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04/13/2021 - Work Session - Meeting MaterialsERIN MENDENHALL DEPARTMENT of COMMUNITY Mayor and NEIGHBORHOODS Blake Thomas Director SALT LAKE CITY CORPORATION 451 SOUTH STATE STREET, ROOM 404 WWW.SLC.GOV P.O. BOX 145486, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84114-5486 TEL 801.535.6230 FAX 801.535.6005 CITY COUNCIL TRANSMITTAL ________________________Date Received: _________________ Lisa Shaffer, Chief Administrative Officer Date sent to Council: _________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ TO:Salt Lake City Council DATE: Amy Fowler, Chair FROM: Blake Thomas, Director, Department of Community & Neighborhoods __________________________ SUBJECT: Interlocal Cooperation Agreement between Salt Lake County and Salt Lake City for Corridor Preservation Funds used for the 700 South Re-Construction Project STAFF CONTACT:Matthew Cassel, City Engineer, matthew.cassel@slcgov.com, 535-6140 DOCUMENT TYPE: Resolution (Salt Lake County) RECOMMENDATION: Authorize the Mayor of Salt Lake City to sign the interlocal agreement for the City. BUDGET IMPACT: Salt Lake City was granted $611,500 of Corridor Preservation Funds for the purchase of land from Suburban Land Reserve (SLR) for the re-alignment of 700 South just east of 5600 West. Salt Lake County administers the Corridor Preservation Fund grant program. The final negotiated property cost of the land was $896,152.50. Existing project funds were used to make up the difference between the final cost and the Corridor Preservation Fund amounts. BACKGROUND/DISCUSSION: The Corridor Preservation Funds were used to purchase property from SLR for the realignment of 700 South. UDOT is reconstructing 5600 West, which will make the current 700 South/5600 West intersection non-functional once UDOT’s project is complete. The Corridor Preservation Fund program is financed through the collection of vehicle registration fees ($3.00 per vehicle) and administered by the County. The fund’s purpose is to provide grant funds to Cities with the goal to preserve highway or public transit corridors that are right-of-ways. Staff applied for funds in July 2018 and were awarded funds in the amount of $611,500 later that fall. Using existing project road funds, staff paid SLR through two wire transfers with the last one on August 14, 2019. The County requires proof of payment before reimbursement. The paid invoices were sent to the County a while ago and now the next to last step is to process the Inter-local Agreement so the City can be reimbursed with the Corridor Preservation Funds. Engineering staff request these funds to be returned to the 700 South project cost center so the last segment of 700 South can be completed as it crosses the Union Pacific Railroad (approximately 4700 West to 5000 West). PUBLIC PROCESS: Not Applicable EXHIBITS: Resolution of Salt Lake City Resolution of the Salt Lake County Council Approving Interlocal Cooperation Agreement 0000002633 Kimberly Barnett Digitally signed by Kimberly Barnett Date: 2021.03.03 13:01:29 -07'00' CITY COUNCIL OF SALT LAKE CITY 451 SOUTH STATE STREET, ROOM 304 P.O. BOX 145476, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84114-5476 SLCCOUNCIL.COM TEL 801-535-7600 FAX 801-535-7651 COUNCIL STAFF REPORT CITY COUNCIL of SALT LAKE CITY TO:City Council Members FROM:Sam Owen, Policy Analyst DATE:April 13, 2021 RE:FISCAL YEAR 2021-22 BUDGET, DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC UTILITIES, Water, Sewer, Stormwater, and Street Lighting Funds ISSUE AT-A-GLANCE The Mayor’s Recommended Budget for the Department of Public Utilities includes the Water, Sewer, Stormwater, and Street Lighting Enterprise Funds, totaling a balanced $420,480,027 for revenue, capital and operating expenses for the fiscal year 2022, with $784,760 to reserves. Major budget items include system upgrades and expansions in response to aging infrastructure and new regulatory requirements, and a proposed 17 new staff positions related to the significant capital projects, regulatory requirements and potential innovation. These four Utilities are Enterprise Funds, operating more or less like businesses separate from the General Fund. Each fund generates revenue through user fees and has separate staff, materials and supply budgets and capital improvement programs. The management and administration of the four funds is all under the Department of Public Utilities. The department’s FY21 revenue is on target with the marginally reduced projections made last year as part of the FY21 adopted budget in relation to the covid-19 pandemic. Projected operating sales for FY22 align with previous years’ operating sales adjusted for growth factors; i.e. pandemic injuries to sales are not anticipated as part of this current budget proposal. IMPORTANT CONTEXT Some of the other major items in this budget document include: -Rate increases: o A proposed 18 percent increase this year in the Sewer Utility; this increase is connected with the need to pay debt service for bonds issued to fund significant capital improvements over the next several years, in particular for the new Water Reclamation Facility Item Schedule: Briefing: April 13, 2021 Public Hearing: Potential Action: Page | 2 (WRF). The estimated impact to the utility bill of a medium residential user would be approximately $6.32 per month. o A proposed 8 percent increase this year in the Water Utility; this increase is connected with the need to pay debt service for bonds issued to fund significant capital improvements over the next several years, in particular for reconstruction of the utility’s aging