She recently influenced me to volunteer my rime to help those less fortunate. talked to The Young Leader about her innovative organization. Q:What advice do you have for young people? At Young people should simply reach out in any way they can.Kids need to realize that they really can make a difference! • To learn how to start a Musical Angels chapter in your town,visit wwwmruicalangels.org.To tell us about someone you know creating change, email theyoungleader@americaspromise.arg. VIM Out Want to connect to other youth activists around the nation?Join the Young Leaders Listsery by visiting http.//www.americaspromise.org/youngleaders/ - - connected/listserv.cfm The Young Leader is a service of the America's Promise C y n G Youth Partnership Team.Created in 2001,the YPT is ti 01... composed of 16 young leaders from around the country who serve as a sounding board and leadership group for America's Promise,and as a voice for the nation's youth. Have ideas for stories or suggestions for the next issue? 'a i The Young Leader is always looking for youth input. • Submit your ideas to theyoungleader@americaspromise.org. rI ' 1 - `■ THE 5 PROMISES: CARING ADULTS SAFE PLACES HEALTHY START MARKETABLE SKILLS OPPORTUNITIES TO SERVE 7 S • e o • PENN STATE : THE PRIDE OF HIGHER EDUCATION • In September, during an event-filled 1,:'' weekend in State College, Pa., Penn pr,„, ,,,,,:, _ . ___ State's Promise debuted the first uni- _ • versity Promise Station.America's Promise Chairman Harris Wofford �` joined school leaders to introduce this ''�U J unique collaboration to the greater � - h A university community and to recruit ,k010, P' _ —:3 i new partners for the effort. ■ ii, �' • '-�`, r -�: . Top left Students from Alpha Phi Omega hosted Chairman Wofford for a"fireside chat"about pub- lic service and leadership at Schreyer Honors College.Earlier in the day,Chairman Wofford _.__ _ • .—�- PENNSTATE accompanied University President Graham Spanier ,� to address the Board of Trustees during their annual •� ^,�-� T meeting. ,• .;'�_: ' Top right:Chairman Wofford reviews the features of www.pennstatespromise.org with students,staff, q faculty and community leaders during a reception sponsored by Penn State Hospitality Services at the 11.1 Nittany Lion Inn. `,� U Bottom-The Nittany Lion mascot introduces To learn more about Penn State's Promise, Penn State's Promise to a sold-out crowd in Beaver visit www.pennstatespromise.org Stadium during a break in the Penn State vs_ . Nebraska football game_ • SEVEN DAYS, FIVE PROMISES: LAS VEGAS CELEBRATES A WEEK OF PROMISE Pk ', - -17; This oasis in the desert has more to offer than showgirls and casinos. In fact, community part- , r,,� • ' t - ,.. .�i,o ar"' ners in Las Vegas are working hard for local children and youth. Las Vegas'Promise, led by �X -'�1 z � "� Executive Director Verise Campbell,celebrated its official coming out with a series of events i, - Promises ry ' �f,�_ , ,_ i BRA r r r!' from September 22 through September 28 in a"Week of Promise". • ' ,,• ` ',y AINMI - The week kicked off with a ribbon cutting ceremony officiated by Mayor Oscar B. e— Goodman at the new Promise office space donated by partner BankWest of Nevada. Special I. proclamations by state and local leaders, including Representative Shelly Berkley and Governor f. E Kenny Guinn,also marked the importance of the week. P- t cpt n Four local Congregations of Promise pledged their commitment and resources to the Five t\'_ , Promises during services on the Sunday of Promise. Mid-week, www.lasvegaspromise.org was f launched at the Andre Agassi College Preparatory School by Executive Director and Las Vegas' + � ' Promise Board Member Wayne Tanaka. More than 50 students participated in the ceremony at A the school's state-of-the-art technology center. Top left:Kevin Kase,Vice President of America's Promise To close an exciting week, the Andre Agassi Boys &Girls Club hosted a Strive for Five congratulates Las Vegas'Promise for hosting a successful Youth Rally.The event featuredguest speakers engaged in the local effort, includingtwo young week. P Y g people from the Andre Agassi School, an executive from corporate partner SunWest Bank, two Top right.A local teen plays the cello during the program. family court judges and leaders from several Congregations of Promise. Local youth entertained Bottom right:A student from the Andre Agassi College the crowd with karate demonstrations,dance exhibitions,step team routines and orchestral Prepatory School shares what the Five Promises mean to her. performances. ■ Bottom left:Youngsters from Brandon's ATA Black Belt • Academy,a local partner,performed for the crowd at the youth rally. For more information visit www.lasvegaspromise.org. CO" O - A M E R I C A ' S PROMISE — THE ALLIANCE FOR YOUTH 18 • • HOLIDAY CARD FOR YOU The Washington,D.C.first graders who are featured on the -.