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03/16/2021 - Work Session - Meeting Materials SALT LAKE CITY COUNCIL AGENDA WORK SESSION March 16, 2021 Tuesday 2:00 PM This meeting will be an electronic meeting pursuant to the Salt Lake City Emergency Proclamation. SJ,C',C',oiuitnefl.d:or n 7:00 pm Formal Meeting (See separate agenda) The Work Session is a discussion among Council Members and select presenters.The public is welcome to listen.Items scheduled on the Work Session or Formal Meeting may be moved and/or discussed during a different portion of the Meeting based on circumstance or availability of speakers. Please note:Dates not identified in the FYI-Project Timeline are either not applicable or not yet determined.Item start times and durations are approximate and are subject to change at the Chair's discretion. Generated: 09:00:03 This meeting will be an electronic meeting pursuant to the Chair's determination that conducting the City Council meeting at a physical location presents a substantial risk to the health and safety of those who may be present at the anchor location. The Salt Lake City Council Chair has determined that conducting a meeting at an anchor location under the current state of public health emergency constitutes a substantial risk to the health and safety of those who may attend in person. For these reasons,the Council Meeting will not have a physical location at the City and County Building and all attendees will connect remotely. Members of the public are encouraged to participate in meetings.We want to make sure everyone interested in the City Council meetings can still access the meetings how they feel most comfortable. If you are interested in watching the City Council meetings,they are available on the following platforms: • Facebook Live:v • YouTube:v .y�: u:Ik.auk ,.����: u �a!��^iu��.u � Il.u�u ;a • Web Agenda: • SLCty Channel 17 Live: [..uVC/2 If you are interested in participating during the Formal Meeting for the Public Hearings or general comment period,you may do so through the Webex platform.To learn how to connect through Webex, or if you need call-in phone options,please Vivo l: OUr w bs to or call us at 8o1-535-7607 to learn more. As always, if you would like to provide feedback or comment, please call us or send us an email: • 24-Hour comment line: 8o1-535-7654 More info and resources can be found at: US/ Upcoming meetings and meeting information can be found here: We welcome and encourage your comments! We have Council staff monitoring inboxes and voicemail, as always,to receive and share your comments with Council Members.All agenda- related and general comments received in the Council office are shared with the Council Members and added to the public meeting record.View comments by visiting the COau rici. iFIINA! MAN,al.un ;COIDIDenits page. Work Session Items The Council will be briefed by the Administration about issues affecting the City that may arise during the 2021 Utah State Legislative Session. FYI — Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing-Tuesday,January 12, 2021; Tuesday, February 2, 2021;Tuesday, February 9, 2021; Tuesday, February 16, 2021;Tuesday, March 2, 2021; and Tuesday, March 16, 2021 Set Public Hearing Date- n/a Hold hearing to accept public comment-n/a TENTATIVE Council Action-n/a j The Council will receive an update from the Administration on major items or projects, including but not limited to: • COVID-19,the March 202o Earthquake, and the September 2020 Windstorm; • Updates on relieving the condition of people experiencing homelessness; • Police Department work, projects, and staffing, etc.; and • Other projects or updates. FYI —Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing-Recurring Briefing Set Public Hearing Date- n/a Hold hearing to accept public comment-n/a TENTATIVE Council Action-n/a . The Council will hold a discussion about recent efforts on various projects City staff are working on related to racial equity and policing in the City.The conversation may include issues of community concern about race, equity, and justice in relation to law enforcement policies, procedures,budget, and ordinances. Discussion may include: • An update or report on the Commission on Racial Equity in Policing; and • Other project updates or discussion. FYI —Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing-Recurring Briefing Set Public Hearing Date- n/a Hold hearing to accept public comment-n/a TENTATIVE Council Action-n/a /iiiir. 4. The Council is holding an ongoing series of discussions about policing and related topics in the City.This briefing focuses on Human Resources and Police Department policies and practices that guide the process to recruit new officers, determine which candidates are hired and how existing officers are promoted. FYI —Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing-Tuesday, March 16, 2021 Set Public Hearing Date- n/a Hold hearing to accept public comment-n/a TENTATIVE Council Action-n/a 5 / i FYI —Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing-n/a Set Public Hearing Date- n/a Hold hearing to accept public comment-n/a TENTATIVE Council Action-n/a / The Council will be briefed about Budget Amendment No. 7 for the Fiscal Year 2020-21 Budget. Budget amendments happen several times each year to reflect adjustments to the City's budgets, including proposed project additions and modifications.The proposed amendment includes $6 million from the U.S.Treasury Department for rental assistance, funding to host the National League of Cities Conference in November 2021, an outdoor business activity assistance pilot program, and a needs assessment of the Police Department, among many other items. FYI —Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing-Tuesday,March 16, 2021 Set Public Hearing Date- Tuesday, March 16, 2021 Hold hearing to accept public comment-Tuesday,April 6, 2021 at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action-Tuesday,April 20, 2021 The Council will receive a briefing from Dan Nackerman,the Executive Director of the Housing Authority of Salt Lake City on recent plans, projects and reports.The Housing Authority is a federally-funded agency that provides rent subsidies and promotes affordable housing for income-eligible people in Salt Lake City. FYI — Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing-Tuesday, March 16, 2021 Set Public Hearing Date- n/a Hold hearing to accept public comment-n/a TENTATIVE Council Action-n/a The Council will receive a follow-up briefing about a new proposal for Shared Housing zoning text amendments.The proposed amendments would redefine what was previously Single Room Occupancy(SRO)housing to Shared Housing, and defines it as a residential building, or part of one that contains smaller housing units consisting of one or more sleeping rooms and contains either a private kitchen or private bathroom,but not both. In the updated proposal, units could contain multiple sleeping rooms,rather than limiting the unit to one sleeping room. FYI — Project Timeline: (subject to change per Chair direction or Council discussion) Briefing-Tuesday,April 14, 2020; Tuesday, October 6, 2020; and Tuesday, March 16, 2021 Set Public Hearing Date- Tuesday, October 6, 2020 Hold hearing to accept public comment-Tuesday, October 20, 202o and Tuesday, November io, 202o at 7 p.m. TENTATIVE Council Action-TBD Standing Items 9 Report of Chair and Vice Chair. 10. Report of the Executive Director,including a review of Council information items and announcements.The Council may give feedback or staff direction on any item related to City Council business, including but not limited to; • Citizens Compensation Advisory Committee (CCAC) Reappointments • Council/School Board Leadership Meeting; • Sugar House S-Line configuration; and • Scheduling Items. 11 The Council will consider a motion to enter into Closed Session.A closed meeting described under Section 52-4-205 may be held for specific purposes including, but not limited to: a. discussion of the character, professional competence, or physical or mental health of an individual; b. strategy sessions to discuss collective bargaining; c. strategy sessions to discuss pending or reasonably imminent litigation; d. strategy sessions to discuss the purchase, exchange, or lease of real property, including any form of a water right or water shares, if public discussion of the transaction would: (i) disclose the appraisal or estimated value of the property under consideration; or (ii) prevent the public body from completing the transaction on the best possible terms; e. strategy sessions to discuss the sale of real property, including any form of a water right or water shares, if: (i) public discussion of the transaction would: (A) disclose the appraisal or estimated value of the property under consideration; or (B) prevent the public body from completing the transaction on the best possible terms; (ii) the public body previously gave public notice that the property would be offered for sale; and (iii) the terms of the sale are publicly disclosed before the public body approves the sale; f. discussion regarding deployment of security personnel, devices, or systems; and g. investigative proceedings regarding allegations of criminal misconduct. A closed meeting may also be held for attorney-client matters that are privileged pursuant to Utah Code § 78B-1-137, and for other lawful purposes that satisfy the pertinent requirements of the Utah Open and Public Meetings Act. CERTIFICATE OF POSTING On or before 5:00 p.m.on ,the undersigned,duly appointed City Recorder, does hereby certify that the above notice and agenda was(1)posted on the Utah Public Notice Website created under Utah Code Section 63F-1-701, and(2) a copy of the foregoing provided to The Salt Lake Tribune and/or the Deseret News and to a local media correspondent and any others who have indicated interest. CINDY LOU TRISHMAN SALT LAKE CITY RECORDER Final action may be taken in relation to any topic listed on the agenda, including but not limited to adoption, rejection, amendment, addition of conditions and variations of options discussed. People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodation,which may include alternate formats,interpreters, and other auxiliary aids and services. Please make requests at least two business days in advance.To make a request,please contact the City Council Office at council.comments@slcgov.com, 8oi-535-7600,or relay service 711. O � U v J O Qj Qj O Qj Qj Qj -Q U Qj Q ca QjQj Qj U U + I � � N co Cl) i � O N O > 4-0 N N N N O E N co _C3 O cn co N O Q N co cn C7- E �_ �-=• U N O j N i X N � co Q cn G) N }' U co N co co o o N �O co CD OE co Co v N N _-• O co C cn N i--� � Co i—% � co co N cn > co cn N O = � cn OIv— N . v v >, = ton N ca E G� N E C� o O � � N C130 N o 3 a� o � a� cn Cl) o o L c co o a 0 0 o o ca Co Oco o > ca Co o 0 0 �. E cn }. 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N O N_ to CU � �� Ca O O O Ca N tom. L tw = O CU CU O CU N L Ca • CU O Ca w N — — U_ N Ca 'Q J U) 7 cu CU Ca m O �' O -M U E co U }• Ocu CU 3 Ca COj Ca N cu j a) CU N � Ca N cn 3 N O •- j N Ca N O O N " }' U U_ O to _ U O ";4- O7 O O . Cam O Ca N N Ca CU O }, Ca O O Cu CU O L� C - _ U • • C/) "7 co L4- co C) to C/) 7p LE C) C) (1) L-- C) C- co co co cc C/) N C:) C) E- co C- cc C/) C) (1) C) cn _C3 cn co Co co O < C) C3 w C) C) tm C cc Co Co co cn C-- ........... .CX C3 co .C: to CD ) co C'u < cn C:)- cn cn co (1) C/5 co (1) C) C) -C:) co -c3 co C) cc co_C3 Cc V cn w C) o co Cc -C3 co Co C) -C3 Co -0--0 C/) co -C—D co Ca 0 -c3 Q 0 Presentation for the Salt Lake City Council March 16, 2021 A Day in the Life..... ..... or, How does a person become a Salt Lake City Police Officer? 1. Finding candidates to be SLC Police Officers Purpose: Diversity, inclusion, community representation, equal opportunity. ➢ Outreach ➢ Community meetings/mentoring/internships ➢ Continuous recruitment 2. Qualifying to be a SLC Police Officer Purpose: Ensuring candidates meet Salt Lake City Police Department (SLCPD) standards and Police Officers Standards &Training (POST) requirements. ➢ Job requirements ➢ Accessibility ➢ Pre-testing questionnaire 3.Testing to be a SLC Police Officer Purpose:Assessing character, ensuring organizational fit, identifying bias or extremism ➢ Phase 1: Physical Testing Written Testing Veteran's & Explorer preferences ➢ Phase 11: Initiate comprehensive background checks: a. Utah POST application &background check b. Internal SLCPD Miller Mendel -eSOPH background check Oral interview Truthfulness verification (Voice stress or Eye Detect) ➢ Phase 111: Finalize comprehensive background checks Psychological testing—multiple tests Psychologist interview 4. Hiring to be a SLC Police Officer: Purpose: Bringing the most qualified (overall) candidates into our organization. ➢ Chief's (or designee) interview. ➢ New recruitment Rules expand opportunity. ➢ Conditional Offer Letter based on successful completion medical exam and drug screen. ➢ Successful candidates become SLC Police Officer!l Having successfully completed this process, a new recruit then begins ten (10) months of training. Potential briefing in April about the training process. Y O J H u a z W � i0iillllllli � fffffff' 1 III p � „huuuuuuuuuu a� 0 Z � a ® � • I I II �u� ����� . uuuuuuui ���� „�uu ��Umuuuuuumiiiiiiiii IIIIIIIIIIIIIII�"" I" �pioill�Vumoo �..uuuuuuuuuu � ni �w"' �' .iu I4 it V�IVi � �uuuuuuuiiiiiiii �I�IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII� uumuuuuu� � �"IIIIIIIIII��II�IIII�IIIIIII ��� N �� IIN� �� ���� u i L. um 0 o - o uY 'Q �� II iIV p VI c y � 0 I � I �I�IIIII�IIII�I�III��I�� IIII v � cv y c � . 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"" r,,,,i IIIIIIIII � { �10 r{„ ���� i�n�n1110 Illlumuum IIIIIIIII . i lu I� IIV I IIIIIIIIIIuuu�O IIIIIIIII III III uiuunuuum � .. nnlll b a ��� .Ilan �ollll Illllmnnm Ilnllm o 0 N = a ti � � , 'f� �'uilllllllllllm � r I�liil i � P Uu'�� � IIVIpii1l�l� ii�ilJli . luill�i � o . � U N O V - O �} y o � �T irilr� � �; �uu�IlJlll�l)I uml ���iulllllllll������ � a co o � u z u 3 0 v U O O � 0 m III�'�il I� j uiiil pll ii ��ll�l i ��.� v V � O C rO ClO to N � � �` p COUNCIL STAFF REPORT CITY COUNCIL of SALT LAKE CITY tom st TO: City Council Members Project Timeline: FROM: Ben Luedtke,Sylvia Richards,Russell Weeks, Set Date: March 16, 2021 Allison Rowland,Kira Luke,and Sam Owen is'Briefing: March 16,2021 Budget and Policy Analysts 2nd Briefing:April 6,2021 Public Hearing:April 6,2021 DATE: March 16, 2021 Potential Action:April 20,2021 RE: Budget Amendment Number Seven FY2021 Budget Amendment Number Seven includes requested changes to fifteen funds.Total expenditures are$22,758,707 including $6,042,o8o from Fund Balance. If this budget amendment is approved as requested by the Administration, then the amount available in Fund Balance above the 13%minimum target would be$6,788,256.There are a total of forty-six items,nineteen of which are new items in Section A. Additionally,this budget amendment includes the addition of three new positions and the transfer of two employees from the General Fund to the IMS fund.The new positions include one in the Fire Department to assist with Emergency Management and two grant-funded positions.This amendment also requests$1 million for maintenance on the central plant boiler for the City&County Building as well as the Library and Leonardo. The Council may wish to note that this budget amendment includes several items related to the Police Department. While the Council's budget and operations audit of the Police Department is still underway,there have been unexpected events throughout the year that have created a need to amend the department's budget.These current budget amendment items are related to reimbursements the City has received for increased security services with other jurisdictions,at special events,protests, overtime during Community Commitment Program service outreach and camp clean up, and an error in calculating the total annual cost of the Social Worker Program which was transferred during the last annual budget. Given the ongoing commitment to examine the Police Department's budget,the amendments were prepared by the Finance and Police Departments with the intent to only address some unexpected expenses and reflect the true cost of current staffing during the pandemic. The transmittal includes a presentation about the proposed transfer of the Emergency Management Division from the Police Department to the Fire Department,program guidelines for the$6 million of rental assistance from the U.S. Treasury,a breakdown of corrected Social Worker Program funding, and a memo from the Public Services Department about the central plant boiler failure. CITY COUNCIL OF SALT LAKE CITY 451 SOUTI I.STA'T1:::: 'Tf l::::1::::'T,fROOM 304 C;OUNC;II....SI...C;G OV.C;OM f".C.IBOX 145476,SAI...'T I...AKI::::C;I'TY,UTAI II 84114 546 Tf::::l... 801-535-'7600 FAX 801-535-'7651 �Ri� Early Hire Advertising Straw Poll Request from Administration (See Attachment 1 for transmittal and proposed ordinance amendment) The below table summarizes proposed changes to appointed positions in the FY21 Compensation Plan.The Administration can reclassify job titles and decrease pay grades without Council approval.The changes in the table are new positions and increases in pay grade which require Council approval.The Administration requested straw polls to allow early hire advertising for currently vacant positions. If the Council has questions or concerns,then some positions could be voted on separately or later.A formal vote is tentatively scheduled for April 20. Department Title Proposed Reason for change Budget Dotes Grade PREVIOUSLY APPROVED Airport Chief Operating 40 Created to reflect new leadership Council approved this Officer role following completion of the position and funding in Airport Rebuild and internal the FY21 annual budget restructuring Human Deputy Chief 37 This request restores the position, Council approved Resources Human previously approved by the restoring this position in Resources Officer Council.The job title is also Budget Amendment#5 updated to mirror the change in of FY21 job title adopted for the Chief Human Resources Officer. IMS Chief Innovations 39 New role established to lead the Council approved Officer City's new Innovations team. creation of this position and funding in Budget Amendment#6 of FY21 NEW REQUESTS City Deputy City 40 Change position from Grade 39 to Department budget will Attorney's Attorney Grade 40 to reflect equity re: absorb cost increase this Office internal restructuring fiscal year and be added into FY22 base budget Economic Business 32 New role established to lead and See Attachment 3 for the Development Development focus onbusiness development. job description,the total Division Director increased cost for FY22 is$36,836 Mayor's Community 24 Position replaces the Census Department budget will Office Outreach-Equity Coordinator position,repurposed to absorb cost increase this &Special Projects meet constituent business fiscal year and be added Coordinator operational needs. into FY22 base budget Police Administrative 37 This request replaces/redefines the See Attachment 4 for the Director of PolicePublic Relations Director, job description,the total Communications which was removed due to Civil increased cost for FY22 Service Commission concerns. is$3o,9o8 Police 37 This request establishes a new role See Attachment 5 for the Administrative Director of and job title job description,the total Internal Affairs increased cost for FY22 is$100,100 911 Director, 911 41 Change position from Grade 33 to Department budget will Department Communications Grade 41 consistent with other absorb cost increase this Bureau department directors. fiscal year and be added into FY22 base budget 911 Deputy Director, 32 Change position from Grade 29 to Department budget will Department 911 Grade 32 for greater parity absorb cost increase this Communications compared to pay level adjustment fiscal year and be added Bureau for Director and pay position with into FY22 base budget subordinate staff. Page I 2: Revenue Update Staff Note:In January 2021, the Council received a revenue update estimating a$5.4 million shortfall. This updated estimate of a$4.4 million shortfall is an improvement of the City's projected fiscal position but still represents a significant decrease from the adopted budget.At the time ofpublishing this staff report, Congress was expected to approve the American Rescue Plan bill which wouldprovide funding to local governments including for making up revenues losses. F'Y 021 F'Y 0121 Variance Annual YTD Mrm�� riri� Revenue BUd ►et Projections lhif',a voral:rle l Property Taxes $ 111,41.8,455 $ 111,418,4555) $o, Sales and Use Tax 67,999,593 $ 67,999,593 $0, Sales and Use Tax- 1/2 Cent $ 32,797,506 $ 3Z,797, 06 $0, J`raarnclniseTaax $ 26,81 ,125 $ 26,430,701 381,424) PILOT $ 1,588,,894 $ 1,S 8,894 $0, TOTAL TAXES 240,536,573 $ 2401,155,149 31,31,42 4) Licenses and Permits $ 28,6 1,482 $ 29,7E17,4,20 �C;i,l il Intergovernmental $ 4,444,400 $ 4,181,157 ($2(53,,Z43) Interest Income $ 1,900,682 $ 1,so, 0o ($lro 50,E 82) Ia"irnes and I-orfeitrares $ 3,938,848 $ 2,7 6,886 ($1,231,1962) Parking Meters $ 3,43 ,,962 $ 1,619,786 ($li,1313,,1'76j Charges and Services $ 4,428,069 $ 4,233,494 ($i 94.,!,;7's) Miscellaraeraar,s Reveraaae $ 4,014,837 $ 3,604,733 ($1'111 I ,3()4l hiter•fund $ 20,281,706 $ 20,281,786 $11 Transfers $ 9,587,812 $ 9,507,812 $11 TOTALOENERALFUND $ 321,086,571 $ 316,608,143 ($4,47D,428 The Administration has provided the following information regarding City revenues: "The City is currently projecting a $4.4 million decrease in budgeted revenue.The largest portion of the decrease is attributed to a$1.2 million decrease in Fines and Forfeitures,a$1.8 million decrease in Parking Meter Revenues and a$1.4 million decrease in Miscellaneous Revenues. These decreases are offset by a projected net increase of$1.2 million in Licenses and Permits. The increase in Licenses and Permits is in spite of airport parking/license tax showing a decrease due to reduced travel as a result of COVID.The decrease in airport parking and licenses is$2,345,000. Innkeepers'tax has also been hit hard by COVID and is projecting a decrease of$1,717,500.According to the local news,hotels are experiencing 30%occupancy compared to this time of year in previous years. Business licenses are also expected to be below budget due to trends for apartment units,new business licenses and renewed business licenses.These losses are offset Page I 3 by gains in permits&zoning building permits(+$1.8M),plan check fees (+$i.9M),and street excavation(+$1.7M) due to a temporary boost from the Google contract).The City was monitoring a bill(HB 98)in the State Legislature which passed that may reduce revenue in the planned check fees/building permit area. Fines and Forfeitures are projected below budget due to a decrease in parking ticket revenue of$book.With COVID cases still at 1,000+cases/day,citation revenue is still about 1/3 of a regular year.Justice Court fines are also down $62K while moving violations are down$315K. Due to COVID restrictions the Administrative Office of the Courts has a limited amount of court activity via WebEx. In those cases that are being seen,defendants are not ordered to pay their fines,they are not being sent to collections and no warrants are being issued. Other areas are also seeing decreases from the pandemic,traffic school revenue is projected to be below budget by$37k and vehicle booting is trending down $12,000 trending based on current actuals. Parking Meter Collection is slightly less than half of the previous fiscal year due to an overall decrease in traffic downtown.This is driving the significant decrease of$1.8 million.Additionally,Miscellaneous Revenue has also been affected by the pandemic with decreases in accounts receivable collections,special event revenue,fuel reimbursement due to the Mayor's emergency declaration and utility reimbursement." Page lid IIM. GI. �r b CC Wu b co I O OzICU 12) I UIm 4.1 r7 �}e' -- ------ --- ---- -- 0--- — la, ItI lid 'it 0 �^ IN rv: 4. co Ol U N 3 rya '•" h �" x-w rM'3 f`w Ch G� w-w 7a"a C'J w� cz M N N 'D w *� v E E � Tv Cc) s � r °� ° y Im Cc) m U U ar a U U U c �i a t-. a Ga,. a ta. > r-L > m.. s In.. > cL c � cz b m r # # # # Impact Fees Update The Administration provided a summary of impact fee tracking,details on refunding amounts and dates and lists of unfinished projects with impact fee funding.The information is current as of January 26, 2021. $103,944 of police impact fees are scheduled to expire through October. Item A-12 is requesting funding to update the police section of the impact fee plan.The Administration reports work is nearing completion to update the fire and parks sections of the impact fee plan. Unallocated Cash Amount of Expiring Type Next Refund Trigger Date "Available to Spend" Impact Fees Fire $806,037 More than a year away - Parks $7,113,425 More than a year away - Police $346,334 March 2021 $16,105 Transportation $4,031,510 More than a year away - Note:Encumbrances are an administrative function when impact fees are held under a contract Section A: New Items (note: to expedite the processing of this staff report,staff has included the Administration's descriptions from the transmittal for some of these items) A-i: National League of Cities Conference ($300,000—General Fund) In November of 2021,the National League of Cities(NLC) Conference will be held at the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City. Initially,the budget for this item was estimated at over$400,000 with an estimate of 4,000 attendees (pre-COVID);however,that number has since been adjusted.Visit Salt Lake and the NLC now anticipate there will be 2,000 to 2,500 attendees(in-person)with a virtual streaming component for others who are not traveling to Salt Lake. The revised cost estimate is$300,000 which includes organizing,managing, and hosting requirements,such as the VIP dinner,mobile workshops,spouse/children programs,volunteer coordination,and a closing concert.The Administration indicates that if the attendance is lower than anticipated and costs run less than$300,000, some money will be returned to the City. In response to Council staffs question about unforeseen conference format changes impacting costs,and recouping potential savings,the Administration indicated that the Department of Economic Development(DED)will be managing the budget directly,so if any savings occur they will remain with the City.Also,the Council may wish to note that the conference budget has not yet been finalized,and it is difficult at this point to anticipate what travel will look like in November. DED is meeting with NLC monthly,which will soon be ramped up to begin planning in earnest.The Administration indicates that DED will be leading fundraising efforts in the coming months to potentially offset City funds or to cover any unanticipated overages that may be incurred. A-2:World Trade Center Membership($50,000 —General Fund) (See Attachment 2 for membership brochure) The World Trade Center Utah leads Utah's international business development and elevates Utah's global status to promote prosperity and build economic resilience.A membership at the Ambassador level gains Salt Lake City a seat on the WTC steering committee,a complimentary registration for one of the Governor's trade missions,and other benefits. Given the City's current position in the face of major development and the desire to attract world-class and cutting-edge tech and other business,this membership would give us another avenue and greater connections. Council Staff Information World Trade Center Executive Director Miles Hansen has spoken to various Salt Lake City officials since 2019 about the City becoming a member of the World Trade Center Utah.This particular item was in Budget Amendment No.4 during the 2019-2020 fiscal year.The item was pulled from consideration due to the financial uncertainty facing the City at the time.There were also questions about what benefits the City would get from this membership. Briefly,if the City becomes a member of the World Trade Center at the$50,00o a year"Ambassador Level,"here are the benefits it would receive for that level of membership: Page I 6 o WTC Utah Board Position: Get involved with leaders across the state and help determine Utah's international business development strategy. o Global Leaders Policy Committee: Shape WTC Utah's public messaging and policy advocacy;join high-level discussions with key business and government leaders. o Steering Committee Involvement: Participate in WTC Utah industry-specific working groups as well as the following steering committees:Trade,Investment,and Outreach. o Governor-led International Trade Mission: Receive complimentary registration to attend one Governor-led trade mission per year. Registration includes airfare,hotel, and participation fees for one. o Utah Economic Summit: Receive four VIP tickets to the Utah Economic Summit. o Event Partnership: Partner with WTC Utah to host events at your location for added marketing and exposure as well as an added service for your clients. o Diplomatic Luncheons: Receive complimentary tickets to diplomatic luncheons hosted throughout the year. o Thought Leader Symposiums: Be the first to receive tickets to thought-provoking discussions from local and international leaders regarding current international events and their impact on business. o VIP Networking Opportunities:Take advantage of exclusive invitations to meetings,seminars,and signature VIP events throughout the year. o Complimentary Client Tickets: Receive additional tickets(up to 4)for clients upon request to the events listed above. o On-screen recognition: Be highlighted as an Ambassador at all WTC Utah events,including the Utah Economic Summit. o Newsletter and email recognition: Feature your company logo on all WTC Utah monthly newsletters and marketing emails. o Referrals: Receive client referrals from WTC Utah,as appropriate and requested,and be included in WTC Utah's Trusted Member Resource Guide both online and in yearly print publication. o Sponsorship Opportunities: Promote the City at high-profile events by becoming a sponsor. o Social Media Spotlight: Gain exposure for the City by being featured on WTC Utah's social media platforms(services available upon request). o On-Site Visits: Receive a one-on-one visit from a senior member of the WTC Utah team to maximize membership benefits and tap into the City's global potential. o Educational Events: Provide employees and clients with priority access to educational workshops, trainings, and business roundtables to keep informed of current international topics and key opportunities. o Trade and Investment Consultations: Receive personalized advice on international business challenges and opportunities for your company and your clients. o Market Research: Provide customized international market research and data to your company and as an added service to your clients. o Monthly Newsletter: Be the first to learn about upcoming events and receive international trade insights. To compare membership costs,the City Council annually appropriates$5o,000 a year as for its membership in the Salt Lake Chamber,and appropriates$io8,000 a year to help support the Economic Development Corporation of Utah.The Mayor and City Council Chair serve as members of the Salt Lake Chamber Board,and the Mayor serves on EDCU Board of Trustees. It should be noted that the Trade Center's website lists about 45 members on its Board of Directors. Former Ambassador Jon Huntsman Jr.was elected Board Chair earlier this this.Ambassador Huntsman originally secured Utah's membership in the World Trade Center organization when he was governor. World Trade Center Utah lists a variety of business,legal,and academic members as Board members on its website. Other members include representatives of the Governor's Office of Economic Development,the Economic Development Corporation of Utah,and the Salt Lake and St. George chambers of commerce,as well as Utah Senate President Stuart Adams and House Speaker Brad Wilson.The only other city official listed on the Board of Directors is Cedar City Mayor Maile Wilson Edwards.Mayor Jenny Wilson represents Salt Lake County on the Board. Council staff has attached a membership brochure that lists other levels of financial participation.The brochure also is on the World Trade Center website. Page A-3: Encampment Reestablishment Prevention($650,000—General Fund) The Administration is requesting this funding for police officer voluntary overtime shifts to provide security to Health Department employees and outreach and social workers efforts as part of the Community Commitment Program. Information about that program is summarized here:htt ps://www.slc. c�v/hand/comm��rnitty-committmentt-prcra_r / All the overtime shifts are voluntary so there is no guarantee they will be filled. Current reduced staffing levels in the Police Department limit available use of on-duty officers during regular hours because reassigning those officers would likely decrease response times to calls for service. Overtime shifts typically pay time and a half as reflected in the $65/hour rate in the table below. The Police Department has already supported 1,071 health department activities in 2020 including operations prior to, during and after camp mitigation.The figure was 640 in 2019.The current estimate is that Soo additional reestablishments(based on over i000 camp health department cleanups in the previous 12 months)would take place throughout the remainder of fiscal year. Estimating that there would be one major camp per month from January to June for two days each and minor camps requiring resources equal to 1 day per week would mean the Police Department would need$650,00o additional funding for FY2021 as shown below. Activity # days Officers #hours Rate Amount Requested Major Cleanups 12 40 10 $65 $312,000 Minor Cleanups* 26 20 10 $65 $338,000 Total Requested $650,000 *previously utilized on-duty resources that are no longer available Some Council Members have asked why these services are not provided by other entities.The Salt Lake County Sheriff s department has largely moved away from law enforcement services and has moved those responsibilities to the Unified Police Department(UPD).The UPD only provides those services in contracted cities and unincorporated areas of the county.As a result,SLCPD has the sole law enforcement responsibility and jurisdiction for providing security to Health Department staff during public health activities. Council staff requested the total budget for the Community Commitment Program this fiscal year which was forthcoming at the time of publishing this staff report. Policy Questions: ➢ Program Update—The Council may wish to ask the Administration for an update on the Community Commitment Program,which includes services and assistance for people staying in the camps,trash pickup, power washing,biowaste pickup and portable restrooms with attendants.Note these services are provided at different levels depending on circumstances at each location. ➢ Long-term Options—The Council may wish to discuss with the Administration long term options to address homelessness such as new State and Federal funding for housing, coordination with the County and other cities in the valley for permanent winter housing,new tools the City is exploring,etc. A-4: Emergency Management Moved to Fire Department($31,844—General Fund) This item would move the Emergency Management Division from the Police Department to the Fire Department. Salt Lake County emergency management is part of the Unified Fire Authority and many large municipalities place emergency management functions within fire departments.The Administration is considering changing the name to Community Risk Reduction Division. One new FTE, a Fire Captain,is proposed as part of this item and reclassifying the Emergency Management Director (currently vacant)to a Fire Division Chief.The Division would continue to operate out of the Public Safety Building where the Emergency Operations Center is located.The Administration is proposing a two-phase transition as detailed below pending Council approved of the second phase in the FY22 annual budget. The proposed transfer of the Division includes"wage initiatives"for existing positions to receive ongoing salary increases. 20 FTEs in the Fire Department would receive the increases because those positions are taking on new Page I responsibilities for emergency management.The total annual cost of the salary increases is estimated to be$140,956 next fiscal year. The three new FTEs(two fire captains and one accountant)would be dedicated to the Emergency Management Division. This would represent an increase from five FTEs to eight FTEs in the division. Note that only one new FTE is proposed in this budget amendment as part of Phase 1.The other two FTEs would be part of the FY22 annual budget. Phase 1(begins when and if Council approves item A-4) Emergency Management Director reclassified to Fire Division Chief(vacancy savings of$37,778 plus one-time costs of $1,500) 1 new Fire Captain(4-month cost of$45,622 plus one-time costs of$1,500) Executive Staff Wage Initiative($21,000) Total Cost for FY21$31,844 Full Year Cost for FY22 $219,875 Phase 2 (begins July 1, 2021 and requests will be made through the annual budget cycle) 2 new FTEs- 1 Fire Captain($136,865)and 1 Accountant($63,517) Battalion Chief Wage Initiative(13 FTEs- $69,516) Administrative Staff Wage Initiative ($8,440) Total Cost for FY22 = $278,338 Emergency Management Objectives 1. Developing the organizational structure of the Emergency Operations Center(EOC)and its place within SLCFD chain of command and Salt Lake City administration. 2. Providing emergency preparation,mitigation,and NIMS training for individual City departments. 3. Improving upon the current City alerting system and better incorporating its use for both internal and external audiences. 4. Identifying critical infrastructure,developing plans for its protection,and communicating and coordinating those plans with all necessary parties. 5. Expanding upon public education initiatives to enable residents to become better prepared. Focus on existing programs like: Firewise Communities,CERT,Safe Neighborhoods,Run-Hide-Fight,Fix the Bricks,etc. 6. Maintaining and growing SLC's Community Wildfire Protection Plan(CWPP). 7. Identifying SLC's Emergency Shelters/Victim ID centers/Family assistance centers and sharing how these facilities benefit the community. 