treatment plants. The estimated impact to the utility bill of a medium residential user would be approximately $5.05 per month. o A proposed 10 percent increase this year in the Stormwater Utility ; this increase is connected with the need to pay debt service for bonds issued to fund significant capital improvements over the next several years, including for stormwater projects timed to coincide with road construction. The estimated impact to the utility bill of a residential user would be approximately $0.55 per month for lots smaller than one-quarter acre. o A proposed rate study in the Street Lighting Utility will help inform future years’ proposals regarding rates in this utility. o Costs related to the Metropolitan Water District of Salt Lake and Sandy will increase an estimated $494,337, related to the cost of new “Utah Lake System” supplies obtained in conjunction with Sandy and through the Central Utah Project. o The department has completed an impact fee study for updating its impact fees, however the administration is considering the possibility of an intermediate impact fee increase to attenuate what could be a significant jump from current charges assessed by the utilities (the last update of these fees was in 1999). See policy questions for further discussion. -Capital projects: capital improvements planned for this year total an estimated $276,506,326 for all funds, compared to last year’s projected actuals of $325,125,792. For constructions costs of the new Water Reclamation Facility (WRF), the department has been authorized to receive federal funding through the Water Infrastructure Financing Innovation Act (WIFIA), which will result in favorably termed loans amounting to $93,210,000 last year and $93,890,000 this year with additional disbursements in subsequent fiscal years. Furthermore, anticipated sewer collection system capacity upgrades are budgeted for $35,090,000 to last year’s projected actuals of $37,101,812. Over $125 million is budgeted for similar projects over the subsequent fiscal years, with almost $700 million in related collection system capital needs delayed (i.e. quantified but not planned in the next five fiscal years). These are Public Utilities Master Plan projects; timelines have been adjusted for some Master Plan collection system projects based on new construction. New development in the City’s Northwest Quadrant (NWQ) has continued to draw on the department’s capacity. Furthermore, the Water Fund anticipates fiscal year 2022 bond proceeds of $26,146,000, with significant additional estimated debt funds through at least fiscal year 2026. Relatively massive bond issuance activity is projected to continue through fiscal 2026 to support capital needs, for example large-scale capital needs ’related to the utility s water treatment plants totaling in the hundreds of millions of dollars. -Personnel-related increases: Personal Services would increase over fiscal 2021 to a proposed $45,645,184, which includes 17 total new full-time equivalents (FTEs) and a proposed 2.5% cost of living adjustment (COLA), as well as merit increases and other changes related to benefits and compensation. The new employees are requested to meet increased operational and regulatory needs, and to support innovation in light of increasing funding, financing and other capacity needs. At least one of these positions is being requested in connection with the department’s objective to find other ways the financial burden might be distributed for future capital projects, i.e. to explore available funding options that might share the burden with rate increases. Attachments Attachment 1, Public Utilities FY2022 proposed budget Attachment 2, Year-over-year payments to outside legal counsel Attachment 3, Summary & detail on select consulting and study line items Page | 3 POLICY QUESTIONS 1. The Council may wish to request feedback and thoughts from the department on impacts to the Wasatch Canyons watershed area for which the City has management responsibility & upon which the entire service area of the water utility relies for drinking water supplies. a. Did the increased outdoor traffic & activity resulting from calendar 2020 COVID-19 quarantine resulted in measurable or subjective impacts to the City watershed? 2. Council Members have received comments and observations from community members and members of the business community regarding the status of the City’s one-stop planning services. In particular, Council Members have wondered whether & how a full-time Public Utilities expert could be made available to the public through the City’s one-stop services. The Council may wish to discuss these issues with the department as part of the fiscal year 2022 budget deliberations. a. Council Members might also note the department has proposed $50,000 in FY22 funding for a process improvement study with its development review activity. 3. Regarding new development in the City’s Northwest Quadrant, the Council may wish to ask which Master Plan projects have been or will be expedited, in response to increased demands for service related to new development in the Northwest Quadrant. This could help with a more comprehensive understanding of how new development in the Northwest Quadrant could be impacting existing customers. 