-' - - ---.471 - cover of the Promise Letter helped design a heart-warming i- -- •- �l _ holiday card for America's Promise.Below is a postcard •r 9�' - " version of the card for you to cut out and send to someone who is helping the children in your community. ' /' " America's Promise thanks the young artists at Mary Mach@,6 Kairi,5 Bianca,6 Church Terrell Elementary School.And a special thanks ' to their art reacher Theodore Rice and Principal Tonya Deskins for working to fulfill the Five Promise for all of Y � ' their students.• q „I: 4,4 DeShauna,6 Ronika,6 lam'\" � I.i _ t 41.l 4tv - P • Diron,5 Tanesha,6 Reins,6 Please cut along the dotted line oT r_. AmF AN PROMISE l� . l • y'( Y t I I: (�'^ ►� - __ - s` 00 : 1L__- 0 e WHAT'S WORKING? w;r ,, • Monitor your mentoring program's goals and progress with What's Working,a tool from Search Institute designed to measure the per- , ceived impact of mentoring programs on both the youth and the AMERICAS PROMISE mentors involved.The guidebook includes surveys,focus group ques- tions and interview protocols that allow you to gather information from mentors,mentees,parents,teachers or other adults.To order a copy,go to www.search-inrtitute.org/catalog or call 1-800-888-7829.■ h at); VVorkin j2 FIVE PROMISES RESEARCH BOOKLET Reserve your copy of the newly updated Five Promises Research Booklet today.Search Institute recently revised this 12-page report that validates the importance of the Five Promises as the fundamental Is.,h=,-I ® resources for children and youth.The revamped publication contains new statistics and recent data to support the Five Promises framework. . , . . . v.::*. Visit the Promise Shop at www.americasprornise.orgto place your order.■ • �11 occasion forfeasts m ce/lration, Tan/ iving it afro tie time Shaul our ap Yreciation,- THANK YOU For your deepened commitment to improve the lives of children and youth. • 1 0 • o' • _. .., , __ . On October 28,America's Promise ` Chairman Harris Wofford received the John W. Gardner Leadership Award from �- Independent Sector.The award recognizes • Chairman Wofford for dedicating his life to 11111111%0111111111. - - --- . the goal of making citizen service a common expectation and experience for all Americans. Named in honor of the founding chairman LINK UP TO SCHOOLS OF of Independent Sector,John W. Gardner, the award recognizes an American working in or PROMISE • with the voluntary sector, institutions and causes whose work has national or interna- America's Promise has worked for several years with tional impact in his or her field and Communities In Schools, Inc. and American Association of contributes to the common good.■ School Administrators to cultivate and nurture schools as sites for fulfilling the Five Promises.A new section of the America's To learn more about Independent Sector, Promise Web site contains the latest information on Schools of visit www.independentsector.org. Promise, from definitions and best practices to requirements and registration.To access this site,visit www.americaspromise.org/schools.■ iiii 1 Il • • it ►t _( •jr '10 Left:Stephanie Abrego,a 2002 participant in the Powell-Straw Youth Exchange,presents a •- • - -• wagon to Anchorage Mayor George Wuerch National Mentoring Month for his continued work as a champion for January 2003 0 youth throughout the city. www.hsph.harvard.edu/chclmentoringmonthl Center:Lanie Fleischer and Dick Wells, www.mentoring.org i' i Co-chairs of Anchorage's Promise. t • .t' Right:Youth Partnership Team member • r I Ophelia Yan,Wilma John Baptiste and Martin Luther King,Jr.Day of Service } , i Stephanie Abrego present a wagon to Alaska "Make it a Day ON, not a day off" O rO Sen,Ted Stevens,for his outstanding commit- January 20, 2003 All ment to youth. www.mlkday.org ANCHORAGE KIDS ARE National Groundhog Job Shadow Day I January 31, 2003 EVERYONE'S BUSINESS www.jobshadow..org III Anchorage's Promise hosted a symposium on Oct. 26 in Fostering Leadership for Service-Learning conjunction with Make a Difference Day. More than 200 area Sustainability Institute residents participated in the youth-led event, in which partici- Sponsored by Community-Campus