8. Emergency Management web page integration 9. Mutual aid/MOUs/contracts A-5: Outdoor Business Activity Assistance Program($ioo,000 —General Fund) This funding would support an initiative from the Department of Economic Development to assist small businesses,like dining and retail establishments,which are interested in expanding their outdoor services.The program would both reimburse City fees for these types of expansions and provide grants to purchase associated equipment to make that possible.Most of the proposed total, $8o,000,would be channeled through grants of up to$5,000 each to at least 16 businesses,based on their actual costs.The remainder would be set aside to fund four neighborhood"Open Streets" events(inspired by efforts of the same name in Seattle),which are designed to benefit multiple businesses at once. The Department notes that it is conscious of the need to strike a careful balance between the need for speed in distributing this funding to businesses as the weather warms,and ensuring that equity in distribution of these funds is at the forefront of its decisions. It plans to: "[...]engage lower income and diverse businesses individually and through community partners. Using examples from Seattle, WA's Open Streets equity efforts,we plan to prioritize areas using "social justice datasets and reach out directly to businesses located within these areas.In addition,we have strong connections with the diverse Chambers of Commerce, Community Councils, and other community partners to engage and provide resources and coordination tailored to their needs. We will provide that information to the Council once the grants are disbursed." Page The uncertainty about how much time may be needed to develop the program and identify the recipients,suggests to the Department that the total amount of funding may not spent by the end of FY21. For this reason,it proposes potentially administering the program through the Economic Development Loan Fund(EDLF)to ensure access to these funds in case they are not completely spent by then.Although this would mean the funding is handled as a loan,the Department mentions that in this case,the funding could be structured as"forgivable loans,"contingent on recipients participating in other City priorities,such as the e2 program,which is operated by the Sustainability Department and designed to help businesses run in a more environmentally and economically sustainable manner. Policy Questions: ➢ Forgivable Loans instead of Grants—Even though it would change the"grant"nature of the funds,does the Council wish to discuss the option of moving this money into the EDLF to provide more time for the Department to distribute these funds? Does the Council want to connect the eligibility for forgiveness to participation in other priority City programs? ➢ Federal Funding for Program—The Council may wish to ask whether Federal funds expected from the recently approved American Rescue Plan may be used toward this loan/grant assistance program. ➢ Social Justice Datasets—The Council may wish to ask the Administration for more information on how the "social justice data sets"referenced are being developed and whether they will be available in time to help guide this effort. A-6: Pulled Prior to Submission A-7: Pulled Prior to Submission A-8:U.S. Department of the Treasury; Emergency Rental Assistance($6,067,O33 —Misc. Grants) US Department of the Treasury deposited$6,067,033.20 into the City's bank account on January 22,2021.These Emergency Rental Assistance(ERA)program funds are supplemental to the CARES Act funding and available to cities with populations over 200,000. The Department of Treasury Emergency Rental Assistance (ERA)program makes funds available to assist households that are unable to pay rent and utilities due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Funding is targeted to households that are at or below 8o%of the area median income,demonstrates a risk of experiencing homelessness or housing instability,and has experienced a reduction in household income and/or incurred significant costs and/or experienced financial hardship due to COVID-19. The Department of Treasury regulations set forth that go%of the funds($5,460,329.88)must be used for direct financial assistance,including rent,rental arrears,utilities and home energy costs,and other expenses related to housing.The Federal regulations limit utility assistance to basic utilities only including heating and electricity. Other utilities such as internet, cable and phone are ineligible.The remaining io% ($606,703.32)may be used for housing stability services,including case management and other services intended to keep households stably housed,and administrative costs. With the addition of US Treasury funding,HAND requests a portion of the io%be utilized to support 2 full time,time limited, staff persons.These staff will facilitate the City administration,coordination, and compliance monitoring.The two(2)requested positions would be Grade 26 Community Development Grant Specialists at a fully loaded annual cost Of$205,512.These positions would sunset when funding expires. Due to the short-term nature of these positions, HAND would consider the use of temporary staffing agencies to fill the positions.The two FTEs would do monitoring, tracking,compliance,and possibly other duties like public communication. This budget amendment will create the ability for the City to accept the allocation from the Department of Treasury and create appropriate expense and revenue budgets for the direct financial assistance and housing stability/administration budgets. The Administration's transmittal includes a four-page program guidance and rules memo.The public can find further information such as how to apply for funds at rentrelief.utah.gov Note that applications open March 15.The Administration is drafting an interlocal agreement to formalize the partnership using the State's existing website.This is expected to be faster than the City creating a new system and website for accepting applications.The interlocal agreement will be transmitted to the Council for consideration. Page u.o At the time of publishing this staff report,the U.S.Treasury Department was issuing new guidance about allowable uses of these funds. It's possible that some homeless assistance will be allowed such as rapid rehousing. Further clarification is expected this month. Policy Question and Straw Poll: ➢ State Partnership Straw Poll—The Council could express support for this approach via a straw poll which would allow the Administration to proceed on setting up the partnership so implementation can begin faster once the interlocal agreement and Budget Amendment*7 are formally adopted. ➢ Balancing Housing and Homelessness Assistance—The Council may wish to discuss with the Administration how to balance housing assistance funding and homeless assistance funding. Does the Council want to discuss with the Administration if some City housing assistance funds could be shifted to homeless assistance given the new$6 million for rental assistance from the Treasury? A-9: Move City GIS(Geographic Information Systems)Personnel to IMS GIS Division—Budget Neutral This adjustment would move two full time employees(FTEs)from Community and Neighborhoods(CAN)to Information Management Services(IMS)the Geographic Information System(GIS)Division.The City had a centralized GIS division before the Great Recession. In the past,many departments had their own staff or outside contracts for different technology-related services. Previous budget discussions revealed momentum toward centralizing many of these services within IMS.Moving the FTEs within the GIS Division of IMS would continue the evolution toward centralized citywide services the Council has seen taking place with the creation of a Chief Data Officer in the FY21 budget,and the new Innovations Team and relocation of the Civic Engagement Team in Budget Amendment 6.These teams provide services and assistance to all City Departments.This amendment moves funding to pay for these employees out of the General Fund and into the IMS Fund. A-io: Inland Port Tax Revenue—Budget Neutral As part of the City's annual financial audit,the City was informed it needs to budget and account for City tax revenue within the boundaries of the Inland Port. Because the tax revenue is dispersed directly to the inland port,the City does not receive the tax revenue.The City will budget a line item to recognize the tax revenue and a corresponding contra- account, so City revenue is not overstated. A-ii: Employee One-time Bonuses($4,943,048 —Fund Balance) During labor negotiations this past summer the Fire and AFSCME labor unions agreed to no compensation adjustments due to COVID and its impact on the City.The Administration agreed to meet with both labor unions about possible adjustments in January based on where the City's financial position was.After negotiating with both of those unions the Administration is proposing a one-time salary bonus for all City employees.The Administration discussed the terms of the negotiations in a closed session with the Council on February 9th. Employees in the Fire Union and AFSCME are proposed to receive a one-time bonus of$2,000.All other employees would receive a one-time bonus of$500. Under this proposal every City employee would receive a bonus. During the FY21 annual budget the Council decided not to provide ongoing base salary increases to any employees because of the financial uncertainty facing the City. A-12: Police Needs Assessment($80,000 —Police Impact Fees) The Administration is requesting these funds to conduct a comprehensive needs assessment for the Police Department that will inform an update to the police section of the impact fee plan.The assessment will analyze estimated population growth,impacts to police service levels resulting from more residents, and the facilities necessary to maintain current service levels over the next decade. One component of the needs assessment is the Crime Lab which has a lease expiring in October 2024. House Bill 63 of the 2021 Legislative Session expanded and clarified allowable expenses for impact fees including developing an impact fee plan and related analysis.This needs assessment is i00%eligible for impact fees.The available to spend balance of police impact fees is$346,334• Since the budget amendment proposal was transmitted to the Council Office,the Administration has requested an increase to$104,000.A benefit of funding this item with police impact fees at the higher level is that the next refund date would be pushed back to 2022. Page Council staff requested the scope of work for the needs assessment which was forthcoming at the time of publishing this staff report. Straw Poll: ➢ The Administration requests the Council conduct a straw poll of this item so contract preparations can proceed, and fewer police impact fees will be at risk of expiring in March and April. A-13: Police Contractual Costs—Salt Lake County($218,858 —General Fund) The Police Department is requesting recognition of budget and expense for multiple contracts which provided reimbursement of overtime related to COVID and joint operations. Salt Lake County COVID contract to provide security around the area of the Red Lion hotel which was utilized as a COVID quarantine facility.The total amount for this contract was $24,158.The contract term was 12/15/2020 to 1/9/2021 for 16 hours per day. The County contract for COVID Response in Parks provides funding for patrols in parks and common places where large crowds tend to gather within Salt Lake City to educate and enforce the Salt Lake County Public Order on COVID.The overtime shifts are coordinated between SLCPD and Salt Lake County Emergency Management.The total for this contract was$194,700.The contract term was 6/26/2020 to 1/20/2021 for 12 hour shifts per day. Policy Question for items A-13—A-15: ➢ Voluntary Overtime Competition—The Council may wish to ask the Administration how voluntary overtime for the City's priority needs is balanced with voluntary overtime opportunities with outside entities. Some voluntary overtime shifts go unfilled. Is there a risk while the Police Department is experiencing reduced staffing levels that City priority volunteer overtime could go unfilled if overtime shifts with outside entities are viewed as preferrable? A-14: Police Contractual Costs—Department of Natural Resources($24,541—General Fund) The Police Department is requesting recognition of budget and expense for multiple contracts which provided reimbursement of overtime related to COVID and joint operations. The contract with the State Department of Natural Resources provided overtime for patrols on or within 250 yards of the Jordan River within the boundaries of Salt Lake City.The total for this contract was$24,541.The contract term is April 2019 to April 2021. A-15: Police Contractual Costs—U.S.Marshal's Office ($34,734—General Fund) The Police Department is requesting recognition of budget and expense for multiple contracts which provided reimbursement of overtime related to COVID and joint operations. The Police Department worked a short-term joint operation with the U.S. Marshal's Office.The total amount was $34,734•The contract started in August and was for 427 hours of overtime. Of the total, $15,440 was for equipment. A-16: Police COVID Costs($241,224—General Fund) The Police Department is requesting budget allocation for additional costs related to COVID which were not covered in CARES Act funding.These costs include Emergency Response Pandemic Leave(ERPQ at$56,785 which are eligible for FEMA reimbursement at l00%and Workers Compensation costs for COVID related care$184,438.The total amount requested$ 241,224.The Administration is planning to submit these costs to FEMA for reimbursement but is unsure if reimbursement will be received. A-17: Police Protest Costs($537,337—General Fund) The Police Department is requesting budget allocation for costs incurred related to ongoing protests and free speech events,including events related to the Presidential election and Inauguration.The costs include additional staffing and an increase in workers compensation due to injuries incurred during these events. — Overtime- $326,528 — Workers Compensation increase for protest related claims- $73,577 Page p �..�� a — The request also includes overtime costs associated with patrols set in place to maintain order in case of protests during the Presidential inauguration.The cost of those patrols was$137,232. A-i8: Police Vice-Presidential Debate Cost Reimbursement($209,521) The Police Department is requesting recognition of additional revenue from the Vice-Presidential Debate in the amount Of$190,279.No additional budget for expense is requested.The Administration worked with the Police Department in seeking full reimbursement for costs associated with the Vice-Presidential debate. Originally, $19,242 was budgeted to be reimbursed;this amount represents the additional reimbursement for the debate totaling$209,521. A-i9: Central Plant Boilers Replacement($i million—General Fund) The primary boiler for the Civic Campus failed a decade earlier than expected after rusted out tubes caused a fuel leak. The rust was not visible or accessible on the failed boiler.The secondary boiler is in poor condition and could also fail. The Administration is requesting funding to replace both boilers.The Central Plant provides heat from October to May for the City&County Building,the Main Library,the Public Safety Building and the Leonardo.The boilers are no longer under warranty,the manufacturer declared bankruptcy,so replacement parts are not available for purchase,and the cause of the failure is not covered under insurance. Replacement boilers will have a different design that's easier to maintain and recent upgrades to the Central Plant conditions the water before it enters the boiler which should reduce risk of a similar incident. Public Services recommends a new design using three boilers for built in redundancy.The new boilers have an estimated 3o-year useful life and a io-year warranty. Estimated delivery and installation is five months. The total cost to replace both boilers is$2.5 million.The Administration is only requesting$1 million and plans to delay 14 facility projects that were funded in FY21 CIP for deferred capital replacements.Most of the delayed projects are roof replacements and exhaust fan replacements at fire stations. Smith's Ball Park and the Sorenson Center would also have facilities projects delayed. See the last page of the transmittal for the full list. Rocky Mountain Power is switching to a new energy delivery system that requires replacing the main power transformers at the Central Plant.An early cost estimate is$2.5 million.The upgrade must be done by 2024. Section B: Grants for Existing Staff Resources Section (None) Section C: Grants for New Staff Resources Section (None) Section D: Housekeeping D-i: Remove CARES Grant Budget from Other Funds In budget amendment*2 of this fiscal year CARES funding was appropriated on a per-department basis. In budget amendment#4,the funding was moved from departments into a Non-Departmental cost center.While the budget was removed from General Fund departments,the budget for other Funds including Airport,Sustainability and IMS was overlooked.This amendment will remove those initially budgeted amounts. D-2: SLC Foundation Reappropriation($3,000 —Non-Departmental) In BA#4 for fiscal year 2020 the administration proposed,and the Council adopted an annual appropriation for the SLC Foundation.The amount was intended to be an annual expense but was not proposed in the current budget.This amendment is to establish the funding for FY2021.The Administration is proposing funding$3,00o as a donation to the SLC Foundation.This donation will cover banking fees incurred by the Foundation and costs of the Foundation's tax return. D-3:Social Worker Funding Back to Police(Housekeeping Adjustment) During the budget process,two fiscal years of funding for social workers was moved from the Police Department to Non- Departmental,which was incorrect.The spreadsheet used to calculate the annual amount included two fiscal years instead of a single fiscal year.The Police Department budget will be short for the miscalculation.This housekeeping amendment will adjust to the correct amount.The detail is enclosed as a separate file. Page I u p D-4:Transportation Budget Carryforward($274,638) The$274,638 amount is associated with budget carryforward for encumbrances.The encumbrance budget carryforward was missed for a contract in FY19 the amount of$174,638.The remaining $1oo,000 associated with this amendment item is for a traffic calming study that was part of the regular budget process from a year ago.As part of the Council approval,these funds were directly placed into a holding account. By the time the funds were released from the holding account the Transportation division was unable to get anything under contract or encumber the funds before they fell to General Fund fund balance. D-5:Transportation On-Demand Ride Services(Trips to Transit Pilot Program) ($800,000 —Transit Key Routes Capital Account) The Salt Lake City Transit Master Plan(2017)identifies On-Demand Ride Services(Trips to Transit)as a key strategy for serving low-density,single-use areas of the City.The goals of the Trips to Transit program,consistent with those of the Master Plan itself, are to improve air quality,increase the number of people taking transit,provide a safe and comfortable transit access experience,provide a complete transit system that supports a transit lifestyle,provide access to opportunity for likely riders who are underserved,and to create economically vibrant,livable places that support use of transit. This program will provide on-demand intra-zonal service,which will connect residents,visitors,and commuters between fixed route transit services and areas of the City that are largely residential,as identified in the Transit Master Plan.The areas in the plan include Rose Park,Glendale,the Upper Avenues, and the East Bench.Travel modeling has yielded the recommendation that an initial pilot would be most successful and serve the greatest number of riders in Rose Park,with a short connection to the Route 9 and Route 4 end-of-line near Redwood Road and 400 South.Adding Poplar Grove and Glendale to this service area would make the pilot even more useful to more residents. UTA has piloted such a service in Southwest Salt Lake County,and it has proven very popular and more cost effective than fixed route service in connecting people to the major transit lines. City staff has evaluated the cost of contracting directly with a provider compared with operating the same service in collaboration with UTA, and the latter is both more affordable and better integrated with the existing transit system. In addition,if the pilot proves to be equal to or better than current service provided by inefficient routes,resources for those routes can be reinvested in two Council priority routes on 60o North/5oo East and i000 North/South Temple. To launch those two routes in 2022,it is important to launch Trips to Transit as soon as possible,with a goal of August 2021.This will allow time for the service to become established and evaluated.This initial request will fulfill start-up costs,and an additional request of approximately$1,000,000 from Funding our Future will be included in the FY22 budget. The Transit Key Routes capital account has a current available to spend balance of$700,285.There is also a holding account created by the Council with a balance of$1,979,369.The budgets were higher than contract costs for the frequent bus routes partnership with UTA in FY2o($999,824)and in FY21 ($979,545)•The Council decided to place these Funding Our Future dollars into a holding account once Transportation's formal recommendations are available for discussion. Council staff requested documents about the problem which was forthcoming at the time of publishing this staff report. Policy Question: ➢ Does the Council want to schedule a discussion about next steps for Funding Our Future transportation projects and programs? D-6:Public Utilities Bond Proceeds and Debt Service ($1,002,936 —Water Fund) Public Utilities is requesting a budget amendment for revenue bond proceeds. The August 202o bond issue included bonds previously planned to be issued in FY 2020. Public Utilities is also requesting to amend the budget to for principal and interest payments based on final the bond issuance transaction that vary slightly from the amounts estimated at the time FY 2021 budget was prepared. D-7:Interest Income on Bonding,GO Series 20i9A($281,866—CIP Fund) The General Obligation Bonds,Series 2019A,were issued in October 2019 for the purpose of funding the reconstruction of City streets. The total par amount of the bonds issued were$17,540,000. At the time the bonds were issued the proceeds were deposited with the Trustee.Since then,the unspent bond proceeds have been earning interest.This amendment will adjust the budget to reflect the actual proceeds available including accumulated interest from October 2oi9 through September 2020. D-8: 9ii Dispatch—UCA Reimbursement($72,332—General Fund) The 911 Dispatch center must maintain their phone equipment and through an agreement with the UCA(Utah Communications Authority),all PSAPs(public safety answering points)in the State,who are able to show proof of payment will be reimbursed. This proposal is cost/revenue neutral to Salt Lake City. D-9 Pulled Prior to Submission D-io:Tree Removal Mitigation Funding($520,15o from Tree Removal Mitigation Fund) The Administration proposes to use most of the accumulated funds in the Tree Removal Mitigation Fund to supplement its tree planting efforts in parking strips,parks and other City properties.These new trees are not part of the Mayor's initiative to plant 1,000+trees annually on the City's West Side;instead these would be planted in any City-owned properties to replace recently removed trees,respond to resident requests,and improve parks,trails and other properties. Salt Lake City Urban Forestry would not plant trees on private property with these funds.Tree Removal Mitigation fees are required when trees on public property(or certain"specimen"trees on private property)need to be removed for construction or development projects.Mitigation fees are assessed depending on the condition of the trees, and the number of new trees that are installed.They apply both to projects on private property that remove City trees, and to City projects that remove trees. Council staff has requested that the Finance Department determine how long it took for this fund to reach its current size. D-11:Frequent Transit Network(FTN)CIP Funding Allocation The Council adopted a transfer of$1,ioo,000 to CIP for the FTN. In the CIP funding log the Council approved$22,000 for cost overrun and$ii,000 for Percent for Art,but did not approve the remaining funds of$1,o67,000 for projects associated with the FTN,including bus stop improvements,crosswalks,pedestrian safety,transit-related signal upgrades,ADA enhancements,first/last mile connections,etc.This amendment is to acknowledge Council approval of the use of these funds to complete these projects. Section E: Grants Requiring No New Staff Resources E-i:Federal Emergency Management Agency(FEMA),Utah State Division of Emergency Management, Pre-Disaster Mitigation($3,768,ogi—Misc.Grants) The Emergency Management Services Division received year four grant funding of$3,768,ogi from the State of Utah, Division of Emergency Management. This grant is awarded from the FEMA Pre-Disaster Mitigation program to assist in the Fix the Bricks Project. The grant funding will provide reimbursement to 26o city residents when they include seismic improvements during a home remodel or roof replacement on Unreinforced Masonry structures.Residents may receive a 75% reimbursement on the cost of the seismic improvements and will be required to work with a contracted structural engineering firm to ensure the work is performed and documented properly. The grant match of$1,271,838 will be met with the Homeowner's expense for the project, 25%remaining after reimbursement,and portion of funds from Emergency Management staff salary,contracts,training,and marketing.A public hearing will be scheduled the grant application for this award. Section F: Donations (None) Page I tl 5 Section G: Council Consent Agenda No.3 —Grant Awards G-i:Salt Lake Rotary Foundation Grant(YouthCity) ($20,000 —Misc. Grants) The Department of Public Services,Division of Youth and Family Services received a grant award of$20,000 from the Salt Lake Rotary Foundation.The grant funds are exclusively for the purchase of supplies and furniture to set up the new YouthCity site at the Utah State Fair Grounds.The Division of Youth&Family Services is finalizing the programming space at the Utah State Fair Grounds with the intent of opening the YouthCity Fair Park site in mid-November to early December.No Match is required.A public hearing was held on November 10,2020 for the grant application. G-2:Utah Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice (CCJJ),State Asset Forfeiture Grant(SAFG) ($io,800—Misc. Grants) The Salt Lake City Police Department applied for and received a$io,800 grant award from the State of Utah, Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice(CCJJ),under the State Asset Forfeiture Grant(SAFG)program.The SAFG program funds crime prevention and law enforcement activities within specific guidelines.CCJJ developed the SAFG program as a means of evaluating and distributing state forfeiture funds. Grant funding will be used for confidential informant funds to enhance investigations in narcotics-related cases. A public hearing was held on October 20,2020 for this grant application. G-3: Utah State Office of Education, Child and Adult Care Food Program-Youth After School Programs (YouthCity) ($22,000—Misc. Grants) The Youth&Family Division of Public Services applied for and received a continuation grant offered annually by the Utah State Office of Education,under the Child and Adult Care Food Program. These funds are available to youth service providers as part of the At-Risk Snack Program to reimburse for the costs of snacks served to children participating in the after-school programs. Fairmont Park,Glendale Library,Liberty Park,Main Library,Ottinger Hall,Plaza 349,the Youth and Family Division Office,and Sorenson Campus will receive reimbursement directly through the State Office of Education and will receive up to$22,000,based on qualified snack expenses. SLC is reimbursed on a monthly basis and only qualified healthy snacks and meals served to children participating in the after-school enrichment/education activities during the afterschool program hours are eligible for reimbursement.A public hearing was held on November 10,2020 for the grant application. G-4:Fairmont Park,School-Age Program Grant 2020, State of Utah,Department of Workforce Services (YouthCity—Fairmont Park)($78,400 —Misc. Grants) The Public Services Division of Youth and Family Services applied for and received a grant award of$78,400 for Fairmont Park for 2020-2021 school year program,from Utah State Department of Work Force Services through the Utah Office of Child Care for the School Age Program Grant. The School-Age Program Grant monies will fund wages and benefits for five positions to serve one group of up to 18 youth from 7:45 a.m.to 2:30 p.m.Monday thru Friday over eight months of the school year 2020-2021:one full-time Group Facilitator for seven hours each day;one part-time Group Facilitator for five hours each day;one part-time Group Facilitator for three hours each day;two part-time Group Facilitators for 1.5 hours each day.Wages and benefits for the five positions to serve one group of up to 18 youth from 2:30 p.m.to 5:30 p.m.Monday thru Friday over eight months of the school year 2020-2021 will be funded through the UDWS Afterschool Match Partnership Grant 2020- 2021 awarded in 2oi9.No match is required by the funding agency.A public hearing was held on October 20,2020. G-5:Liberty Park,School-Age Program Grant 2020,State of Utah,Department of Workforce Services(YouthCity— Liberty Park) ($78,400—Misc. Grants) The Public Services Division of Youth and Family Services applied for and received a grant award of$78,400 for Liberty Park for 2020-2021 school year program,from Utah State Department of Work Force Services through the Utah Office of Child Care for the School Age Program Grant. The School-Age Program Grant monies will fund wages and benefits for five positions to serve one group of up to 18 youth from 7:45 a.m.to 2:30 p.m.Monday thru Friday over eight months of the school year 2020-2021:one full- time Group Facilitator for seven hours each day;one part-time Group Facilitator for five hours each day;one part- time Group Facilitator for three hours each day;two part-time Group Facilitators for 1.5 hours each day.Wages and benefits for the five positions to serve one group of up to 18 youth from 2:30 p.m.to 5:30 p.m.Monday thru Friday over eight months of the school year 2020-2021 will be funded through the UDWS Afterschool Match Page u.6 Partnership Grant 2020-2021 awarded in 2oi9.No match is required by the funding agency.A public hearing was held on October 20,2020. G-6: Main Library,School-Age Program Grant 2020,State of Utah,Department of Workforce Services(YouthCity) ($156,800—Misc. Grants) The Public Services Division of Youth and Family Services applied for and received a grant award of$156,800 for Main Library for 2020-2021 school year program,from Utah State Department of Work Force Services through the Utah Office of Child Care for the School Age Program Grant. The School-Age Program Grant monies will fund wages and benefits for five positions to serve one group of up to 18 youth from 7:45 a.m.to 2:30 p.m.Monday thru Friday over eight months of the school year 2020-2021: one full- time Group Facilitator for seven hours each day;one part-time Group Facilitator for five hours each day;one part- time Group Facilitator for three hours each day;two part-time Group Facilitators for 1.5 hours each day.Wages and benefits for the five positions to serve one group of up to 18 youth from 2:30 p.m.to 5:30 p.m.Monday thru Friday over eight months of the school year 2020-2021 will be funded through the UDWS Afterschool Match Partnership Grant 2020-2021 awarded in 2oi9.No match is required by the funding agency.A public hearing was held on October 20,2020. G-7:Plaza 349,School-Age Program Grant 2020,State of Utah,Department of Workforce Services (YouthCity) ($117,600 —Misc. Grants) The Public Services Division of Youth and Family Services applied for and received a grant award of$117,600 for Plaza 349 for 2020-2021 school year program,from Utah State Department of Work Force Services through the Utah Office of Child Care for the School Age Program Grant. The School-Age Program Grant monies will fund wages and benefits for five positions to serve one group of up to 18 youth from 7:45 a.m.to 2:30 p.m.Monday thru Friday over eight months of the school year 2020-2021: one full- time Group Facilitator for seven hours each day;one part-time Group Facilitator for five hours each day;one part- time Group Facilitator for three hours each day;two part-time Group Facilitators for 1.5 hours each day.Wages and benefits for the five positions to serve one group of up to 18 youth from 2:30 p.m.to 5:30 p.m.Monday thru Friday over eight months of the school year 2020-2021 will be funded through the UDWS Afterschool Match Partnership Grant 2020-2021 awarded in 2oi9.No match is required by the funding agency.A public hearing was held on October 20,2020. G-8:Sorenson Center,School-Age Program Grant 2020,State of Utah,Department of Workforce Services(YouthCity) ($156,800—Misc. Grants) The Public Services Division of Youth and Family Services applied for and received a grant award of$156,800 for Sorenson Center for the 2020-2021 school year program,from Utah State Department of Work Force Services through the Utah Office of Child Care for the School Age Program Grant. The School-Age Program Grant monies will fund wages and benefits for five positions to serve one group of up to 18 youth from 7:45 a.m.to 2:30 p.m.Monday thru Friday over eight months of the school year 2020-2021: one full- time Group Facilitator for seven hours each day;one part-time Group Facilitator for five hours each day;one part- time Group Facilitator for three hours each day;two part-time Group Facilitators for 1.5 hours each day.Wages and benefits for the five positions to serve one group of up to 18 youth from 2:30 p.m.to 5:30 p.m.Monday thru Friday over eight months of the school year 2020-2021 will be funded through the UDWS Afterschool Match Partnership Grant 2020-2021 awarded in 2oi9.No match is required by the funding agency.A public hearing was held on October 20,2020. G-9:US Department of Justice,202o Bureau of Justice Assistance Grant(JAG) ($300,713—Misc. Grants) The Police Department applied for and received a grant award from the U.S.Department of Justice under the 2020 Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant(JAG)program.The total grant award is$300,713.Of that total, the City will subaward$49,817 to the Unified Police Department and$49,817 to Salt Lake County(Sheriff s Office). The subaward amounts are determined by a federal funding allocation formula. Page I u. The police department will use its award to provide training for sworn and civilian personnel,to repair or purchase fitness equipment,to provide protective equipment for police officers(helmet,eye/hand protection),to support the Officer Wellness/Peer Support Program,and to conduct directed community policing overtime projects such as targeted hot spot enforcement and community pharmaceutical take back events.No Match is required.A public hearing was held on October 20,2020 for the grant application on this award. G-io:State of Utah,Utah Highway Safety Office,Distracted Driving Prevention Program($12,000 —Misc. Grants) The police department applied for and received a$12,000 grant from the Utah Highway Safety Office for the 2021 Distracted Driving Prevention Program.The grant funding for overtime to conduct distracted driving enforcement/education shifts. A Public Hearing was held on May 5,2020 for the grant application on this award. G-ii:State of Utah,The Utah Highway Safety Office,Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Program ($10,296—Misc. Grants) The Police department applied for and received a$10,296 grant from the Utah Highway Safety Office for the 2021 Salt Lake City Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Program.This award is to fund distracted driving enforcement/education overtime shifts. A public hearing was held on May 5,2020 for the grant application on this award. Council Consent Agenda No.4—Grant Awards G-i:State of Utah,CCJJ(Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice),Jurisdictions with Half-way Houses and Parole Violator Centers Grant($248,o64—Misc. Grants) The Police Department has applied for and been awarded a$248,064 grant from the State of Utah, Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice,in support of the Jurisdictions with Halfway Houses and Parole Violator Centers grant. This grant provides funding for law enforcement agencies that provide services directly to areas with halfway houses or parole violator centers,or both.The Police Department will use these funds for overtime efforts to include targeted enforcement operations,mental health co-responder teams,and extra patrol shifts.The department will also utilize the funding for a van for the Public Order Unit,helmet communication kits for the Motor Squad officers and maintenance/supplies for the mobile camera trailers previously funded through this grant program.A public hearing was held on January 19,2021. G-2:Department of Workforce Services,Housing&Community Development Divisions,FY 21 Homeless Shelter Cities Mitigation Grant Program($16o,ioo —Misc. Grants) The State Department of Workforce Services is funding$16o,ioo to continue efforts to mitigate the impacts of the Geraldine E.King Women's Resource Center and Gail Miller Resource Center to the Central City/Downtown and Ballpark/Liberty Wells host neighborhoods. Grant funds will be used to continue funding one City FIFE to work as a Homeless Services Coordinator and continue contracting with Volunteers of America for a Homeless Outreach Caseworker.Including professional development,local mileage reimbursement,and outreach/promotional materials for community-based programming initiatives.A public hearing was held on November 12,2019. G-3:Utah State Utah Department of Health,Bureau of Emergency Medical Services($6,275 —Misc. Grants) Additional Funding of$6,275 has been awarded to this original grant bringing the total grant award amount to $15,91o.This agenda item is to increase the funding budget. The Fire Department applied for and was awarded$9,635 of grant funding from the Utah Department of Health, Bureau of Emergency Medical Services.This funding will be used towards the purchase of a 12-lead heart monitor relating to the provision of Emergency Medical Services as funding permits.A Public Hearing was held on April 7, 2020 for the grant application on this award. Page :u,.8 G-4:Utah Department of Natural Resources,Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands,FY21 Jordan River Vegetation Improvement, 2100 South Oxbow Restoration Project($9,920 —Misc. Grants) Public Services Trails&Natural Land applied for and was awarded$9,920 of grant funding from the Utah Department of Natural Resources,Division of Forestry,Fire and State Lands,FY21 Jordan River Vegetation Improvement,for the 2100 South Oxbow Restoration Project. The Trails&Natural Lands Division is preparing to initiate a multi-year restoration effort at the 2100 South Oxbow property focused on weed control and the establishment of healthy and diverse native riparian vegetation across this 2.5-acre site.Currently the site is a vacant field containing multiple noxious weed species which must be controlled prior to native planting efforts.Funds will be used to support a large first-year noxious species treatment by the City's contracted weed control specialist,PMG Vegetation Control.Specifically,FFSL Vegetation Improvement funds will be used to control Russian Olive,Phragmites,Russian Knapweed,and Scotch Thistle on the property,preparing the site for subsequent restoration seeding and planting efforts.A Public Hearing was held on January 19,2021. Section I: Council Added Items (None) ATTACHMENTS 1. Transmittal Ordinance Amending FY21 Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees 2. World Trade Center Utah Membership Brochure 3. Director of Business Development Job Description 4. Administrative Director of Communications Job Description 5. Administrative Director of Internal Affairs Job Description ACRONYMS AFSCME—American Federal of State,County and Municipal Employees CAN—Community and Neighborhoods Departments CARES Act—Federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief,and Economic Security Act CCJJ—Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice CIP—Capital Improvement Program CWPP—Community Wildfire Protection Plan DED —Department of Economic Development EDCU—Economic Development Corporation of Utah EDLF-Economic Development Loan Fund EOC—Emergency Operations Center ERA—Emergency Rental Assistance ERP—Enterprise Resource Planning FEMA—Federal Emergency Management Agency FFSL—Forestry,Fire and State Lands FOF—Funding Our Future FTE—Full time employee FTN—Frequent Transit Network FY—Fiscal Year GF—General Fund GIS—Geographic Information Systems GO Bond—General Obligation Bond HAND—Housing and Neighborhood Development Division IMS—Information Management Services Department JAG—Justice Assistance Grant MOU—Memorandum of Understanding NLC—National League of Cities PSAP—Public Safety Answering Point SLCPD—Salt Lake City Police Department Pageu. UCA—Utah Communication Authority UPD—Unified Police Department UTA—Utah Transit Authority WTC—World Trade Center Page I 20 CITY COUNCIL TRANSMITTAL Date Received: 02/26/2021 Lisa Shaffer, Chief Administrative Officer Date Sent to Council: 02/26/2021 TO: Salt Lake City Council DATE: February 25, 2021 Amy Fowler, Chair FROM: Lisa Shaffer, Chief Administrative Officer, Mayor's Office SUBJECT: Amendment of Appendix B ("Appointed Employees by Department") of the FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation STAFF CONTACTS: Lisa Shaffer, Chief Administrative Officer,Mayor's Office Debra Alexander, Chief Human Resources Officer, Human Resources David Salazar, Compensation Program Manager, Human Resources DOCUMENT TYPE: Ordinance RECOMMENDATION: The City Council,in Salt Lake City Ordinance No. 27 of 202o, approved the FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation. However, in order to meet the operational needs of Salt Lake City Corporation,the Mayor's Office recommends that the City Council adopt the attached ordinance amending Appendix B ("Appointed Employees by Department") of the FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non- Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation to add six new appointed positions, modify the job title and increase the pay grade of one existing appointed position, and increase the pay grades associated with three other existing appointed positions. BUDGET IMPACT: Among the new appointed job titles noted in Section 2 of the proposed ordinance, all are associated with existing positions, approved and allocated in the City budget for FY21. The same is true for the titles specified for modification in Section 3. It should be noted,however,the Census Coordinator(Mayor's Office),which was funded through the end of FY21,is being repurposed as a Community Outreach/Equity and Special Projects Coordinator. As a result, this position will require approximately the same level of funding for continuation into the 2021-22 budget year. Any additional costs associated with implementation of these title changes are funded and covered within existing department FY21 budgets. Although there is no budgetary impact in FY21, additional funding may be required when developing the FY21-22 city budget. BACKGROUND/DISCUSSION: As is customary,the Appointed Pay Plan is updated every year during the regular budget season. However, particularly in light of ongoing restructuring and rebuilding necessary across the City, departments are working to create better solutions to achieve evolving business objectives, which sometimes includes creation or modification of new and/or existing appointed roles. Summary of proposed changes to the Appointed Pay Plan Proposed Department Title Grade Reason for change: Created to reflect new leadership role Airport Chief Operating Officer 40 following completion of the Airport Rebuild and internal restructuring. City Attorney's Deputy City Attorney 40 Change position from Grade 39 to Grade 40 Office to reflect equity re: internal restructuring Economic Business Development 32 New role established to lead and focus on Development Division Director business development. This request reflects restoration of the former Deputy Director position, previously Human Deputy Chief Human approved the Council in December 2020. Resources Resources Officer 37 The job title is also updated to mirror the change in job title adopted for the Chief Human Resources Officer. IMS Chief Innovations 39 New role established to lead the City's new Officer Innovations team. Community Outreach - Position replaces the Census Coordinator Mayor's Office Equity&Special 24 position, repurposed to meet constituent Projects Coordinator business operational needs. This request replaces/redefines the Police Police Administrative Director 37 Public Relations Director,which was -Communications removed due to Civil Service Commission concerns. Police Administrative Director 37 This request establishes a new role and job -Internal Affairs title 911 Director, 911 Communication Communications 41 Change position from Grade 33 to Grade 41 consistent with other department directors. Bureau Bureau 911 Deputy Director, 911 Change position from Grade 29 to Grade 32 Communication Communications 32 for greater parity compared to pay level Bureau Bureau adjustment for Director and pay position with subordinate staff. A legislative and clean copy of the Appointed Pay Plan proposed with this ordinance (approved as to form) is included with this transmittal and Lisa Shaffer, Debra Alexander, and David Salazar can attend the work session if so desired by the City Council. SALT LAKE CITY ORDINANCE No. of 2021 (Amending Appendix B ("Appointed Employees by Department") of the FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation) An ordinance amending Appendix B ("Appointed Employees by Department") of the FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation. PREAMBLE The City Council, in Salt Lake City Ordinance No. 27 of 2020, approved the FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation. However, the City Council, in order to meet the operational needs of Salt Lake City Corporation, wishes to amend Appendix B ("Appointed Employees by Department") of the FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation to add six new appointed positions, modify the job title and increase the pay grade of one existing appointed position, and increase the pay grades associated with three other existing appointed positions. Be it ordained by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah: SECTION 1. PURPOSE. The purpose of this ordinance is to approve the attached amended FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation. Three copies of the attached amended FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation shall be maintained in the City Recorder's Office for public inspection. SECTION 2. NEW APPOINTED POSITIONS. Appendix B ("Appointed Employees by Department") of the FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation is hereby amended to add the following six new appointed positions: i) Chief Operating Officer Department of Airports Grade 040X ii) Business Development Division Director Economic Development Department Grade 032X iii) Deputy Chief Human Resources Officer Human Resources Department Grade 037X iv) Chief Innovations Officer Information Management Services Department Grade 039X v) Administrative Director of Communications Police Department Grade 037X vi) Administrative Director of Internal Affairs Police Department Grade 037X SECTION 3. MODIFICATIONS TO EXISTING APPOINTED POSITIONS. Appendix B ("Appointed Employees by Department") of the FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non- Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation is hereby amended to modify the job title and/or increase the pay grades of the following four existing appointed positions: i) Prior Job Title: Census Coordinator, Mayor's Office New Job Title: Community Outreach/Equity and Special Projects Coordinator, Mayor's Office Prior Grade: 023X New Grade: 024X 2 ii) Director, 911 Communications Bureau Prior Grade: 033X New Grade: 041X iii) Deputy Director, 911 Communications Bureau Prior Grade: 029X New Grade: 032X iv) Deputy City Attorney, City Attorney's Office Prior Grade: 039X New Grade: 040X SECTION 4. APPLICATION. The attached amended FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation shall not apply to non- represented employees of Salt Lake City Corporation whose employment terminated prior to the effective date of this ordinance. SECTION 5. EFFECTIVE DATE. This ordinance shall become effective upon adoption. Passed by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah, this day of March, 2021. CHAIRPERSON ATTEST: CITY RECORDER Transmitted to the Mayor on Mayor's Action: Approved. Vetoed. MAYOR 3 ATTEST: Salt Lake City Attorney's Office Approved as to Form CITY RECORDER Dat - February 25,2021 (SEAL) By: Bill No. of 2021. Jonathan Pap asideris Published: 4 APPENDIX B —APPOINTED EMPLOYEES BY DEPARTMENT Effective::V„ , a,. TB1109 0, 911 DISPATCH DIRECTOR 04:9..X 0.2.. .X 911 COMMUNICATIONS DEPUTY DIRECTOR 0::37X i EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF AIRPORTS O41X 0,40,X DIRECTOR AIRPORT ENGINEERING 039X DIRECTOR AIRPORT MAINTENANCE 039X DIRECTOR FINANCE/ACCOUNTING AIRPORT 039X DIRECTOR OF AIRPORT ADMINISTRATION/COMMERCIAL SERVICES 039X DIRECTOR OF AIRPORT INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 039X DIRECTOR OF AIRPORT PLANNING &CAPITAL PROJECTS 039X DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS -AIRPORT 039X DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONAL READINESS &TRANSITION 039X DIRECTOR COMMUNICATIONS & MARKETING 038X EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X CITY ATTORNEY 041X 0 DEPUTY CITY ATTORNEY 040X. CITY RECORDER 033X COUNCIL MEMBER-ELECT N/A* EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR CITY COUNCIL OFFICE 041X COUNCIL LEGAL DIRECTOR 039X DEPUTY DIRECTOR - CITY COUNCIL 039X ASSOCIATE DEPUTY DIRECTOR COUNCIL 037X SENIOR ADVISOR CITY COUNCIL 037X SENIOR PUBLIC POLICY ANALYST 033X COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR CITY COUNCIL 031X COMMUNITY FACILITATOR 031X OPERATIONS MANAGER& MENTOR—CITY COUNCIL 031X PUBLIC POLICY ANALYST 031X POLICY ANALYST/PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT 028X PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT&COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST II 028X CONSTITUENT LIAISON/POLICY ANALYST 027X CONSTITUENT LIAISON 026X PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT&COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST I 026X ASSISTANT TO THE COUNCIL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 025X COUNCIL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/AGENDA 024X COUNCIL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 021X DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY& NEIGHBORHOODS O41X CITY ENGINEER 039X DEPUTY DIRECTOR - COMMUNITY& NEIGHBORHOODS 037X DIRECTOR OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEER 037X PLANNING DIRECTOR 037X BUILDING OFFICIAL 035X DIRECTOR OF HOUSING & NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT 035X DIRECTOR OF TRANSPORTATION PLANNER 035X EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X DIRECTOR OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 041X DEPUTY DIRECTOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 037X ARTS DIVISION DIRECTOR 032X V::.3USINV:::::SS IDi---:VV:::::V.....Q:)PIMV:::N...0 DIVISION If IRV:::Q.:;"'FOR 0::32X CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER 041X CITY TREASURER 039X CHIEF PROCUREMENT OFFICER 033X FIRE CHIEF 041X DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF 037X ASSISTANT FIRE CHIEF 035X CHIEF HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER 041X fDEPU Y Q.:,IL IIIV:::::V::::' II HUMAN RV:::::SOURQ...V:::::S ( :::'V:::'ICER 0::37X CIVILIAN REVIEW BOARD INVESTIGATOR 035X TRAN517YONCHIEF OF STAFF 041X* TRAN517YONCOMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR 039X* TRAN517YONEXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X* CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER 041X Q;II III V INNOVACIQ)NS QA V;;ICER 0;. 