4. The Council may wish to learn more about the department’s perspective on updating the impact fee plan. The department has signaled that an intermediate plan might be prepared to “phase in” recommendations for increasing impact fees that could hit hard if implemented all at once. a. Council Members may wish to discuss or attempt to balance the notion that the City could be losing a significant revenue opportunity in the midst of generational capital expenditures. b. Council Members may wish to request an estimate or projection from the department quantifying the potential magnitude of impact fees over the next 3-4 years of these generational projects, if the impact fees were adjusted to reflect the costs they attempt to recoup. c. Council Members may wish to request information from the department about any current information on the scale of changes that have been calculated for the department’s impact fees, and whether those changes should be implemented sooner than an intermediate plan would allow. 5. Council Members might wish to discuss the department’s use of outside legal resources (see attachment). 6. During previous years’ budget deliberations, the Council discussed community concerns regarding the Water Utility’s 4th Avenue well project. a. The Council may wish to ask for an update on the status and community reception of this project. MAJOR ITEM DETAIL Rate increases - Increase in rates for the current fiscal year, as well as the years subsequent, are proposed in response to the bonding requirements and related debt service necessary to fund the replacement, maintenance and upgrades of aging and in some cases badly deteriorated infrastructure. - The replacement, maintenance and upgrades of existing infrastructure will facilitate the ongoing use and availability of the Utilities’ services for current customers. - Projected rate increases will continue to be evaluated with each year’s budget and capital project schedule, and may change as circumstances warrant, and by the discretion of the Council. Water Utility - There is an 8 percent proposed rate increase for this fund this year. Rate increases for this utility are timed based on capital project needs and the related bonding to finance the projects; as part of this, Page | 4 rates will be proposed for increase in subsequent years: “[the utility] is planning rate increases between 10% and 15% in future years through FY2025 in order to maintain and rehabilitate infrastructure, and meet more stringent water quality requirements.” - The Water Fund anticipates fiscal year 2022 bond proceeds of $26,146,000, with significant additional estimated debt funds through at least fiscal year 2026. Relatively massive bond issuance activity is projected to continue through fiscal 2026 to support capital needs, for example large-scale capital ’needs related to the utility s water treatment plants totaling in the hundreds of millions of dollars. Debt service as a percent of gross operating revenue is projected this year at 5 percent and projected to rise to 8 percent through fiscal 2026. - The non-capital expenditure budget for the Water Utility is proposed to increase to $78,375,791 from the fiscal year 2020 $74,158,308. - The utility drew from reserves an additional $ 36,010,521 over the FY21 adopted budget amount for primarily capital and some other expenses. The $36 million had been appropriated by the Council and contractually obligated by the department in previous fiscal years. As a practice, the department transparently “adds back” funds that are appropriated, obligated, but not spent to its cash balance. For that reason, this $36 million appears in the narrative budget summary pages as “from reserves” under the amended budget category. Sewer Utility - There is a proposed rate increase of 18 percent. Rates are also projected to increase in subsequent fiscal years. Increases are timed based on capital project needs and the related bonding to finance the projects; as part of this, rates also increased 18 percent last fiscal year. - The utility anticipates fiscal year 2022 bond proceeds of $123,687,000 and federal government WIFIA loan proceeds of $93,890,000. Bond issuance activity is projected to continue through fiscal 2024, and WIFIA loan disbursements are projected to continue through fiscal 2026. Debt service as a percent of gross operating revenue is projected to peak this year at 27 percent and taper to 24 percent through fiscal 2026. - The non-capital expenditure budget for the Sewer Utility is proposed to increase to $24,274,620 from last year’s $23,191,576. - The utility expended an additional $ 56,017,556 over the FY21 adopted budget amount for primarily capital and some other expenses. The $56 million had been appropriated by the Council and contractually obligated by the department in previous fiscal years. As a practice, the department transparently “adds back” funds that are appropriated, obligated, but not spent to its cash balance. For that reason, this $56 million in capital expenditures appears in the narrative budget summary pages as “from reserves” under the amended budget category. Stormwater Utility - There is a proposed rate increase of 10 percent this year. Previous and current bonding activity related to infrastructure needs drives the proposed rate increase. - The utility does not anticipate issuing additional bonds in the near-term future (i.e. through fiscal 2026); reserves from previous issuances as well as a FY22 issuance of $6,125,000 will be used to fund riparian corridor projects and projects implemented in relation to road work funded by the recent general obligation bond. Debt service as a percent of gross operating revenue is projected to peak this year at 16% and taper off to 12 percent through fiscal 2026. Page | 5 - The non-capital expenditure budget for the Stormwater Utility is proposed to increase to $8,704,042 from last year’s $8,143,582. - The utility expended an additional $4,984,009 over the FY21 adopted