Partnerships pants offered creative ideas on how adults could provide the Five February 1-4, 2003 Promises to Anchorage's youth. "When you listen to kids and O ficturehealth.ucsfeda�%cph/servicelearning.html#advsl take their ideas into account,you're showing you care," said Kim Aho, a volunteer with Anchorage's Promise. "It reinforces I that they're a part of the community and that they matter." To learn more,visit www.anchoragespromise.org. ■ THE 5 PROMISES: CARING ADULTS SAFE PLACES HEALTHY START MARKETABLE SKILLS OPPORTUNITIES TO SERVE 11 • Experience The Power of Five "The best place to TO LEARN ABOUT find a helping hand *%' AMERICA'S PROMISE • is at the end of your » � Visit us on the World Wide Web at own arm. i' � Ys J ` www.americaspromise.org —Swedish proverb. AOL Keyword:America's Promise or call our toll-free number, This adage describes the soul of The Power of 1-888-55-YOUTH. Five,a new America's Promise tool which encourages young people to lend a hand to To learn more about becoming a National kids in their community by fulfilling Five Partner or supporting a Community of Promises.This service-learning program was Promise,please call(703)684-4500 or fax created by America's Promise and Weekly Reader for small group leaders working us at(703)535-3900. with young people ages 11 to 14.Based on the founding principles of America's To order publications and videos,please Promise,the Power of Five asks"tweens"to do their part in making sure that call(800)292-6430. every young person has what he or she needs to grow up happy and healthy and become a successful adult and citizen.The activities and instructor's guide help To order Little Red Wagon merchandise . facilitate the group's efforts as the young people evaluate and research their vol- (hats,pins,T-shirts,wagons,etc.),please unmet or service options,and then commit at least five days to fulfilling the Five call(800)291-5871 or order online at Promises to kids their age or younger. wwwtargetlogosonline.com/ap/ To receive your free educational kit,contact America's Promise at powerofve@americaspromise.org,or 1-800-365-0153.■ t,TETC,tS PROMISE NONPROFIT • 1-11V11..I EAALLIANCC ALLIANCE RY\O 1t rVll•Jli ORGANIZATION U.S.POSTAGE PAID 909 North Washington Street,Suite 400 PERMIT NO.2520 Alexandria,VA 22314-1556 ODENTON,MD www.omericospromise.org 1-888-55-YOUTH The Promise Letter Winner of a Pull your weight. 2002 Apex Award for Excellence Printed on paper generously donated by e SAPPI FINE PAPER NORTH AMERICA tle a and UTAH'S PRONILSE reams or red fds symbol of childhood. ilio could ofA tiers an c i child's hopes help or weighed wagon.A with their burdens. Millions o/American children need our help to pull that wagon along.Let's all pull together"-Retired General Colin L.Powell • WHEN WAS UTAH'S PROMISE INITIATED? In April 1997,Retired General Cohn Powell joined all former living U.S.Presidents in initiating America's Promise,a nationwide effort aimed at ensuring the nation's youth receive five essential promises. Six months later,the state of Utah responded to General Powell's call for service and launched its own effort. WHAT IS UTAH'S PROMISE? Utah's Promise is a grassroots effort that mobilizes volunteers to improve local communities. It also seeks to deliver five fundamental • promises to Utah's children and youth: .A Caring Adult such as a parent,teacher,mentor,or coach; Safe Places to learn and to grow; A Healthy Start in life for a healthy future; MX,Marketable Skills through an effective education;and Opportunities to Serve and give back to the community. Founding Chairman of Americus Promise Ret.Con.Colin Powell HOW IS UTAH'S PROMISE ORGANIZED? With CONY-mON Micho J Lenart am the la,nching of Utah's Promise. Unlike most statewide efforts,Utah's Promise is supported primarily by volunteers. The Utah Commission on Volunteers,a Commission of the Office of the Lieutenant Governor,provides some staff support,but most of •the work is accomplished by volunteers in communities throughout Utah. Governor Michael O.Leavitt,First Lady Jacalyn S.Leavitt and Lieutenant Governor Olene S.Walker provide the Utah's Promise initiative with leadership and direction. However,the backbone of Utah's Promise lies in residents who spearhead local community efforts and donate their time and energies. Communities that decide to participate in the Utah's Promise effort pledge their commitment to the cause by becoming a"Community of Promise." By doing this,a community determines issues,sets goals,obtains com- mitments