9X JUSTICE COURT JUDGE 037X CITY COURTS ADMINISTRATOR 033X 711 CHIEF OF STAFF 041X CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 041X COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR 039X SENIOR ADVISOR 039X COMMUNICATIONS DEPUTY DIRECTOR 030X POLICY ADIVSOR 029X COMMUNITY LIAISON 026X EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X OFFICE MANAGER - MAYOR'S OFFICE 024X Q.:.;' N.�....Q:,,Q.: .. �..::�::....IM,IM. ..��:I:�...�'.._�::....�gIV;;;;: �::::Ik:::IL...:::::....�: �:.,U11...Y PRQ:)JV:::Q.:,FS Q.:,Q:ORDINA"'FOR 024X COMMUNICATION AND CONTENT MANAGER - MAYOR'S OFFICE 021X ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 019X CHIEF OF POLICE 041X ASSISTANT CHIEF OF POLICE 039X DEPUTY CHIEF POLICE 037X ADMINISTRA CIVV::::: If IRV:::Q.:;"'FOR ... Q.:OMMUNICA...CIQ:NS 0::37X AIDMINIST FIVV::::: If IRV::.Q..."'FOR . I�°�"'CQ RNAV.....AV:l:::'AIRS 037X .... ..... ..... ..... ..... is 7 11 DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC SERVICES O41X DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 038X DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS 038X DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC LANDS 038X FACILITIES DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X FLEET DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X GOLF DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X PARKS DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X STREETS DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X YOUTH & FAMILY DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X COMPLIANCE DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC UTILITIES O41X DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC UTILITIES 039X FINANCE ADMINISTRATOR PUBLIC UTILITIES 039X CHIEF ENGINEER - PUBLIC UTILITIES 037X WATER QUALITY &TREATMENT ADMINSTRATOR 037X EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X DEP UTY C);I,I V;;;;;Q,;;; Q;)R, REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 039X TY DIRECTORR,.�:�imm-REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 037X SUSTAINABILITY DIRECTOR 041X SUSTAINABILITY DEPUTY DIRECTOR 037X WASTE& RECYCLING DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X Except for a change in job title or reassignment to a lower pay level, no appointed position on this pay plan may be added, removed or modified without approval of the City Council. * Compensation for transitional positions,including city council member-elect, is set as provided under Chapter 2.03.030 of the Salt Lake City Code. Benefits for transitional employees are equivalent to those provided to full-time employees. Except for leave time, benefits for city council members-elect are also equivalent to those provided to full-time employees. APPENDIX B —APPOINTED EMPLOYEES BY DEPARTMENT Effective TBD 911 DISPATCH DIRECTOR 041X 911 COMMUNICATIONS DEPUTY DIRECTOR 032X / EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF AIRPORTS O41X CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER, AIRPORT 040X DIRECTOR AIRPORT ENGINEERING 039X DIRECTOR AIRPORT MAINTENANCE 039X DIRECTOR FINANCE/ACCOUNTING AIRPORT 039X DIRECTOR OF AIRPORT ADMINISTRATION/COMMERCIAL SERVICES 039X DIRECTOR OF AIRPORT INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 039X DIRECTOR OF AIRPORT PLANNING &CAPITAL PROJECTS 039X DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS -AIRPORT 039X DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONAL READINESS &TRANSITION 039X DIRECTOR COMMUNICATIONS & MARKETING 038X EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X i o CITY ATTORNEY 041X DEPUTY CITY ATTORNEY 040X CITY RECORDER 033X COUNCIL MEMBER-ELECT N/A* EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR CITY COUNCIL OFFICE 041X COUNCIL LEGAL DIRECTOR 039X DEPUTY DIRECTOR - CITY COUNCIL 039X ASSOCIATE DEPUTY DIRECTOR COUNCIL 037X SENIOR ADVISOR CITY COUNCIL 037X SENIOR PUBLIC POLICY ANALYST 033X COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR CITY COUNCIL 031X COMMUNITY FACILITATOR 031X OPERATIONS MANAGER& MENTOR—CITY COUNCIL 031X PUBLIC POLICY ANALYST 031X POLICY ANALYST/PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT 028X PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT&COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST II 028X CONSTITUENT LIAISON POLICY ANALYST 027X CONSTITUENT LIAISON 026X PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT&COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST I 026X ASSISTANT TO THE COUNCIL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 025X COUNCIL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/AGENDA 024X COUNCIL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 021X 11110 DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY& NEIGHBORHOODS O41X CITY ENGINEER 039X DEPUTY DIRECTOR - COMMUNITY& NEIGHBORHOODS 037X DIRECTOR OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEER 037X PLANNING DIRECTOR 037X BUILDING OFFICIAL 035X DIRECTOR OF HOUSING & NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT 035X DIRECTOR OF TRANSPORTATION PLANNER 035X EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X [[[ 11 DIRECTOR OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 041X DEPUTY DIRECTOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 037X ARTS DIVISION DIRECTOR 032X BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT DIVISION DIRECTOR 032X CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER 041X CITY TREASURER 039X CHIEF PROCUREMENT OFFICER 033X FIRE CHIEF 041X DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF 037X / ASSISTANT FIRE CHIEF 035X CHIEF HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER 041X DEPUTY CHIEF HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER 037X CIVILIAN REVIEW BOARD INVESTIGATOR 035X TRAN5ITIONCHIEF OF STAFF 041X* TRAN5ITIONCOMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR 039X* TRAN5ITIONEXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X* RZ CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER 041X CHIEF INNOVATIONS OFFICER 039X JUSTICE COURT JUDGE 037X / CITY COURTS ADMINISTRATOR 033X CHIEF OF STAFF 041X CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 041X COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR 039X SENIOR ADVISOR 039X COMMUNICATIONS DEPUTY DIRECTOR 030X POLICY ADIVSOR 029X COMMUNITY LIAISON 026X EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X OFFICE MANAGER - MAYOR'S OFFICE 024X COMMUNITY OUTREACH - EQUITY&SPECIAL PROJECTS 024X COORDINATOR COMMUNICATION AND CONTENT MANAGER- MAYOR'S OFFICE 021X ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 019X CHIEF OF POLICE 041X ASSISTANT CHIEF OF POLICE 039X DEPUTY CHIEF POLICE 037X ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTOR- COMMUNICATIONS 037X ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTOR - INTERNAL AFFAIRS 037X 71 DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC SERVICES O41X DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 038X DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS 038X DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC LANDS 038X FACILITIES DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X FLEET DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X GOLF DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X PARKS DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X STREETS DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X YOUTH & FAMILY DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X COMPLIANCE DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC UTILITIES O41X DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC UTILITIES 039X FINANCE ADMINISTRATOR PUBLIC UTILITIES 039X CHIEF ENGINEER - PUBLIC UTILITIES 037X WATER QUALITY &TREATMENT ADMINSTRATOR 037X EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X i DIRECTOR, REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 039X DEPUTY DIRECTOR, REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 037X SUSTAINABILITY DIRECTOR 041X SUSTAINABILITY DEPUTY DIRECTOR 037X WASTE& RECYCLING DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X Except for a change in job title or reassignment to a lower pay level, no appointed position on this pay plan may be added, removed or modified without approval of the City Council. * Compensation for transitional positions,including city council member-elect, is set as provided under Chapter 2.03.030 of the Salt Lake City Code. Benefits for transitional employees are equivalent to those provided to full-time employees. Except for leave time, benefits for city council members-elect are also equivalent to those provided to full-time employees. "* W I1''' III II""III'' IUM' �k` Dear Utah Business Leader, As the Chair of the Board and the President & CEO of World Trade Center Utah, we invite you to join the cadre of business, civic, and government leaders who are spearheading Utah's global engagement by becoming a member of WTC Utah. 000�w ;mmooiil Governor Gary R. Herbert's vision is that"Utah will lead the nation as the best performing economy and be recognized as a premier global business destination." uuuuuuuuuuuuuui�i�uul To achieve this vision, WTC Utah leads Utah's international business development """"N�IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII and elevates Utah's global status to promote prosperity and build economic ui resilience. °°°°�Illlllllllllllllllll uuui WTC Utah pursues this mission in tandem with all of Team Utah, including Utah �IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII businesses, state and local governments, civic organizations, industry associations, chambers of commerce, and educational institutions. WTC Utah is proud to provide uu�ii�ll�llilllllllll�ll strategic leadership on international engagement to this statewide network, elevating Team Utah's work to a global level. WTC Utah is also part of an international network of more than 300 World Trade Centers operating in 90 countries and supported by 15,000 WTC professionals that deliver reciprocal resources to WTC members. This trade and investment ecosystem is designed to make doing business around the world as easy as doing business across the street. We invite you to partner with us in this highly collaborative effort. WTC Utah members shape how Utah engages with the rest of the world. Being a member of WTC Utah will create opportunities for you to lead our community at home and abroad, receive trade and investment services, expand your network, and increase your exposure. Please review the following member benefits information to see the value and opportunity that will come as you join the WTC Utah community. Around the world, we are witnessing a shift in power away from gridlocked national and multilateral institutions, giving an edge to innovative states like Utah that effectively lead out on global issues. As WTC Utah takes Utah to the world and brings the world to Utah, we will drive economic growth and create avenues to expand our influence globally, influence that enables Utah businesses and organizations to increase prosperity at home and far beyond our borders as well. This is an unprecedented opportunity, and we aim to seize it. join us as we move forward in this important work by becoming a member of WTC Utah. Sincerely, Scott Anderson Miles Hansen Chair of the Board, WTC Utah President & CEO, WTC Utah Owe S S 0 IN WORLD 'TRADE World Trade Center Uta h Illleads CENTER" Uta[Cs buslhness U IIIXl,,I, dev6�qp��x�ient and 6levates Uta�h's g��Vb4�� statustoIIIIIraIxmteIII Irosperity and build ecana�x1Jt resIIII Ih�en ode. (1) Bffl�)MeIII" I-ItaIli bus uuuuuuuuuuuuul to expand Ih InterInat III ana� saIIIes to ��n("Drease revellUe and ("-r'eate Jobs. (2) Attra-.'t fare��gn hnvestrrent and fa('-.Tftate �nternatbnaIII part]nershlups to fi.idI II mnovatJan and Ib,jslu iess dev III opn-ent. (3) IM o�b z e I e a rr� U t a h's II nternatbna�� engagerrent toIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIII 6evate Utah's gbba�� status. 11 NM-e(onomi I(-gfo wth is,tied to mcfeas'l I ng IIIIII (onne(fiom-vvith ifitefn(itiowl m(Acts,to biisiri(!ss-fri(!rl(ll)le(onoffi)4 N1TIJ1(jh'spjft)rI-,5 to ,r-tfeq,,then feldtiom-hipr-vviffq S lob(Ilbusines' '(Ind dlicpxtnm-po,r-ition UNh to,Yulvai,r-e AN we have to of#!r lo Me Iworld(ind helf)ensure our (-ontinuedpfarpef#, II wRerelGeoUhGyHb vmrf IS WTC Fk�H SUR PG�RTS Fk�H I E 1 liss 1 E�Rmm uuuuuuu u° m m m DEVELORM ENT �BY P ROVIDING. Export "Fraining & Services Cornpete and win in ter nador4I IIy Iby utHizing our rnarket int6kgence, training, and one-on-one counsekng frorn our network of trade and industry experts, 3 International Invesrment & Partnerships �E muum ingage qualffied inteirinational investoirs inteirested in �ftah (:()irTq)ainiles, funds, and projects to invest in, State & International Otdreach Leverage our statewide and internatior4 networks of businesses, liinvestirneint I institutions, governrnent �leaders, and business oirgainizatJoins, Frade Mission & Trade Shows Pursue exports, investrnents, and pairureirs hips abiroad Ire"y j61nliing W"FC Utah on internador4 trade rnissions and tirade s�hows, National ResotiInes & Grant I Recerve fUnding and resouirces to PUir-SUe IIinteirinafloir4a sa�Ies aind 4rvestirneint IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII oppoirtUinffies, Rtu4II kinterinational Trade & I inl s iinn iiinil t Girow Wheire YOU aire Iby drscoveiriing inew hnteirinafloir4I lrnairkets, Ireairureirs, aind iinvestoirs, miw w����� � �����������I�����I I��. �������I��. ���. ������� ��. � III 'AL. OF G GBA CON, OMER( G�D�P G�R OW 111 PLAZO iASH\JG VE OUl' [)E OF �IS OUT' [YE POWER OUTSHI)E I]i�E U. OF I]flE)U.'). 17 %95 OFTHEWDRUD") 85% OF GLUE) 3 OFI]i IE U)). WE UkH 'FEAM ,r Nmria '� MM ,/ FJi/IrIO# � 1 � s N � � IIIIIIIIIII MILES HANSEN DAVID CARLEBACH NICOLE SHERWOOD COURTNEY RAE President and CEO VP,International Investment Director of Grants&Operations International Program Manager mhansen@wtcutah.com dcarlebach@wtcutah.com STEP Project Director crae@wtcutah.com 202-823-5350 43S-640-0724 nsherwood@wtcutah.com 435-901-4377 801-599-9185 �IIIIII� ui nj/ »irt( F 31 I i i%% � IIIIIIIII��^� y q 1 JULIA PAPPAS JIM PORTER HANNAH LOWRY MarComm Director Trade Services Manager Events Manager jpappas@wtcutah.com jporter@wtcutah.com hlowry@wtcutah.com 435-650-3484 43S-S12-1890 706-993-8728 tlllllllr, ,,,m kl$uui uui uui uu m 'S S ou III um ZIONS THEU M BANK. UNIVERSITY Colliers OF UTAH INTERNATIONAL Scott Anderson Natalie Gochnour Lew Cramer III °°°°�IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII __ �IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII SAL 'CLA K E I T-. CHAMBER � � nor J � moI Dominion L, Governors Office.l �IIIIIOU�IIIIIIWm Energy, Group of Companies Economic Development 01,10I� III Derek Miller Steve Starks Val Hale Craig Wagstaff ""sllllllllllllllllllll��ll ��illllllllll���llllllllllllllllllllllllllllll SL�m THE CHURCH OF °I JESUS CHRIST SALA' LAI£F^. 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Salt Lake City Corporation, Human Resources Department rr xuaa+" Job Title: Director of Business Development Job Code Number: FLSA: Exempt Pay Level: 32 EEO Code: 1 Bargaining Unit: 000 Benchmark: Executive /Administrative JOB SUMMARY: Under the general administrative direction of the Director of Economic Development, incumbent plans, organizes, directs, and promotes business development, including efforts to attract, retain, and support locally operated small, medium and large business interests, private corporations, and international trade opportunities. Partners and works collaboratively with the City's elected officials, business leaders, the Governor's Office of Economic Development, (GOED), and Economic Development Corporation of Utah (EDCU)to develop, support and promote opportunities for all business types. Develops, implements, and provides specialized support services to small and medium-sized business owners. Monitors and evaluates program goals and performance standards, long range planning, budgeting, contracting, fiscal controls, and service delivery. This is an appointed, at-will position without tenure and exempt from the career service system. TYPICAL DUTIES: 1. Working with the Director of Economic Development, leads and directs the City's business development efforts, including: Establishes and aligns program goals, services and objectives with the City's mission and vision for business & economic development. Modifies and adapts plans, goals and objectives, as necessary, in response to changing business and economic conditions. 2. Recommends policies, projects and programs which guide businesses towards city priorities for sustainability and racial and regional equity. 3. Analyzes existing economic situations relative to business attraction and expansion; reviews modern techniques for business attraction and retention and negotiates and resolves sensitive and controversial issues; monitors program performance and regularly reports the status to the department director. 4. Facilitates the strategic efforts necessary to resolve complex and high-level business development concerns. 5. Establishes positive working relationships and coalitions with appropriate private sector, non-profit and public organizations, including: federal, state, and local agencies; the Governor's Office of Economic Development (GOED); and the Economic Development Corporation of Utah (EDCU). Builds and develops opportunities to bring companies into Salt Lake City that are complementary to the local economy. 6. Builds and supports a strong business & economic development team with diverse backgrounds and expertise in various aspects of economy including small businesses, private sector corporations, international trade, and cultural economies. Director of Business Development -continued 7. Aligns Salt Lake City with the state's focus on sustainable innovation in target industries for the City. 8. Oversees Business Development staff. 9. Works collaboratively with other departments to assist businesses having challenges navigating the City's framework. 10. Meets established economic and business development objectives and customer expectations by guiding and making timely decisions that produce high-quality results after applying technical knowledge, analyzing problems, and calculating risks. 11. Establishes policy and procedures relating to business development services; coordinates activities and services between agencies; and, delivers services through agreements with other governmental and private sector agencies with a priority being placed on economic mobility for SLC residents through all areas of business development activities. 12. Develops long and short range plans in cooperation with agency directors. 13. Monitors performance of all agency functions and conducts program effectiveness reviews. 14. Responds to public inquiries. 15. Serves on state and local committees related to business development functions. 16. Performs other duties as assigned. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: 1. Bachelor's degree in Urban Planning, Business Administration, Public Administration, Law, Finance, or a related field plus ten years of progressively responsible related work experience, including senior level management and background with large corporation(s). 2. Proven record of achievement building a strong economic and business community, especially in support of small business. Outstanding knowledge and ability to work collaboratively with the business community, apply established economic development principles, and implement best practices relating to urban design, redevelopment, and/or economic development. 3. Extensive ability and experience to lead change and people in a large, multi-faceted organization; ability to successfully achieve organizational, customer service goals, and manage financial and information resources strategically. 4. Demonstrated history of creative leadership and ability to create and implement operational objectives in a successful manner. PREFERED QUALIFICATIONS: 1. Master's degree in Urban Planning, Business Administration, Public Administration or related field. 2. An established record of strategic thinking; demonstrated capacity to foresee the consequences of decisions to the future reality of the City and the capability of assisting City leadership as that vision is refined. Director of Business Development— continued 3. An experienced professional who expects to be held accountable and will, in turn, hold others accountable for outcomes; an aptitude for transparency and openness. 4. An individual who is creative, resilient, straightforward and self-confident; with strong communication skills highlighted by tact and diplomacy. Demonstrated enthusiasm and energy. 5. The aptitude and motivation for transparency and openness; the talent to understand politics, while not being personally involved. A willingness to challenge established thinking will be important. Offers of employment are contingent on successful completion of a criminal background check in accordance with City policy and applicable law. Criminal offenses will be reviewed on a case-by- case basis and do not automatically disqualify a candidate from City employment. The above statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of work being performed by persons assigned to this job. They are not intended to be an exhaustive list of all duties, responsibilities and skills required of personnel so classified. All requirements are subject to possible modification to reasonably accommodate individuals with disabilities. Position Review Information Date: 3/10/2021 Departmental Approval: Ben Kolendar HR Consultant Approval: Mike Sanchez Compensation Approval: David Salazar Notes: New job assignment xx, �y •,.JxuM�,�A,'. Salt Lake City Corporation, Human Resources Department +x Job Title: Communications Administrative Director Job Code Number: FLSA: Exempt (Administrative) Pay Level: 037 EEO Code: 2 Bargaining Unit: 000 Benchmark: Executive /Administrative JOB SUMMARY: Under the general administrative direction of the Police Chief or designee, incumbent oversees and assists with professional, creative, and technical work involved in disseminating information regarding the activities of the Police Department. Serves as Public Information Officer when directed. This position requires excellent verbal and written communications skills, including strength in print, broadcast, and social media. The ability to handle media inquiries from both print and broadcast, including on-camera responses, is mandatory. This is an appointed, at-will position without tenure and exempt from the career service system. TYPICAL DUTIES: 1. Researches, writes and edits, or assists in the research, writing and editing, of speeches for the Police Chief and others as requested. Acts as Public Information Officer when assigned as such by the Police Chief or designee. 2. Keeps Chief and/or command staff advised regarding the coordination of information dissemination. Works with GRAMA coordinator and/or legal counsel to ensure consistency and uniformity in position statements, and in dealing with members of the media. 3. Counsels command staff on public relations protocols and implication of issues vital to the well being and best interests of the City and Police Department. 4. Responsible for the Police Department's communication materials including the design and content of the Department's web site and social media. 5. Researches, writes, prepares, edits and oversees publication of the informational brochures/flyers and a broad range of other publications. 6. Coordinates photography, interviews, statistics and other needed information. Develops and directs radio, television, film and newspaper advertising campaigns. Writes letters, speeches and presentations. 7. Serves as the Department's contact for local, national and international media. Responds to requests for specialized information, coordinates interviews/release of information and performs research on behalf of the media. 8. Conducts on camera interviews. Issues media releases and public information announcements, coordinates news conferences and handles the media in emergency response situations. Promotes the Police Department through positive media exposure and acts as the Department's spokesperson. 9. Proofreads, edits and analyzes City and Police Department documents before they become public domain (budget books, policy papers, etc.). 10. As directed, coordinates and directs press conferences arranged by the Chief or designee. Coordinates responses to issues raised by the public and other stakeholders and works with the Mayor's Office in this endeavor to ensure consistent reaction while tracking issues and responses. 11. Establishes and maintains strong working relationships with internal bureaus and units as well as other departments within the city, county and state to promote collaboration, to include participating in monthly city communications coordination meetings acting as the police department's representative. 12. Seeks out, coordinates, and engages in all department outreach programs and community engagements to leverage involvement and face-to-face interactions on behalf of the Department. 13. Coordinates annual events such as the Fallen Officer Memorial, Awards Gala, and Police Week activities for the department, to include engaging key attendees, creating branding and programs, finalizing script, and working closely with involved committees. 14. Evaluates success and establishes mechanisms for feedback through two-way communication channels to meet department goals, to include developing cross sector partnerships that allow for ongoing and substantive dialogues on community needs and vision. 15. Establishes and maintains associations and contacts with national, state and local representatives to ensure the Department is properly represented within the industry and local community as well as with the general public. 16. Manages designs, orders, and updates all public education and recruiting collateral in conjunction with CompStat assignments, outreach programs, and community engagement. 17. Oversees all daily press releases (Watch Logs, wanted persons, public warnings, media advisories, etc.) and confers with counsel on release of information. 18. Fulfills other responsibilities as assigned by the Chief or designee. PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS: 1. Graduation from an accredited four-year college or university with a degree in Broadcast Media, English, Journalism, Communications, Public Relations, Political Science or a related field. At least five years' experience in journalism or public relations; experience in broadcast television and in management preferred. 2. Ability to interact effectively with police personnel, department heads, government and business leaders, and others in positions of authority and influence. 3. Demonstrated superior communications skills, including the ability to deal effectively with members of both broadcast and print media and to appear on behalf of the Chief, and Police Department on radio or broadcast television. 4. Preference will be given to applicants with local media experience. Offers of employment are contingent on successful completion of a criminal background check in accordance with City policy and applicable law. Criminal offenses will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis and do not automatically disqualify a candidate from City employment. The above statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of work being performed by persons assigned to this job. They are not intended to be an exhaustive list of all duties, responsibilities and skills required of personnel so classified. All requirements are subject to possible modification to reasonably accommodate individuals with disabilities. Position Review Information Date: 1/4/2021 Departmental Approval: Mike Brown, Chief of Police HR Consultant Approval: Jessica Weaver Compensation Approval: David Salazar Notes: Updated job description r INai y Salt Lake City Corporation, Human Resources Department i11 Al111 M Job Title: Internal Affairs Administrative Director Job Code Number: TBD FLSA: Exempt (Administrative) Pay Level: 37 EEO Code: 1 Bargaining Unit: 000 Benchmark: Executive /Administrative JOB SUMMARY: Under the general direction of the Police Chief, incumbent serves as an executive administrator over the Internal Affairs Unit. Responsible for the oversight of the internal affairs investigations. Works closely with the Police Chief, Mayor's Office, Human Resources, public and the Civilian Review Board. Reviews investigative procedures, interviews, and reports; facilitates and mediates alternative dispute resolution process between residents and officers. May take direct complaints from residents or general public. This is an appointed, at-will position without tenure and exempt from the career service system. TYPICAL DUTIES: 1. Oversees the Internal Affairs Unit by providing guidance and direction to the investigators, including review of investigative methodology and files. 2. Responsible for reviewing all Internal Affairs reports prior to submission, may participate in investigatory interviews. 3. May conduct initial interview with the complainant. Provides information to the complainant about the process, policies and procedures. 4. Facilitates the alternative dispute resolution process. 5. May serve as a mediator for the alternative dispute resolution process. 6. Complies with all applicable City, state and federal law, and union contract procedures. 7. Maintains confidentiality of all information, interviews, and reports. 8. Performs other duties as assigned. PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS: 1. Graduation from an accredited college or university with a degree in Political Science, Police Science, Police Administration or a related field and six years of investigative experience preferably with a federal or state agency. Experience in public sector labor and employment law (preferably in a public safety organization), Utah civil service law, Internal Affairs Administrative Director— continued and civil rights law, or the ability to quickly learn applicable legal principles. Related education and experience may be substituted one for the other on a year-for-year basis. 2. Demonstrated ability to be methodical in investigative procedures, and to thoroughly analyze situations and reach independent decisions. Capable of writing clear and concise reports that convert complex information into a readable, understandable and professional format. 3. Strong communication and writing skills, verbally articulate, strong interviewing and investigative skills. Have knowledge of current law enforcement investigatory concepts and techniques, clear and concise report writing skills, knowledge of state and federal criminal statues, knowledge of current best security practices, and strong leadership skills. 4. Strong interpersonal and supervisory skills including the ability to develop an effective working rapport with the Police Department's Internal Affairs Unit, Public, the Mayor's Office, Human Resources and Civilian Review Board members. 5. Ability to objectively balance police and community interests. 6. Ability to communicate with credibility and confidence on an individual basis as well as in a group/Board setting. Capable of improving the effectiveness of communications and interactions with others especially in the investigative interview setting. 7. Familiarity with personal computers and associated software (word processing, spread sheets, data bases, etc.)and experience using such for the preparation of reports, for tracking data and performing related analysis. WORKING CONDITIONS: 1. Considerable exposure to stressful situations as a result of human behavior. Conduct investigations, interview suspects and complete required investigative reports on deadline. 2. Will work varied hours including early mornings, late evenings, weekends, etc. to coordinate interview times with witness availability. Offers of employment are contingent on successful completion of a criminal background check in accordance with City policy and applicable law. Criminal offenses will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis and do not automatically disqualify a candidate from City employment. The above statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of work being performed by persons assigned to this job. They are not intended to be an exhaustive list of all duties, responsibilities and skills required of personnel so classified. All requirements are subject to possible modification to reasonably accommodate individuals with disabilities. Position Review Information Date: 3/2/21 Departmental Approval: Chief Mike Brown HR Consultant Approval: Jessica Weaver Compensation Approval: Notes: New position. N M O N N N vi vi vi vi vi vi ro u u u u u u o''......... N aJ aJ aJ aJ aJ aJ T r0 - - - - - - U Ln 1, M lD w w w w w w o 4) llo llo llo llo llo llo o ri r-1 C _0 _0 _0 _0 _0 _ r r-1 lD 00 O 1- O Ln Ol ri N lD r- a-I lD 4) O -1 00 Ln 1, N Ln � lD N M M O Ln QT lD OM 00 un O r, . 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O M M lD + N Lr) M Lr) r-I 00 O QX) a a Lei Q";t II 00 o � � � � � r ;w -;w Lei -;w Lei Lei T E c o lD O O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 _0 lD 00 N O M Ol N M N Ol 00 r-I 12 Q s to' lD O O O Ln 00 lD all � N r-1 O ao �� o Ln Ln ri Ln c r-1 r-1 r-1 N r co O o a O r_ N M N ri M 00 Q _0 GJ O O 00 00 r-1 O lD lD ri lD Ol Ol r-I ri 1.f) N N ri C Vl N r 00 O Ol Ol r cn Im � 00 00 � r-I � 00 00 Ln M ri ri ri 4) y 1i O O 00 pj f0 a-I ri M N ri ri Lr lD LP) ri lD r-1 M r, C `Z Q 00 N O M ri U O M r-I r-I r, r-I Ln n ri Ln lD 1.f) lD O 4) `_ 00 N M r0 N T r-1 m 1, lD m Ln T M N - >` C •� Uw M •�•� N Ln I� N lD Rzz 3 Q aj M O O lD 4J lD lzT lzT m O r CDlD lD Ol Ln O Ln r, r-I r, r, N lD O r, O H O 00 > i 5 L lD M N Lr >` o O Ln lD � O r-I r-I lD Ln r-I � lD M p m GJ rr-I"1 M lD r-I Ln ^ O M Ln lD 00 O M E N r-I � r-I O r-I O E U ON � co M n N QT M QT M ri M 1� 00 O 1� RzF lD RzF a-- pp N O Ln r, lD lD 00 Ol lD 00 O M 00 N •N Z GJ ri lD lD N N 4J p Ln � m � � 00 lD � m lD 00 m M w lD 'O 4) aj aj 7 y u v Q f0 aj N 4) N > u d w QT M N N QT M Ln r-I M Ln n 00 C y O 3 Ln Rt Rt O 00 lD M '7 O '7 u) '7 ^ X u r-1 M M 1, 00 1, n 00 O O N r-I U C i j 4.1 lD l O lD l r-i r-i Lr Ol M O O ^ c CA cn Q Im lD Ol Ol lD 00 N O N M '7 00 00 C 'N GJ aj vi rl ri Ol Ol ri M Ol Ol I� n Ol 00 u O Li O t O aj � aj O 4) Ln ajo _0 M 3 ^ N O a-- M n C O ru m - f0 -p G) LL r0 Lns c f0 aJ i Cl i C ru aj O * O O aJ C -O p 00 -p O •u 4) N ) V N LL �a GJ aJ H r0 . r N aj of +, aJ aJ aj aj C ro O aO- +' Z s 0'a aj aj aj O O O- O O cw: � H 7 Z ~ 4J C t3 W - O s aj c 3 pu o u m aj Q H m N C o +`° 0 O � m H rn Z LL - N r rnaj Q r FUNDING AMOUNT SOURCE SPENT ON CARES Act $82,518,726 Directly from U.S. Rate stabilization for airlines and concession Airport Grant Federal Aviation businesses at the airport by lowering landing Program Administration(FAA) fees and terminal rents,and employee retention to maintain 90%of workforce CARES Act $5,925,738 Pass through via Cover personnel costs in the Fire Department, First Round Salt Lake County 911 Bureau,Social Worker Program, homeless services program,and cleaning supplies and Stay Safe Stay Active street closure CARES Act $5,925,738 Pass through via Spent on 22 items including:$500 Salt Laker Second Round Salt Lake County Cards,Community Commitment Program,City employee telework equipment, Downtown Ambassador Program expansion, Nourish to Flourish food assistance,enhanced YouthCity Program,City personnel costs and other items CARES Act $150,000 Pass through via TBD in future budget amendment,Council Third Round Salt Lake County approved contingency to use for personnel costs in the Fire Department and 911 Bureau CARES Act CDBG-CV $3,063,849 Directly from U.S. Awarded to community nonprofits and City HUD-CV Grants Esc-CV $3,986,911 Housing and Urban departments for direct responses to and HOPWA-CV $87,443 Development(HUD) recovery from the pandemic TOTAL $7,138,203 DECEMBER 2020 $6,067,033 Directly from U.S. Mayor's proposal is in Budget Amendment#7 COVID Relief Bill Treasury Department and pending Council review Treasury Housing Assistance Annual HUD CDBG $3,518,665 Directly from U.S. Awarded to community nonprofits and City Grants Esc $299,267 Housing and Urban departments for housing and homeless HOME $974,863 Development(HUD) assistance,housing development and HOPWA $674,671 community development priorities identified TOTAL $5,467,466 in the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan IIII IIII IIII � u u � • 1 ERIN MENDENHALL MARY BETH THOMPSON Mayor Chief Financial Officer I DEPARTMENT or,FINANCE CITY COUNCIL TRANSMITTAL 9,202 0,7.41i7 I�,rf Date Received: Lisa Shaffer, Chief Administrative Officer Date sent to Council: TO: Salt Lake City Council DATE: March 1, 2021 Amy Fowler, Chair FROM: Mary Beth Thompson, Chief Financial Officer SUBJECT: Budget Amendment 47 - Revised SPONSOR: NA STAFF CONTACT: John Vuyk, Budget Director(801) 535-6394 or Mary Beth Thompson (801) 535-6403 DOCUMENT TYPE: Budget Amendment Ordinance RECOMMENDATION: The Administration recommends that, subsequent to a public hearing, the City Council adopt the following amendments to the FY 2020—21 adopted budget. II.:D'EIPARIYJ IE T OF II:::1I'ANCE Il:mOLOCY A14D 113UDGET II..)WOSION 451 SOU TI a STATE::.�TRE.:.E.:7,rROOM 238 ::"o I:,OX 14546'7,SAI...'T I...AKI:.:.C;I'TY,UTAI II 84114 5455 Tf::::l...801..535 6394 BUDGET IMPACT: REVENUE EXPENSE GENERAL FUND $ 540,744.00 $ 6,528,824.00 IMS FUND 93,766.00 93,766.00 AIRPORT FUND (19,000.00) 859,674.00 SEWER FUND 0.00 241,206.00 STORM WATER FUND 0.00 67,282.00 STREET LIGHTING FUND 0.00 5,038.00 WATER FUND 34,894,992.00 1,543,238.00 REFUSE FUND (3,200.00) 128,084.00 FLEET FUND 97,612.00 97,612.00 GOLF FUND 23667.00 23,667.00 GOVERNMENTAL IMMUNITY FUND 5,296.00 5,296.00 RISK FUND 3,836.00 3,836.00 TRANSPORTATION FUND 0.00 1,876.00 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT(CIP)FUND 1,281,866.14 1,361,866.14 MISCELLANEOUS GRANT FUND 11,223,292.00 11,223,292.00 OTHER SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 0.00 520,150.00 TOTAL $ 48,142,871.14 $ 22,758,707.14 BACKGROUND/DISCUSSION: Revenue for FY 2019-20 Budget Adjustments The Fiscal Year 2021 projections are coming in below budgeted revenues. The following chart shows a current projection of General Fund Revenue for fiscal year 2021. FY2021 FY2021 Variance Annual YTD F a�o rahe Revenue Budget Projections (Unfavorable) Property Taxes $ 111,418,455 $ 111,418,455 $0 Sales and Use Tax $ 67,999,593 $ 67,999,593 $0 Sales and Use Tax-1/2 Cent $ 32,797,506 $ 32,797,506 $0 Franchise Tax $ 26,812,125 $ 26,430,701 (U$381,4h24h) PILOT $ 1,508,894 $ 1,508,894 $0 TOTAL TAXES $ 240,536,573 $ 240,155,149 (U$381,424) Licenses and Permits $ 28,601,482 $ 29,767,420 $II II W;'0 19 Intergovernmental $ 4,444,400 $ 4,181,157 (U$263,24.3) Interest Income $ 1,900,682 $ 1,550,000 (U$"l50,682) Fines and Forfeitures $ 3,938,848 $ 2,706,886 (U$U,23 @,962) Parking Meters $ 3,432,962 $ 1,619,786 (U$U,8 U 3,U 76) Charges and Services $ 4,428,069 $ 4,233,494 ($@ 94,575) Miscellaneous Revenue $ 4,014,037 $ 2,604,733 (U$@, fU9,304l) Interfund $ 20,281,706 $ 20,281,706 $0 Transfers $ 9,507,812 $ 9,507,812 $0 TOTAL GENERAL FUND $ 321,086,571 $ 316,608,143 (U$4, 78, 28) The City is currently projecting a$4.4 million decrease in budgeted revenue. The largest portion of the decrease is attributed to a $1.2 million decrease in Fines and Forfeitures, a $1.8 million decrease in Parking Meter Revenues and a$1.4 million decrease in Miscellaneous Revenues. These decreases are offset by a projected net increase of$1.2 million in Licenses and Permits. The increase in Licenses and Permits is in spite of airport parking/license tax showing a decrease due to decreased travel as a result of COVID. The decrease in airport parking and licenses is $2,345,000. Innkeepers tax has also been hit hard by COVID and is projecting a decrease of$1,717,500. According to the local news, hotels are experiencing 30% occupancy compared to this time of year in previous years. Business license are also expected to be below budget due to trends for apartment units, new business license and renew business licenses. These losses are offset by gains in permits & zoning building permits (+$1.8M),plan check fees (+$1.9M), and street excavation (+$1.7Mdue to a temporary boost from Google contract). The City is currently monitoring a bill (HB 98) in the State Legislature that may reduce revenue in the planned check fees/building permit area. Fines and Forfeitures are projected below budget due to a decrease in parking ticket revenue of $800k. With COVID cases still at 1,000+ cases/day, citation revenue is still about 1/3 of a regular year. Justice Court fines are also down $62K while moving violations are down$315K. Due to COVID restrictions the Administrative Office of the Courts has a limited amount of court activity via WebEx. In those cases that are being seen, defendants are not ordered to pay their fines, they are not being sent to collections and no warrants are being issued. Other areas are also seeing decreases from the pandemic, traffic school revenue is projected to be below budget by $37k and vehicle booting is trending down $12,000 trending based on current actuals. Parking Meter Collection is slightly less than half of the previous fiscal year due to an overall decrease in traffic downtown. This is driving the significant decrease of$1.8 million. Additionally, Miscellaneous Revenue has also been affected by the pandemic with decreases in accounts receivable collections, special event revenue, fuel reimbursement due to the Mayor's emergency declaration and utility reimbursement. a� a� a� rC a� N U O M O M dM' M O) O � O Call, C�j O M 00 N ti <\ M O O d' O ri N p L� d" O1 O L� O O �p t" M N N O - L� N O �O eti N •"'� F.. O Lr 10 M O O a, vCl F Ci O m d' O o O M o d' O - o r O mC3, M M M C3, �c M C` N O O y V O, O OJ O OO -I N I-, M 00 C� �, $-'•i N N M Ol �c M N N H M c-� N O O N N C,H N N vUi J O .. N -cu O O O O C ti O eti O O O O •�--� N H <\ Oj Lc Oj O O O cq �p LL M N N OM 11 a, O .O Qy ru O �M' L� L� v �c p Cz a, L n d^" O o N co o <\ O O M N O l� d' L�r� a, d' Cl O O N y� d" O O on co a; O Q O O � ti O N ti NO r- O Lri CCO : ti N N v v M N � O N Cz N M $-'•i 7� v O 71, ro O cz u W c Oy y y y y y y y y y y y y y U cz cz U a CZN w w w u cC w cC w cC w cC w cC w cC w cC w121 PO w m w 1:4a w °� �i ° m m m m m m m m m m m m m m u 9L w The Administration is requesting a budget amendment totaling $48,142,871.14 of revenue and expense of$22,758,707.14. The amendment proposes changes in fifteen funds, with $6,042,080 from the General Fund fund balance. The proposal includes 46 initiatives for Council review. The Budget amendment includes the addition of three new positions and the transfer of two positions from the General Fund to the IMS Fund. The additional positions are one within the Fire Department to help manage Emergency Management and two grant funded positions. The revision includes a request for $1,000,000 for maintenance on the central plant boiler for the City and County Building as well as the Library and Leonardo. Finance staff worked specifically with the Police Department to work through additional needs in the Police Department. The seven items specific to the Police Department were compared to available budget and future needs. The comparison included a look at current staffing levels and projected hiring and other costs. This cultural shift allowed the Administration to provide clear direction for the Police Department moving forward. A summary spreadsheet document, outlining proposed budget changes is attached. The Administration requests this document be modified based on the decisions of the Council. The budget opening is separated in eight different categories: A. New Budget Items B. Grants for Existing Staff Resources C. Grants for New Staff Resources D. Housekeeping Items E. Grants Requiring No New Staff Resources F. Donations G. Council Consent Agenda Grant Awards L Council Added Items PUBLIC PROCESS: Public Hearing SALT LAKE CITY ORDINANCE No. of 2020 (Seventh amendment to the Final Budget of Salt Lake City, including the employment staffing document, for Fiscal Year 2020-2021) An Ordinance Amending Salt Lake City Ordinance No. 27 of 2020 which adopted the Final Budget of Salt Lake City, Utah, for the Fiscal Year Beginning July 1, 2020 and Ending June 30, 2021. In June of 2020, the Salt Lake City Council adopted the final budget of Salt Lake City, Utah, including the employment staffing document, effective for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2020 and ending June 30, 2021, in accordance with the requirements of Section 10-6-118 of the Utah Code. The City's Budget Director, acting as the City's Budget Officer,prepared and filed with the City Recorder proposed amendments to said duly adopted budget, including the amendments to the employment staffing document necessary to effectuate the staffing changes specifically stated herein, copies of which are attached hereto, for consideration by the City Council and inspection by the public. All conditions precedent to amend said budget, including the employment staffing document as provided above, have been accomplished. Be it ordained by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah: SECTION 1. Purpose. The purpose of this Ordinance is to amend the final budget of Salt Lake City, including the employment staffing document, as approved, ratified and finalized by Salt Lake City Ordinance No. 27 of 2020. SECTION 2. Adoption of Amendments. The budget amendments, including amendments to the employment staffing document necessary to effectuate the staffing changes specifically stated herein, attached hereto and made a part of this Ordinance shall be, and the same hereby are adopted and incorporated into the budget of Salt Lake City, Utah, including the amendments to the employment staffing document described above, for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2020 and ending June 30, 2021, in accordance with the requirements of Section 10-6-128 of the Utah Code. SECTION 3. Filing of copies of the Budget Amendments. The said Budget Officer is authorized and directed to certify and file a copy of said budget amendments, including amendments to the employment staffing document, in the office of said Budget Officer and in the office of the City Recorder which amendments shall be available for public inspection. SECTION 4. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall take effect upon adoption. Passed by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah, this day of , 2020. CHAIRPERSON ATTEST: CITY RECORDER Transmitted to the Mayor on Mayor's Action: Approved Vetoed MAYOR ATTEST: CITY RECORDER Salt Lake City Attorney's Office Approved As To Form (SEAL) voj�o� Jaysen Oldroyd Bill No. of 2020. Published: 2 � o o a. on C5 N C5 � 4� 10 10 a. on 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 N � N O 0 � O O O O O O O O O O O O O O ^� iC U � O W O O N W W n ti n O ti O d T 07 N oc h ti H Y 4 4� C7 C7 C7 C7 C7 C7 C7 C7 C7 C7 C7 C7 C7 C7 C7 y cNl row U o ro o o �? •� w °6 w o. °o o o o ° ou.� ou •c v°'i q � 'r ro apij ropi F4 �U �w C',w ro .r =ro .r ro ro i�ro i�ro ��ro q ro� ro^' o •,q � � � �"k, k°, •ro 6 ro o.� ro o a ro o 'ro ro o ro ro o o ro o m �, ro o ro'C ro `° pv 8 g x ml1 maa m rox C7q U'S.'C7 p�o�oi0 # � § \ ) 2 ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . J � J - � . uc,u / \ ) _ \ - Q , . Q ¥ = Q / e § = , � = - K } , V, N 'C' It M rM 6, z x, M in 0 Z 4 m 'D 0 'D rl�oc� cl N 00 6 oc 119 0 C5 oo 0 0 0 0 0 ry un C� W- un 0 oo oo oo u� oo oo C5 bA oo ooO U� � 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 oo oo 0 0 0 0 0 oo oo oo 0 O oo r� 0 r� 0 0 1- 0 a, a,10 0 co a, r� oo 0 'o - co oo 'I- N 6 oo I "'o �; L'� oo m '?'o c- I- N oo N o-o u�'Dcj NO ;o cfJ W cvJ W N N m 4N ti tn O oc oc ti tn M oc O'C 16 z oa In u, t'n OC tn ul oc oc ' h t Salt Lake City FY2020-21 BudgetAmendment #7 Initiative Number/Name Fund Amount Section A New Items A-is National League of Cities Conference IGF $300,000.00 Department:Economic Development Prepared By:Ben Kolendar/John Vuyk The 2021 National League of Cities`City Summit'is a conference of municipal leaders from around the country which will be hosted in Salt Lake City in November 2021.The purpose of this funding will include but not be limited to venue rentals, catering,transportation,the planning and execution of mobile workshops,marketing needs and staff time for the estimated 2,500 in-person conference attendees.The funding is a contractual requirement of the host city of$300,000,which was awarded following a competitive bidding process which took place during the Becker administration and included a resolution of support from the Council. A-2:World Trade Center Membership GF $50,000.00 Department:Economic Development Prepared By:Ben Kolendar/John Vuyk The World Trade Center Utah leads Utah's international business development and elevates Utah's global status to promote prosperity and build economic resilience.A membership at the Ambassador level gains SLC a seat on the WTC steering committee,a complimentary registration for one of the Governor's trade missions,and other benefits.Given the City's current position in the face of major development and the desire to attract world-class and cutting-edge tech and other business,this membership would give us another avenue and greater connections. A-3: Encampment Reestablishment GF $650,000.00 Department:Police Prepared By:Shellie Dietrich The Administration is requesting $650,000 of funding,to provide funding for the Community Commitment Program to provide staffing by the Police Department to support the homeless encampment community re- establishments. Police officers working extra overtime shifts will provide security to ensure the Health Department and outreach workers can proceed in an environment that will be safe for all involved. Depending on the size and location of the camp,30 to 45 officers would be needed with up to six sergeants.The assignments will take between 8 and io hours each day. The Police Department has already supported over i000 health department activities in 2020 including operations prior to, during and after camp mitigation. The current estimate is that Soo additional re- establishments (based on over i000 camp health department cleanups in the previous 12 months)would take place throughout the remainder of fiscal year. Estimating that there would be one major camp per month from January to June for two days each and minor camps requiring resources equal to 1 day per week would mean the Police Department would need $650,000 additional funding for FY2021 as shown below. Activity #days Officers #hours Rate Amount Requested Major Cleanups 12 40 10 $ 65 $ 312,000 Minor Cleanups* 26 20 10 $ 65 $ 338,000 Total Requested $ 650,000 *previously utilized on-duty resources that are no longer available 1 Salt Lake City FY2O2O-21 BudgetAmendment #7 Initiative Number/Name Fund Amount A-4: Emergency Management Moved to Fire GF -$703,683.00 GF $735,527.00 Department:Fire Prepared By:Clint Rasmussen The Salt Lake City Fire Department has proposed to assume and assimilate the Emergency Management team into our department. The prospect of this change is an enormous challenge but one that can and will be accomplished through the Fire Department by multiple objectives.The formal vision as identified by FEMA and adopted by multiple agencies is to "Promote safer,less vulnerable communities with the capacity to cope with hazards and disasters". Although complete integration and development of the EM Bureau would take several months to a year,SLCFD will begin working on programs and projects on day one,initially focusing on the following: • Developing the organizational structure of the Emergency Operations Center(EOC)and its place within SLCFD chain of command and Salt Lake City administration. • Providing emergency preparation,mitigation,and NIMS training for individual City departments. *For a complete list of goals and objectives,please see attachment* To achieve these objectives,SLC Fire is requesting additional resources in 2 phases. Phase L• (begins March 1,2021 with this Budget Amendment) Emergency Management Director reclassified to Fire Division Chief (vacancy savings of$37,778 plus one-time costs of $1,500) 1 new Fire Captain(4-month cost of$45,622 plus one-time costs of$1,500) Executive Staff Wage Initiative($21,000) Total Cost for FY21 $31,844 Full Year Cost for FY22 $219,875 Phase 2: (begins July 1,2021 and requests will be made through the annual budget cycle) 2 new FTEs- 1 Fire Captain($136,865)and 1 Accountant($63,517) Battalion Chief Wage Initiative(13 FTEs- $69,516) Administrative Staff Wage Initiative($8,440) Total Cost for FY22 = $278,338 A-5: Outdoor Business Activity Assistance Program GF $100,000.00 Department:Economic Development Prepared by:Ben Kolendar/John Vuyk The purpose of this program is to assist small businesses expand outdoor business activities.Administered by DED,the program will reimburse City fees associated with outdoor business activities,such as dining,retail,and supporting events, and provide grants to fund the purchase of equipment associated with outdoor business activities. A-6: Pulled prior to submission A-7: Pulled prior to submission 2 Salt Lake City FY2020-21 BudgetAmendment #7 Initiative Number/Name Fund Amount A-8: US Department of the Treasury; Emergency Rental Misc. Grants $6,067,O33.00 Assistance Department:CAN Prepared By:Lani Eggertsen-Goff US Department of the Treasury deposited$6,067,033.20 into the City's bank account on January 22, 2021.These Emergency Rental Assistance(ERA)program funds are supplemental to the CARES Act funding and available to cities with populations over 200,000. The Department of Treasury Emergency Rental Assistance(ERA)program makes funds available to assist households that are unable to pay rent and utilities due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Funding is targeted to households that are at or below 8o%of the area median income,demonstrates a risk of experiencing homelessness or housing instability,and has experienced a reduction in household income and/or incurred significant costs and/or experienced financial hardship due to COVID-19. The Department of Treasury regulations set forth that go%of the funds($5,460,329.88)must be used for direct financial assistance,including rent,rental arrears,utilities and home energy costs,utilities and home energy costs arrears,and other expenses related to housing.The remaining io% ($606,703.32)may be used for housing stability services,including case management and other services intended to keep households stably housed,and administrative costs. With the addition of US Treasury funding,HAND requests a portion of the io%be utilized to support 2 full time,time limited,staff persons.These staff will facilitate the City administration,coordination,and compliance monitoring.The two (2)requested positions would be Grade 26 Community Development Grant Specialists at a fully loaded annual cost of $205,512.These positions would sunset when funding expires. Due to the short-term nature of these positions,HAND would consider the use of temporary staffing agencies to fill the positions. This budget amendment will create the ability for the City to accept the allocation from the Department of Treasury and create appropriate expense and revenue budgets for the direct financial assistance and housing stability/administration budgets. See the attached guidance for more information. A-9: Move City GIS Personnel to IMS GIS Division General Fund $0.00 IMS $62,571.00 Department:CAN/IMS Prepared By:John Vuyk The Administration is proposing to move two FTE's from CAN to IMS.The individuals work directly in the GIS function for the City.The amendment consolidates these two employees within IMS and the GIS division there.The amendment is cost neutral because the General Fund would reimburse the IMS fund for the employees. A-io:Inland Port Tax Revenue GF $0.00 Department:Finance Prepared by:John Vuyk As part of the City's annual financial audit,the City was informed it needs to budget and account for City tax revenue within the boundaries of the Inland Port. Because the tax revenue is dispersed directly to the inland port,the City does not receive the tax revenue.The City will budget a line item to recognize the tax revenue and a corresponding contra-account,so City revenue is not overstated. 3 Salt Lake City FY2020-21 BudgetAmendment #7 Initiative Number/Name Fund Amount A-ii:Employee Bonuses GF $3,044,3i6.00 Airport $878,674.00 Sewer $241,206.00 Storm Water $67,282.00 Street Lighting $5,038.00 Water $540,302.00 Refuse $131,284.00 Fleet $97,612.00 Golf $23,667.00 Govt Immunity $5,296.00 Risk $3,836.00 Transportation $1,8 76.o 0 IMS $43,195.00 Department:Finance Prepared by: John Vuyk During labor negotiations this past summer the Fire and AFSCME labor unions agreed to no compensation adjustments due to COVID and its impact on the City.The Administration agreed to meet with both labor unions about possible adjustments in January based on where the City's financial position was. After negotiating with both of those unions the Administration is proposing a one-time salary bonus for all City employees. The Administration discussed the terms of the negotiations in a closed session with the Council on February 9th. A-12: Police Crime Lab Needs Assessment CIP—Police $80,000.00 Impact Fee Department:CAN Prepared By:Dan Ripp/Kalli Ruiz In 2013, Police completed a needs assessment for a partnership and co-ownership between Salt Lake City and West Valley City for a future crime lab. While this partnership and plan was never implemented and with the crime lab lease expiring in October 2024,the need remains for the City to expand its crime lab as the current crime lab model and lease was intended as a short-term solution. In addition,as an instrument to inform the forthcoming Impact Fee Facility Plan update,a comprehensive needs assessment is necessary to also detail a io-year strategic plan that will measure current capacity as well as the necessary police facility expansion needs proportionate to the City's population growth. Funding exists within the police impact fees;this request is for an appropriation of budget from those funds. A-13: Police Contractual Costs—SL County GF 1 $218,858.00 Department:Police Department Prepared By:Shellie Dietrch The Police Department is requesting recognition of budget and expense for multiple contracts which provided reimbursement of overtime related to COVID and joint operations. • SL County COVID contract to provide security around the area of the Red Lion hotel which was utilized as a COVID quarantine facility.The total amount for this contract was$24,158. • The County Contract for COVID Response in Parks provides funding for patrols in parks and common places where large crowds tend to gather within Salt Lake City to educate and enforce the Salt Lake County Public Order on COVID.The overtime shifts are coordinated between SLCPD and Salt Lake County Emergency Management. The total for this contract was$194,700. 4 Salt Lake City FY2O2O-21 BudgetAmendment #7 Initiative Number/Name Fund Amount A-14: Police Contractual Costs—DNR GF $24,541.00 Department:Police Department Prepared By:Shellie Dietrch The Police Department is requesting recognition of budget and expense for multiple contracts which provided reimbursement of overtime related to COVID and joint operations. • The contract with the State Department of Natural Resources provided overtime for patrols on or within 250 yards of the Jordan River within the boundaries of Salt Lake City.The total for this contract was$24,541• A-15: Police Contractual Costs—US Marshals Office GF 1 $34,734.00 Department:Police Department Prepared By:Shellie Dietrch The Police Department is requesting recognition of budget and expense for multiple contracts which provided reimbursement of overtime related to COVID and joint operations. • The Police Department worked a short-term joint operation with the US Marshals service.The total amount was$34,734• A-16: Police COVID Costs GF 1 $241,224.00 Department:Police Department Prepared By:Shellie Dietrch The Police Department is requesting budget allocation for additional costs related to COVID which were not covered in CARES act funding.These costs include ERPL at$56,785 which are eligible for FEMA reimbursement at l00%and Workers Compensation costs for COVID related care$184,438.Total amount requested$241,224. The Administration is planning to submit these costs to FEMA for reimbursement,but is unsure if reimbursement will be received. A-17: Police Protest Costs GF $537,337.00 Department:Police Department Prepared By:Shellie Dietrch The Police Department is requesting budget allocation for costs incurred related to ongoing protests and free speech events,including events related to the Presidential election and Inauguration.The costs include additional staffing and an increase in workers compensation due to injuries incurred during these events. • Overtime- $326,528 • Workers Compensation increase for protest related claims-$73,577 • The request also includes overtime costs associated with patrols set in place to maintain order in case of protests during the presidential inauguration.The cost of those patrols was$137,232. A-18: Police VP Debate Cost Reimbursement GF $0.00 Department:Police Department Prepared By:Shellie Dietrch The Police Department is requesting recognition of additional revenue from the VP Debate in the amount of$190,279. No additional budget for expense is requested. The Administration worked with the Police Department in seeking full reimbursement for costs associated with the vice- presidential debate. Originally, $19,242 was budgeted to be reimbursed,this amount represents the additional reimbursement for the debate totaling$209,521. A-i9: Central Plant Boilers GF $1,000,000.00 CIP $1,000,000.00 Department:Public Services Prepared By:Dawn Valente One of two boilers in the Central Plant has failed.We are running on a single boiler at this time,which was the secondary boiler,that is in the same poor condition as the primary boiler that has failed catastrophically. The replacement of the boilers at the Central Plant were on the Capital Facilities Plan as a priority 3 (energy conservation& sustainability)for replacement in 2030. Currently replacement funding is for priority 1(life safety and human risk)and some of priority 2 (structural damage&property loss). These boilers failed early and unexpectedly. 5 Salt Lake City FY2O2O-21 BudgetAmendment #7 Initiative Number/Name Fund Amount We can delay$1.5 million in FY21 capital renewal projects that are in planning and design phases,however there is a need of$1 million additional to cover this project. The projects delayed would be moved to any FY22 Capital Renewal funding that would be provided and subsequent projects would be delayed to accommodate funding received in FY22. The boilers will need to be up and running by October 1st,2021 in order to provide heat to the Public Safety Building,the City&County Building,the Library and the Leonardo facilities. There is a 16-week lead time on the equipment order and then additional time will be needed for installation. A memo is attached with additional information. Section B: Grants far Existing Staff Resources , Section Q Grants for New Staff Resources Section Di Housekee 'itn D-i: Remove CARES Grant Budget from Other Funds Airport $19,000.00 Refuse -$3,200.00 IMS -$12,000.00 Department:Finance Prepared By:John Vuyk In budget amendment#2 of this fiscal year CARES funding was appropriated on a per-department basis. In budget amendment#4,the funding was moved from departments into a Non-Departmental cost center. While the budget was removed from General Fund departments,the budget for Other Funds including Airport, Sustainability and IMS was overlooked. This amendment will remove those initially budgeted amounts. D-2: SLC Foundation Reappropriation GF $3,000.00 Department:Finance/Non-Departmental Prepared By:John Vuyk In BA#4 for fiscal year 2020 the administration proposed,and the Council adopted an annual appropriation for the SLC Foundation.The amount was intended to be an annual expense but was not proposed in the current budget.This amendment is to establish the funding for FY2021. The Administration is proposing funding$3,00o as a donation to the SLC Foundation.This donation will cover banking fees incurred by the Foundation and costs of the Foundation's tax return. D-3: Social Worker Funding Back to Police GF -$1,589,008.00 GF $1,589,008.00 Department:Finance Prepared By:John Vuyk During the budget process funding for social workers was moved from the Police Department to Non-Departmental.The calculation was incorrect.The Police Department budget will be short for the miscalculation.This housekeeping amendment will adjust to the correct amount. The spreadsheet used to calculate the annual amount included two fiscal years instead of a single fiscal year.The detail is enclosed as a separate file. 6 Salt Lake City FY2O2O-21 BudgetAmendment #7 Initiative Number/Name Fund Amount D-4:Transportation Budget Carryforward GF 274,638.00 Department:CAN Prepared By:Brent Beck The $274,638 amount is associated with budget carryforward for encumbrances. 1. The encumbrance budget carryforward was missed for a contract in FY19 the amount of$174,638. 2. The remaining$1oo,000 associated with this amendment item is for a traffic calming study that was part of the regular budget process from a year ago. As part of the Council approval,these funds were directly placed into a holding account. By the time the funds were released from the holding account the Transportation division was unable to get anything under contract or encumber the funds before they fell to General Fund fund balance. D-5:Transportation—On-Demand Ride Services(Trips to Transit) GF -$800,000.00 GF $800,000.00 Department:CAN Prepared By:Jon Larsen The Salt Lake City Transit Master Plan(2017)identifies On-Demand Ride Services(Trips to Transit)as a key strategy for serving low-density,single-use areas of the City.The goals of the Trips to Transit program,consistent with those of the Master Plan itself,are to improve air quality,increase the number of people taking transit,provide a safe and comfortable transit access experience,provide a complete transit system that supports a transit lifestyle,provide access to opportunity for likely riders who are underserved,and to create economically vibrant,livable places that support use of transit. This program will provide on-demand intra-zonal service,which will connect residents,visitors,and commuters between fixed route transit services and areas of the City that are largely residential,as identified in the Transit Master Plan.The areas in the plan include Rose Park,Glendale,the Upper Avenues,and the East Bench.Travel modeling has yielded the recommendation that an initial pilot would be most successful and serve the greatest number of riders in Rose Park,with a short connection to the Route 9 and Route 4 end-of-line near Redwood Road and 400 South.Adding Poplar Grove and Glendale to this service area would make the pilot even more useful to more residents. UTA has piloted such a service in Southwest Salt Lake County,and it has proven very popular and more cost effective than fixed route service in connecting people to the major transit lines. City staff has evaluated the cost of contracting directly with a provider compared with operating the same service in collaboration with UTA,and the latter is both more affordable and better integrated with the existing transit system. In addition,if the pilot proves to be equal to or better than current service provided by inefficient routes,resources for those routes can be reinvested in two Council priority routes on 600 North/5oo East and i000 North/South Temple. To launch those two routes in 2022,it is important to launch Trips to Transit as soon as possible,with a goal of August 2021.This will allow time for the service to become established and evaluated.This initial request will fulfill start-up costs, and an additional request of approximately$1,000,000 from Funding our Future will be included in the FY22 budget. D-6: Public Utilities Bond Proceeds and Debt Service I Water I $1,002,936.00 Department:Public Utilities Prepared By:Mark Christensen/Lisa Tarufelli Public Utilities is requesting a budget amendment for revenue bond proceeds. The August 202o bond issue included bonds previously planned to be issued in FY 2020. Public Utilities is also requesting to amend the budget to for principal and interest payments based on final the bond issuance transaction that vary slightly from the amounts estimated at the time FY 2021 budget was prepared. 7 Salt Lake City FY2O2O-21 BudgetAmendment #7 Initiative Number/Name Fund Amount D-7: Interest Income on Bonding, GO Series 2019A CIP 1 $281,866.14 Department:Finance Prepared By:Brandon Bagley The General Obligation Bonds,Series 2o19A,were issued in October 2019 for the purpose of funding the reconstruction of City streets. The total par amount of the bonds issued were$17,540,000. At the time the bonds were issued the proceeds were deposited with the Trustee. Since then,the unspent bond proceeds have been earning interest.This amendment will adjust the budget to reflect the actual proceeds available including accumulated interest from October 2019 through September 2020. D-8: 911 Dispatch—UCA Reimbursement GF $72,332.00 Department:911 Dispatch Prepared By:Clint Rasmussen The 911 Dispatch center must maintain their phone equipment and through an agreement with the UCA(Utah Communications Authority),all PSAPs in the State,who are able to show proof of payment will be reimbursed. This proposal is cost/revenue neutral to Salt Lake City. D-9: Pulled prior to submission D-1o:Tree Removal Mitigation Funding $520,150.00 Department:Public Services Prepared By:Dawn Valente In certain instances,when trees are removed or destroyed,the planting of replacement trees is required. When the required replacement trees cannot be planted in the vicinity of the removed tree,the City assesses a Tree Removal Mitigation fee. The revenue from this fee is then utilized to purchase,plant,and maintain trees on public property. As a result,the City is able to mitigate the negative impacts of tree removal by planting new trees and providing higher levels of maintenance for the urban forest. The cash balance in this account as of February 11,2021 is$525,876.78. This budget request is to appropriate an additional expense budget of$520,150 to the$5,719.02 budget currently approved. 13-11:Frequent Transit Network(FTN) CIP Funding Allocation CIP $0.00 Department:CAN I Prepared By:John Vu k The Council adopted a transfer of$1,ioo,000 to CIP for the FTN. In the CIP funding log the Council approved$22,000 for cost overrun and$ii,000 for Percent for Art,but did not approve the remaining funds of$1,o67,000 for projects associated with the FTN,including bus stop improvements,crosswalks,pedestrian safety,transit-related signal upgrades, ADA enhancements,first/last mile connections,etc. This amendment is to acknowledge Council approval of the use of these funds to complete these projects. 8 Salt Lake City FY2020-21 BudgetAmendment #7 Initiative Number/Name Fund Amount Section E: Grants Requiring No New Staff Resources E-i: Federal Emergency Management Agency(FEMA), Utah Misc. Grants $3,768,ogi.00 State Division of Emergency Management, Pre-Disaster Mitigation Department:Finance Prepared By:Melyn Osmond The Emergency Management Services Division received year four grant funding of$3,768,ogi from the State of Utah, Division of Emergency Management. This grant is awarded from the FEMA Pre-Disaster Mitigation program to assist in the Fix the Bricks Project. The grant funding will provide reimbursement to 26o city residents when they include seismic improvements during a home remodel or roof replacement on Unreinforced Masonry structures. Residents may receive a 75 reimbursement on the cost of the seismic improvements and will be required to work with a contracted structural engineering firm to ensure the work is performed and documented properly. The grant match of$1,271,838 will be met with the Homeowner's expense for the project, 25% remaining after reimbursement, and portion of funds from Emergency Management staff salary, contracts,training, and marketing. A public hearing will be scheduled the grant application for this award. Section F T onatio s Section Go Cdnsent'A ends Consent Agenda#3 G-i: Salt Lake Rotary Foundation Grant(YouthCi ) Misc. Grants $20,000 Department:Public Services E-- Prepared By:Kim Thomas/Melyn Osmond The Department of Public Services,Division of Youth and Family Services received a grant award of$20,000 from the Salt Lake Rotary Foundation. The grant funds are exclusively for the purchase of supplies and furniture to set up the new YouthCity site at the Utah State Fair Grounds.The Division of Youth&Family Services is finalizing the programming space at the Utah State Fair Grounds with the intent of opening the YouthCity Fair Park site in mid-November to early December. No Match is required A public hearing was held 11 l0 20 for the grant application. G-2: Utah Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice Misc. Grants $10,800 (CCJJ), State Asset Forfeiture Grant (SAFG) Department:Police Department Prepared By:Jordan Smith/Melyn Osmond The Salt Lake City Police Department applied for and received a$io,800 grant award from the State of Utah,Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice(CCJJ),under the State Asset Forfeiture Grant(SAFG)program.The SAFG program funds crime prevention and law enforcement activities within specific guidelines. CCJJ developed the SAFG program as a means of evaluating and distributing state forfeiture funds. The funds will be used for confidential informant funds to enhance investigations in narcotics-related cases. 9 Salt Lake City FY2O2O-21 BudgetAmendment #7 Initiative Number/Name Fund Amount A public hearing will be scheduled for this grant application. G-3: Utah State Office of Education, Child and Adult Care Misc. Grants $22,000 Food Program-Youth After School Programs (YouthCity) Department: Public Services Prepared By: Kim Thomas/Melyn Osmond The Youth&Family Division of Public Services applied for and received a continuation grant offered annually by the Utah State Office of Education,under the Child and Adult Care Food Program. These funds are available to youth service providers as part of the At-Risk Snack Program to reimburse for the costs of snacks served to children participating in the after-school programs. Fairmont Park,Glendale Library,Liberty Park,Main Library,Ottinger Hall,Plaza 349,the Youth and Family Division Office, and Sorenson Campus will receive reimbursement directly through the State Office of Education and will receive up to$22,000,based on qualified snack expenses. SLC is reimbursed on a monthly basis and only qualified healthy snacks and meals served to children participating in the after-school enrichment/education activities during the afterschool program hours are eligible for reimbursement. A public hearing was held 11/10/20 for the grant application. G-4: Fairmont Park,School-Age Program Grant 2020, Misc. Grants $78,400 State of Utah, Department of Workforce Services (YouthCity—Fairmont Park) Department:Public Services Prepared By:Kim Thomas/Melyn Osmond The Public Services Division of Youth and Family Services applied for and received a grant award of$78,400 for Fairmont Park for 2020-2021 school year program,from Utah State Department of Work Force Services through the Utah Office of Child Care for the School Age Program Grant. The School-Age Program Grant monies will fund wages and benefits for five positions to serve one group of up to 18 youth from 7:45 a.m.to 2:30 p.m.Monday thru Friday over eight months of the school year 2020-2021: one full-time Group Facilitator for seven hours each day; one part-time Group Facilitator for five hours each day; one part-time Group Facilitator for three hours each day;two part-time Group Facilitators for 1.5 hours each day.Wages and benefits for the five positions to serve one group of up to 18 youth from 2:30 p.m.to 5:30 p.m.Monday thru Friday over eight months of the school year 2020-2021 will be funded through the UDWS Afterschool Match Partnership Grant 2020-2021 awarded in 2019. No match is required by the funding agency. A public hearing will be held for the grant application. G-5: Liberty Park,School-Age Program Grant 2020, Misc. Grants $78,400 State of Utah, Department of Workforce Services (YouthCity— Liberty Park) Department:Public Services Prepared By:Kim Thomas/Melyn Osmond The Public Services Division of Youth and Family Services applied for and received a grant award of$78,400 for Liberty Park for 2020-2021 school year program,from Utah State Department of Work Force Services through the Utah Office of Child Care for the School Age Program Grant. The School-Age Program Grant monies will fund wages and benefits for five positions to serve one group of up to 18 youth from 7:45 a.m.to 2:30 p.m.Monday thru Friday over eight months of the school year 2020-2021: one full-time Group Facilitator for seven hours each day; one part-time Group Facilitator for five hours each day; one part-time Group Facilitator for three hours each day;two part-time Group Facilitators for 1.5 hours each day.Wages and benefits for the five positions to serve one group of up to 18 youth from 2:30 p.m.to 5:30 p.m.Monday thru Friday over eight months of the 10 Salt Lake City FY2O2O-21 BudgetAmendment #7 Initiative Number/Name Fund Amount school year 2020-2021 will be funded through the UDWS Afterschool Match Partnership Grant 2020-2021 awarded in 2019. No match is required by the funding agency. A public hearing will be held for the grant application. G-6: Main Library, School-Age Program Grant 2020, Misc. Grants $156,800 State of Utah, Department of Workforce Services (YouthCi ) Department:Public Services Prepared By:Kim Thomas/Melyn Osmond The Public Services Division of Youth and Family Services applied for and received a grant award of$156,80o for Main Library for 2020-2021 school year program,from Utah State Department of Work Force Services through the Utah Office of Child Care for the School Age Program Grant. The School-Age Program Grant monies will fund wages and benefits for five positions to serve one group of up to 18 youth from 7:45 a.m.to 2:30 p.m.Monday thru Friday over eight months of the school year 2020-2021: one full-time Group Facilitator for seven hours each day; one part-time Group Facilitator for five hours each day; one part-time Group Facilitator for three hours each day;two part-time Group Facilitators for 1.5 hours each day.Wages and benefits for the five positions to serve one group of up to 18 youth from 2:30 p.m.to 5:30 p.m.Monday thru Friday over eight months of the school year 2020-2021 will be funded through the UDWS Afterschool Match Partnership Grant 2020-2021 awarded in 2019. No match is required by the funding agency. A public hearing will be held for the grant application. G-7: Plaza 349,School-Age Program Grant 2020, Misc. Grants $117,600 State of Utah, Department of Workforce Services (YouthCi ) Department:Public Services Prepared By:Jordan Smith/Melyn Osmond The Public Services Division of Youth and Family Services applied for and received a grant award of$117,600 for Plaza 349 for 2020-2021 school year program,from Utah State Department of Work Force Services through the Utah Office of Child Care for the School Age Program Grant. The School-Age Program Grant monies will fund wages and benefits for five positions to serve one group of up to 18 youth from 7:45 a.m.to 2:30 p.m.Monday thru Friday over eight months of the school year 2020-2021: one full-time Group Facilitator for seven hours each day; one part-time Group Facilitator for five hours each day; one part-time Group Facilitator for three hours each day;two part-time Group Facilitators for 1.5 hours each day.Wages and benefits for the five positions to serve one group of up to 18 youth from 2:30 p.m.to 5:30 p.m. Monday thru Friday over eight months of the school year 2020-2021 will be funded through the UDWS Afterschool Match Partnership Grant 2020-2021 awarded in 2019. No match is required by the funding agency. A public hearing will be held for the grant application. G-8: Sorenson,School-Age Program Grant 2020, Misc. Grants $156,800 State of Utah, Department of Workforce Services (YouthCity) Department:Public Services Prepared By:Kim Thomas/Melyn Osmond The Public Services Division of Youth and Family Services applied for and received a grant award of$156,80o for Sorenson for 2020-2021 school year program,from Utah State Department of Work Force Services through the Utah Office of Child Care for the School Age Program Grant. The School-Age Program Grant monies will fund wages and benefits for five positions to serve one group of up to 18 youth from 7:45 a.m.to 2:30 p.m.Monday thru Friday over eight months of the school year 2020-2021: one full-time Group 11 Salt Lake City FY2O2O-21 BudgetAmendment #7 Initiative Number/Name Fund Amount Facilitator for seven hours each day; one part-time Group Facilitator for five hours each day; one part-time Group Facilitator for three hours each day;two part-time Group Facilitators for 1.5 hours each day.Wages and benefits for the five positions to serve one group of up to 18 youth from 2:30 p.m.to 5:30 p.m.Monday thru Friday over eight months of the school year 2020-2021 will be funded through the UDWS Afterschool Match Partnership Grant 2020-2021 awarded in 2019. No match is required by the funding agency. A public hearing will be held for the grant application. G-9: US Department of Justice, 202o Bureau of Justice Assistance Misc. Grants $300,713 Grant(JAG) Department:Police Department Prepared By:Jordan Smith/Melyn Osmond The police department applied for and received a grant award from the U.S. Department of Justice under the 202o Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant(JAG)program.The total grant award is$300,713. Of that total,the City will subaward$49,817 to the Unified Police Department and$49,817 to Salt Lake County(Sheriffs Office).The subaward amounts are determined by a federal funding allocation formula. The police department will use its award to provide training for sworn and civilian personnel,to repair or purchase fitness equipment,to provide protective equipment for police officers(helmet,eye/hand protection),to support the Officer Wellness/Peer Support Program,and to conduct directed community policing overtime projects such as targeted hot spot enforcement and community pharmaceutical take back events. No Match is required. A Public Hearing was held on 10/20/20 for the grant application on this award. G-io: State of Utah,The Utah Highway Safety Office, Distracted Misc. Grants $12,000 Driving Prevention Program Department:Police Department Prepared By:Jordan Smith/Melyn Osmond The police department applied for and received a$12,000 grant from the Utah Highway Safety Office for the 2021 Distracted Driving Prevention Program. The grant funding for overtime to conduct distracted driving enforcement/education shifts. A Public Hearing was held on 5/5/20 for the grant application on this award. G-ii: State of Utah,The Utah Highway Safety Office, Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Program Misc. Grants $10,296 Department:Police Department Prepared By:Jordan Smith/Melyn Osmond The Police department applied for and received a$10,296 grant from the Utah Highway Safety Office for the 2021 Salt Lake City Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Program. This award is to fund distracted driving enforcement/education overtime shifts. A public hearing was held on 5/5/20 for the grant application on this award. 12 Salt Lake City FY2O2O-21 BudgetAmendment #7 Initiative Number/Name Fund Amount Consent Agenda#4 G-i: State of Utah, CCJJ (Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Misc. Grants $248,068.00 Justice),Jurisdictions with Half-way Houses and Parole Violator Centers Grant Department:Police Department Prepared By:Jordan Smith/Melyn Osmond The Police Department has applied for and been awarded a$248,064 grant from the State of Utah,Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice,in support of the Jurisdictions with Halfway Houses and Parole Violator Centers grant. This grant provides funding for law enforcement agencies that provide services directly to areas with halfway houses or parole violator centers, or both.The Police Department will use these funds for overtime efforts to include targeted enforcement operations,mental health co-responder teams,and extra patrol shifts.The department will also utilize the funding for a van for the Public Order Unit,helmet communication kits for the Motor Squad officers and maintenance/supplies for the mobile camera trailers previously funded through this grant program. A public hearing will be scheduled for this grant application. G-2: Department of Workforce Services,Housing&Community Misc. Grants $16o,ioo.00 Development Divisions, FY 21 Homeless Shelter Cities Mitigation Grant Program Department:Community&Neighborhoods Prepared By:Michelle Hoon/Melyn Osmond The State Department of Workforce Services is funding$16o,ioo to continue efforts to mitigate the impacts of the Geraldine E. King Women's Resource Center and Gail Miller Resource Center to the Central City/Downtown and Ballpark/Liberty Wells host neighborhoods. Grant funds will be used to continue funding one City FIFE to work as a Homeless Services Coordinator and continue contracting with Volunteers of America for a Homeless Outreach Caseworker. Including professional development,local mileage reimbursement,and outreach/promotional materials for community-based programming initiatives. A Public Hearing will be scheduled for the application on this grant. G-3: Utah State Utah Department of Health, Bureau of Misc. Grants $6,275.00 Emergency Medical Services Department:Fire Prepared By:Brittany Blair/Melyn Osmond 'Additional Funding of$6,275 has been awarded to this original grant bringing the total grant award amount to $15,91o'This agenda item is to increase the funding budget. The Fire Department applied for and was awarded$9,635 of grant funding from the Utah Department of Health,Bureau of Emergency Medical Services.This funding will be used towards the purchase of a 12-lead heart monitor relating to the provision of Emergency Medical Services as funding permits. A Public Hearing was held on 4/7/20 for the grant applications on this award. G-4: Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry, Misc. Grants $9,920.00 Fire and State Lands,FY21 Jordan River Vegetation Improvement, 2100 South Oxbow Restoration Project Department:Public Services Prepared By:Lewis Kogan/Melyn Osmond Public Services Trails&Natural Land applied for and was awarded$9,920 of grant funding from the Utah Department of Natural Resources,Division of Forestry,Fire and State Lands,FY21 Jordan River Vegetation Improvement,for the 2100 South Oxbow Restoration Project. 