and initiates efforts to improve the community. WHAT HAS UTAH'S PROMISE ACCOMPLISHED? Many communities provide caring adults by partnering with mentoring programs, after-school clubs and faith- based organizations. Safe neighborhood councils partner with local officials to ensure safe communities. Some Communities of Promise ensure their youth have a healthy start by sponsoring health fairs and promoting immu- nizations.As a way to provide marketable skills to their youth,many establish literacy programs,encourage job shadowing and co-sponsor career fairs. Schools and Universities of Promise have also made the commitment. Communities encourage youth to serve by establishing youth courts and encouraging youth service teams to par- ticipate in local projects on national days of service. These are only a few of the ways Utah's Promise is making a difference. OW TO CONTACT UTAH'S PROMISE For more information on Utah's Promise,please contact the Utah Commission on 11a11 5 PromiseVolunteers at 1-888-755-UTAH(8824)or visit www.utahspromise.org. 1 • • UTAH COMMISSION ON VOLUNTEERS AN OFFICE OF THE LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR • HISTORY II-1 The Utah Commission on Volunteers was established February 1994.Its i purpose is to improve Utah communities through service and volunteering. The Commission has three basic responsibilities:to administer Corporation p J1896 for National and Community Service programs,oversee America's Promise efforts in Utah,and provide technical support to Utah's Volunteer Centers. I The Commission consists of 25 members appointed by the Governor and ' Lt.Governor. _-t? •1 i•¶ AMER'CORPS "' I . 'FEfi 9 AmeriCorps,the domestic Peace Corps,engages more than 40,000 Americans in intensive,results-driven service each year. *3✓e The majority of AmeriCorps members are selected by and serve with various local and national organizations and projects.For the . 2000-2001 program year,AmeriCorps members offered 231,459 hours of II service.After their term of service,AmeriCorps members receive education Lt.Governor Olene S.Walker,Chair awards to help finance college or pay back student loans.To date,more than 800 Utah residents have qualified for education awards totalling more than$2,800,000. •LEARN AND SERVE Learn and Serve America supports service-learning programs in schools and community organizations Rp N.c that help nearly one million students from kindergarten through college meet community needs,while r, improving their academic skills and learning the habits of good citizenship.Learn and Serve grants are .. `..‘• used to create new programs or replicate existing programs,as well as to provide training and develop- - tnent to staff,faculty and volunteers. The Commission administers community-based Learn and Serve programs in Utah.Last year,more than 3,000 youth were involved in service-learning activities,resulting in a total of 34,500 service hours. UTAH'S PROMISE In April 1997,Retired General Cohn Powell joined all former living U.S.Presidents in initiating America's Promise,a nationwide effort aimed at ensuring the nation's youth receive five essential promises.Six months later,the state of Utah responded to General Powell's call for service by launching Utah's Promise,a multiyear initiative to mobilize citizens to make a positive impact in their communities through volunteer service.Communities,clubs,schools,universities and faith-based organiza- tions throughout the state are involved with Utah's Promise. VOLUNTEER CENTERS Volunteer Centers are established to connect volunteers with service opportunities within their own communities.Utah's 18 Volunteer Centers are part of the Volunteer Center National Network of over• 450 Volunteer Centers that partner with the Points of Light Foundation—a national nonprofit organi- zation—to help individuals,groups,and families become effectively engaged in service to their commu- nities. Since its inception,the Commission has helped increase the number of Utah's Volunteers Centers by 14. For more inloimation,please contact the Commission at 1-888-755-UTAH(8824)or visit www.volunteers.utah.org. President Bush Underscores Commitment To Nation's Youth Signs Declaration"Fulfilling The Promise Of America" tad' 1 . v N iftriA tttca'sPRUrZ ©3 President Bush signs a declaration as America's Promise Chair- man Marc Racicot looks on. (NAPS)—At a recent White chronicles the specific commit- House event recognizing the good meats of America's Promise part- work of America's Promise—The