13 Salt Lake City FY2020-21 BudgetAmendment #7 Initiative Number/Name Fund Amount The Trails&Natural Lands Division is preparing to initiate a multi-year restoration effort at the 2100 South Oxbow property focused on weed control and the establishment of healthy and diverse native riparian vegetation across this 2.5- acre site. Currently the site is a vacant field containing multiple noxious weed species which must be controlled prior to native planting efforts. Funds will be used to support a large first-year noxious species treatment by the Cites contracted weed control specialist,PMG Vegetation Control. Specifically,FFSL Vegetation Improvement funds will be used to control Russian Olive,Phragmites, Russian Knapweed,and Scotch Thistle on the property,preparing the site for subsequent restoration seeding and planting efforts. A Public Hearing will be scheduled for the grant application on this award ect on I Council Added Items 14 Impact Fees - Quick Summary confld""Ml Data p0ed 1/26/2021 UnaHocated Budget Amounts:by lMajor Area Area Cost Center UnAllocated Notes. Cash Impact fee-Police 8484001 $ 346,334 a. Impact fee-Fire 8484002 $ 806,037 a Impact fee-Parks 8484003 $ 7,113,425 C Impact fee-Streets 8484005 $ 4,031,510 ID $ 12,297,305 E=A+B+C+ID FxpHng Amounts:by lMajor Area,by 9Aonth QuarterCalendar Fiscal Total Month 202007(Ju12020) 2021Q1 - 202008(Aug2020) 2021Q1 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - N 202009(Sep2020) 2021Q1 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ •• 0 202010(occ2020) 2021Q2 $ $ $ $ $ N 202011(Nov202O) 2021Q2 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - rO 202012(Dec202O) 2021Q2 $ $ $ $ $ 202101(Jan2021) 2021Q3 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - Current Month 202102(Feb2021) 2021Q3 $ 16,273 A' ,j. $ - $ - $ - $ 16,273 U 202103(Mar2021) 2021Q3 $ 16,105 A' ,j. $ - $ - $ - $ 16,105 LL 202104(Apr2021) 2021Q4 $ 1,718 �°' ,�. $ - $ - $ - $ 1,718 202105(May2021) 2021Q4 $ 14,542 A' j. $ - $ - $ - $ 14,542 202106(Jun2021) 2021Q4 $ 30,017 A° ',j. $ - $ - $ - $ 30,017 202107(Ju12021) 2022Q1 $ 10,107 A' 'JI. $ - $ - $ - $ 10,107 N 202108(Aug2021) 2022Q1 $ 6,804 �°' 'J. $ - $ - $ - $ 6,804 O 202109(Sep2021) 2022Q1 $ 5,554 A' $ - $ - $ - $ 5,554 } 202110(occ2021) 2022Q2 $ 3,106 A' '. $ _ $ _ $ _ $ 3,106 LI_ 202111(Nov2021) 2022Q2 $ $ $ $ $ 202112(iec2021) 2022Q2 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - Total,Currently Expiring through June 2021 $ 103,944 $ - $ - $ - $ 103,944 Notes 1/26/21: We are currently in a refund situation.We will refund$104k in the next 9 months without offsetting expenditures Impact Fees Cc)fldeMaI Data pulled 1/26/2021 AAA BBB ccc DDD=AAA-BBB-CCC UnAllocated Budget Allocation Budget Allocation Allocation Bud 9 Police Amended Encumbrances YTD Expenditures Remaining Amount A ro riation Crime lab rent 8417001 $ - $ 118 $ - $ (118) Im actfee-Police 8484001 $ - $ - $ - $ - EastsidePrecm 8419201 $ 21,639 $ 21,639 $ - $ - Su arhousePolicePrecinct 8417016 $ 10,331 $ 10,331 $ $ 346,334 Public Safe Buildin Re icmn 8405005 $ 14,068 $ 14,068 $ - $ 0 Police'sConsultant'sContract 8419205 $ 5,520 $ 5,462 $ - $ 58 Policeim ct fee refunds 8417006 $ 510,828 $ - $ - $ 110,828 Police Refunds 8418013 $ 539,687 $ - $ 2,883 $ 536,804 8484001 A PolicePrecincti-andA uisition 8419011 $ 1,410,243 $ 239,836 $ $ 1,170,407 Grand Total $ 2,514316 $ 291,454 $ 2,883 $ 2,217,979 Allocation Budget Allocation Allocation Amended Encumbrances YTD Expenditures Remaining Fire A ro riation Fire refunds 8416007 $ 82,831 $ $ $ 82,831 Fire Station#14 8415001 $ 6,650 $ 6,083 $ 567 $ - Fire Station#14 8416006 $ 52,040 $ 5,603 $ - $ 46,437 Fire Station#3 8415002 $ 1,568 $ - $ - $ 1,568 $g06 037 Fire Station#3 8416009 $ 1,050 $ 96 $ 485 $ 469 Im act fee-Fire 8484002 $ - $ - $ - $ - Stud for Fire House#3 8413001 $ 15,700 $ - $ - $ 15,700 FireTrainin Center 8419012 $ 46,550 $ - $ 46,550 $ - 8484002 B Fire'sConsuitant'sContract 8419202 $ 10,965 $ 10,907 $ - $ 58 FV20 FireTrainin Fac. 8420431 $ 66,546 $ - $ 10,516 $ 56,031 Fire Station#3 Debt Service 8421200 $ 541,306 $ - $ - $ 541,306 Fire Station#14 Debt Service 8421201 $ 339,172 $ $ $ 339,172 Grand Total 1,164,177 22,689 .........58 1171 083 371 Allocation Budget Allocation Allocation Amended Encumbrances YTD Expenditures Remaining Parks Appropriation Im act fee-Parks 8484003 $ $ $ -$... Three Creeks Confluence 8419101 $ 173,017 $ 122,688 $ 50,329 $ - Park'sConsuitant'sContract 8419204 $ 7,643 $ 7,601 $ - $ 42 337 Commun" Garden 337 S 40 8416002 $ 277 $ - $ $ 277 $d� 7 113 425 Folsom Trail Ci Creek Da i" 8417030 $ 766 $ - $ 353 $ 414P Cwide Dog Lease Im 8418002 $ 24'056 $ 23,000 $ 270 $ 786 Jordan R 3 Creeks Confluence 8417018 $ 11,856 $ 50 $ 10,237 $ 1,570 Rosewood Do Park 8417013 $ 16,087 $ - $ 14,155 $ 1,932 84.003 C Jordan RTrail Land Ac uisitn 8417017 $ 2,946 $ - $ - $ 2,946 Fairmont Park-htin Im 8418004 $ 50,356 $ 43,597 $ 3,295 $ 3,465 Parks and Public Lands Com reh 8417008 $ 7,500 $ - $ - $ 7,500 9line ark 8416005 $ 86,322 $ 38,566 $ 39,901 $ 7,855 Rich Prk Comm Garden 8420138 $ 27,478 $ 4,328 $ 14,683 $ 8,467 Redwood Meadows Park Dev 8417014 $ 15,939 $ - $ 6,178 $ 9,761 Im rialParkShadeAcct' 8419103 $ 10,830 $ - $ - $ 10,830 Park refunds 8416008 $ 11,796 $ - $ - $ 11,796 Warm S rin s Off Leash 8420132 $ 27,000 $ - $ - $ 27,000 7R Boat Ram 8420144 $ 125,605 $ 57,482 $ 5,462 $ 62,662 IF Prop Acquisition 3 Creeks 8420406 $ 350,000 $ - $ 257,265 $ 92,736 Parks Impact Fees 8418015 $ 102256 $ - $ - $ 102,256 UTGov Ph2 Foothill Trails 84204H $ 200:000 $ 35,506 $ 51,934 $ 112,560 Cn #2 Match 3 Creek Confluen 8420426 $ 515,245 $ 357,213 $ 2,088 $ 155,943 9Line Orchard 8420136 $ 195,045 $ - $ - $ 195,045 Brid eto Backman 8418005 $ 350,250 $ 15,658 $ 44,752 $ 289,841 Park:'s Trail Desi n&Constr 8417012 $ 327,678 $ 979 $ - $ 326,699 Cn #1 Match 3 Creek Confluen 8420424 $ 400,000 $ - $ - $ 400,000 Jordan Prk Event Grounds 8420134 $ 431,000 $ - $ - $ 431,000 Wasatch Hollow Im rovements 8420142 $ 490,830 $ - $ - $ 490,830 FV20 Brid a to Backman 8420430 $ 727,000 $ 67,956 $ - $ 659,044 Marmalade Park Block Phase II 8417011 $ 1,145,394 $ 51,474 $ 28,569 $ 1,065,351 Fisher Carriage House IST20130 $ 1,098,764 $ - $ - $ 1,098,764 Pioneer Park 18419150 $ 3,442,199 $ 92,850 $ 21,033 _$ 3,328,317 Grand Total 10,37S,136 918,949 sso 501 8,90S,687 Allocation Budget Allocation Allocation YTD Expenditures Remaining Amended Encumbrances Streets Appropriation 700 South Reconstruction 8414001 $ 330,032 $ - $ 330032 $ 700 South Reconstruction 8415004 $ 1,157,506 $ 258,285 $ 899:221 $ - IF Roundabout 2000 E Parleys 8420122 $ 455,000 $ - $ 455,000 $ - Im act - 8484005 $ - $ - $ $ 403 SOO to fee 700 SStreets Westside 8418016 $ 575,000 $ 575,000 $ - $ - / 1/510 LifeOnState Im Fee 8419009 $ 124,605 $ - $ 124,605 $ - Trans nation Safe Im rovem 8417007 $ 22,360 $ 19,122 $ 1,699 $ 1,539 Gladiola Street 8406001 $ 16,544 $ 13,865 $ 435 $ 2,244 8484005 D Street'sConsuitant'sContract 8419203 $ 39,176 $ 17,442 $ 9,360 $ 12,374 Trans Master Plan 8419006 $ 13,000 $ - $ - $ 13,000 Trans Safe Im o ments 8420112 $ 250,000 $ 181,917 $ 30,000 $ 38,083 500 700 S Street Reconstructio 8412051 $ 41,027 $ 118 $ - $ 40,909 1300 S Bi le Bypass destr 8416004 $ 42,833 $ - $ - $ 42,833 Com k:te Street Enhancements 8420120 $ 125,000 $ 53,794 $ 8,018 $ 63,188 Trans Safe Improvements 8419007 $ 210,752 $ 73,878 $ 51,939 $ 84,935 Indiana Ave 900 S Rehab Des"n 8412002 $ 124,593 $ - $ - $ 124,593 Trans nation Safe Imp 8418007 $ 147,912 $ 1,264 $ 8,796 $ 137,852 9 Line Central Ninth 8418011 $ 152,500 $ - $ - $ 152,500 Bikewa Urban Trails 8418003 $ 200,000 $ - $ - $ 200,000 Trans rtationSafe Im rov IF 8421500 $ 375,000 $ 72,947 $ - $ 302,053 IF Com fete Street Enhancement 8421502 $ 625,000 $ - $ - $ 625,000 Traffic Si nal U rades 8419008 $ 251,316 $ 2,340 $ 13,348 $ 235,628 Traff Si n2 8420105 $ 300,000 $ - $ - $ 300,000 TraS naU rde 8421501 $ 875,000 $ - $ - $ 875,000 Street Im ove Reconstruc 20 8420125 $ 2,858,090 $ 403,307 $ 49,563 _$ 2,405,220 Grand Total $ 9,292,247 $ 1,673,280 $ 1,96 015 $ 5 656 952 rotas............. $ 23,343,877 $ 2,906,372 $ 2,573,516 $ 17,863,989 12/297/305 E=A+B+C+D TRUE TRUE TRUE TRUE J' �Sn 111 .I �umiiu i uu iugi � y � llllllllllllll �„ Illlui '�' ��IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII�III������ rnnnnnnnmm�nnmm�nnnnnm ���� V W LM E ca O LU EMN . 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These funds were distributed to the Utah Housing and Community Development Division. This program is designed to assist low income Utahans,who have, directly or indirectly, experienced financial hardship due to the Covid-19 Pandemic,in obtaining or retaining rental housing. The Housing Assistance Program(HAP)is set up to allow tenants to apply for assistance through nine regional HAP agencies. For additional information go to https://rentrelief.utah.gov/ General Program Rules 1. Applicants may receive 3 months of prospective rent for future rents at the time of approval. a. Rent is considered prospective when paid before due date. 2. Applicants can receive assistance in arrears going back to March 13'2020. a. Arrears must be resolved if future rent is to be approved. 3. Applicants cannot be assisted for more than 12 months. Assistance approved with CARES funding during 2020 will not count towards this 12-month period. If an applicant is requesting assistance with arrears, the first month counting towards the 12 months will be the first month approved during 2021 but may include months assisted in arrears during 2020. a. An additional 3 months of assistance beyond the 12-month limit may be approved on a case-by-case basis with permission from HCD staff. 4. Rent payments must go directly to landlords.Utility assistance must go directly to the utility companies. 5. No rental and utility assistance will be approved or paid after June 30, 2021. Applicant Eligibility 1. Eligible Households must meet the following criteria: a. Household income at or below 80% AMI b. Qualified for unemployment, OR has experienced a reduction in household income, incurred significant costs, or experienced financial hardship due to COVID-19; AND c. Demonstrates a risk of experiencing homelessness or housing instability; i. Past due utility or rent notice or eviction notice. ii. Unsafe or unhealthy living conditions iii. Any other evidence of such risk, as determined by the grantee involved 2. At least one individual in the applicant household must be obligated by a lease agreement/contract to pay rent for the unit for each month for which the applicant is applying for assistance. a. If an applicant is in a month-to-month lease then they will only be eligible for the current month's rent in addition to arrears. Applicant will have to reapply each month to receive future assistance. b. If an applicant's lease is due to end during the three month period, the applicant may renew his lease and receive the three months of assistance. Eligible Uses of Funds Expenses incurred from March 13,2020—June 30, 2021 1. Rent,including eligible fees 2. Rent arrears 3. Utilities (Water, Sewer, Electrical, Gas) 4. Utility arrears a. Utility assistance will only be provided for utilities already billed to the household. Future utilities are only eligible when the utility payment does not vary month-to-month. 5. Security deposits Documentation 1. Lease Agreement 2. HAP application(Appendix I) 3. Income Certification Form (Appendix II) a. Other income documentation as required 4. Signed HAP Assistance Contract(Appendix III) 5. Utility bill(s) (If utilities are being paid for) Income Determination Income documentation will be required for applicants to be approved for assistance. Applicants may apply based on either monthly income or annual income. If applicants are approved based on monthly income, they will need to recertify their financial need with each subsequent application for assistance. Monthly income documentation 1. Documentation to demonstrate monthly income may include the following: a. Two months of pay statements for all adult wage earners,in the household b. Two months of statements regarding unemployment compensation c. Two months of statements for all other sources on income 2. If an applicant has no income and does not wish to certify using annual documentation, they may submit a statement indicating that they are unable to produce documentation demonstrating income. Annual income documentation a. Annual income will be gathered using the guidelines in CFR 24 5.609 Regardless of method of demonstrating income, the Appendix II Income Certification will also be required with each certification. If an applicant is unable to provide any of the above methods of documenting income, they may still be allowed to receive benefits under certain circumstances. Applicant Priority Agencies will give priority to applicants in particular need of assistance.Priority applicants will be eligible for expedited application review. Applicants to be expedited include: 1. Applicants in which a member or members of the household has been unemployed due to job loss directly or indirectly caused by Covid-19, for the 90-days period preceding the time of application. 2. Applicants below 50% AMI Data Gathering Each applicant must provide the following information with their application: 1. Address of the rental unit 2. The landlord's W-9 is required. This document contains name, address, social security number, tax identification number or DUNS number, as applicable, for the landlord. 3. Amount and percentage of monthly rent covered by HAP assistance 4. Amount and percentage of separately-stated utility and home energy costs covered by HAP assistance 5. Total amount of each type of assistance (i.e.,rent,rental arrears,utilities and home energy costs, utilities and home energy costs arrears)provided to each household 6. Amount of outstanding rental arrears for each household 7. Number of months of rental payments and number of months of utility or home energy cost payments for which assistance is provided 8. Household income and number of individuals in the household, and 9. Gender,race, and ethnicity for the primary applicant for assistance. Monthly Reporting 1. Number of eligible households that receive assistance 2. Acceptance rate 3. Type or types of assistance provided to each household 4. The average amount of funding provided per eligible household 5. Household income levels a. <30% AMI b. 30% - 50% AMI c. 50% - 80% AMI 6. Average number of monthly rental or utility payments that were covered by the funding amount that the household received 7. Gender,race, and ethnicity of primary applicant 8. Total amount of funds expended Monitoring All agencies will be monitored to ensure compliance and accuracy in undertaking the HAP 2.0 program. Customer Service Upon reviewing applications, all agencies must notify applicants if there is missing information or documentation,which may result in the application being denied. Applicants are expected to have all missing information submitted within one week or the application will be denied and the applicants will have to resubmit a new application. 0 0 0 0 0 0 O i0 N O N O 0 O Q O O 00 m N OJ O.Ni Lr Lr O ' ' ' ' O O M w w N N N O ' ' ' ' ' ' O O O w .ti O.--i^ OJ 0 ll rl M N m M N m W C O Q O O Q O W Ln O M �y N M N N I O .0 w w N o o a m ip OJ O N O O O O UOoc� �vNi rn� v� o o Vi co oo >O n n 9 aao E E O Y O O V V O O N i i N v M v N N 3 c to to N a o U E N O n 0 pM N N N E O co oo O rl N N U �� vv VI VI _ V V J� v O N W W m l!I l!I m 01 J i m N i0 O O O i0 O O i0 OJ n O r 00 O 00 O V rl N N N O.-ti M W i0 N M i0 m m m M � N ti M f� O W O M N N O O O N rl rl c O Q O -o w N OJ O �Lr O O O M w V— w N N N O ' ' ' ' ' ' O O O O O�.--i M N --�M O W --' O.--i M W OJ f� M N M V N .-v M M N VI W O N N N rl rl V V Y n Y O_N a a V L j� m m N p U Y 6f O E O � L2 N U N y j CO-O U m �' amYaa °' E¢.oL o °'mu 2 u`°i d m �n cF � o � a M. o�" E o E F m M M E > - n o 4S n' m 'n E o > o N c o a c o -E c .2 o c y ,�o o f a�i c a3 'ou= o c o U' c O NQ �OQ c� o �?�mm�.�m �u V wy o m fig. �F�5 2 m t c Y �, - > O u.> > `� -6-`-'�`-'��Q >a >'� ��m �m m��� c m a°3 a�i �'o w o o¢ � n m p �> >� >aaa._._ u0�ac� o m m� :f N aeSu~a cw +m+�www .) V V cn 9- 1 u � 'cwOwww �-=�a O�ntO m t � ) c New N�c�c� ucn cn-¢C � m.�.,mow Q`c'noa y�O��O��Oa J V 0000000 ' o ' ' -. N ' ' oo� � � �o Q L .Mi M i0 M i0 M f�Q y O�Q O�O M OJ M O N .-v.-v.-v .Mi.Mi.Mi.Mi.Mi In In i0.^i.^i Oi Oi Oi Oi Oi Oi Oi Oi F C Oi F m N N N N N N V Oi F F O m.ti.-v.-v.-v .-v.-v N N L M M In In In In In In O um....................... O N N V........ F Memorandum Facilities Division Public Services Department ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TO: Loma Vogt, Public Services Director FROM: Cameron Scott P.E. — Commissioning Authority DATE: 04 February 2021 RE: Central Plant Boiler Failure - Briefing Boiler 41 in the Central Plant is one of two low pressure steam boilers serving heating loads in the Public Safety Building, Library, Leonardo, and City/County Building. Boiler 41 has a catastrophic failure. The fire tubes have rusted and calcium built up to the point where the tube has rusted out and is leaking fuel into the water side. The result is a natural-gas leak that filled the boiler room and if ignited could have caused an explosion. The boiler is a"Universal" brand boiler. Universal Boilers have filed bankruptcy and are no longer providing support or replacement parts. Unfortunately, both boilers are Universal boilers. Boiler 42 has the same problem, but is still operational, but could fail any time. Colvin Engineering recommends steam boiler replacements. The purpose of this memo is to present a suitable replacement option and propose funding options. Boiler Replacement Information The heating plant operates during the months of October to May. Replacement of like-for-like boilers is not recommended as it is greater in cost and less efficient. The recommended replacement is 3 boilers and a pre-heater instead of a deaerator. Switching to a modular design will build in redundancy and allow boilers to be repaired without affecting performance. The overall efficiency will increase due to not running steam through the deaerator and the boilers will increase from 84%to 86%. The equipment will be able to turn down during the summer months to supply reheat for the Leonardo and main library. Due to the vertical design of the boilers, the equipment estimate life is 30 years. Estimated time to receive boilers after notice to proceed is approximately 16 weeks. The manufacture will also include a 10-year warranty. Estimated Costs Equipment cost is estimated to be around $960,000. We are estimating design, installation, and contingency to be an additional $1,540,000. Once we have approval and funding to purchase the boilers, our mechanical contractor can provide a bid to install the boilers. Engineering has a state contract with American Mechanical that can purchase the equipment and install the equipment. Funding Options o Option #1 Fund the full $2,500,000 with General Fund fund balance in FY21 • Advantages o Fully funded o Other planned capital renewal projects will not be affected. • Disadvantage o Large use of General Fund fund balance o Option #2 FY21 Capital Renewal Funding $1,500,000 and $1,000,000 General Fund fund balance FY21 Use FY21 existing Capital Renewal funds on projects that can be delayed entirely or in a portion in the amount of$1,500,000 to pay for a portion of the cost of the project. The additional $1,000,000 needed will be requested from the General Fund fund balance in FY21. • Advantage o Smaller use of General Fund fund balance in FY21 • Disadvantages o Current funded projects will have to pushed off until we receive future capital renewal funding. See list below for projects to be delayed. o FY22 Capital Renewal funding has not yet been approved. The request submitted was for$5,860,449 to continue coverage of priority 1 and priority 2 assets. The projects delayed will become the first projects to be completed with any FY22 funding received and could possibly push other projects out should funding not be available to proceed with priority 1 and priority 2 replacements. FY 21 Planned Projects to be Delayed: City & County Building - General Exhaust Fan Fire Station 42 - Replace Roof Fire Station 45 - Replace General Exhaust Fan Fire Station 45 - Replace roof Fire Station 46 - Replace General Exhaust Fan Fire Station 47 - Replace General Exhaust Fan Fire Station 48 - Replace Roof Fire Station 49 - Replace General Exhaust Fan Fire Station 410 - Replace General Exhaust Fans Smith's Ball Park- Replace locks and doorknobs Smith's Ball Park- Repair Stairs Sorenson Multicultural Center - Replace Parking Lot Sorenson Multicultural Center- Replace old sections of roof Sorenson Multicultural Center- Replace General Exhaust Fans CITY COUNCIL TRANSMITTAL Date Received: 02/26/2021 Lisa Shaffer, Chief Administrative Officer Date Sent to Council: 02/26/2021 TO: Salt Lake City Council DATE: February 25, 2021 Amy Fowler, Chair FROM: Lisa Shaffer, Chief Administrative Officer, Mayor's Office SUBJECT: Amendment of Appendix B ("Appointed Employees by Department") of the FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation STAFF CONTACTS: Lisa Shaffer, Chief Administrative Officer,Mayor's Office Debra Alexander, Chief Human Resources Officer, Human Resources David Salazar, Compensation Program Manager, Human Resources DOCUMENT TYPE: Ordinance RECOMMENDATION: The City Council,in Salt Lake City Ordinance No. 27 of 202o, approved the FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation. However, in order to meet the operational needs of Salt Lake City Corporation,the Mayor's Office recommends that the City Council adopt the attached ordinance amending Appendix B ("Appointed Employees by Department") of the FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non- Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation to add six new appointed positions, modify the job title and increase the pay grade of one existing appointed position, and increase the pay grades associated with three other existing appointed positions. BUDGET IMPACT: Among the new appointed job titles noted in Section 2 of the proposed ordinance, all are associated with existing positions, approved and allocated in the City budget for FY21. The same is true for the titles specified for modification in Section 3. It should be noted,however,the Census Coordinator(Mayor's Office),which was funded through the end of FY21,is being repurposed as a Community Outreach/Equity and Special Projects Coordinator. As a result, this position will require approximately the same level of funding for continuation into the 2021-22 budget year. Any additional costs associated with implementation of these title changes are funded and covered within existing department FY21 budgets. Although there is no budgetary impact in FY21, additional funding may be required when developing the FY21-22 city budget. BACKGROUND/DISCUSSION: As is customary,the Appointed Pay Plan is updated every year during the regular budget season. However, particularly in light of ongoing restructuring and rebuilding necessary across the City, departments are working to create better solutions to achieve evolving business objectives, which sometimes includes creation or modification of new and/or existing appointed roles. Summary of proposed changes to the Appointed Pay Plan Proposed Department Title Grade Reason for change: Created to reflect new leadership role Airport Chief Operating Officer 40 following completion of the Airport Rebuild and internal restructuring. City Attorney's Deputy City Attorney 40 Change position from Grade 39 to Grade 40 Office to reflect equity re: internal restructuring Economic Business Development 32 New role established to lead and focus on Development Division Director business development. This request reflects restoration of the former Deputy Director position, previously Human Deputy Chief Human approved the Council in December 2020. Resources Resources Officer 37 The job title is also updated to mirror the change in job title adopted for the Chief Human Resources Officer. IMS Chief Innovations 39 New role established to lead the City's new Officer Innovations team. Community Outreach - Position replaces the Census Coordinator Mayor's Office Equity&Special 24 position, repurposed to meet constituent Projects Coordinator business operational needs. This request replaces/redefines the Police Police Administrative Director 37 Public Relations Director,which was -Communications removed due to Civil Service Commission concerns. Police Administrative Director 37 This request establishes a new role and job -Internal Affairs title 911 Director, 911 Communication Communications 41 Change position from Grade 33 to Grade 41 consistent with other department directors. Bureau Bureau 911 Deputy Director, 911 Change position from Grade 29 to Grade 32 Communication Communications 32 for greater parity compared to pay level Bureau Bureau adjustment for Director and pay position with subordinate staff. A legislative and clean copy of the Appointed Pay Plan proposed with this ordinance (approved as to form) is included with this transmittal and Lisa Shaffer, Debra Alexander, and David Salazar can attend the work session if so desired by the City Council. SALT LAKE CITY ORDINANCE No. of 2021 (Amending Appendix B ("Appointed Employees by Department") of the FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation) An ordinance amending Appendix B ("Appointed Employees by Department") of the FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation. PREAMBLE The City Council, in Salt Lake City Ordinance No. 27 of 2020, approved the FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation. However, the City Council, in order to meet the operational needs of Salt Lake City Corporation, wishes to amend Appendix B ("Appointed Employees by Department") of the FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation to add six new appointed positions, modify the job title and increase the pay grade of one existing appointed position, and increase the pay grades associated with three other existing appointed positions. Be it ordained by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah: SECTION 1. PURPOSE. The purpose of this ordinance is to approve the attached amended FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation. Three copies of the attached amended FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation shall be maintained in the City Recorder's Office for public inspection. SECTION 2. NEW APPOINTED POSITIONS. Appendix B ("Appointed Employees by Department") of the FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation is hereby amended to add the following six new appointed positions: i) Chief Operating Officer Department of Airports Grade 040X ii) Business Development Division Director Economic Development Department Grade 032X iii) Deputy Chief Human Resources Officer Human Resources Department Grade 037X iv) Chief Innovations Officer Information Management Services Department Grade 039X v) Administrative Director of Communications Police Department Grade 037X vi) Administrative Director of Internal Affairs Police Department Grade 037X SECTION 3. MODIFICATIONS TO EXISTING APPOINTED POSITIONS. Appendix B ("Appointed Employees by Department") of the FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non- Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation is hereby amended to modify the job title and/or increase the pay grades of the following four existing appointed positions: i) Prior Job Title: Census Coordinator, Mayor's Office New Job Title: Community Outreach/Equity and Special Projects Coordinator, Mayor's Office Prior Grade: 023X New Grade: 024X 2 ii) Director, 911 Communications Bureau Prior Grade: 033X New Grade: 041X iii) Deputy Director, 911 Communications Bureau Prior Grade: 029X New Grade: 032X iv) Deputy City Attorney, City Attorney's Office Prior Grade: 039X New Grade: 040X SECTION 4. APPLICATION. The attached amended FY 2021 Annual Compensation Plan for Non-Represented Employees of Salt Lake City Corporation shall not apply to non- represented employees of Salt Lake City Corporation whose employment terminated prior to the effective date of this ordinance. SECTION 5. EFFECTIVE DATE. This ordinance shall become effective upon adoption. Passed by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah, this day of March, 2021. CHAIRPERSON ATTEST: CITY RECORDER Transmitted to the Mayor on Mayor's Action: Approved. Vetoed. MAYOR 3 ATTEST: Salt Lake City Attorney's Office Approved as to Form CITY RECORDER Dat - February 25,2021 (SEAL) By: Bill No. of 2021. Jonathan Pap asideris Published: 4 APPENDIX B —APPOINTED EMPLOYEES BY DEPARTMENT Effective::V„ , a,. TB1109 0, 911 DISPATCH DIRECTOR 04:9..X 0.2.. .X 911 COMMUNICATIONS DEPUTY DIRECTOR 0::37X i EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF AIRPORTS O41X 0,40,X DIRECTOR AIRPORT ENGINEERING 039X DIRECTOR AIRPORT MAINTENANCE 039X DIRECTOR FINANCE/ACCOUNTING AIRPORT 039X DIRECTOR OF AIRPORT ADMINISTRATION/COMMERCIAL SERVICES 039X DIRECTOR OF AIRPORT INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 039X DIRECTOR OF AIRPORT PLANNING &CAPITAL PROJECTS 039X DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS -AIRPORT 039X DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONAL READINESS &TRANSITION 039X DIRECTOR COMMUNICATIONS & MARKETING 038X EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X CITY ATTORNEY 041X 0 DEPUTY CITY ATTORNEY 040X. CITY RECORDER 033X COUNCIL MEMBER-ELECT N/A* EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR CITY COUNCIL OFFICE 041X COUNCIL LEGAL DIRECTOR 039X DEPUTY DIRECTOR - CITY COUNCIL 039X ASSOCIATE DEPUTY DIRECTOR COUNCIL 037X SENIOR ADVISOR CITY COUNCIL 037X SENIOR PUBLIC POLICY ANALYST 033X COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR CITY COUNCIL 031X COMMUNITY FACILITATOR 031X OPERATIONS MANAGER& MENTOR—CITY COUNCIL 031X PUBLIC POLICY ANALYST 031X POLICY ANALYST/PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT 028X PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT&COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST II 028X CONSTITUENT LIAISON/POLICY ANALYST 027X CONSTITUENT LIAISON 026X PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT&COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST I 026X ASSISTANT TO THE COUNCIL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 025X COUNCIL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/AGENDA 024X COUNCIL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 021X DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY& NEIGHBORHOODS O41X CITY ENGINEER 039X DEPUTY DIRECTOR - COMMUNITY& NEIGHBORHOODS 037X DIRECTOR OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEER 037X PLANNING DIRECTOR 037X BUILDING OFFICIAL 035X DIRECTOR OF HOUSING & NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT 035X DIRECTOR OF TRANSPORTATION PLANNER 035X EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X DIRECTOR OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 041X DEPUTY DIRECTOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 037X ARTS DIVISION DIRECTOR 032X V::.3USINV:::::SS IDi---:VV:::::V.....Q:)PIMV:::N...0 DIVISION If IRV:::Q.:;"'FOR 0::32X CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER 041X CITY TREASURER 039X CHIEF PROCUREMENT OFFICER 033X FIRE CHIEF 041X DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF 037X ASSISTANT FIRE CHIEF 035X CHIEF HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER 041X fDEPU Y Q.:,IL IIIV:::::V::::' II HUMAN RV:::::SOURQ...V:::::S ( :::'V:::'ICER 0::37X CIVILIAN REVIEW BOARD INVESTIGATOR 035X TRAN517YONCHIEF OF STAFF 041X* TRAN517YONCOMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR 039X* TRAN517YONEXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X* CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER 041X Q;II III V INNOVACIQ)NS QA V;;ICER 0;. 9X JUSTICE COURT JUDGE 037X CITY COURTS ADMINISTRATOR 033X 711 CHIEF OF STAFF 041X CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 041X COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR 039X SENIOR ADVISOR 039X COMMUNICATIONS DEPUTY DIRECTOR 030X POLICY ADIVSOR 029X COMMUNITY LIAISON 026X EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X OFFICE MANAGER - MAYOR'S OFFICE 024X Q.:.;' N.�....Q:,,Q.: .. �..::�::....IM,IM. ..��:I:�...�'.._�::....�gIV;;;;: �::::Ik:::IL...:::::....�: �:.,U11...Y PRQ:)JV:::Q.:,FS Q.:,Q:ORDINA"'FOR 024X COMMUNICATION AND CONTENT MANAGER - MAYOR'S OFFICE 021X ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 019X CHIEF OF POLICE 041X ASSISTANT CHIEF OF POLICE 039X DEPUTY CHIEF POLICE 037X ADMINISTRA CIVV::::: If IRV:::Q.:;"'FOR ... Q.:OMMUNICA...CIQ:NS 0::37X AIDMINIST FIVV::::: If IRV::.Q..."'FOR . I�°�"'CQ RNAV.....AV:l:::'AIRS 037X .... ..... ..... ..... ..... is 7 11 DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC SERVICES O41X DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 038X DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS 038X DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC LANDS 038X FACILITIES DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X FLEET DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X GOLF DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X PARKS DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X STREETS DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X YOUTH & FAMILY DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X COMPLIANCE DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC UTILITIES O41X DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC UTILITIES 039X FINANCE ADMINISTRATOR PUBLIC UTILITIES 039X CHIEF ENGINEER - PUBLIC UTILITIES 037X WATER QUALITY &TREATMENT ADMINSTRATOR 037X EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X DEP UTY C);I,I V;;;;;Q,;;; Q;)R, REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 039X TY DIRECTORR,.�:�imm-REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 037X SUSTAINABILITY DIRECTOR 041X SUSTAINABILITY DEPUTY DIRECTOR 037X WASTE& RECYCLING DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X Except for a change in job title or reassignment to a lower pay level, no appointed position on this pay plan may be added, removed or modified without approval of the City Council. * Compensation for transitional positions,including city council member-elect, is set as provided under Chapter 2.03.030 of the Salt Lake City Code. Benefits for transitional employees are equivalent to those provided to full-time employees. Except for leave time, benefits for city council members-elect are also equivalent to those provided to full-time employees. APPENDIX B —APPOINTED EMPLOYEES BY DEPARTMENT Effective TBD 911 DISPATCH DIRECTOR 041X 911 COMMUNICATIONS DEPUTY DIRECTOR 032X / EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF AIRPORTS O41X CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER, AIRPORT 040X DIRECTOR AIRPORT ENGINEERING 039X DIRECTOR AIRPORT MAINTENANCE 039X DIRECTOR FINANCE/ACCOUNTING AIRPORT 039X DIRECTOR OF AIRPORT ADMINISTRATION/COMMERCIAL SERVICES 039X DIRECTOR OF AIRPORT INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 039X DIRECTOR OF AIRPORT PLANNING &CAPITAL PROJECTS 039X DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS -AIRPORT 039X DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONAL READINESS &TRANSITION 039X DIRECTOR COMMUNICATIONS & MARKETING 038X EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X i o CITY ATTORNEY 041X DEPUTY CITY ATTORNEY 040X CITY RECORDER 033X COUNCIL MEMBER-ELECT N/A* EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR CITY COUNCIL OFFICE 041X COUNCIL LEGAL DIRECTOR 039X DEPUTY DIRECTOR - CITY COUNCIL 039X ASSOCIATE DEPUTY DIRECTOR COUNCIL 037X SENIOR ADVISOR CITY COUNCIL 037X SENIOR PUBLIC POLICY ANALYST 033X COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR CITY COUNCIL 031X COMMUNITY FACILITATOR 031X OPERATIONS MANAGER& MENTOR—CITY COUNCIL 031X PUBLIC POLICY ANALYST 031X POLICY ANALYST/PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT 028X PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT&COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST II 028X CONSTITUENT LIAISON POLICY ANALYST 027X CONSTITUENT LIAISON 026X PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT&COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST I 026X ASSISTANT TO THE COUNCIL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 025X COUNCIL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/AGENDA 024X COUNCIL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 021X 11110 DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY& NEIGHBORHOODS O41X CITY ENGINEER 039X DEPUTY DIRECTOR - COMMUNITY& NEIGHBORHOODS 037X DIRECTOR OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEER 037X PLANNING DIRECTOR 037X BUILDING OFFICIAL 035X DIRECTOR OF HOUSING & NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT 035X DIRECTOR OF TRANSPORTATION PLANNER 035X EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X [[[ 11 DIRECTOR OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 041X DEPUTY DIRECTOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 037X ARTS DIVISION DIRECTOR 032X BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT DIVISION DIRECTOR 032X CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER 041X CITY TREASURER 039X CHIEF PROCUREMENT OFFICER 033X FIRE CHIEF 041X DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF 037X / ASSISTANT FIRE CHIEF 035X CHIEF HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER 041X DEPUTY CHIEF HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER 037X CIVILIAN REVIEW BOARD INVESTIGATOR 035X TRAN5ITIONCHIEF OF STAFF 041X* TRAN5ITIONCOMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR 039X* TRAN5ITIONEXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X* RZ CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER 041X CHIEF INNOVATIONS OFFICER 039X JUSTICE COURT JUDGE 037X / CITY COURTS ADMINISTRATOR 033X CHIEF OF STAFF 041X CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 041X COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR 039X SENIOR ADVISOR 039X COMMUNICATIONS DEPUTY DIRECTOR 030X POLICY ADIVSOR 029X COMMUNITY LIAISON 026X EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X OFFICE MANAGER - MAYOR'S OFFICE 024X COMMUNITY OUTREACH - EQUITY&SPECIAL PROJECTS 024X COORDINATOR COMMUNICATION AND CONTENT MANAGER- MAYOR'S OFFICE 021X ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 019X CHIEF OF POLICE 041X ASSISTANT CHIEF OF POLICE 039X DEPUTY CHIEF POLICE 037X ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTOR- COMMUNICATIONS 037X ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTOR - INTERNAL AFFAIRS 037X 71 DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC SERVICES O41X DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 038X DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS 038X DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC LANDS 038X FACILITIES DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X FLEET DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X GOLF DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X PARKS DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X STREETS DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X YOUTH & FAMILY DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X COMPLIANCE DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC UTILITIES O41X DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC UTILITIES 039X FINANCE ADMINISTRATOR PUBLIC UTILITIES 039X CHIEF ENGINEER - PUBLIC UTILITIES 037X WATER QUALITY &TREATMENT ADMINSTRATOR 037X EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 024X i DIRECTOR, REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 039X DEPUTY DIRECTOR, REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 037X SUSTAINABILITY DIRECTOR 041X SUSTAINABILITY DEPUTY DIRECTOR 037X WASTE& RECYCLING DIVISION DIRECTOR 035X Except for a change in job title or reassignment to a lower pay level, no appointed position on this pay plan may be added, removed or modified without approval of the City Council. * Compensation for transitional positions,including city council member-elect, is set as provided under Chapter 2.03.030 of the Salt Lake City Code. Benefits for transitional employees are equivalent to those provided to full-time employees. Except for leave time, benefits for city council members-elect are also equivalent to those provided to full-time employees. 1 f ex " r e !lcl nc u 411 ffim "r 2' ewer . ,, �.� .- �arriily and seiiiar affordable leasing " firlix d use,mixed-firvi onle Transit-oriienteld Suppg rtive housing' rafessi€rna �rrinageet t:sev's i n ces Low- Income Housing Tci'Cre Pt 3rce ano e1 'fGu6➢ry 55i firnancing a nun-preiai dovelraper for effaidab e,'werkfarce"Iheushig with over 1,5 o units and 2Tredi � estate developments,cr"eateO,in S6It Lake City.; �� 3/10/2021 J i • Our issio�n • Who We Are M are Than Just Housing 10 a Programs Properties Where We're HeededHOUSING Contact Us AUTHORITY 3 /frr r HOUSING r/fir/r r a%r r r , r The Housing Authority of Sait fake City(HA.StC)is a federatlly purpose government agency,was created funded special 1976 to provide rent subsidies and promote of airdable hbus94i p t for those living in the SaK Lake area H ISLC is ate Irudep tr of agency. The Housing Authority and tykasldl� far ,r , manages over 1,700 utA�t ������i p; �tff ro a es Arid� cornmercW sites Tire 7�j �,Aof4�YU) ref$aft ILraW uE+��i lAsi rahHousing Choiice qq�� /e i tc o // help or ha r/ir /ii r rr '� r ri / / / ri �r r r /� �/ r iF/9l�✓ ri r /� 2 /10/201 , This is a finance holding place--waiting for data/pie charts 2020 and 2021 Finances 5 More thaii just ins p o �i�/ ice/ r u '" ANHASLC also works to provide families with tho transition off govern ment-a ssbsted progr and n o'E n h�n r9de9 C" ° The Housing Authority has cowpjI; s'u�p �rnpusi�' � programs. SuchinitiatdvesrnSu,r�rtF �sor�a�aFrtrlflhGtrrp� ardq� s'�� while providing mar�ringa� iv ycs a �1 � irp alocanorraol( sufficiency. i'T i� „olF ii raprn�,4rydrnarnt���(rp,��aru�laY;rN .` /� i ��i �afkbwnipxtlk�r�ru,�4vuur(�a5cl�uf���tr�.�#�q��ra�ray^m�or�us�aw���uauslr��,�Cac1t "� ,r '� '�% ���'�" �i'11� ,,"! � �i�,7�r;��llk�atd���ralth�pr� ���➢,k��^r+s�ux�la� y,'�4����P�u��ri�� ��r�il� �� �� i/i , >�+ i4�4praySln�s��D�'�m��sr"�r�9s�d✓"��rdJ� ,d��rp9� �Ge �ii/i i�� � � I ' AVI, �� r AS aq %i qli , iii of 3 3/10/ 021 r r , 43 Programs ; ,. � � �M"��� ' ��AY✓Y�x�rv�A�i�����r�rrV�����hs�x�U��4�aa��� ��� Housing Choice Voucher • Housung pportuna Des � er s z9 j n r t Ift ��� �T r��mc o(HOPWA � 19bn reye��A er i Pro ectuwr , " ", �trs ar �� ii � i��MRttftP1 o, fly I ic �n� i Ttnotaur„ sDaee eel Pim file l � bixes � axe �� ce Tr'al itrr),atlked verl�rrpf) 1� usyrriw ; 51 4i i175n / ,ir i�i * 7e9"�a� e'4tuie}i1IOIRI i o ii i � � ii i � ��11�CC����yaL15i�1''rtdX Cf`�t�Dt fl�d11C9n Ft l I� �PI V I AD Conversion The Rental Assistance Demonstration (RACD), is a rdig aim of the Department of' Rendon Terrace dousing and Urban levenopment �H'UCD HASIILC is in the ro'cess oil a full Public Hair swn Portfolio RACD conver,sir n. he RAf,D rograrrasim ifts units r s0 x P a u sing er -type private make ents on thei �erties are dition and at ,,; 'M e major work a w on of City Plaza P �HOUSING w 8 4 3/10/ 0 1 Ij e �� I � i I� I'IIII I ry I r I N a: n �f�✓ r µ roil 3 � w r I" 9 d � it ii r � �up�l i/ l ' 10 /10/2021 HOUSING AUTHORITY „6V r f 1,HC C PTV r�r "S, % %/'% tlUl ill�� i i� , i r �I " IHAS'LC City Plaza—150 units r rir ,,� ��r Freedom Landing • Jefferson Circle 22o, ra t • Phillips Plat tampts '% ri% r %, ' IUlux � y ' �'A nw ii; tpI M4rj for '2'u 61 /��i r/�////ri�%/ i ,, i , -./ � j U% i' riai r r r � u µi „r Properties corit. 1H.A E " 330 North—25 units I �� Pst w 771 South 17oa s 9th East Loftt � ,v Carruc4 �/ 1rbVt�, ora 07, IG i htrJ Id r ii i"�' '% ����'i' r i� 12 6 3/10/2021 ;,i /R dour i �r, " Per ties b� Cont. HAM.E. • Denver-22 unW r r • Pamela's Pjace "Ob!'(y� 71 rhn I * der K h- / FV r eeUTHORITY kA6T LAKE r^4Kw 13 r pp �d' �� �"tlP r t i�Y'tl 76µ C �ny���'P��pua °aG ��e�."k m� w 7@ @i nw ri H.A.M.E» 5i�nrrse i era Rervua° • Rendon l�er 7 r�uu ����VVVVVVVVVVVV�VVVVu�� "� 11111111111111011111����IIII111f� R+ ad � a uuuiu �VVVV Vuiuu r r`sld oraip �r jr ,irr r " / /i CXf1 klPll� O e� 14 7 3/10/2021 o� - Landlord Incentives� �� I Start-up of Ho me Buyers 0 o Future De elaprments B s Lodge n Place �suppart for seniors, families and y homeless HOUSING AUTHORITY 15 Coming Sooni's'." rri/, r r r� a Y III J lu�uulll III � i" 1 ui� y, w V �i rr rr r %r% i f r r o I � %iJ f/r, / v ri err r 7rfli 1p� y ri r �� r Mal r t ry 1'larC1Y '.«� i1rA % li'be // 1 � �d / yy s„�r, /1Mfr "M' �d ��w�3ipwler� 1�e"�srs�a, rek' ��� � ✓i � � �Yl R� � r ii///rill j�/i/i r/ r u' r✓„6 /n+xr ri' iu�f ,, r"" r r r 1, 16 8 3/10�/2021 i USING HIORITY 17 9 /10/2021. Housing Authority CONTENTS II 2 1 / OVERVIEW HASLC and Entities Ail AFFORDABLE HOUSING 1 3/10/2021 Housing,Authority of Salt Lake City Property Map ter.a o I LL �r 3 3/1 2021 WANNNEENNE11= SAMPLE PROPERTY 9th East Lofts- . | UHTC Family Mixed 7 ME ? z ©... ... . � > y� . ... . ...... . \T2 , $ \ \ \ \ } ■ »/+ ■»� a 4 J r, Y r 10 3/10/2021 Denver Streetr Go e arsaa,a '�c�t W. >5 r� r, 1.2 6 3/10/2021 11��1�1J�'�P�d171�171�11�i II% il. qgY 1 Sunrise Metro Apartments- ■ Chronicp • � o i 14 7 3/10/2021 I 15 Pamela's .. Place 100 �1 ,s +� i °illl i IIIIII ti. 16 3/10/ 01 'a .. . Place d; r 1 s s5 { JV r p In uN Mpg M1 off; r r e 17 Full Clinic / M r n off, 18 3/10/2021 Capiitot, - d- Construction 19 ;. New City P[aza U I. Revitalization 20 Q 3/10/2021 N . 200i Units Partnership xwM ��au �m4�ik ams Oil " a 21 I 2021 Operating Expenses Housing Assistance prnts(67%) 59'14 24,515,465 Administrative(18%) 19% 7,964,445 Ordinary Maintenance(7%) 7% 2,974,583 Willies(2%1 3% 1,304,272. General Expenses(2%) 3% 1,068,997 Depreciation NA Interest Expense 2% 792,508 Capital Expense 70; 2,771,12E 41,391,398 202,1 Operating Revenue Rt tal Reuerue(19%) 26% 10,793,497 Federal Funds(78%) 6% 2,359,300 Housing Choice Voucher 58% 24,030;032 'Ot0.1er Grants and Revenues(3%) 11% 4,455,115 100% 41,637,944 2021 Budget Balanced but Barety 22 3/10/2021 r 1 �i� uuuuuuiYBi uuuuuuuuuuuu u 'Y 11ui 1�a, lf�ll 23 HOMELESS RESPONSE r 24 12 3/10/2021 Pushing Programs/Metrics 25 Progriamsi/Metrics Cont. 26 13 1 2021 Prog � e 2 �M �0 all ( � 27 Programs/Metrics C $ a , o n | 28 14 1 2021 ons Housed Pri , - ;! 29 & WORKING z� ■ . £ � - *f £ » !f £ ;� # » % < ■ � � .> , e0 15 1 2021 ! FEW STRUGGLES \ � 11 Covid, Response . 37 16 1 2021 GOING. . FORWARD 33 SUPPORT NEEDED § � .4 , � .; � � , . . • a -& : . y . ?# � ! »\. 2 ■ K . \, /, �¥ � �f - � < . \� w ! . � i : , ,t � . . ■ � i 34 17 l 2021 YOU HELPED � f«2s ^ © : « » . d#£ . - 2, . i ■ ; ««r � 4 : :; ¥ ; ® t2 r■. 