ners,communities and states to Alliance for Youth and its more than build the character and compe- 1,000 partners,communities and tence of the nation's youth. states,President Bush underscored "Our 2001 Report to the Nation commitment to the nation's documents thousands of activities g people by signing a declaim- all across this great country and n supporting the Five Promises of within every sector that makes o s 1. America's Promise:caring adults, our democracy work—govern- safe places, a healthy start, ment,business,education,labor marketable skills and opportunities and faith-based organizations," to serve.The Five Promises are said America's Promise Chairman fundamental resources that Marc Racicot."It involves those young people need to grow up who have,and those who do not. with character and competence. It involves young and old devoted "We know what children need to a common mission,one that I to succeed.They need mentors know is important to our Presi- and role models.They need to be dent:mobilizing armies of com- healthy and educated and chal- passion to ensure that we leave no lenged to serve,"said President child behind." Bush."I want to thank America's In signing the declaration,and Promise. I want to thank the recognizing the importance of the thousands all across our land who Five Promises for all children, are working hard to make Amer- President Bush joins former ica a fabulous country for all." Presidents G.H.W.Bush,Carter, Prior to the signing,America's Clinton,Ford and Reagan,in Promise Chairman Marc Racicot, their shared commitment to mak- Founding Chairman Colin L.Pow- ing children and youth a national ell and President and CEO Peter priority. Gallagher met with President To join this crusade for youth Bush in the Oval Office and pre- in your community, visit sented him with the America's www.americaspromise.org;AOL Promise Report to the Nation Keyword:America's Promise or 2001.The nearly 650-page report call 1-888-55-YOUTH. AMERICANS INACTION rimw_twiwirirwtartcwiwiami . _ _ . Warrior of Citizen Initiatives Leads America's Promise (NAPS)—Leaders across Amer- ica are talking about the recently ° i ,�g /41 T elected chairman of America's Promise—The Alliance for Youth, N. former Senator Harris Wofford. '' America's Promise was founded 1 . after the Presidents'Summit for America's Future in 1997 where \'s",J, ,„. @,, Presidents Clinton,G.H.W.Bush, \"#,�rq Carter and Ford,with Nancy Rea- "".— gai representing President Rea- y:^,.y.. - gan,challenged the country to make children and youth a r` ,, national priority.General Colin L Powell is the founding chairman of or the organization.The mission of America's Promise is to mobilize 0 't.' people from every sector of Amen can life to build the character and :,_ competence of youth by fulfilling , a the Five Promises:caring adults, Former Senator Harris Wofford safe places,healthy start,mar- leads an initiative to help Amer- ketable skills and opportunities to ica's youth. serve. "Through their dedication and leaders on both sides of the aisle. hard work,America's Promise and Former President Clinton released i s Alliance partners are pointing a statement saying, "I was so way to fulfill the Five Promises grateful for the great job Harris forth at the Presidents'Summit Wofford did as head of the Corpo- in 1997,"said Wofford. ration for National and Commu- As a former U.S.senator from nity Service during my administra- Pennsylvania and most recently tion...I am glad to know that he CEO of the Corporation for will continue helping people as National and Community Service, chair of America's Promise."Such Wofford has dedicated much of praise also came from Senator Rick his life to the goal of making citi- Santorum(R-Penn.):"It has been zen service a common expectation my pleasure to work with Mr.Wof- and experience for all Americans. ford over the years on providing He played a key role in passing faith-based and charitable organi- the trailblazing legislation that zations—like America's Promise— created AmeriCorps,the Learn with the tools necessary to con- and Serve America program and tinue their mission of service." the Corporation for National and In 2001,Wofford convened and Community Service.He was also chaired the Working Group on instrumental in organizing the Human Needs and Faith-Based Presidents'Summit. and Community Initiatives.Addi- "Harris has been with us from tionally,Wofford is a member of the the very beginning.His chairman- National Commission on Service- ship at America's Promise