2 . 2«i. 35 CONCLUSION 27 � ■ : � 36 18 COUNCIL STAFF REPORT CITY COUNCIL of SALT LAIZE CITY ''•44,uui.•••`•t1''' Item Schedule: Briefing: No. 1: October 6, TO: City Council Members 2020;No. 2,March 16, 2021. Set Date: October 6,2020 FROM: Russell Weeks Public Hearing: October 20 • Senior Policy Analyst and November 10,2020 Potential Action:TBD DATE: March 11,2021 RE: SINGLE ROOM OCCUPANCY TEXT AMENDMENTS FOI,I,OW UP TO NOVEMBERw 20'20 ,SECOND PU I,IC HEARING This report is aI.follow-up to the second public hearing on the proposed ordinance to alrnend the Salt Lake City Municipal Code pertaining to the definition of"sha.red housin " alnd the expansion of areal.s where shared housing could locate.After the second public hearing the City Council unal.nirnously al.dopted aI.motion to close the hearing al.nd defer al.ction to a.latter Matte. our speakers It thesecond public hearing spoke in support of the proposed ordinal.nce, and six people spoke in opposition to it. Council staff hal.s included the November 1.o Council meeting rni.nutes and written comments in an attachment to this report. ft relight be noted that at the October 20, 2020, first public hearing three people spoke to the issue-- one in opposition and two in support. Councilstaff also has included the reaps of each Council district that show where shared housing would be allowed, if the Council adopts the proposed ordinance, plus aI.copy of conditions for ba.rs, taverns, and brewpubs that are part of the City's zoning ordinance. The attachments appear after Page 1.6 of this report. At the City Council December 1., 2020,work session the Council discussed the overview of the Administration's housing efforts. fn the discussion introduction Council Planning Analyst Nick Tarbet said each of five proposed ordinances included in the discussion may have aI.future separate work session briefing and public hearing. fn general terms, the Administration said its goal is to build housing based on equity and halving neighborhoods where i.terns involving daily living are within 1.5 minutes of each resident's horne. CITY COUNCIL OF SALT LAKE CITY 451 SOUTI I.STA'T1:::: 'Tf l::::1::::'T,fROOM 304 SI...C;C;OUNC;II....C;OM f".C.IBOX 145476,SAI...'T I...AKI::::CITY,UTAI II 84114 546 Tf::::l... 801-535-'7600 FAX 801-535-'7651 LR� Components of the Administrati on's efforts include having housing options in all neighborhoods despite the disparity in housing costs, and having (financially) accessible housing in all parts of the City.:2 The components are based on the Growing SLC:A Five Year Housing Plan 2o.18- 2022. One section includes Goc .fl 1-1-2 which reads, "Develop in-fill ordinances that promote a.diverse housing stock, increase housing options, create redevelopment opportunities, and allow additional units within existing structures,while minimizing neighborhood impacts." ISSUIE RECAP The petition to increase the number of areas were shared housing would be a.permitted land use originally was filed by Mayor Jacqueline Bistcupsld's Administration can,January 30, 2ol.8, "to implement the recently adopted Growing SLC:A Five Year Housing Plan (L-�m&2022)-- Wb.ere When the petition first was filed, areas zoned were"single-room occupancy" stmetures were permitted land uses were: Transit Station Urban Center, Transit Station Urban Neighborhood, Transit Station Mixed Use Employment Center, Transit Station Special Purpose. SR.Os were later included as a. permitted use in Form Mi.sed Urban Neighborhood 2 zoneS.4 The proposed text amendment would permit Shared Housing in the following zones: Downtown Central Business District; Downtown Support District; Downtown Secondary Central Business District; Downtown Warehouse/Residential; Residential Mixed-Use; Residential Mixed-Use- 45; Residential Mixed-Use 35; Corridor Commercial; Sugar House Central Business District 1. and 2; General Commercial; Mixed Use; Gateway Mixed Use; Form-Mi.sed Special Purpose Corridor Core (Sugar House); and Form-Based Special Purpose Corridor Edge (Sugar House). Shared Housing would not be permitted in the following residential and commercial zones: All Foothill Residential districts; Residential 1/5,000; Residential 1/7,000; Residential 1/1.2,000; R.-2 Single and Two.-Family Residential District; all Special Development Pattern Residential districts; all Residential Multif,.unily districts; :Residential/Office District; Neighborhood Cornrnercial districts; Community Business districts; Community Shopping districts, and Small Neighborhood Business districts. At a.November 1.9, 201.9, City Council work session, Planning Director Nick Norris sdiid current zoning allows "Shared Housing" on 484 acres west of tnterstate 15 and on 204 acres east of f- 15. The proposed amendments would boost significantly the areas were"Shared Housing"would be permitted. Two-thirds of the increase would be east of f-15.5 The total proposed area.where Shared Housing would be allowed west of f-15 woUld include 1,264 acres. The area. east of f-15 would include 1.,850 acres. ft might be noted that,with the exception of the Downtown districts, all of the zoning districts proposed to permit"Shared Housing" are at some point adjacent to a.single or two f,.unily residential district. However, the contact generally occurs at the perimeter of single or two fi.unily neighborhoods, and the neighborhoods are fiirly homogenous which may mean there would be little to no opportunity for"Shared Housing"to be located within them.1 Wb.at The proposed ordinance has one through a. variety of changes from the City's original discussion with Salt Ui.ke City Planning Commission on Jena 27, 2ol.8. Changes include: Redefining"Single Room Occupancy"housing to "Shared Housing"to bet-ter reflect what the housing use actually is. The revised definition: "A building or portion thereof, 11age I 2 that is (iesignate(i for reskientia.1 ptirposes a.n(i contains in(fivkhml hotising units that may be occtipie(i on a.weekly or monthly W.sis. Ea.ch in(fivi(itml hotising unit consists of one or more sleeping rooms that may contain either kitchen or Nithroom anienities, brit not both. Whichever anienities axe not containe(i within the in(fivi(itml tinit (the kitchen, bathroom, or both) sha.11 be provi(ie(i as a.common f,.i.cility within the si.me btiikfing, to be sha.re(i with other tena.nts of the sha.re(i hotising(ievelopment." ft might be note(i that the(iefinition wotiki permit Sha.re(i f-lotising to be in a."portion thereof, (of a. btiil(fing) that is (iesignate(i for reskientia.1 ptirposes." • R.eqtiiring a. property mam.ger to be on site 24 hotirs a.&y, who wotiki be responsible for the con(hict, operation, a.n(i maintenmee of a.Sha.re(i f-cousing strtiettire. • Allowing a. sha.re(i hotising (ievelopment to inch.xie an office for the purpose of mam.ging the living tinits a.n(i common f,.i.cilities "a.M/or one self-containe(i livi.ng tinit with private kitchen a.n(i Wthroom f,.i.cilities for a.mam.ger or ca.reta.ker." • R.eqtiiring the contintiotis monitoring by security ca.meras of a.11 commima.1 axeas that are a.ccessible to a.11 tena.nts. • R.eqtiiring"All arrears of a.sha.re(i hotising(ievelopment"to be 'Aesigne(i to be tiniversafly a.ccessible as reqtiire(i by applicable IMera.1 a.n(i state laws."The propose or(finmee goes on to siy, "fn(fivi(hia.1 units a.n(i sleeping rooms reqtiire(i to be tiniversflly a.ccessible by the a.(iopte(i btiiMing c(Ae sha.11 be locate(i on the grotin(i floor. ff more units a.n(i sleeping rooms are reqtiire(i than what can be a.ccommo(iate(i on the grotin(i floor, the awaits may be lorate(i on other floors within the btiikfing, if an elevator is reqtiire(i a.n(i provi(iM." Issues After the November 1.0, 2020, pUblic hea.ri.ng City Cotincil staff receive(i four concerns raise(i in relation to the propose(i or(finmee: 1..) A concern about t.h.e b.ealt.h. and safety of Sbawed Housing residentsmi.h.o use a sbared kiteb.en and tb.e potentially better idea of a cafeteria model for serving meals. Accor(fing to the Plaming Division, the City Gores not monitor private kitchens in any other instance pertaining to hotising. The Division also checke(i with the,Sant Uflce Cotinty Flea.lth Depa.rtment on Sha.re(i Flotising a.n(i sha.re(i kitchens. The Depa.rtment in(ficate(i that it(E(i not inspect or regiflate sha.re(i kitchens in btifl(fings such as single-room ocetipmey strtiettires. Beem.1se the Flea.lth Depa.rtment(lees not inspect kitchens like the, the Plaming Division (lees not think it wotiki be appropriate for a.zoning regiflation to a.&iress the isstie. Beca.tise the propose(i or(finmee reqtii.res on- site mam.gement 24 hotirs a.&y, Division officia.ls believe the cleanliness of sha.re(i kitchens shol.11(i be left tip to the mam.gement of a.share hotising f,.i.cility to a.&iresS.7 fn .i.&fition, an earlier version of this report that(iescri.be(i a.Sha.re(i Flotising(ieveloprnent containing in(fivi(itml hotising tinits with rrailtiple separate sleeping rooms tise(i a.link showing floor plans for strident hotising at Ptir(hie University at Fort Wayne to ilhistrale the concept. Like the more mo(iern sti.xient(iormitories at the University of Uta.h, severa.1 of the floor plans contain sha.re(i kitchen f,.i.cilities. Flere is the link to the Ptir(hie University floor plans that:Ply ming Director Nick Norri.s provi(ie(i: btu p.�:Z_LvL,y�. sin P L -h L----gZ-L1-iQ-1L--Ph1jhZ-- 2.) Mould there be a limit set on the number of b.ousing units per building? Page, I 3 Accorofing to the Administration, the City Cotincil cotiloi cap the ntimber ofnits. "Flowever, it wotiloi likely reqtiire some sort of sttioiy to oietermine what is feasible anoi a.voi(i being arbitrary."The Mministration went on to say that restricting the ntimber of tini.ts may make Shareoi Flotising tinbtifloiable. The Mministration compareoi the qtiestion of a.similar one pertaining to congregate care anoi noteoi that the City Cotincil oiecioieoi not to enact regiflations in that instance.8 The Mministration also sai(i, "Arbitrarily applying a.oiensity reqtiirement to a.shareoi hotising oievelopment wotiloi be contrary to the goa.ls aoiopteoi by the City Cotincil fotinoi in Plan Salt Lake a.noi Growing SLC relateoi to hotising eottiftya.noi expa.Ming hotising types for people with very low incomes. One of the reasons that the proposal a.oiois this type of hotising to the zoning ofistricts that it (lass is becatise none of those zoning ofistricts have oiensity limitations for apartments a.noi other rntilti- fa.mily(iwellings."') 3.) Could ared Housing be a conditional use instead of a permitted use? This qtiestion also was raise(i by the Planning Commission at its July 11, 2ol.8, meeting. fn its November 14, 201.8, response to the Commission, the Planning Division sai(i it still recommenoie(i Shareoi Flotising as a. permitteoi tise instea.(i of a.conofitional tise for the following reasons: • "The main ptirpose of this text amenoirrient is to stipport anoi implement the recently- aoiopteoi Growing SLCfive-year hotising plan. Goa.1 1.of the plan is to "Reform City practices to promote a.responsive, high-opporttinity hotising mafl.,cet." Otitlineoi objectives that stipport this goal inchioie, "Review anoi moofify lanai tise anoi zoning regiflations to reflect the afforoiability neeois of a.growing, pioneeri.ng city," anoi "Remove impeofirrients in City processes to encotirage hotising oieveloprnent." Designating the SR.O tise a.conofitional tise wotiloi be counter-inttiftive to these goa.ls anoi objectives, as it wotiloi aoioi significant review time anoi cost to the oievelopment process. Planning Staff finois that the qtmlif�jing provisions recommenoie(i in the ctirrent proposal wotiloi aoieqtiately a(Wress all concerns expresse(i by Commissioners thus far, anoi can be accomplisheoi without making the tise a.conofitional rise." • "Staff maintains confioience in the list of zoning ofistricts ptit forwaroi to permit the SR.O tise. Location criteria.tise(i to choose these ofistricts consioiereoi zones with existing oiesign stanoiarois in place, anoi zones that alreaoiy permit tises with similar characteristics anoi levels of intensity. fn a(Wition, all propose(i ofistricts alreaoiy permit a,mix of tises, anoi (icy not have oiensity limitations. Staff finois that these characteristics, paireoi with the propose(i qtialifying provisions for the SR.O tise,will achieve the same result as the conofitional tise process, btit reqtiire less of the applicants' money anoi time." The City Cotincil has at least twice aoiopteoi orofinances with operating conofitions for lanoi tises. One orofinance involve(i the operation of taverns, bars, anoi brewptibs in certain locations. The other is for homeless resotirce centers. Conofitions have inchioieoi: "Reqiiire that a.sectirity anoi operations plan be prepareoi by the applicant anoi approve(i by the Salt Lake City Police Department anoi the btfflofing official, anoi fileoi with the City Recoroier's Office, which shall inchioie: (1.) A complaint-response comaninity relations prograrn; anoi (2) A provision for a.representative of the tavern, bar establishment, or brewptib to anent with neighbors ripen re guest in oroier to attempt to resolve any neighborhoo(i complaints regarofing the operations on the btisiness premises; .... Designation of a.location for smoking tobacco otiWoors in conformance with State law; Page (7) A provi.sion staling that any trash strewn on the premises be collecte(i a.n(i (ieposite(i in a, trash receptacle by six o'clock(6:�oo) A.M. the following (iay, inclu(iing any smoldng a.n(i parking lot ueas; a.n(i (8) A provision stalingthat portable trash receptacles on the premises beemptie(i (iailya.n(i mitomale(i receptacles be emptie(i at least weekly. Autornale(i receptacles sha.11 be locate(i only within a,City approve(i trash storage area.; a.n(i (9) A parking mam.gement plan which shall inclu(ie conskieration of the impa.ct of pa.fl.,cing on surroun(fing neighborhoo(is." 4.)Is there any inft)rmation on b.ow well sbared b.ousing bas worlied in other cities? Do they bave lessons learned to sbare that perhaps can be applied tag tb.e proposed ordinance? The short,.i.nswer is: City Council staff coul(i not fin(i a.(iefinitive stu(iy of the effects of Sha.re(i Housing on alleviating homelessness a.n(i provi(fing aff'oniable housing, or what constitutes an effective Sha.re(i Housing progra.m. However, there are a. variety of a.rticles that unequivocally state that Sha.re(i Housing is the lowest rung on the la.&ier of aff'oniable housing a.n(i has kept people from becoming homeless. The information often is inclu(ie(i a.rticles about the loss of single-room occupmey buil(fings, a.n(i the effect losing that kin(i of housing has on people who live in them. A typica.1 excerpt rea.(is: "Pa.ul Groth was Wffle(i when, in August 1977, thousa.mis of protesters surroun(ie(i San Fra.neisco's tnternationa.1 Hotel to stop police from evicting ekierly reskients Aea.(i of the buil(fing's (iernolition "t aske(i, ' Thy such a. hiss?Whywoul(i anyone want to live in a.hotel?"'the University of C lifornia., Berkeley professor emeritus of uchitecture a.n(i geography wrote in the intro(hiction to his 1994 book on the subject, "Living Downtown. Groth eventually conclu(ies in "Living Downtown"that"this wholesd.fle closing a.n(i (iestruction of reskientia.1 hotels is a.major tra.ge(iy a.n(i a.root ca.use of homelessness in the Unite(i States." "A goo(i hotel room of 150 squa.re feet -- (iry space, perhaps with a, Nith or a.room sink, col(i a.n(i sometimes hot water, enough electric service to run a. 6o-watt bulb a,n(i a.television, centra.1 heat, a.n(i a.ccess to telephones a.n(i other servi.ces -- constitutes a.living unit mechmicafly more luxurimt than those live(i in by a,thir(i to a.ha of the population of the ea.rth."111 Here are some Sha.re(i Housing pro runs of note locate(i by City Council staff: Seattle: Seattle offers a.real-worki lesson on the intemetion between muket(ierrmn(i for SR.Os a.n(i (ievelopment regulations. From 2009 to 2014, Seattle experience(i a. boom in rrmfl.,Cet-rate SR.0 construction when (ievelopers rea.lize(i that existing regulations aflowe(i for the construction of these units in a,way that woul(i not trigger a. lengthy(iesign review process a.n(i that coul(i, in sorne cases, a.voi(i requirements to buil(i off-street parking. These units ha.(i an average rent of$66o, f,.w less than the average rent of$1,367 for tra.(fitiona.l stu(fios. fn 2013 flone, more than 1.,800 SR.Os a.n(i micro-apa.rtments were built, wcounting for nearly 25 percent of all(iwellings built in Seattle that year. Despite a.fin(fing from the city's Depa.rtrnent of Planning a.n(i Development that"micro-hou sing a.n(i congregate housing reskiences pro(itiction is consistent with a.(iopte(i Comprehensive Plan God.fls a.n(i Policies,"the city, through a. series of ju(ficia.l (iecisions a.n(i legislation from the city council, pursue(i regulatorny changes that have ha.(i the effect of Page � 5 making affordable SRO and micro.-unit constniction economically infeasible. These include subjecting proposed developments to longer review processes; expanding parking requirements; tightening zoning regulations; and increasing minimurn size requi.rements. One study estimates that as a.result, 829 fewer affordable housing units are being built in the city per year. The city's Housing Affordability and I-Avability Agenda.task force recommends rescinding these changes to promote private-market development of more affordable hoes ipg. -- H LJD LJSER..Gov-- EDGE -- An Online Magazine .San Francisco: Probably the most interesting contemporary example of hotel living is San Francisco's Red Victorian, located in Haight-Ashbury. Occupied in a.hundred-year-old building, the Red Vi.c, as it is known, is a. community-nin hotel with a.large mix of short- and long-term residents. The long-term residents effectively run the hotel, performing the operational duties and domestic-labor services for credit, which they call community units (CLJs). The lobby has undergone many changes over the years; it has been a.caf-'6, a.co-working space, and a. vintage clothing and furniture store. Currently, it's being used for events and community gatherings that range from lectures on dernocrj and the Bible to talks .P1------------------ on tissi.1ttp !L.. J.. for intestinal ration. It's a.vibrant and diverse cornrnunit�y that has gj ttL D_g............ .....L_ge ene............ demonstrated the success and appeal of hotel living. --An Overlooked Solution to the Affordable Housing Crisis: Hotels, Matthew Okaz,,iki, The Bold Italic Magazine,,June 13, 201.9. Fort Collins Co. orrarl..o The Single Room Occupancy(SRO) Pro rare provides rooms for people experiencing homelessness in Fort Collins. The federal government provides funds for rental assistance administered through Housing Catalyst. We have 27 SRO units located on two properties in Fort Collins. A room J.s provi.ded and participants share common areas such as a.kitchen, livi.ng room, laundry and bathroorns. A resident manager lives on site at each location. Resident managers help ensure a.safe living environment and can assist residents in set-Ling gocfls and finding resources. Eligibility Guidelines Applicants for the SRO Prograrn must be homeless at the time of admission and earn no more than 50% of area.median income. Applicants must meet citizenship or eligible immigration requirements and have a. background free of recent violent or drug-related criminal activity. An e�Ies SRO Housing Corporation LA: SRO Housing Corporation has a.unique insight into the needs of the community we serve, and we work diligently to anticipate and address those needs with a.wide array of innovative, culturally appropriate and effective services.We follow a. Housing First model and do not impose requirements or restrictions that would create an obstacle for housing new clients/residents. We are the only agency in L.os Angeles that offers the full continuum of housingin pri.vale units. SRO Housing provides a.wide range of specialized and individualized supportive services to enhance each individual's wellness, recovery and resiliency. Salt 1,aloe Cnl The Rio Grande hotel was built in ign for railroad workers at the adjacem depot, and it still offers low.-cost rooms with shared kitchens and bathrooms. Nobody has to sign a lease or divulge their criminal record. It's clean and quiet, and through an innovative private managemem approach, it's able to turn a profit, Page I 6 And yet the 5o roorns here constitute the city's only housing in the category known as single-roorn occupancy(SR.0), down frorn Boo in 1978. The house rules are affixed to the wall in the Rio Grande hotel lobby. No borrowing or lending. No smoldng. No public intoxication. Visitors have to sign in and out. LJnder innkeeper laws, tenants of the Rio Grande hotel are "guests," not residents, and when they ,Violate the rules, managers have broad authority to eject there at a.moment's notice. Still, management say they only eject about a.dozen people each year, and ejectees are welcome back on the waiting list for another room. There's no black book. The hotel's hallways are bright and airy,with a.central atrium that feeds fresh air and sunlight into interior-fa.cing rooms. There's a. bathroorn per every five residents, and each bathroorn includes a. shower and a. lock. Guests share three large fridges, a. free laundrny room, and a. central cornrnunity space where they can check out hundreds of DVDs and books. Out back, a.gated lot secures guests' ears and bikes and includes a.covered smoking area.. Security carneras are everywhere you look, feeding two large displays in the manager's office. All for as little as $225 per month, for one of a.few bunk roorns, or $330 for a.single roorn. — U.S. cities used to have low-rent, short-term, dorin-style housing.. Is that what Utah's homeless need? Matthew Piper, Deseret News, September 1., 2ol.8. Information below this senten This report is a follow-up to the first public hearing on the proposed ordinance to amend the Salt Lake City Code pertaining to the definition of"shared housing"and the expansion of areas where shared housing could locate. The second public hearing on this issue is scheduled for the City Council's November lo formal meeting. It might be noted that at the October 20 public hearing three people spoke to the issue—one in opposition and two in support. No written comments were received for the hearing. A motion sheet reflecting the Council's options after the second hearing is attached to this report.The motion options with be discussed later in this update. Since the October 20 meeting two things have occurred: • The City Council and Mayor Erin Mendenhall's Administration plan to discuss at the Council's work session on December 1 five proposed ordinances,including the proposed shared housing ordinance.The discussion will involve how the five ordinances interrelate and how—as a whole —they might affect Salt Lake City's neighborhoods,future land uses and development patterns. The other proposed ordinances involve RMF-30 zoning,an affordable housing overlay district, off-street parking,and housing loss mitigation. • At the November 2 Central Ninth Community Council meeting,Chair Paul Johnson,and Ballpark Community Council Chair Amy Hawkins,Ph.D.,said they would speak to oppose the ordinance at the November lo public hearing.They raised the following items as reasons for their opposition: • As a matter of equity,the proposed ordinance should be part of a new land-use petition that would permit shared housing in all areas of Salt Lake City. • The potential for shared housing to foster public safety problems as some motels in the Central Ninth and Ballpark areas have. • The potential for erosion of home ownership in the area. Page � 7 Zoning within the two Community Councils'boundaries spans the spectrum of land uses from R-15,000 single family homes to Downtown Central Business District,the"most urban and intense"area of the City, according to the City zoning ordinance. Zones in the areas include R-15,000 single family residential; R-2 single and two-family residential; Form-Based Urban Neighborhood 1; Form-Based Urban Neighborhood 2; Residential Multi-family-35; Residential Multi-family-45; Residential Mixed Use; Community Business; Residential Business; General Commercial; D-2 Downtown Support; and D-1 Central Business District. Under the proposed ordinance,shared housing in the Central Ninth and Ballpark Community Council areas would be prohibited in the areas zoned as R-15,000 single family,R-2 single and two-family; Form-Based Urban Neighborhood 1; Residential multi-family 35; Residential multi-family 45; and Community Business. For a description of the various zones,please see the first end note of this document." Motion Options The City Council has four motion options to consider: close the public hearing and defer action to a later date; close the public hearing and adopt the proposed ordinance; continue the public hearing to a later date; and close the public hearing,not adopt the proposed ordinance,and deny the petition. Given the Council's interest in discussing on December 1 how the proposed ordinance will work with other proposed ordinances,the first option reflects the Council's intent. Information below this sentence has a 3 eared hi 3re "ous staff re orts> NEW INFORMATION This item is a follow-up briefing for the City Council.The briefing is based on a further revision of a proposed text amendment discussed at an April 14,2020,City Council work session.The latest proposed revision is intended to clarify which construction codes will be used to address building"universally accessible" spaces in a shared housing development. The proposed text amendment plus two earlier proposed text amendments also will be scheduled for public hearings on October 20 and November to if the City Council adopts the hearings as part of the consent agenda during the Council's October 6 formal meeting. Due to the length of time between the April 14 work session briefing and now,Council staff has included most of the entire New Information section from the Council staff report for the April 14 work session briefing. Here is the new proposed clarification of the construction codes to use for"universally accessible"areas: Accessibility: All areas of a shared housingdevelopment shall be designed to be universally accessible as required by the construction codes adopted by the Utah Building Code Commission to be used statewide,by the political subdivisions of the State .Individual units and sleeping rooms required to be universally accessible by the adopted building code shall be located on the ground floor. If more units and sleeping rooms are required than what can be accommodated on the ground floor.the units may be located on other floors within the building,if an elevator is required and provided. The proposed ordinance also would do three other things: o It would eliminate the term"Single Room Occupancy" and its definition from the City Code's zoning ordinance. o It would replace the term with another term—"Shared Housing"and provide a new definition. o It would retain the original proposed zoning areas in the text amendment where Shared Housing structures would be allowed—a significant increase in the number of areas from the current zoning ordinance. However,the City Council at the November 19, 2019,meeting said Page I the Administration should follow up in the future on potentially expanding areas where Shared Housing could be built to ensure geographic equitability citywide. Expansion of shared housing into other areas beyond the original proposed text amendments would require a new land use petition process that first would go through the Planning Commission, Planning Division Director Nick Norris noted at the April 14,2020,work session.12 POLICY ISSUES/OUESTIONS o If the City Council determines to explore future expansion of Shared Housing in the interest of geographic equity,what priority might the Council place on moving any proposed ordinance like that through the City legislative process within the context of other planning issues already in process? ADDITIONAL BACKGROUND The proposed changes originally stem from a City Council's discussion with Planning Division officials at a November 19, 2019,work session. Issues in the discussion included those raised in an October 22,2019, meeting with then-Council Member Erin Mendenhall and Council Member Amy Fowler, Planning Division staff and Administration, and a variety of housing advocates who had questioned the original proposed amendments at an April 23, 2019,public hearing.The meeting between the two Council Members and the other participants aimed at striking a balance between immediate needs for housing and concerns about where housing should be located equitably. At the November 19, 2019,work session, Council Member Mendenhall,who by then was Mayor-elect, said,adopting the proposed ordinance with amendments stemming from the October 22 meeting was"urgent, and is something that we as a Council should do what we can to instruct the Planning Division to prioritize these changes that we've been working on with the housing community."13 The City Council agreed to consider changes to the proposed ordinance that could be made without starting over with a new land-use petition,but also to address geographic equity sooner than later. The term"Shared Housing"is intended to describe better the actual function of that kind of housing. It also is an effort to jettison a term that has become pejorative in many communities. Participants in the October 22,2020,meeting of housing advocates and advocates for homeless people concurred that the actual function of Shared Housing is that it is housing that can be used by a spectrum of people including college students,service industry workers and people working at seasonal jobs. The proposed ordinance defines"Shared Housing"as,"A building or portion thereof,that is designated for residential purposes and contains individual housing units that may be occupied on a weekly or monthly basis. Each individual housing unit consists of one or more sleeping rooms that may contain either kitchen or bathroom amenities,but not both.Whichever amenities are not contained within the individual unit(the kitchen,bathroom,or both)shall be provided as a common facility within the same building,to be shared with other tenants of the shared housing development." According to the Administration transmittal,"a Shared Housing development could contain individual housing units with multiple separate sleeping rooms,rather than each housing unit being limited to one sleeping room as previously proposed.This change provides more flexibility in design and allows for Shared Housing developments that serve families rather than just singles or couples."Planning Director Nick Norris provided the following link from Purdue University at Fort Wayne to illustrate the concept: httys://www.i)f-vv.edu/housing/floor-i)lans/. The proposed new section addressing accessibility to and within Shared Housing also is the result of the October 22,2019,meeting.The idea arose when Andrew Riggle of the Disability Law Center said housing resulting from the proposed text amendment could be designed in a way that the housing becomes a model for universal design that accommodates people of all abilities. Page Again,the proposed text amendments addressing where shared housing would be a permitted use are the same as in the original proposed text amendment.At the November 19,2019,work session Planning Director Norris said current zoning allows Shared Housing on 484 acres west of Interstate 15.All the acreage is in areas zoned as Transit Station Areas. Current zoning allows"Shared Housing"on 204 acres east of I-15.The proposed amendments would boost significantly the areas where Shared Housing would be permitted, and two- thirds of the increase would be east of I-15,he said.14 The total proposed area where Shared Housing would be allowed west of I-15 would include 1,264 acres.The area east of I-15 would include 1,85o acres,Mr. Norris said. To review,here are the zones where single-room occupancy structures are permitted now:Transit Station Urban Center,Transit Station Urban Neighborhood,Transit Station Mixed Use Employment Center, Transit Station Special Purpose,and Form Based Urban Neighborhood 2. The proposed text amendment would permit Shared Housing in the following zones: Downtown Central Business District; Downtown Support District; Downtown Secondary Central Business District; Downtown Warehouse/Residential; Residential Mixed-Use; Residential Mixed-Use-45; Residential Mixed-Use 35; Corridor Commercial; Sugar House Central Business District 1 and 2; General Commercial;Mixed Use; Gateway Mixed Use; Form-Based Special Purpose Corridor Core(Sugar House); and Form-Based Special Purpose Corridor Edge (Sugar House). Shared Housing would not be permitted in the following residential and commercial zones:All Foothill Residential districts; Residential 1/5,000; Residential 1/7,000; Residential 1/12,000; R-2 Single and Two-Family Residential District; all Special Development Pattern Residential districts; all Residential Multifamily districts; Residential/Office District;Neighborhood Commercial districts; Community Business districts; Community Shopping districts, and Small Neighborhood Business districts. Mr.Norris in remarks to the City Council at the November 19,2019,work session,and in the Administration transmittal, said all residential uses are allowed on 21 percent of the City's land area.Twelve percent of the total land area is designated as exclusively for single-family uses. Higher density housing is permitted on 9 percent of the total land area, according the transmittal.15 It should be noted that geographical equity is a focal point of the City Council and the Administration, and the extension of inequity dates back at least to the 1940s under federal programs.The following link depicts some of the thinking then:httys://dsl.richmond.edti/panorama/redlining/#loc=11/4o.754/-ll2.052&city=salt- lake-city-ut. (Thanks to Policy Analyst Libby Stockstill for providing the link.) Information below this sentence has appeared in-previous staff reports. On October 22,2019, Council Members Erin Mendenhall and Amy Fowler met with housing advocates and representatives of Mayor Jacqueline Biskupski's Administration to discuss finding a balance between potential long-term effects of adopting a proposed ordinance that would amend the City zoning ordinance pertaining to single-room occupancy housing and short-term housing needs of people earning low incomes, including people experiencing homelessness.Administration representatives included Deputy Chief of Staff David Litvack and Planning Director Nick Norris. At the end of the meeting,participants agreed on a four-step path forward: 1.) Brief the full City Council on particulars of the meeting to gauge the Council's sentiment on further review of the proposed ordinance.The review would include studying the proposed ordinance and determining whether further changes might be made based on the October 22 meeting. 2.) If the City Council approves,undertake the review. 3.) Have a follow up meeting to discuss specifics of proposed amendments. 4.) Determine how to proceed to further housing needs for people earning low incomes and people experience homelessness. To review,the City Council held a briefing on the proposed ordinance at a March 5,2019,work session. The Council then held a public hearing on the proposed ordinance April 23,2019.The Council then closed the hearing and deferred action until a later date. Council Members Fowler and Mendenhall then met October 22 with the Administration and housing advocates Pamela Atkinson,June Hiatt,Andrew Riggle,Tara Rollins,and Brent Willis. Page u.o Issues raised in the discussion included: • Potential barriers in the zoning ordinance that prohibit expanding locations of single-room occupancy housing. • The potential effect of adopting the proposed current amendments to unintentionally reinforce long-standing segregation—economically and socially within the community. • The potential opportunity for further revisions to reverse trends in economic and community segregation. • The potential effect of delaying short-term housing needs to address long-term housing issues. • The need to change perceptions of single-room occupancy living from perceptions of disapproval to perceptions that it is"non-traditional"housing that can be used by a spectrum of people including college students,service industry workers and people working seasonally in the tourism industry. • The need to put SRO housing into communities that can support people living there through the closer availability of jobs and educational opportunities. • The potential of places where SROs could be located beyond traditional bus and rail lines that may not necessarily serve people who need public transportation. • The need to think in terms of valley-wide transportation. • The potential for"congregate living"to alleviate some of the need for SRO housing. • The potential of SRO housing to be designed in a way that it becomes a model for"universal design"that accommodates people of all abilities. POLICY QUESTIONS o How do the locations of single-room occupancy housing in the current proposed ordinance compare with the locations very low,low,moderate,high,and very high income levels in the opportunity index census tract presented to the City Council at its November 12 work session? o How do the locations of Section 8 housing voucher holders,and locations of rent assisted rental projects presented at the same meeting compare to the locations of single-room occupancy in the current proposed ordinance? (Please see attachment.) o If the City Council determines to explore additional revisions,how much can the proposed ordinance be revised before it would have to return to the Planning Commission for more consideration? o If the City Council determines to explore additional revisions,what priority might it place on moving the proposed ordinance through the legislative process within the context of other planning issues already in process? ISSUE AT-A-GLANCE Goal of the briefing: To inform the City Council about proposed changes to the City zoning ordinance pertaining to single-room occupancy housing. The proposed ordinance would: o Expand the number of zoning districts where single-room occupancy uses could locate. o Allow for weekly rentals in SROs to make housing more easily available to some people and allow SRO owners more leverage to enforce rules they may have. o Help add to the City's inventory of permitted housing types. o Appear to meet goals of Growing SLC:A Five-Year Housing Plan 2oi8-2022 adopted by the City Council on December 12,2018,and other City plans.16 POLICY QUESTIONS Page 1. Planning Commission discussion and public comment indicated an interest in having single-room occupancy structures be categorized as conditional uses instead of as permitted uses.The Planning Commission at its November 14, 2o18,meeting adopted a motion to forward a positive recommendation to the City Council with the proposed amendments categorizing single-room occupancy businesses as permitted uses.17 Would the City Council prefer the proposed amendments designate single-room occupancy businesses as permitted uses or as conditional uses? 2. The proposed amendments include qualifying provisions for single-room occupancy use.The provisions address minimum floor areas for individual units and communal areas,requirements that a property manager be on-site 24 hours a day and security cameras continually monitor communal areas.Are there other qualifying provisions such as those similar to qualifying provisions for homeless resource centers that the City Council might want to consider? 3. The proposed amendments would remove the"dwelling"designation from single-room occupancy group. Removing the designation would allow the weekly rental of SRO rooms. However,weekly rentals are considered a"transient"use under building codes the City follows.The building codes require higher plumbing ratios,such as each room having a bathroom,than the proposed amendments contemplate for single-room occupancy housing.The Building Services Division plans to follow international building codes for hostels.The codes allow one water closet per 10 people and one shower or bathtub per eight people.The codes do not contemplate people staying longer than a month.18 ADDITIONAL&BACKGROUND INFORMATION The Salt Lake City Zoning Ordinance permits single-room occupancy use in the following zones: Transit Station Urban Center,Transit Station Urban Neighborhood,Transit Station Mixed Use Employment Center,Transit Station Special Purpose, and Form Based Urban Neighborhood 2. The proposed text amendment would permit single-room occupancy use in the following zones: Downtown Central Business District; Downtown Support District; Downtown Secondary Central Business District; Downtown Warehouse/Residential; Residential Mixed-Use; Residential Mixed-Use-45; Residential Mixed-Use 35; Corridor Commercial; Sugar House Central Business District 1 and 2; General Commercial; Mixed Use; Gateway Mixed Use; Form-Based Special Purpose Corridor Core(Sugar House); and Form-Based Special Purpose Corridor Edge(Sugar House). Single-room occupancy use would not be permitted in the following residential and commercial zones: All Foothill Residential districts; Residential 1/5,000; Residential 1/7,000; Residential 1/12,o00; R-2 Single and Two-Family Residential District; all Special Development Pattern Residential districts; all Residential Multifamily districts; Residential/Office District;Neighborhood Commercial districts; Community Business districts; Community Shopping districts, and Small Neighborhood Business districts. For the Downtown Warehouse/Residential districts(D-3)the underlined language in bold would be inserted into the current language of City Code 2 LA.30.040.C.1: C. Controls Over Mixed Use:The concept of mixed use is central to the nature of the D-3 downtown warehouse/residential district.To ensure that mixed use developments provide for on-site compatibility as well as neighborhood compatibility,the change of land use type or an increase in floor area by twenty five percent(25%)of existing principal buildings and the construction of buildings for new uses after April 12, 1995, shall conform to the following provisions. ... 1. Buildings containing commercial/office uses located above the second story shall incorporate multi-family dwellings,single-room occu-pancy(SRO),boarding house, bed and breakfast,or hotel uses in the amount of at least fifty percent(50%)of the total floor area of the building; Page p �..�� a As indicated earlier,the proposed ordinance contains qualifying provisions for single-room occupancy use.The provisions address minimum floor areas, communal areas,a requirement that a property manager be on-site 24 hours a day, and security camera monitoring.The proposed ordinance also describes a typical unit as"one combined living and sleeping room"that may contain"either a private kitchen or separate private bathroom but not both." Master Plans According to the Administration,the proposed ordinance meets goals presented in Growing SLC:A Five-Year Housing Plan 2oi8-2022 and Plan Salt Lake which the City Council adopted December 1, 2015. Under Growing SLC,the proposed ordinance supports the following objectives,according to the Administration: o Goal is Reform City practices to promote a responsive,affordable,high-opportunity housing market. ■ Objective is Modernize land-use and zoning regulations to reflect the affordability needs of a growing,pioneering city. o Goal 2: Increase housing opportunities for cost-burdened households. ■ Objective is Prioritize the development of new affordable housing with an emphasis of households earning 40 percent of AMI (average median income)and below. o Goal 3: Build a more equitable city. ■ Objective 3: Implement life cycle housing principles in neighborhoods throughout the city.l9 • 3.3.1: Support diverse and vibrant neighborhoods by aligning land use policies that promote a housing market capable of accommodating residents throughout all stages of life. Growing SLC also includes the following goal and objective: o Goal 2: Increase housing opportunities for cost-burdened households. • Objective is Prioritize the development of new affordable housing with an emphasis of households earning 40 percent of AMI(average median income)and below. Under Plan Salt Lake,the proposed ordinance supports the following objectives,according to the Administration: Guiding Principle i/Neighborhoods that provide a safe environment,opportunity for social interaction,and services needed for the wellbeing of the community therein. Initiatives: 3. Create a safe and convenient place for people to carry out their daily lives; 5. Support policies that provide people a choice to stay in their home and neighborhood as they grow older and household demographics change; 7. Promote accessible neighborhood services and amenities,including parks,natural lands,and schools. Guiding Principle 2/Growth: Growing responsibly,while providing people with choices about where they live,how they live,and how they get around. Initiatives: 1. Locate new development in areas with existing infrastructure and amenities,such as transit and transportation corridors. Guiding Principle 3/Housing:Access to a wide variety of housing types for all income levels throughout the city,providing the basic human need for safety and responding to changing demographics. Page I u p 204o Targets: 1. Increase diversity of housing types for all income levels throughout the city; 2. Decrease percent of income spent on housing for cost-burdened households. Initiatives: 1. Ensure access to affordable housing citywide(including rental and very low income); 2. Encourage housing options that accommodate aging in place; 3. Direct new growth toward areas with existing infrastructure and services that have the potential to be people-oriented. Guiding Principle ii/Equity: Ensure access to all City amenities for all citizens while treating everyone equitably with fairness,justice,and respect. Initiatives: 3. Pursue equitable access to privately provided services and amenities across the City; 4. Support policies that provide housing choices,including affordability,accessibility,and aging in place.2O It might also be noted that the Salt Lake City Transit Master Plan recommends,"Residential densities should be at least 10-12 households per acre for corridors that receive high-frequency transit investments and/or have more than 12-16 jobs per acre."21 It may be that single-room occupancy housing will increase the likelihood of bolstering high-frequency transit corridors. Single-Room Occuuancy In the last five years 5,697 apartment units have been built in Salt Lake City.Another 1,75o apartment units are under construction.22 Of the first figure, 1,464 units were affordable, and 1,057 affordable units are under construction for occupancy in the next two years.�3 The only single-room occupancy units left in Salt Lake City are the 5o rooms at the Rio Grande Hotel, 428 West 300 South.�4 Forty years ago Salt Lake City had about Boo single-room occupancy units.25 The Housing and Neighborhood Development Division describes single-room occupancy units as places with"a unique floor plan that increases housing affordability through efficiencies realized in shared amenities, as well as foster resident support systems."26 Studies read by City Council staff describe single-room occupancy hotels as the lowest-cost,permanent rental housing that is the lowest rung on the housing ladder and often occupied by the aged,disabled and working poor.27 According to one analysis of three San Francisco SRO hotels: "... In this research many of the residents were low-paid maids,janitors, and dishwashers.Their units enable them to save for a future for either themselves or their families. One middle-aged man who worked as a short order cook had save enough money by living in a io-foot by 13-foot room for over 20 years to send his four children to college.Another middle-aged woman who worked as a maid in a nearby hotel had saved enough money...to build a small home for her elderly mother."28 However,the studies noted that as urban areas changed single-room occupancy hotels either were demolished for newer building projects or were repurposed.A 2017 report by the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness on ending encampments of homeless people said San Francisco,"despite having more permanent supportive housing per capita than any other city," still was seeking ways to build more. "The city is in the process of advocating for addition units from affordable developers to become permanent supportive housing,and has used master leasing of SRO buildings as a key strategy to create units,"the report said.29 Area Resident Concerns The main concerns pertaining to the proposed ordinance raised by residents at the November 14, 2018, public hearing and in emails afterward were: o Potential effects on residential neighborhoods,even if single-room occupancy structures were next to,but not in,neighborhoods. o Single-room occupancy structures should be conditional uses instead of permitted uses. o Well-managed SROs,whose residents have passed background checks, are OK,but poorly run SROs would degrade neighborhoods. o How large would an SRO be? o The number of SROs allowed in one geographical area. o How can the City ensure that management regulations are enforced and not ignored? o SROs often are places of drug use and interpersonal violence requiring frequent visits by paramedics or police officers. o SROs should not be repurposed single-family homes or small unit complexes where neighbors are directly adjacent. 1 Council Planning Analyst Nick Tarbet,work session videotape December 1,2020, 1:38. Z Planning Director Nick Norris,work session videotape,Decemberl,2020,2:20-2:21:33. 3 Petition Initiation Request,Nick Norris,Mayor Jackie Biskupski,January 30,2018. 4 Petition Request,Nick Norris,Mayor Biskupski. 5 Nick Norris,City Council work session video,November 19,2019,21:26. 66 Planning Division Memorandum to Planning Commission,Ashley Scarff,November 14,2018,Page 4. Email,Nick Norris,December 15,2020. a Email,Nick Norris,December 15,2020. 9 Email,Nick Norris,December 15 2020. 10 U.S.cities used to have low-rent,short-term,dorm-style housing.Is that what Utah's homeless need?,Mathew Piper,Deseret News,September 1,2018. 11 The purpose of the R-1/5,000 single-family residential district is to provide for conventional single-family residential neighborhoods on lots not less than five thousand (5,000)square feet in size. The purpose of the R-2 single and two-family residential district is to preserve and protect for single-family dwellings the character of existing neighborhoods which exhibit a mix of single-and two-family dwellings by controlling the concentration of two-family dwelling units. Form-Based Urban Neighborhood 1: Generally includes small scale structures, up to two-and-one-half(2.5) stories in height,or relatively small lots with up to four dwelling units per lot depending on building type. Reuse of existing residential structures is encouraged. Development regulations are based on building type. The purpose of the RMF-35 moderate density multi-family residential district is to provide an environment suitable for a variety of moderate density housing types, including single-family, two-family, and multi-family dwellings with a maximum height of thirty five feet(35'). The purpose of the RMF-45 moderate/high density multi-family residential district is to provide an environment suitable for multi-family dwellings of a moderate/high density with a maximum building height of forty five feet(45'). The purpose of the R-MU residential/mixed use district is to reinforce the mixed use character of the area and encourage the development of areas as high density residential urban neighborhoods containing retail, service commercial, and small scale office uses. Form-Based Urban Neighborhood 2: generally included buildings up to four stories in height,with taller buildings, located on street corner parcels,which may contain a single use or a mix of commercial, office, and residential uses. Development regulations are based on building type,with the overall scale, form, and orientation of buildings as the primary focus. The purpose of the Residential/Business district is to create vibrant small scale retail, service, and office uses oriented to the local area within residential neighborhoods along higher volume streets. Development is in intended to be oriented to the street and pedestrian,while acknowledging the need for automobile access and parking. The CB community business district is intended to provide for the close integration of moderately sized commercial areas with adjacent residential neighborhoods while limiting adverse impacts through appropriate design standards. The purpose of the CG general commercial district is to provide an environment for a variety of commercial uses, some of which involve the outdoor display/storage of merchandise or materials. This district provides economic development opportunities through a mix of land uses, including retail sales and services, entertainment,office, residential, heavy commercial and low intensities of manufacturing and warehouse uses. The purpose of the D-2 downtown support commercial district is to provide an area that fosters the development of a sustainable urban neighborhood that accommodates commercial,office, residential and other uses that relate to and support the central business district. Development within the D-2 downtown support commercial district is intended to be less intensive than that of the central business district,with high lot coverage and buildings placed close to the sidewalk. The purpose of the D-1 central business district is to provide for commercial and economic development within Salt Lake City's most urban and intense areas. 12 Nick Norris,Salt Lake City Council work session video,April 14,2020,2:23:50. 13 Salt Lake City Council work session video,November 19,2019,25:29. 14 Nick Norris,City Council work session video,November 19,2019,21:26. 15 Transmittal,February 28,2020,Page 2. 16 Salt Lake City Council Minutes,December 12,2017. 17 Salt Lake City Planning Commission Minutes,November 14,2018 18 Emails,Orion Goff,Building Services Director,February 22,2019. 19 Salt Lake City Planning Commission Memorandum,Ashley Scarff,June 27,2018,Pages 3-4. 21 Scarff,June 27,Pages 4-5 21 Salt Lake City Transit Master Plan,Land Use&Place Making,Page 6-2. 22 Email,Heather Gilcrease,Development Review Supervisor,February 14,2019. 23 Email,Tony Milner and discussion,HAND Project and Policy Manager,February 14,2019. 24 U.S.cities used to have low-rent,short-term, dorm-style housing.Is that what Utah s homeless need?Matthew Piper, Deseret News,September 1,2018. 25 Matthew Piper,Deseret News. 26 Presentation,Tony Milner,Planning Commission meeting,November 14,2018. 27 Single Room Occupancy Residential Hotel Program,Innovations in American Government Awards,Harvard Kennedy School;Housing With Dignity,Mark Gillem and others. 28 Housing With Dignity,Mark Gillem and others. 29 Ending Homelessness for People Living in Encampments:Lessons from San Francisco, CA,U.S.Interagency Council on Homelessness,August 2017. Alcohol Related Establishments 21 A.36.300 D. Taverns, Bar Establishments, And Brewpubs; Authorized As Conditional Uses: Taverns, bar establishments, and brewpubs may be allowed as conditional uses pursuant to the provisions of 2hap p� [2j& of this title, and pursuant to subsection B of this section in zoning districts noted in the tables of permitted and conditional uses provided the following standards are achieved: 1. In approving a conditional use permit for a tavern, bar establishment, or brewpub, the Planning Commission shall: a. Require that a security and operations plan be prepared by the applicant and approved by the Salt Lake City Police Department and the building official, and filed with the City Recorder's Office, which shall include: (1) A complaint-response community relations program; and (2) A provision for a representative of the tavern, bar establishment, or brewpub to meet with neighbors upon request in order to attempt to resolve any neighborhood complaints regarding the operations on the business premises; (3) Design and construction requirements to ensure that any sound level originating within the premises, measured within fifteen feet (15') from an exterior wall or door thereof, does not exceed the maximum permissible sound level set forth for the applicable zoning district in title 9, chap i[ 9.:. . . of this Code; (4) A provision stating that live entertainment shall only be located within an enclosed building subject to the foregoing sound limit; (5) Prohibiting electronically amplified sound in any exterior portion of the premises; (6) Designation of a location for smoking tobacco outdoors in conformance with State law; (7) A provision stating that any trash strewn on the premises be collected and deposited in a trash receptacle by six o'clock (6:00) A.M. the following day, including any smoking and parking lot areas; and (8) A provision stating that portable trash receptacles on the premises be emptied daily and automated receptacles be emptied at least weekly. Automated receptacles shall be located only within a City approved trash storage area; and (9) A parking management plan which shall include consideration of the impact of parking on surrounding neighborhoods; b. Require a review and approval of the site and floor plan proposed for the premises by the Salt Lake City Police Department. Such review may require design features for the purpose of reducing alcohol related problems such as consumption by minors, driving under the influence, and public drunkenness; c. Require buffering where a tavern, bar establishment, or brewpub abuts a residentially zoned parcel. Said buffering shall include vegetative landscaping or walls along any property line or within any required yard area on the lot where the premises are located; d. Require that landscaping be located, and be of a type, that cannot be used as a hiding place; and e. Require that the exterior of the premises be maintained free of graffiti, including the main building, any accessory buildings or structures, and all signs. Graffiti shall be removed from the exterior of the premises within forty eight (48) hours, weather permitting. 2. If necessary to meet the standards for approval of a conditional use set forth in section „I A 5 4 tit of this title, the following conditions may be imposed: a. Limit the size and kind of signage located on the outside of any building in conformance with .chap p� [2j& of this title; b. Require parking area lighting to produce a minimum foot-candle that provides safe lighting for pedestrians, but does not intrude on residents' enjoyment of their homes; and c. Consider the proposed location of an outdoor smoking area in the security and operations plan and the potential effect on neighboring residences, businesses, and buildings and designating a new area if the potential effects of the area in the security and operations plan appear to adversely affect neighboring residences, businesses, and buildings. E. Minimum Area: In the CN and RB Zoning Districts, an alcohol related establishment shall only be allowed if such zoning district in which the alcohol related establishment is proposed is at least one-half(1/2)acre in contiguous area. F. Concentration Prohibited: In the CN and RB Zoning Districts, not more than one alcohol related establishment as noted in the table of permitted and conditional uses shall be located within six hundred feet (600') of another alcohol related establishment as measured linearly without regard to intervening structures from the nearest point on the property line of one establishment to the nearest point on the property line of the second establishment. In CB Zoning Districts, not more than one bar establishment, brewpub, or tavern shall be located within three hundred fifty feet (350') of another alcohol related establishment as measured linearly without regard to intervening structures from the nearest point of the property line of one establishment to the nearest point on the property line of the second establishment. (Ord. 23-18, 2018) UJIMMMUMMIMMY jL..h aA J ..J L. MI Oil Jill 11111 ............ .......... 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In summary, comments included: -Single occupancy housing providing an important niche for low-income population of the City; -Proposal should be expanded to other areas of the City as well as beyond Salt Lake City; and -Properly managed shared housing allowing for a new start/transitioning from homelessness. Shelley Bodily, Paul Johnson, Ryan O'Mahony, Michelle Goldberg, George Chapman, and Amy Hawkins spoke in opposition of the proposal. In summary, comments included: -Proposed housing/living style bringing more crime/negatively impacting the Ball Park area of the City; -Geographic limitations of the proposal being un-fair/equitable (targeting low-income areas west of State Street and lacking east/west geographical equity); -Shared housing should be dispersed across the State/integrated into every City; -More beneficial to integrate shared housing into existing/newly built apartment buildings (promoting more diversity/redistributing equity of housing across the community); -Proposed ordinance would discourage the building of high-density housing in Salt Lake City (implement inclusionary zoning instead); and -Shared/low-cost housing causing increased loitering and encouraging/enabling criminal behavior. Council staff emails: November 17, 2020 • This is great. It will give the possibility diversify the city. Shared housing is great for getting homeless back on track and also students would love to see more option around the city. Make sure there is still commercial property for restaurants and shops in the neighborhood. Most likely people in shared housing do not have a car or money for public transit. Let's make it a walkable city. • Finally ! Salt Lake City needs to realize that our city is growing and not in the traditional Utah family values model, along with the always rising cost and the wages that are paid to many that keep our city running. SRO's will help to reestablish a network of much need housing if developed properly. Utilize the vast inventory of city owned ground that may fall short of the current antiquated building codes for lot size and setbacks. This should be a no brainer,just do it! • Shared Housing/SRO's are a management nightmare. I used to manage an SRO near the University of Utah where tenants shared a kitchen and bathrooms. There were often problems with people leaving messes (including going to the bathroom in showers), stealing food, or personality conflicts. Micro-units (similar to suite hotel units)would be better so everyone has their own kitchenette and small bathroom. It provides a more dignified yet affordable housing solution for people. The Council should consider on-site management, social services, en suite bathroom and food preparation. Council staff email November 16, 2020 I noticed an article today informing residents that the City Council might be approving some areas of Salt Lake for Single Room Occupancy and Shared Housing buildings. I can certainly see the need for these buildings. But my question is,will this affect our neighborhood here? You are more aware than anyone how this would affect this area. This are being TSA Zoned and then to have that added to our zoning would be a mess. I realize I may be late. But I wanted to urge you to please consider how the residents in this area have pleaded for some sort of protection when it comes the overdevelopment and preservation of this neighborhood. I hope that our past discussions and the various other conversations you have had with the constituents of this area will have some effect on the decisions you and the other council members will be making shortly. Council staff email November 10, 2020. I have attached the letter I wrote to the Planning Commission, along with comments from Sugar House residents,when we discussed this in November of 2018. I don't want you to have to find it in the 1200 page Staff Report and I want to be sure you read it. In general,the concept is a good one, and this provides a good stepping point for someone, or a family, as they transition from homeless to independent living. I suppose for some,it might become permanent housing. There are some flaws in your plan. First,you clearly have no idea what the cost of land is in Sugar House, or you wouldn't have included these parcels. Here are a few examples: Park Ave MF 1.77 acres sold for$go a square foot. Dreyers purchase was a little less but similar. 24 hour fitness will sell for north of$140 per square foot dirt. Holy crap it's expensive.That equates to $446 million an acre.-- Sizzler $too a foot $7 million. .80 of an acre If these are built by an agency,they should not be spending that kind of money because they will never recoup that expense. So they won't be building them, and no developer in her right mind will not build an SRO either.Any SRO built in Sugar House will NOT be affordable. And, I don't see much in the draft ordinance, or the existing ordinance that talks about the care and upkeep of these facilities, and the behavior expected of the tenants. The only thing is there needs to be a full time manager on site 24/7. These things notoriously turn into slums, and you need to have some sort of active participation by the city to see that these stay clean and nice facilities at all times, so the tenants learn how to be responsible citizens. I want to see in writing how that will happen.There must be a reason why we used to have a lot of these in town, and now we are down to two. We don't want these run by landlords looking to make a buck who spend nothing to maintain the spaces. There are enough of these in town. A former fire chief provided a comment(attached)that said these places have good intentions but usually are places of drug use and interpersonal violence,requiring frequent visits from police or paramedics.That should be not allowed in the code of conduct for admission as a resident of the building. I think these should be a conditional use with design review,to make sure they are well designed to serve the purpose. Maybe they need support services included. Or the population is screened, and those that need services go in certain buildings, and the college student who is dead broke is allowed in another building. Maybe there needs to be compliance with the Utah fit Premises Act, and the landlord and renter each sign saying they will comply with their part of the bargain. You know that this is premature,you need to get all the rules and regulations written BEFORE you approve this, And you need to use the people who are doing the Rio Grande to help you and train others,to do this right. All human beings deserve a decent place to live, and we don't want to be building tomorrow's slums today. LEGISLATIVE DRAFT 1 SALT LAKE CITY ORDINANCE 2 No. of 2020 3 (An ordinance amending various sections of Title 21A 4 of the Salt Lake City Code pertaining to single room occupancy (SRO)uses (to be called Shared 5 housing uses)) 6 7 An ordinance amending various sections of Title 2 1 A of the Sall Lake City Code pertaining 8 to single room occupancy (SRO)uses (to be called shared housing uses)pursuant to Petition No. 9 PLNPCM2018-00066. 10 WHEREAS, the Salt Lake City Planning Commission held public hearings on June 27, 2018 11 and November 14, 2018 to consider a request by then-Salt Lake City Mayor Jacqueline Biskupski 12 (Petition No. PLNPCM2018-00066)to clarify the definition and appropriate locations of single 13 room occupancy (SRO)uses and amend Subsection 21A.30.040.C.1; Sections 21A.33.020, 14 21A.33.030, 21A.33.035, 21A.33.050, 21A.33.060, 21A.33.070, 21A.33.080, 21A.36.360; 15 Subsection 21A.44.030.G.1; Section 21A.60.020; and Section 21A.62.040 of the SaltLake City Code; 16 and 17 WHEREAS, at its November 14, 2018 hearing, the planning commission voted in favor of 18 recommending to the Salt Lake City Council that the city council amend the above listed sections of 19 Title 2 1 A of the Sall Lake City Code identified herein; and 20 WHEREAS,the city council held briefings on this petition,which resulted in several 21 modifications, including changing the name of"single room occupancy"uses to"shared housing" 22 uses; and 23 WHEREAS, the Salt Lake City Council finds, after holding a public hearing on this 24 matter, that adopting this ordinance is in the city's best interests. 25 NOW, THEREFORE, be it ordained by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah: LEGISLATIVE DRAFT 26 SECTION 1. Amending the Text of Sall Lake City Code Subsection 21A.30.040.C. That 27 Subsection 21A.30.040.0 (Zoning: Downtown Districts: D-3 Downtown Warehouse/Residential 28 District: Controls over Mixed Use) of the Salt Lake City Code shall be and hereby is amended to 29 read as follows: 30 1. Buildings containing commercial/office uses located above the second story shall 31 incorporate i au 32 residential uses allowed in the zoning district, bed and breakfast, or hotel uses in the 33 amount of at least fifty percent(50%) of the total floor area of the building; 34 35 2. Commercial/office uses shall be permitted as the sole use in two story buildings only; and 36 37 3. Commercial/office uses in buildings of three (3) stories or more without 38 residential uses shall be allowed only as a conditional use and then only when 39 the applicant has demonstrated that the proposed location is not suitable for 40 residential use. 41 42 SECTION 2. Amending the Text of Sall Lake City Code Section 21A.33.020. That Section 43 21A.33.020 of the SaltLake City Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and 44 Conditional Uses for Residential Districts) shall be and hereby is amended to add a new use category 45 titled,"Shared housing"to the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Residential Districts,which 46 use category shall be inserted into that table in alphabetical order and shall read and appear in that table as 47 follows: 48 FR- FR- FR- R- R- R- SR SR SR R RMF- RMF- RMF- RMF- R- R- R- RO 1/43, 2/21, 3/12, 1/12, 1/7, 115, -1 -2 -3 -2 30 35 45 75 MU- MU- MU 560 780 000 000 000 000 35 45 P P P Shared housin 49 LEGISLATIVE DRAFT 50 SECTION 3. Amending the Text of Sall Lake City Code Section 21A.33.030. That Section 51 21A.33.030 of the Sall Lake City Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and 52 Conditional Uses for Commercial Districts) shall be and hereby is amended as follows: 53 a. That the use category titled"Single room occupancy"in the Table of Permitted and 54 Conditional Uses for Commercial Districts shall be amended to read as follows: CN CB CS' CC CSHBD' CG SNB sioRle v icr�rn 55 56 b. That a new use category titled "Shared housing" shall be inserted into the Table of 57 Permitted and Conditional Uses for Commercial Districts in alphabetical order under the 58 "Dwelling"category and shall read and appear in that table as follows: CN CB CS' CC CSHBD' CG SNB Shared housing P P P 59 60 SECTION 4. Amending the Text of Sall Lake City Code Section 21A.33.035. That Section 61 21A.33.035 of the Sall Lake City Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and 62 Conditional Uses for Transit Station Area Districts) shall be and hereby is amended as follows: 63 a. That the use category titled"Single room occupancy"in the Table of Permitted and 64 Conditional Uses for Transit Station Area Districts shall be amended to read as follows: TSA-UC TSA-UN TSA-MUEC TSA-SP Core Transition Core Transition Core Transition Core Transition 65 66 b. That a new use category titled "Shared housing" shall be inserted into the Table of 67 Permitted and Conditional Uses for Transit Station Area Districts in alphabetical order under 68 the"Dwelling"category and shall read and appear in that table as follows: LEGISLATIVE DRAFT 69 70 TSA-UC TSA-UN TSA-MUEC TSA-SP Core Transition Core Transition Core Transition Core Transition Shared housing P P P P P P P P 71 72 SECTION 5. Amending the Text of Sall Lake City Code Section 21A.33.050. That Section 73 21A.33.050 of the Sall Lake City Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and 74 Conditional Uses for Downtown Districts) shall be and hereby is amended to add a new use category 75 titled,"Shared housing"to the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Downtown Districts,which 76 use category shall be inserted into that table in alphabetical order and shall read and appear in that table as 77 follows: D-1 D-2 D-3 D-4 gioRle i9=. Shared P_ P_ P_ P_ housin 78 79 80 SECTION 6. Amending the Text of Sall Lake City Code Section 21A.33.060. That Section 81 21A.33.060 of the SaltLake City Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and 82 Conditional Uses in the Gateway District) shall be and hereby is amended to add a new use category 83 titled,"Shared housing"to the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses in the Gateway District,which 84 use category shall be inserted into that table in alphabetical order and shall read and appear in that table as 85 follows: 86 G-MU Sit4RI.r .aurr Shared P_ housin 87 LEGISLATIVE DRAFT 88 SECTION 7. Amending the Text of Sall Lake City Code Section 21A.33.070. That Section 89 21A.33.070 of the Sall Lake City Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and 90 Conditional Uses for Special Purpose Districts) shall be and hereby is amended to add a new use 91 category titled, "Shared housing" to the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Special Purpose 92 Districts,which use category shall be inserted into that table in alphabetical order and shall read and 93 appear in that table as follows: RP BP FP AG AG-2 AG-5 AG-20 OS NOS A PL PL-2 I UI ME EI MU P °Shared housin 94 95 96 SECTION 8. Amending the Text of Sall Lake City Code Section 21A.33.080. That Section 97 21A.33.080 of the Sall Lake City Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and 98 Conditional Uses in Form Based Districts) shall be and hereby is amended as follows: 99 a. That the use category titled"Single room occupancy"in the Table of Permitted and 100 Conditional Uses in Form Based Districts shall be amended to read as follows: FB-UN1 FB-UN2 FB-SC FB-SE 101 102 b. That a new use category titled "Shared housing" shall be inserted into the Table of 103 Permitted and Conditional Uses in Form Based Districts in alphabetical order under the 104 "Dwelling"category and shall read and appear in that table as follows: FB-UN1 FB-UN2 FB-SC FB-SE Shared housing P P P 105 106 LEGISLATIVE DRAFT 107 SECTION 9. Adopting Section 21A.36.360 of Sall Lake City Code. That Chapter 21A.36 of 108 the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: General Provisions) shall be and hereby is amended to adopt a new 109 Section 21A.36.360, which shall read and appear as follows: 110 111 21A.36.360: QUALIFYING PROVISIONS FOR THE aTtl" - -nnAa n��Tm n rr�v 112 ) SHARED HOUSING USE: 113 114 The shared housing use, as defined in Chapter 21A.62 of this 115 title, shall be allowed in zoning districts id@otW=i-&d as provided in Chapter 21A.33 "Land Use 116 Tables," and are subject to the following_provisions: 117 118 A. The shared housing use shall be subject to the same lot and bulk requirements as the 119 multi-family dwelling use, but not the density requirements of the underlying zone. 120 121 B. Maximum Occupancy of Sleeping Rooms: Each sleeping room contained within the 122 individual shared housing unit shall house a maximum of 2 people. 123 124 AC. Minimum Floor Area of Sleeping Rooms: Each ra: ,:a,, ' „ k sleepingrom 125 contained within the individual shared housing unit shall eoou�* include a minimum of 126 100 square feet of floor area for a single tenant, or a minimum of 120 square feet of floor 127 area for two (2)tenants. 128 129 1. The floor area of each „r4 sleeping- room shall be calculated as the sum of 130 the gross horizontal area of the unit measured from the interior face of interior walls. 131 132 2. Calculation of this area shall not include th@=afmo spaces consumed by 133 _ i Rf0 bath~ closets/storage, mechanical equipment_ or 134 appljances.-Q--,-Q-- : ,.'„a,.a . AWL- r y :ra: ,:a,, , r4 135 136 41). Communal Areas: In an effort to provide sufficient accommodations for socializing 137 and meeting,Gcommunal areas including, but not limited to= libraries, lounges, 138 recreation rooms, dining rooms, and laundry rooms, Rod that are 139 accessible to all residents of the&R=Q shared housingdevelopment 140 shall be included, and shall meet 141 the following requirements: 142 143 1. The total amount of communal area shall have a minimum of twenty (20) square feet 144 per sleepingroom oom ,5 = M*"5o Px tL,- *o*Q' 145 floo.. Px Q11 :ra: ,:a,, 1=4Q. 146 LEGISLATIVE DRAFT 147 148 c 'z.'z.. Px P , r4 8--8-2,.., ,.,,ti:r,.a :r 149 2 A"CA., 150 LQtL 151 152 153 26. Areas including, but not limited to=kitchens and bathrooms shared between 154 multiple units, hallways and corridors, storage areas (including bicycle storage), 155 operations and maintenance areas, or management areas and offices may not be 156 counted toward the communal area requirement. 157 158 GE. Management: 159 160 1. A shared housingdevelopment may include an office for the purpose of managing the 161 living units and common facilities, and/or one self-contained living unit with private 162 kitchen and bathroom facilities for a manager or caretaker. 163 164 +2. A property manager shall be on site twenty-four(24) hours a day, who will be 165 responsible for the conduct, operation, and maintenance of the&R=Q=shared housing 166 development. 167 168 23. All communal areas that are accessible to all tenants of the&R=Q shared housin_ 169 with the exception of bathrooms_ shall be continuously monitored by security 170 cameras. 171 172 F. Accessibility: All areas of a shared housingdevelopment shall be designed to be 173 universally accessible as required by the construction codes adopted by the Utah Building 174 Code Commission to be used statewide,by the political subdivisions of the State ftpgk� 175 F-a a-Q' Qr a QtQt,. I ,..,, Individual units and sleeping rooms required to be universally 176 accessible by the adopted building code shall be located on the ground floor. If more units and 177 sleeping rooms are required than what can be accommodated on the ground floor,the units 178 may be located on other floors within the building, if an elevator is required and provided. 179 180 181 SECTION 10. Amending the Text of Sall Lake City Code Subsection 21A.44.030.G.1. That 182 Table 21A.44.030 under Subsection 21A.44.030.G.1 of the SaltLake City Code (Zoning: Off Street 183 Parking, Mobility and Loading: Number of Off Street Parking Spaces Required: Schedule of 184 Minimum Off Street Parking Requirements) shall be and hereby is amended as follows: LEGISLATIVE DRAFT 185 a. Amending the use category "Multiple-family dwellings."That the use category 186 titled"Multiple-family dwellings" shall be amended to read and appear as 187 follows: Residential Multiple-family dwellings' 2 parking spaces for each dwelling unit containing 2 or more bedrooms 1 parking space for 1 bedroom and efficiency dwelling 188 189 b. Adding the use category "Shared housing."That a new use category titled, 190 "Shared housing" shall be added to the Schedule of Minimum Off Street 191 Parking Requirements,which use category shall be inserted into that table in 192 alphabetical order under"Residential"and shall read and appear in that table as 193 follows: Residential Sitig e wossopwqsk ern.,` Shared '/2 parking space per:-,a:-- Sleepin room housin 194 195 SECTION 11. Amending the Text of SaltLake City Code Section 21A.60.020. That Section 196 21A.60.020 of the SaltLake City Code(Zoning: List of Terms: List of Defined Terms), shall be and 197 hereby is amended as follows: 198 a. Deleting the term "Dwelling,single room occupancy." That the term"Dwelling, 199 single room occupancy"shall be amended as follows: 200 Dig 201 b. Adding the term "Shared housing". That the term"Shared housing"shall be 202 inserted in the list of defined terms in alphabetical order,to read as follows: LEGISLATIVE DRAFT 203 Shared housing. 204 c. Adding the term "Sleeping room". That the term"Sleeping room"shall be 205 inserted in the list of defined terms in alphabetical order,to read as follows: 206 Sleeping room. 207 208 SECTION 12. Amending the Text of Sall Lake City Code Section 21A.62.040. That Section 209 21A.62.040 of the SaltLake City Code(Zoning: Definitions: Definitions of Terms), shall be and hereby is 210 amended as follows: 211 a. Amending the definition of"Dwelling."That the definition of"Dwelling"shall 212 be amended to read as follows: 213 DWELLING: A building or portion thereof, which is designated for residential 214 purposes of a family for occupancy on a monthly basis and which is a self-contained 215 unit with kitchen and bathroom facilities. The term "dwelling" excludes living space 216 within hotels, bed and breakfast establishments, .paFtmei t h shared housing 217 developments boarding houses and 218 lodging houses. 219 220 b. Amending the definition of"Dwelling, single room occupancy."That the 221 definition of"Dwelling, single room occupancy"shall be amended to read as 222 follows: 223 224 225 226 227 c. Adding the definition of"Shared housing." That the definition of"Shared 228 housing"be added and inserted into the list of definitions in alphabetical 229 order to read as follows: 230 SHARED HOUSING: A building, or portion thereof, that is designated for residential 231 purposes and contains individual housing units that may be occupied on a weekly or 232 monthly basis. Each individual housing unit consists of one or more sleepingroms 233 and may contain either kitchen or bathroom amenities_ but not both. Whichever 234 amenities are not contained within the individual unit(the kitchen, bathroom. or bothl LEGISLATIVE DRAFT 235 shall be provided as a common facility within the same building to be shared with 236 other tenants of the shared housingdevelopment. 237 238 d. Adding the definition of"Sleeping room." That the definition of"sleeping 239 room"be added and inserted into the list of definitions in alphabetical order 240 to read as follows: 241 SLEEPING ROOM: A room within a shared housing land use that is 242 identified and used for sleeping purposes. 243 244 245 SECTION 13. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall become effective on the date of its first 246 publication. 247 248 Passed by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah this day of 249 , 2020. 250 251 CHAIRPERSON 252 253 ATTEST: 254 255 256 CITY RECORDER 257 258 259 Transmitted to Mayor on 260 261 262 Mayor's Action: Approved. Vetoed. 263 264 265 266 MAYOR 267 268 269 CITY RECORDER 270 271 (SEAL) 272 LEGISLATIVE DRAFT 273 Bill No. of 2020. 274 Published: 275 276 277 Ordinance amending single room occupancy regulations SALT LAKE CITY ORDINANCE No. of 2020 (An ordinance amending various sections of Title 21A of the Salt Lake City Code pertaining to single room occupancy (SRO)uses (to be called Shared housing uses)) An ordinance amending various sections of Title 2 1 A of the Salt Lake City Code pertaining to single room occupancy (SRO)uses (to be called shared housing uses)pursuant to Petition No. PLNPCM2018-00066. WHEREAS, the Salt Lake City Planning Commission held public hearings on June 27, 2018 and November 14, 2018 to consider a request by then-Salt Lake City Mayor Jacqueline Biskupski (Petition No. PLNPCM2018-00066)to clarify the definition and appropriate locations of single room occupancy (SRO)uses and amend Subsection 21A.30.040.C.1; Sections 21A.33.020, 21A.33.030, 21A.33.035, 21A.33.050, 21A.33.060, 21A.33.070, 21A.33.080, 21A.36.360; Subsection 21A.44.030.G.1; Section 21A.60.020; and Section 21A.62.040 of the SaltLake City Code; and WHEREAS, at its November 14, 2018 hearing, the planning commission voted in favor of recommending to the Salt Lake City Council that the city council amend the above listed sections of Title 2 1 A of the Sall Lake City Code identified herein; and WHEREAS,the city council held briefings on this petition,which resulted in several modifications, including changing the name of"single room occupancy"uses to"shared housing" uses; and WHEREAS, the Salt Lake City Council finds, after holding a public hearing on this matter, that adopting this ordinance is in the city's best interests. NOW, THEREFORE, be it ordained by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah: SECTION 1. Amending the Text of Salt Lake City Code Subsection 21A.30.040.C. That Subsection 21A.30.040.0 (Zoning: Downtown Districts: D-3 Downtown Warehouse/Residential District: Controls over Mixed Use) of the Salt Lake City Code shall be and hereby is amended to read as follows: 1. Buildings containing commercial/office uses located above the second story shall incorporate any residential uses allowed in the zoning district, bed and breakfast, or hotel uses in the amount of at least fifty percent(50%) of the total floor area of the building; 2. Commercial/office uses shall be permitted as the sole use in two story buildings only; and 3. Commercial/office uses in buildings of three (3) stories or more without residential uses shall be allowed only as a conditional use and then only when the applicant has demonstrated that the proposed location is not suitable for residential use. SECTION 2. Amending the Text of Salt Lake City Code Section 21A.33.020. That Section 21A.33.020 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Residential Districts) shall be and hereby is amended to add a new use category titled, "Shared housing"to the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Residential Districts,which use category shall be inserted into that table in alphabetical order and shall read and appear in that table as follows: FR- FR- FR- R- R- R- SR SR SR R RMF- RMF- RMF- RMF- R- R- R- RO 1/43, 2/21, 3/12, 1/12, 1/7, 115, -1 -2 -3 -2 30 35 45 75 MU- MU- MU 560 780 000 000 000 000 35 45 Shared P P P housing SECTION 3. Amending the Text of Salt Lake City Code Section 21A.33.030. That Section 21A.33.030 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Commercial Districts) shall be and hereby is amended as follows: a. That the use category titled"Single room occupancy"in the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Commercial Districts shall be deleted. b. That a new use category titled "Shared housing" shall be inserted into the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Commercial Districts in alphabetical order under the "Dwelling"category and shall read and appear in that table as follows: CN CB CS' CC CSHBD' CG SNB Shared housing P P P SECTION 4. Amending the Text of Salt Lake City Code Section 2IA.33.035. That Section 2IA.33.035 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Transit Station Area Districts) shall be and hereby is amended as follows: a. That the use category titled"Single room occupancy"in the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Transit Station Area Districts shall be deleted. b. That a new use category titled "Shared housing" shall be inserted into the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Transit Station Area Districts in alphabetical order under the"Dwelling"category and shall read and appear in that table as follows: TSA-UC TSA-UN TSA-MUEC TSA-SP Core Transition Core Transition Core Transition Core Transition Shared housing P P P P P P P P SECTION 5. Amending the Text of Salt Lake City Code Section 2IA.33.050. That Section 2IA.33.050 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Downtown Districts) shall be and hereby is amended to add a new use category titled, "Shared housing"to the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Downtown Districts,which use category shall be inserted into that table in alphabetical order and shall read and appear in that table as follows: D-1 D-2 D-3 D-4 Shared housing P P P P SECTION 6. Amending the Text of Salt Lake City Code Section 21A.33.060. That Section 21A.33.060 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses in the Gateway District) shall be and hereby is amended to add a new use category titled, "Shared housing"to the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses in the Gateway District,which use category shall be inserted into that table in alphabetical order and shall read and appear in that table as follows: G-MU Shared housing P SECTION 7. Amending the Text of Salt Lake City Code Section 21A.33.070. That Section 21A.33.070 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Special Purpose Districts) shall be and hereby is amended to add a new use category titled, "Shared housing" to the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Special Purpose Districts,which use category shall be inserted into that table in alphabetical order and shall read and appear in that table as follows: RP BP FP AG AG-2 AG-5 AG-20 OS NOS A PL PL-2 I UI ME EI MU Shared housing P SECTION 8. Amending the Text of Salt Lake City Code Section 21A.33.080. That Section 21A.33.080 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses in Form Based Districts) shall be and hereby is amended as follows: a. That the use category titled"Single room occupancy"in the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses in Form Based Districts shall be deleted. b. That a new use category titled "Shared housing" shall be inserted into the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses in Form Based Districts in alphabetical order under the "Dwelling"category and shall read and appear in that table as follows: FB-tTNI FB-tTN2 FB-SC FB-SE Shared housing P P P SECTION 9. Adopting Section 21A.36.360 of Sall Lake City Code. That Chapter 21A.36 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: General Provisions) shall be and hereby is amended to adopt a new Section 21A.36.360, which shall read and appear as follows: 21A.36.360: QUALIFYING PROVISIONS FOR THE SHARED HOUSING USE: The shared housing use, as defined in Chapter 21A.62 of this title, shall be allowed in zoning districts as provided in Chapter 21A.33 "Land Use Tables," and are subject to the following provisions: A. The shared housing use shall be subject to the same lot and bulk requirements as the multi-family dwelling use, but not the density requirements of the underlying zone. B. Maximum Occupancy of Sleeping Rooms: Each sleeping room contained within the individual shared housing unit shall house a maximum of 2 people. C. Minimum Floor Area of Sleeping Rooms: Each sleeping room contained within the individual shared housing unit shall include a minimum of 100 square feet of floor area for a single tenant, or a minimum of 120 square feet of floor area for two (2)tenants. 