will be Learning and serves on the boards yet another milestone in his long- of Youth Service America and the standing commitment to ensure Points of Light Foundation.In the that young people in this great 1970s,Wofford was president of country have every opportunity to Bryn Mawr College.He is also the lead successful lives,"said General author of four books,including Of Colin L.Powell,Founding Chair- Kennedys and Kings:Making Sense man,America's Promise. of the Sixties. News of Senator Wofford'e elec- For more information,visit ' n to the Chairmanship of Amer- their Web site at www.Americas s Promise drew comments from Promise.org. AMERIC& Elected Officials • z THE Auux.[baYounf • FACT SHEET Mobilizing Elected Officials Elected officials—with their leadership and influence—are in an ideal position to vocalize the needs of young people and fulfill these needs in the most profound way.Across the country,political lead- ers at all levels of government are partnering with America's Promise to ensure that every young per- D son has access to the tools that create opportunities for success.By adopting the Five Promises mframework,public officials have effectively garnered resources from all sectors of society to improve t^ the lives of their young constituents. • Here are examples of how elected officials are fulfilling the Five Promises for our nation's youth: National •In July 2001,President George W.Bush became the second sitting president and sixth overall N President to sign the Summit Declaration pledging to fulfill the Five Promises for children and youth in America. z •Each summer,US Senator Ted Stevens(Alaska)offers high school students the opportunity to • serve as interns in his office.As the keynote speaker at the 2002 Anchorage's Promise Make A Difference Day youth symposium,Sen.Stevens stressed the importance of the youth voice in com- • b munity issues. rn State co •Governor Gary Locke(Washington)created the Washington's Promise Scholarship in 1999 to rn provide two-year college scholarships to high school students in low-and middle-income families. Gov.Locke also created the Washington Reading Corps program in 1998.To date,the reading 7c corps has trained 11,000 volunteers who provide intensive tutoring to 22,000 elementary students ✓ statewide. •In January 2002,Governor Bob Wise(West Virginia)initiated the West Virginia Partnership to • Assure Student's Success(PASS)in the state capital.In partnership with America's Promise and O Communities in Schools,PASS is the first statewide pilot program to proactively encourage local vbusinesses and organizations to contribute to the development of sustainable school-community O collaborations.•Attorney General Bill Pryor(Alabama)established Mentor Alabama,an organization dedicated to fighting juvenile crime byengagingadults in the lives ofyouths.Mentor Alabama works closely g g with Alabama's Promise and Montgomery's Promise. m •Governor Michael Leavitt and Lt.Governor Olene Walker(Utah)established Utah's Promise in the office of the Utah Commission on Volunteers.Utah's Promise works directly with seventy- -1 five Communities of Promise across the state at the grassroots level,to mobilize volunteers to improve their local communities. By effectively using statewide resources, the goal of Utah's m Promise is to provide all Five Promises to 30,000 children and youth across the state. • m 11 909 North Washington Street,Suite 400•Alexandria,VA 22314•(703)684-4500 Fax:(703)535-3900 • •On May 21,2002,Mayor Tom Murphy(Pittsburgh,Pa.)hosted a graduation ceremony for his Inaugural Mayor's Youth Advisory Council. In partnership with Allegheny County's Promise and the YWCA of Greater Pittsburgh,the Mayor's Youth Policy Office is working directly with young activists to develop and produce a youth-led cable television show,maintain and promote a resource Web site (www.ypconnection.com), and plan Pittsburgh's first official Youth Day 2003 with $28,500 from the Mayor's Youth Policy Office. •Mayor Joseph P.Riley,Jr.(Charleston,S.C.)houses Charleston's Promise at the Mayor's Office for Children,Youth and Families(MOCYF). Mayor Riley is also mobilizing Berkeley,Charleston and Dorchester counties to create the Trident Promise Alliance. •The Lakewood City Council(Washington),a Council of Promise,recently awarded$132,000 to several agencies that strive to fulfill the Five Promises to the city's children and youth. It also recent- ly selected Lakewood's Promise Co-Chairperson Andie Gernon as a councilmember. For additional information on how elected officials can work with America's Promise on behalf of youth,contact William Ramos at 1-800-365-0153 or Wi[UamRCamericaspromise.org. • • ■ 909 North Washington Street,Suite 400•Alexandria,VA 22314•(703)684-4500 Fax:(703)535-3900 • • SUMMIT DECLARATION Two centuries ago,America was founded on the proposition that just as all people are endowed by their Creator with inalienable rights,citizenship entails undeniable responsibilities. As each of us has the right to Life,Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness,each of us has an obligation to give something back to country and community a duty to cake responsibility not just for ourselves and our families,but for one another. We owe a debt of service to fulfill the God-given promise of America,and our children. In this time of opportunity ac the dawn of a new century and a new millennium the need for shared responsibility is self-evident. The challenges of today,especially those that confront our children,require a special commitment of us all.People of all ages and from all walks of life must claim society's problems as their own, pulling together,leading by example,and lifting American lives. • Our obligation,distinct and unmistakable,is to assure that all young Americans have • Caring adults in their lives,as parents, mentors,tutors,coaches Safe places with structured activities in which to learn and grow A healthy start and healthy future An effective education that equips them with marketable skills - An opportunity to give back to their communities through their own service As Americans and as Presidents,we ask every caring citizen to pledge individual commitments of citizen service,voluntary action,the efforts of their organizations,or commitments to individual children in need. By doing so,this nation pledges the fulfillment of America's promise for every American child. THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Gerald R.For James @art Carter Ronald W.Reagan George H.W.Bush William Jefferson Clinton by Mrs.Nancy Reagan • Declaration to Fulfill the Promise of America With this Declaration,I build on an historic foundation. In April 1997,in front of Philadelphia's Independence Hall,the Nation committed itself to the fundamental belief that every child is a child of promise. This vision,affirmed by the signatures of every living President on this declaration and by Nancy Reagan on behalf of President Reagan,is one to which I commit my Administration and call all Americans to embrace: Two centuries ago,America was founded on the proposition that just as all people are endowed by their Creator with unalienable rights,citizenship entails undeniable responsibilities. As each of us has the right to Life,Liberty,and the Pursuit of Happiness,each of us has an obligation to give something back to country and community—a duty to take responsibility not just for ourselves and our families,but for one another. We owe a debt of service to fulfill the God-given promise of America,and our children. In this time of opportunity—at the dawn of a new century and a new Millennium—the need for shared responsibility is self-evident. The challenges of today,especially those that confront our children,require a • special commitment of us all. People of all ages and from all walks of life must claim society's problems as their own,pulling together,leading by example,and lifting American lives. Our obligation,distinct and unmistakable,is to assure that all young Americans have Caring adults in their lives,as parents,mentors,tutors,coaches Safe places with structured activities in which to learn and grow A healthy start and healthy future An effective education that equips them with marketable skills An opportunity to give back to their communities through their own service As Americans and as Presidents,we ask every caring citizen to pledge individual commitments of citizen service,voluntary action,the efforts of their organizations,or commitments to individual children in need.By doing so,this Nation pledges the fulfillment of America's promise for every American child. Today,with this Declaration to Fulfill the Promise of America,I carry this special commitment from us all into the 21u Century. I call on Americans from every walk of life to join together in fulfilling these Five Promises. And I ask the country to stand as a single nation,united by the common mission of building the character and competence of every child and young person in America. • President George W.Bush