1. The floor area of each sleeping room shall be calculated as the sum of the gross horizontal area of the unit measured from the interior face of interior walls. 2. Calculation of this area shall not include spaces consumed by closets/storage, mechanical equipment, or appliances. D. Communal Areas: In an effort to provide sufficient accommodations for socializing and meeting, communal areas including, but not limited to libraries, lounges, recreation rooms, dining rooms, and laundry rooms that are accessible to all residents of the shared housing development shall be included, and shall meet the following requirements: 1. The total amount of communal area shall have a minimum of twenty (20) square feet per sleeping room. 2. Areas including, but not limited to kitchens and bathrooms shared between multiple units, hallways and corridors, storage areas (including bicycle storage), operations and maintenance areas, or management areas and offices may not be counted toward the communal area requirement. E. Management: 1. A shared housing development may include an office for the purpose of managing the living units and common facilities, and/or one self-contained living unit with private kitchen and bathroom facilities for a manager or caretaker. 2. A property manager shall be on site twenty-four(24) hours a day, who will be responsible for the conduct, operation, and maintenance of the shared housing development. 3. All communal areas that are accessible to all tenants of the shared housing, with the exception of bathrooms, shall be continuously monitored by security cameras. F. Accessibility: All areas of a shared housing development shall be designed to be universally accessible as required by the construction codes adopted by the Utah Building Code Commission to be used statewide,by the political subdivisions of the State. Individual units and sleeping rooms required to be universally accessible by the adopted building code shall be located on the ground floor. If more units and sleeping rooms are required than what can be accommodated on the ground floor,the units may be located on other floors within the building, if an elevator is required and provided. SECTION 10. Amending the Text of Salt Lake City Code Subsection 21A.44.030.G.1. That Table 21A.44.030 under Subsection 21A.44.030.G.1 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Off Street Parking, Mobility and Loading: Number of Off Street Parking Spaces Required: Schedule of Minimum Off Street Parking Requirements) shall be and hereby is amended as follows: a. Amending the use category "Multiple-family dwellings."That the use category titled"Multiple-family dwellings" shall be amended to read and appear as follows: Residential Multiple-family dwellings' 2 parking spaces for each dwelling unit containing 2 or more bedrooms 1 parking space for 1 bedroom and efficiency dwelling b. Adding the use category "Shared housing."That a new use category titled, "Shared housing" shall be added to the Schedule of Minimum Off Street Parking Requirements,which use category shall be inserted into that table in alphabetical order under"Residential"and shall read and appear in that table as follows: Residential Shared housing '/2 parking space per sleeping room SECTION 11. Amending the Text of Sall Lake City Code Section 21A.60.020. That Section 21A.60.020 of the Sall Lake City Code(Zoning: List of Terms: List of Defined Terms), shall be and hereby is amended as follows: a. Deleting the term"Dwelling, single room occupancy." That the term"Dwelling, single room occupancy"shall be deleted. b. Adding the term"Shared housing". That the term "Shared housing"shall be inserted in the list of defined terms in alphabetical order,to read as follows: Shared housing. c. Adding the term"Sleeping room". That the term"Sleeping room"shall be inserted in the list of defined terms in alphabetical order,to read as follows: Sleeping room. SECTION 12. Amending the Text of SaltLake City Code Section 21A.62.040. That Section 21A.62.040 of the Sall Lake City Code(Zoning: Definitions: Definitions of Terms), shall be and hereby is amended as follows: a. Amending the definition of"Dwelling."That the definition of"Dwelling"shall be amended to read as follows: DWELLING: A building or portion thereof, which is designated for residential purposes of a family for occupancy on a monthly basis and which is a self-contained unit with kitchen and bathroom facilities. The term "dwelling" excludes living space within hotels, bed and breakfast establishments, shared housing developments, boarding houses and lodging houses. b. Amending the definition of"Dwelling, single room occupancy."That the definition of"Dwelling,single room occupancy"shall be deleted. c. Adding the definition of"Shared housing." That the definition of"Shared housing"be added and inserted into the list of definitions in alphabetical order to read as follows: SHARED HOUSING: A building, or portion thereof, that is designated for residential purposes and contains individual housing units that may be occupied on a weekly or monthly basis. Each individual housing unit consists of one or more sleeping rooms and may contain either kitchen or bathroom amenities, but not both. Whichever amenities are not contained within the individual unit(the kitchen, bathroom, or both) shall be provided as a common facility within the same building, to be shared with other tenants of the shared housing development. d. Adding the definition of"Sleeping room." That the definition of"sleeping room"be added and inserted into the list of definitions in alphabetical order to read as follows: SLEEPING ROOM: A room within a shared housing land use that is identified and used for sleeping purposes. SECTION 13. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall become effective on the date of its first publication. Passed by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah this day of , 2020. CHAIRPERSON ATTEST: CITY RECORDER Transmitted to Mayor on Mayor's Action: Approved. Vetoed. MAYOR CITY RECORDER APPROVED AS TO FORM Salt Lake City Attomey's Office (SEAL) Date: ly 20 020 Bill No. of 2020. By P u elson,S zor City Attorrrey Published: Ordinance amending single room occupancy regulations(final) ERIN MENDENHALL DEPARTMENT of COMMUNITY Mayor `'' , and NEIGHBORHOODS �= = Marcia L.White rfi= Director IT CITY COUNCIL TRANSMITTAL V4,"AR Date Received: ( l achel Otto, Chief of Staff Date sent to Council: . 7� .- — TO: Salt Lake City Council DATE: ' Chris Wharton, Chair FRO : M rci L. White, Director Department of Community & Neighborhoods SUBJECT: Revised Transmittal re: Petition PLNPCM2018-00066- Shared Housing Zoning Text Amendments (formerly titled-Single Room Occupancy(SRO) Text Amendments) STAFF CONTACT: Ashley Ogden, RDA Project Manager(formerly Principal Planner) (801) 535-7207, ashle .og ien(r>slcgov.com DOCUMENT TYPE: Ordinance RECOMMENDATION: Adopt the attached ordinance, which has been revised in response to feedback received during the City Council public hearing held on April 23, 2019, a meeting with local housing advocates held on October 22, 2019, and direction received from the Council during the November 19, 2019, work session. BUDGET IMPACT: None BACKGROUND/DISCUSSION: This is a follow up briefing memo to the existing transmittal package for this proposal and includes the following updated information: On March 19, 2019, Planning Division Staff briefed the City Council on a Mayor-initiated proposal to amend sections of the Zoning Ordinance to better define Single Room Occupancy (SRO) housing and determine appropriate locations within the City for the use. Proposed amendments included changing the existing definition of SRO Dwelling, expanding the number of zoning districts that permit SROs, and creating qualifying provisions for the use. The Council held a public hearing on April 23, 2019, where numerous residents with differing views provided comment: some expressed concerns with the potential negative impacts of SRO SALT LAKE CITY CORPORATION 451 SOUTH STATE STREET, ROOM 404 WWW.SLC.GOV P.O. BOX 145486,SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84114-5486 TEL 801.535.6230 FAX 801.535.6005 developments, and some felt that the ordinance didn't go far enough, and that the use would be restricted to parts of the City that were historically reserved for undesirable uses and lower- income and minority residents through redlining practices. In an effort to address equity concerns, Council Staff organized a meeting with local housing advocates who had provided comments at the public hearing, representatives from the Community & Neighborhoods (CAN)Department, and Councilmembers Fowler and Mendenhall on October 22, 2019. A constructive conversation was had regarding the terminology used, accessibility of the units, the history of discriminatory zoning and lending practices, and the City's immediate need for the SRO housing type versus more long-term Zoning Ordinance reform, The item was scheduled for,another Council briefing on November 19, 2019, where Planning Director Nick Norris described how the City's existing zoning only permits residential uses on 21% of the City's land area, with 12% of that area reserved exclusively for single-family uses. When Staff identified zoning districts that are appropriate for the SRO use, they included districts that already permit uses with similar levels of intensity such as multi-family residential dwellings. Because higher density housing is only permitted on approximately 9% of the City's land, the proposed locations for SROs are limited. Councilmembers indicated that due to the City's immediate need for more affordable housing types they were willing to adopt the text amendment as proposed but expressed an interest in taking a deeper look into the way the City is currently zoned and tackling unintended impediments to constructing housing. In response to feedback received at the October 22 meeting with housing advocates, Planning Staff requested to transmit a revised ordinance with a new name for the use and added accessibility requirements—Councilmembers agreed. The revised ordinance is attached and the following changes have been made: 1, The terin 'Single Room Occupancy (SRO)' has been changed to 'Shared Housing.' 2. Shared Housing is defined as follows: A building, or portion thereof, that is designated fbr residential purposes and contains individual housing units that may be occupied on a weekly or monthly basis. Each individual housing unil, consists qf'one or more sleeping rooms and may contain either kitchen or bathroom amenities, but not both. Whichever amenities are not contained ivithin the individual unit (the kitchen, bathroom, or both) shall be provided as a common fiacility within the same building, to be shared ivith other, tenants of the shared housing development. 3. Under this definition, a Shared Housing development could contain individual housing units with multiple separate sleeping rooms, rather than each housing unit being limited to one sleeping room as previously proposed, This change provides more flexibility in design and allows for Shared Housing developments that serve families rather than just singles or couples. 4. All requirements formerly proposed for individual sleeping rooms (maximum occupancy, minimum square footage, etc.) still apply. 5. A general provision was added that requires all aspects of a Shared Housing development to be accessible to and usable by people with disabilities as Outlined in applicable federal and state laws. PUBLIC PROCESS: Since the initial transmittal, this petition has been briefed to the Council twice, and one public hearing was held. In addition, select COUncilmernbers and Council Staff held a meeting that included CAN Staff, Pamela Atkinson (local housing advocate), Brent Willis (Current operator of the only SRO in Salt Lake City, the Rio Grande Hotel), and representatives of the Disability Law Center and Utah I-Iousing Coalition, V. EXHIB1170; 1) Revised Ordinance =LEGISLATIVE DRAFT I SALT LAKE CITY ORDINANCE 2 No. of202O 3 (An ordinance amending various, sections of Title 2 1 A 4 of the,halt Lake City Co4le pertaining to single room occupancy (SRO) uses (to be called Shared 5 housing uses)) 6 7 An ordinance amending various sections of Title 21 A of the Salt Lake City Code pertaining 8 to single room occupancy (SRO) uses (to be called shared housing uses) pursuant to Petition No. 9 PLNPCM2018-00066, 10 WHEREAS, the Salt Lake City Planning Commission held public hearings on June 27, 2018 11 and November 14, 2018 to consider a request by then-Salt Lake City Mayor Jacqueline Biskupski 12 (Petition No. P,LNPCM2018-00066) to clarify the definition and appropriate locations of single 13 room occupancy (SRO) uses and amend Subsection 21 A.30.040.C.1 ; Sections 21 A.33.020, 14 21A.31030, 21A.33.035, 21A.33.050, 21A.33,060, 21A.33.070, 21A.33.080, 21A.36.360; 15 Subsection 21A.44.030.G.1; Section 21A.60.020;,and Section 21A.62,040 oftheSaItLake City Code; 16 and 17 WHEREAS, at its November 14, 2018 hearing, the planning commission voted in favor of 18 recommending to the Salt Lake City Council that the city council amend the above listed sections of 19 Title 21 A of the&lt Lake Cky Code identified herein; and 20 Wl 1EIREAS,the city council held briefings on this petition,which resulted in several 21 modifications, including changing the name of"single room occupancy" uses to "shared housing" 22 uses; and 23 Wffl.�.REAS, the Salt Lake City Council finds, after holding a public hearing on this 24 matter, that adopting this ordinance is in the city's best interests. 25 NOW, TFIEREFORE, be it ordained by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah: LIE'GASLATIVE DRAFT 26 SE`CTION 1. Amending, the 'f'elxt olS'alt Lake City Code Subsection 21 A.30,040,C, That 27 Subsection 2 1 A.30.040.0 (Zoning: Downtown Districts: D-3 Downtown Warehouse/Residential 28 District: Controls over Mixed Use) of theS'ah Lake City Code shall be and hereby is amended to 29 read as l'ollows: 30 1. Buildings containing commercial/office uses located above the second story shall I 31 incorporate - 4i fi-mi.. AMI 32 residential uses allowed ate-the-z,-Qj.jjj� district, bed and breakfast, or hotel uses in the 33 amount of at least fifty percent (50�%) of the total floor area of the building; 34 35 1 Commercial/office uses shall be permitted as the sole use in two story buildings only; and 36 37 3, Commercial/office uses in buildings of three (3) stories or more without molti family 38 residential uses shall be allowed only as a conditional use and then only when 39 the applicant has demonstrated that the proposed location is not suitable for av&Ri-fiw+4y 40 residential use. 41 42 SECTION 2. Amending the Text ofS'all Lake Ci.y Code.Section 21 A.33.020. That Section 43 21 A.33.020 of the,5'ah: Lake City Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of`Permittedand 44 Conditional Uses for Residential Districts) shall be and hereby is amended to add a new use category 45 titled, "Shared housing"to the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Residential Districts, which 46 use category shall be inserted into that table in alphabetical order and shall read and appear in that table as 47 follows: 48 R- R R PMF- RMF- FR- FR- FR- - j sip SR S R RMF- RMF- R- R- R- R 0 1/4-4, 2/21, 3112, �221/7, 115, 1 .2 -3 -2 30 35 45 75 MU- MU- W 5 6 780 000 100 000 000 35 45 P P P ram ............ 49 LEGISLATIVE DRAFT - 1 50 SECTION 3. Amending the Text ofWt Lake City Code Section 21A.33.030. That Section 51 21A.33.030 of the Wt Lake City Code (Zoning. Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and 52 Conditional Uses for Commercial Districts) shall be and hereby is amended as follows, 53 a. That the use category titled"Single room occupancy"in the Table of Permitted and 54 Conditional Uses for Commercial Districts shall be amended to read as follows: CN CB CS, C CSIIBDI CG SNIP P 42 55 56 b. That a new use category titled "Shared housing" shall be inserted into the Table of 57 Permitted and Conditional Uses for Commercial Districts in alphabetical order under the 58 "Dwelling" category and shall read and appear in that table as follows: CN CB (Is, cc CSIJBF)l CG SNB S499OR49n P P P 59 60 SECTION 4. Amending the Text of Wt Lake City Code Section 21A.33.035. That Section 61 21A.33.035 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and 62 Conditional Uses for Transit Station Area Districts) shall be and hereby is amended as follows: 63 a. That the use category titled"Single room occupancy'"in the Table of Permitted and 64 Conditional Uses for Transit Station Area Districts shall be amended to read as follows: TSA-UC TSA-UN TSA-MUEC TSA-SP Core Transition Core Transition Core Transition Core Transition P P P P 65 66 b. That a new use category titled "Shared housing" shall be inserted into the Table of 67 Permitted and Conditional Uses for Transit Station Area Districts in alphabetical order under 68 the"Dwelling"category and shall read and appear in that table as follows: L.EGISLATIVE DRMI. 69 70 TSA-I.JC TSA-UN TSA-MIJEC TSA-SP Core Transition Core Transition Core Transition Core, Transition P P 71 72 SECTION 5. Amending, the Text of Sall Lake 00� Code Section 21A.33.050. 'Fhat Section 73 21A.33,050 of the Salt Lake C ity Code (Zoning: [..and Use Tables: Table of Permitted and 74 Conditional Uses for Downtown Districts) shall be and hereby is amended to add a new use category 75 titled, "Shared housing"to the'fable of Permitted and Conditional Uses fbr Downtown Districts, which 76 use category shall be inserted into that table in alphabetical order and shall read and appear in that table as 77 follows: D-I D-2 D-3 D-4 ......... ..............(9 R Q) pr� . P. F P 78 79 80 SECTION 6. Amending the Text of all Leyke City Code Section 21 A.33.060. That Section 81 21A.33.060 o f the Salt Lake City ("ode (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and 82 Conditional Uses in the Gateway District) shall be and hereby is amended to add a new use category 83 titled,"Shared housing"to die Table of Pennitted and Conditional Uses in the Gateway District,which 84 use category shall be inserted into that table in alphabetical order and shall read and appear in that table as 85 follows: 86 ...................... G-MU ........... P ............ 87 ILEGISLATIVE DRAFT 1 88 SECTION 7. Amending the Text of Wt Lake City Code Section 21A.33.070. That Section 89 2 1 A.3 3.070 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: 'fable of Permitted and 90 Conditional Uses for Special Purpose Districts) shall be and hereby is amended to add a new use 91 category titled, "Shared housing" to the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Special Purpose 92 Districts, which use category shall be inserted into that table in alphabetical order and shall read and 93 appear in that table as follows: RP BP IT --XG .�1G-2 AG-5 AG-20 OS NOS A I'L PI,-2 I UI � M11 El MU P 94 95 96 SECTION 8. Amending the Text ofSWt Lake City Code Section 21A.33.080. That Section 97 21A.33.080 of the,salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and 98 Conditional Uses in Form Based Districts) shall be and hereby is amended as follows: 99 a. That the use category titled"Single room occupancy" in the Table of Permitted and 100 Conditional Uses in form Based Districts shall be amended to read as follows: F13-UN1 FB-UN2 F13-SC FB-SE 101 102 b. That a new use category titled "Shared housing" shall be inserted into the Table of 103 Permitted and Conditional Uses in Form Based Districts in alphabetical order under the 104 "Dwelling"category and shall read and appear in that table as follows: Fly-IJNI FB-UN2 FB-SC FB-SE $jj4jed ousin P P P- 105 106 ILEGISLATIVE DRAiF,r 1 107 SECTION 9. Adopting; Section 21A.36.360 of SaItLake City Coele. That Chapter 21A.36 of 108 the Salt Lake (.,ity ("ode (Zoning General Provisions) shall be and hereby is amended to adopt a new 109 Section 21A,36.360, which shall read and appear as follows: 110 III 21A.363W QUALfFYING PROVISIONS FORTTIE SING-1-W 112 ff4 Y4)= S IjJARED JJQ � ING USE 113 114 Thedefined in Chapter 21 A,,62 ofthis 115 title, shall be allowed in KonitIg districts � as,gav 116 Tables to the fo�llowin�roy�jskgiLs... and are 117 118 A. The.,sharg-d-housi Ig-, 0 . ..., -4 tbr�Qe.­ali gments asahg ................ . .....­­­.­...... ­- - 119 M= L I I t wji�wqItg u a_ .t the dQ ssty r uiremens_ Qmunderin S 120 121 B. MaximunL)KRUIN _Occi. go-ri—ta—inedwithinft x 122 indi kluaJ_skmah ru "in g. nA shall holkW­411rrijaximurn of 2.,,Pqo 123 1,24 C. Minimum Floor Area of Y-n4s5, LNp 'ach jj"A4+f sic_ 125 conidin r d within the individuaLsharabag siij unit shall D clude a mininluirl of - 126 100,square feet of floor area, for a single tenant, or a minimum of 120 square feet of floor 127 area for two(2) tenants. 128 129 1. The floor area of each room shall be calculated as the sum of 130 the gross horiZODtal area of the unit measured from the interior face of interior walls. 131 132 2, Calculation of this area shall not include ®"s gms consumed b 133 closets/storne, mechanical S a me rt� fat 134 _p ances.afeas i ed -within (ho_p 135 136 14D, Communal Areas: Ln-Meffort to Drovi icient accommo ations for sQci..a 137 anlimited to; libraries, lounges, I. recreation rooms, dinina rg( e 139 accessible to all residents, of the jRq_ J1 §j��qpn= "t-h -_�Rffij_6- 140 Am 800604_�,,;.inm and n-.­,:"­ shall be luded and shall meet 141 the following requirements. 142 143 1. The total amount ofconimunal area shall have a minimum- quare feet 144 p 145 i d!1-M 1 tin i t S 146 LEGISLATIVE DRAFT 147by 148 149 150or- J~ 151 152 1.53 2b &�*Arcas including, but not limited to;kitchens and bathr arms shared between 154 multiple.units, hallways and corridors, storage areas (including bicycle storage), 155 operations and maintenance areas, or management areas and offices rna not be 156 counted toward the communal area requirement. 157 158 GE. Management: 159 160 1. A shared housing development may include an office for the purpose of managing the 161 living units and common facilities and/or one self-contained living unit with private 162 kitchen and bathroom facilities for a manager or caretaker. 163 164 +2. A propeqy manager shall be on site twenty-four 24 hours a da who will be 165 responsible for the conduct operation, and maintenance of the shared housing 166 development. _._.__ ._ 167 168 43. All communal areas that are accessible to all tenants of the &Ro shared housing. 169 with the exception of bathrooms shall be continuously monitored by security 170 cameras.. 171. 172 F, Accessibility: All areas of a shared housing develop~ment..shall be deli",n d to be 173 universally accessible as requjmd by applicable federal and state laws. 174 175 176 SECTION 10. Amending the Text of Salt Lake City Code Subsection 21A.44.03a.G.1. That 177 Table 21A.44.030 under Subsection 21A.44.030.G.1 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Off Street 178 Parking, Mobility and Loading: Number of Off`Street Parking Spaces Required: Schedule of 179 Minimum Off Street Parking Requirements) shall be and hereby is amended as follows: 180 a. Amending the use category "Multiple-family dwellings."That the use category 181 titled"Multiple-family dwellings" shall be amended to read and appear as 182 follows: LEGISLATIVE DRAFT Multiple-family dwellings' __. parkin ,spaces for each dwelling unit containing 2 or more bedroorns 1 parking space for l bedroom and efficiency dwelling 1��- fk-iw s. e W single,.00n „cc v well-i are . _........ 183 184 b. Adding the use category "Shared housing." That a new use category titled, 185 "Shared housing" shall be added to the Schedule of Minimum OffStreet 186 Parking Requirements, which use category shall be inserted into that table in 187 alphabetical order under"Residential"and shall react and appear in that table as 188 follows: }residential trarkrrpace per ' Icprn rta .�ty _ . lao.t-sink„.. 189 190 SECTION ION 11. Amending the Text of ilt Lake City C otle Section 21 A.60.020, That Section 191 21A.60.020 ofthe,halt.Lake City(76de (Zoning: List of Terms: List of Defined Terms), shall be and 192 hereby is amended as follows: 193 a. Deleting the terra"Dwelling, single room occupancy." That the terra "Dwelling, 1.94 single roam occupancy"shall be amended as follows: 195 4wel4iig, 196 b. Adding the term "Shared housing". That the tern- "Shared housing" shall be 197 inserted in the list ofdefined terms in alphabetical order,to read as follows: 198 Shared housin w 199 c, Adding the term"Sleeping room". That the tern--"Sleeping,room" shall be 200 inserted in the lust of"defined terms in alphabetical order,to read as follows ILEGISLATIVE DRAFT 201 S I Q ii js—, 202 203 S `CTlON 12. Amending the Text ofSalt Lake City Code Section 21 A.62.04O. That Section 204 2 1 A.62.040 of the Salt Lake City COI(le(Zoning: Definitions: Definitions offerms), shall be and hereby is 205 amended as f'ollows: 206 a. Amending the definition of"Dwelling,"'.That the definition of"Dwelling" shall 207 be amended to read as follows: 208 DWELLING. A building or portion thereof, which is designated for residential 209 put-poses of a family for occupancy on a monthly basis and which is a self-contained 210 unit with kitchen and bathroom facilities, The term "dwelling" excludes living space 211 within hotels, bed and breakfast establishments, apaf4men! h S 212 developments Single (SRO) 08 boarding houses and 213 lodging houses. 214 215 b. Amending the definition of"Dwelling, single room occupancy."That the 216 definition of"Dwelling, single room occupancy" shall be amended to read as 217 follows: 218 —'j " ,%At A .I DA'KVIX7. AA.-'ellintl- %e4liyu4 I-gait Mang, pf=-,hil 219 individual, Sol f d- ...... 220 -RWn0- 221 222 e, Adding the definition of"Shared housing," That the definition of"Shared 223 housing" be added and inserted into the list of definitions in alphabetical 224 order to read as follows: 225 SHARED HOUSING: A b r portion thereat that is dg g5j,Z ,qtgd 11 wrje 226 p�Lir�p occupied on a weeklv or QsQs-and contains-,tudividual hous"n units that M&! .- 227 monthly basis. Alsin Each-i-n-dividual ---=1w --g 228 and mav contain either kitchen or b s amenitie . but Hatt--j2.QtJ1.-W-bj9-hQK(Lr .......... 229 amenities are not contained within the individual unit-( 230 11 be provided a��shall 4-p(Ing be shared with ltd]ity within the buildirig,, 231 other tenants of the sharqd,h2M�j�c 232 LEGISLATIVE DRAFT 233 d. Adding the definition of"Sleeping room." That the definition of"sleeping 234 room" be added and inserted into the list of definitions in alphabetical order 235 to read as follows: 236 SLEEPING ROOM:__A room within.a shared housing.land use that is 237 identified and used for slee iiii2 imi-Doses. 238 239 240 SECTION 13. EfTective Date, This Ordinance shall become effective on the date of its first 241 publication. 242 243 Passed by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah this day of 244 , 2020. 245 246 CHAIRPERSON 247 248 ATTEST: 249 250 251 CITY RECORDER 252 253 254 Transmitted to Mayor on 255 256 257 Mayor's Action: Approved. Vetoed. 258 259 260 261 MAYOR 262 263 264 CITY RECORDER 265 266 (SEAL) 267 268 Bill No. of202O. 269 Published: 270 LEGISLATIVE DRAFT 271 272 Ordinance amending single room occupoicy irgulations SALT LADE CITY ORDINANCE No. of202O (An ordinance amending various sections of Title 21 A of the Salt Lake City Code pertaining to single room occupancy (SRO) uses (to be called Shared housing uses)) An ordinance amending various sections of Title 21 A of the 45alt Lake City Code pertaining to single room occupancy (SRO) uses (to be called shared housing uses) pursuant to Petition No. PLNPCM2018-00066. WHEREAS, the Salt Lake City Planning Commission held public hearings on June 27, 2018 and November 14, 2018 to consider a request by then-Salt Lake City Mayor Jacqueline Biskupski (Petition No. Pl..NPCM2018-00066) to clarify the definition and appropriate locations of single room occupancy (SRO) uses and amend Subsection 21A.30.040.C.1; Sections 21A.33.020, 21A,33.030, 21A.33.035, 21A.33.050, 21A.33.060, 21A.33.070, 21A.33.080, 21A.36.360; Subsection 21A.44.030.G.1; Section 21A.60.020; and Section 21A.62.040 ofthe Salt Lake City Cradle; and WHEREAS, at its November 14, 2018 hearing, the planning commission voted in favor of recommending to the Salt Lake City Council that the city council amend the above listed sections of Title 21 A of the Salt Lake City Code identified herein; and WHEREAS,the city council held briefings on this petition,which resulted in several modifications,including changing the name of"single room occupancy"uses to"shared housing" uses; and WHEREAS, the Salt Lake City Council finds, after holding a public hearing on this matter, that adopting this ordinance is in the city's best interests. NOW, THEREFORE, be it ordained by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah: SECTION 1, Amending the Text qfS'alt Lake City Code Subsection 21 A.30,04O.C, That Subsection 21 A.30.040.0 (Zoning: Downtown Districts: D-3 Downtown Warehouse/Residential District: Controls over Mixed [.Ise) of the Sall Lake City Code shall be and hereby is amended to read as follows: I. Buildings containing commercial/office uses located above the second story shall incorporate any residential uses allowed in the zoning district, bed and breakfast, or hotel uses in the amount of at least fifty percent (50%) of the total floor area of the building; 2. Commercial/office uses shall be permitted as the sole use in two story buildings only; and 3, Commercial/office uses in buildings of three (3) stories or more without residential uses shall be allowed only as a conditional use and then only when the applicant has demonstrated that the proposed location, is not suitable for residential use. SECTION 2. Amending the Text ofSall Lake City Code Section 21A.33.020. That Section 21 A.3 3.020 of the Salt Lake City (Zoning: Land Use 'cables: Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Residential Districts) shall be and hereby is amended to add a new use category titled, "Shared housing"to the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Residential Districts,which use category shall be inserted into that table in alphabetical order and shall read and appear in that table as ,t,allows: --FR- FR- es- R- R- R- SR SR SR R RM RMF. R R R MI',- - R- - RO- 11,13, 2/21, 3/12, 1112, 1/7, 115, -1 -2 -3 -2 30 35 45 75 MLJ- ML.1- MO 560 780 000 (100 000 000 kKF -- --- 35 45 ..........-...... Shrd P P P housing SECTION 3. Amending the 'rext ofS'all Lake City Code Section 21A.33.030, That Section 21 A3 3®03 0 of the&711 Lake Ciq,Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Perini tted and Conditional Uses for Commercial Districts) shall be and hereby is amended as follows: a. That the use category titled"Single room occupancy"in the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses fior Commercial Districts shall be deleted. b. That a new use category titled "Shared housing" shall be inserted into the'Fable of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Commercial Districts in alphabetical order under the "Dwelling"category and shall read and appear in that table as follows: _jCG S NB i�a red housing P P SECTION 4. Amending the Text of&dl Lake City Code Section 21A.33.035. That Section 21 A.33.035 oftheW1 Lake City Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Transit Station Area Districts) shall be and hereby is amended as follows: a. That the use category titled"Single room occupancy" in the'Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Transit Station Area Districts shall be deleted. b. That a new use category titled "Shared housing" shall be inserted into the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Transit Station Area Districts in alphabetical order under the"Dwelling"category and shall read and appear in that table as follows: ........... TSA-UC TSA-UN TSA-MIJEC TSA-SP Core Transition Core rransition Core Transition Core Transition Shared housing P P P P P P P 1), SECTION 5. Amendi-ne the Text ofWt Lake (..i1v Code Section 21A.33.050. That Section 21 A,33.050 of the,salt Lake City Code (Zoning., Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Downtown Districts) shall be and hereby is amended to add a new use category titled, "Shared housing"to the 'fable of Permitted and Conditional U ses for Downtown Districts, which use category shall be inserted into that table in alphabetical order and shall read and appear in that table as follows: ...... .................... ----------------- . D-I D-2 IM 1)-4 Shared hK.)L-.I-S.-i 1-1 g­ P P P P SECTION C. Amending the Text of Salt Lake City Code Section 21A.33.060. That Section 21 A.3 3.060 of the.salt Lake C ity Cocle (Zoning: Land Use Tables: I'able of Permitted and Conditional Uses in the Gateway District) shall be and hereby is amended to add a new use category titled, "Shared housing"to the Table of Pen-nitted and Conditional Uses in the Gateway District, which use category shall be:inserted into that table in alphabetical order and shall read and appear in that table as follows: G-MIJ Shared-11'0"'uS'i 1-1 g- P .................. SECTION 7. Amendipg_the Text ol'Salt Lake City Code Section 2 I.A.33.070. That Section 21 A.33.070 of the Salt Lake Citv C'o&, (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Special Purpose Districts) shall be and hereby is amended to add a new use category titled, "Shared housing" to the Table of Pen-nitted and Conditional Uses for Special Purpose Districts, which use category shall be inserted into that table in alphabetical order and shall read and appear in that table as follows: RP BP FP A6 AG-2 AG-5 A(3-20 OS NOS A PI, PL-2 I (A MH Ell M 1.) Shared housing P-] si.-rri ON 8, Amending, the Text of Sall Lake C'ify Code Section 21A..33.080. 'That Section 21 A.33,080 of the Salt Lake C11ily Code (Zoning: Land Use Tables: Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses in Form Based [districts) shall be and hereby is amended as follows� a. That the use category titled"Single roorn occupancy" in the Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses in Forrn Based Districts shall be deleted. b. That a new use category titled "Shared housing" shall be inserted into the'"I"able of Permitted and Conditional Uses in Form Based Districts in alphabetical order under the "Dwelling"category and shall read and appear in that table as follows- FB-UNI F13-LJN2 FB-SC F41-SE Shared housing P P P tv SECTION 9. AAdo tin Y Section 21A.36.360 of Salt Lake Ci Code. That Chapter 21A.36 of the Sall Lake Cio� Code (Zoning: General Provisions) shall be and hereby is, amended to adopt a new Section 21A.36.360, which shall read and appear as follows: 21A.36360: QUALIFYING PROVISIONS FOR THE SHARED IJOUSING USE: The shared housing use, as defined in Chapter 21A.62 of this title, shall be allowed in zoning districts as provided in Chapter 21 A.33 "Land tJse 'fables," and are subject to the following provisions: A. The shared housing use shall be subject to the same tot and bulk requirements as the multi-farnily dwelling use, but not the density requirements of the underlying zone. B. Maximum Occupancy of Sleeping Rooms. Each sleeping room contained within the individual shared housing unit shall house a maximum of 2 people. C. Minimum Floor Area of Sleeping Rooms: Each sleeping room contained within the individual shared housing unit shall include a minimum of 100 square feet of floor area for a single tenant, or a minimum of 120 square feet of floor area for two (2) tenants. 1. The floor area of each sleeping room shall be calculated as the sum of the gross horizontal area of the unit measured from the interior face of interior walls. 2. Calculation of this area shall not include spaces consumed by closets/storage, Of mechanical equipment, or appliances. D Communal Areas: In an effort to provide sufficient accommodations for socializing and meeting, communal areas including, but not limited to libraries, lounges, recreation rooms, dining rooms, and laundry rooms that are accessible to all residents of the shared housing development shall be included, and shall meet the following requirements: I I. The total amount of communal area shall have a minimum of twenty (20) square feet per sleeping room. 2. Areas including, but not limited toy kitchens and bathrooms shared between multiple units, hallways and corridors, storage areas, (including bicycle storage), operations and maintenance areas, or managernent areas, and offices may not be counted toward the communal area requirement. E. Management: 1. A shared housing development may include an office for the purpose of managing the living units and common facilities, and/or one self-contained living unit with private kitchen and bathroom facilities for a manager or caretaker. 2. A property manager shall be on site twenty-four (24) hours a day, who will be responsible for the conduct, operation, and maintenance ofthe shared housing development, 1 All communal areas, that are accessible to all tenants of the shared housing, with the exception of bathrooms, shall be continuously monitored by security cameras, F. Accessibility: All areas of a shared housing development shall be designed to be universally accessible as required by applicable federal and state laws, S1`CTION 10, Amendina the Text of Still Lake City Code Subsection 21 A.44.030 G.11., That Table 21 A.44.030 under Subsection 21 A.44.030.G.I of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Off Street Parking, Mobility and Loading: Number of Off Street Parking Spaces Required: Schedule of Minimum Off Street Parking Requirements) shall be and hereby is amended as follows: a. Amending the use category "Multiple-fw-nily dwellings."That the use category titled"Multiple-Cannily dwellings" shall be amended to read and appear as follows: Residential ........... Multiple-family dwellings' 2 parking spaces for each dwelling Unit containing 2 or more bedroorns I parking space for I bedroom and efficiency dwelling b. Adding the use category "Shared housing,"That a new use category titled, "Shared housing", shall be added to the Schedule of Minimum Off Street Parking Requirements, which use category shall be inserted into that table in alphabetical order under"Residential"and shall read and appear in that table as follows: Residential -7-Shared housing 1/2 EparkinTgss�pace—rp�eer sleeping room -.......... SF'CTION 11. Amending the'rext of Salt.Lake C:'ity de Section 21A.60.020. That Section 21A.60.020ofthe Salt Lake C 1 I kv C0 de (Zoning: List of Tenns: List of Defined Terms), shall be and hereby is amended as follows: a. Deleting the term "Dwelling, single room occupancy." That the term "Dwelling, single room occupancy" shall be deleted, b. Adding the terns "Shared housing". That the term "Shared housing"shall be inserted in the list of defined terms in alphabetical order,to read as follows: Shared housing, e. Adding the term"Sleeping room". That the term"Sleeping room" shall be inserted in the list of defined terms in alphabetical order,to redid as, follows: Sleeping room. Sl CTION 12. Amending the,Text-of,&uh Lake Citv Code Section 21 A.62.040. That Section 2 IA.62.040 of the,salt Lake C!it)l Code (Zoning: Definitions: Definitions ofTerms), shall be and hereby is amended as,fiAlows- a. Amending the definition of"Dwelling."'rhat the definition of"Dwelling" shall be amended to read as hallows: DWELUNG: A building or portion thereof, which is designated for residential purposes of a family for occupancy on a monthly basis and which is a self-contained unit with kitchen and bathroom facilities. The term "dwelling"' excludes living, space within hotels, bed and breakfast establishments, shared housing developments, boarding houses and lodging houses. b. Amending the definition of"Dwelling, single room occupancy,"That the definition of"Dwelling, single roorn occupancy" shall be delete& c. Adding the definition of"Shared housing."' 'rhat the definition of"Shared housing" be added and inserted into the list of definitions in alphabetical order to read as follows: SHARED HOUSING: A building, or portion thereof, that is designated for residential purposes and contains individual housing units that may be occupied on a weekly or monthly basis. Each individual housing unit consists of one or more sleeping rooms and may contain either kitchen or bathroom amenities, but not both. Whichever amenities are not contained within the individual unit (the kitchen, bathroom, or both) shall be provided as to common facility within the same building, to be shared with other tenants of the shared housing, development. d. Adding the definition of"Sleeping room." That the definition of"sleeping room" be added and inserted into the list of definitions in alphabetical order to read as follows: SLEEPING ROOM: A room within a shared housing land use that is identified and used for sleeping purposes. SECTION 13. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall become effective on the date of its first publication. Passed by the City Council of Salt Labe City, Utah this day of , 2020 CHAIRPERSON ATTEST: CITY RECORDER Transmitted to Mayor on Mayor's Action: Approved, Vetoed. MAYOR CITY RECORDER APPROVED As To FORM Salt Lake City Attomey's Office (SEAL) Date: AA1e 2,02 D Bill No. of 202O. By' E'auC.l Published: ielson germ rCityAttorney Ordinance amending single room occupancy regulations(final) City Council Announcements March 16, 2021 Information Needed by Staff A. Citizens Compensation Advisory Committee (CCAC) Reappointments The CCAC has three Council-appointed, three Mayor-appointed and one committee-appointed member positions. Two of the Council's appointed positions are scheduled to end August 2021. Both current serving members, Jeff Worthington and Brandon Dew, expressed an interest and willingness to serve another term. Both would be appointed to their first full four-year terms. Mr. Worthington was originally appointed to finish serving prior member Dale Cox's term and Mr. Dew was originally appointed to finish serving prior member Ginny Hsu's term after they resigned from the committee. lf t:nincil Mlerubers have any concern s t,)r questh)r s, please let lien 1,uedtk kru,)w. For Your Information A. Upcoming School Board Leadership Meeting The City Council/School Board Leadership meeting is set up for Friday, March 19 from 1:30 PM — 3:00 PM to include: Amy Fowler, Council Chair; James Rogers, Council Vice Chair; Amy Valdemoros, RDA Chair; School Board Member Melissa Ford, President; and School Board Nate Salazar,Vice President. Mayor Mendenhall has been invited to attend with Council Members. t'lleas , let O:ninci:l staff kru,)w if yt,)u have an agenda itern.(s) yt,)u wt,)u.ld lily O:ninci:l leadership tt:) discuss with chtx:il lt,)ard leadership. B. Sugar House S-Line Graphics (next page) Council staff has attached two graphics from previous City studies on potential ways to extend the "S"line in Sugar House to Highland Drive. The studies may be pertinent as the City moves forward with plans to extend the line after the $12 million allocation the City expects to receive for the project. Sugar House Streetcar: Land Use and Urban Design Recommendation November 2011 Marilee A. Utter and Ronald A. Straka ; l 6 � ..v rL. .m..... ' L s E ..airy "M � u n u �sr zlma rrarr✓�,ur�w�(drr�,.;...,. _. ..__ .,: 1�r Graphic: Sugar House Business District Circulation Plan Fehr and Peers for Salt Lake City Redevelopment Agency Adopted by the City Council November 12, 2013 ii t'ron� u p r/iih ' /i /yYy%� Another poI trainsportation investment in the i. ,.� s aIC�,"a Its P�a5�" �'% o� t�I� V�I�IaIf C��15 stTieeaICf. Prase One of the Sugar House Streetcar exteItVids � � i �/J i' j ��r�/ri% � ' / r r////rl�%/d/pN✓�i i «lr�itll�Id%�e,� from the 21100 South (C eYtrA Pointe) oin e) T7A w Stabon � i� �� �W 1���"�NM��'e� d�� � W � tU' id�,Tti in b� r �p spring 2.012, An extension(Phase Two) is cuffently s ��i JU � Y� �o/lr«ir/ ✓/ �r r under consideration, an,4 woWd take the stieetcam eastbound! firom McClefland,onto Simpson Avenue, north on 1+ hiairm I Driveto the r�on,uu J�t� � Ra�V�roaa� "11111,f South, returnIingi south, on, HigINand Drive to ' r INK ugarmont Aveniue,,and west louu d on Sugarmont Avenue to, McClelland street and onward, The foiiowiing figure. utllustuat s the locally pret ure alternative it.M atigumurnm nt for the,streetcas in this area An eventual streetcar extension along 11100 East to 1700 South may be considered in the future, u,u amrmmont Drive, cu»urrenfl a one-way rruadi westbound with, on-Street $pace tof bicychts and pedestrians,would be dosied to vehid s other than the streetcar,.