budget amount for primarily capital and some other expenses, including about $1 million in delayed capital outlay. The $5 million had been appropriated by the Council and contractually obligated by the department in previous fiscal years. As a practice, the department transparently “adds back” funds that are appropriated, obligated, but not spent to its cash balance. For that reason, this $5 million in capital expenditures appears in the narrative budget summary pages as “from reserves” under the amended budget category. Street Lighting Utility - This fund will not have a rate increase this year, however the department is proposing funding for a rate study to inform potential future rate increases. - The utility plans to draw down $1,508,894 from reserves and projects revenue of $4,142,928 relative to last year’s projected $4,129,361. This utility pays debt service equivalent to 4.7 percent of its gross operating revenue. - The non-capital expenditure budget for the Street Lighting Utility is proposed to increase to $3,266,126 from last year’s $2,972,232. - This utility drew $38,995 from reserves above the FY21 adopted budget amount for a combination of capital and other expenses. Capital projects: Improvements planned in the Water Utility have to do with strengthening service capacity and updates to aging, critical infrastructure. Proposed capital expenditures total $39,600,000; some items of note: - Treatment plant projects o Upgrades at the City Creek Water Treatment Plant are budgeted for $2,050,000 this year, reflecting necessary upgrades to critical infrastructure for the treatment and conveyance of drinking water. Improvements at this facility will total an approximate $4 million for each of the four subsequent years. Phase 2 of the City Creek Plant upgrades is budgeted for an estimated $51,200,000; that expense is not scheduled for any year for which projections are provided and is delayed indefinitely at this point. o The Parley’s Water Treatment Plant will undergo improvements this year totaling an estimated $1,300,000. The subsequent fiscal year budgets for $9,700,000 in capital costs for the plant and $7,600,000 in capital costs for the year after. The department estimates delayed capital costs for this facility at $127,875,000. The delayed capital expenditures are costs that the utility anticipates as being necessary but has not planned to implement in terms of the projections included as part of the current budget proposal. o The Big Cottonwood Canyon Treatment Plant will undergo improvements budgeted for $4,000,000. The department estimates an additional $10,000,000 in capital costs for this facility the following year, and then approximately $40 million for each of the three years after that. The delayed capital expenditures are costs that the utility anticipates as being necessary but has not planned to implement in terms of the projections in the current budget proposal; for this facility, those delayed costs total an estimated $82,430,000. - Capital expenditures for the Mountain Dell Dam are proposed at $1,420,000; co-located with a popular hiking destination, the Lake Mary Dam is proposed to receive $150,000 in maintenance and improvements; total dam capital needs are estimated at $1,650,000 this year. - Pump station improvements at 5 th Avenue and U Street are budgeted for $1,300,000 this year. - 300 West from 900 South to 2100 South is planned for a $1,300,000 water main upgrade, in concert with other roadway improvements on that segment. Page | 6 - Water meter replacements are budgeted for $2,500,000 this year and will begin to allow meters to be read remotely. The meter replacement program is budgeted for $2,700,000 each year subsequent (through fiscal year 2025, after which the budget increases to $3,100,000). Upgrades are expected to reduce costs of meter reading and allow customers to access water consumption information in real time, thus supporting water conservation programs and enabling customers to identify property-side leakages promptly. - A prospective Millcreek treatment plant is itemized with an associated future deferred cost estimated at $80,000,000 and no plans on the horizon; this is consistent with the department’s most recent 50-year water supply forecast. - Total delayed or unplanned-but-quantified capital needs in the Water Utility amount to an estimated $755,920,700 by this year’s projections. Improvements planned in the Sewer Utility have to do with updates and replacements to aging infrastructure, as well as expansions to service capacity. The capital program totals an estimated and proposed $226,135,826 for FY22. Some items of note: - Approximately $1,725,000 in maintenance to the existing Water Reclamation Facility (WRF), along with $191,045,826 budgeted for ongoing construction and design related to the new WRF. Issue periods of bonds used to fund the new construction are timed to coincide with the life of the WRF; payments on the bonds are timed to coincide with the customers who will most benefit during this 30-year period. - Master Plan implementation of sanitary sewer system upgrades and expansions are budgeted for a combined total of $24,180,000 in the fiscal year 2022 and are budgeted for $11,310,000 and $1,810,000 in the two subsequent fiscal years, respectively. These projects will provide for needed capacity in areas where capacity is already an issue, particularly on the fast-growing west side of the City. - Total delayed or unplanned-but-quantified capital needs in the Sewer Utility amount to an estimated $696,370,000 by this year’s projections. The following are some items of note planned as part of the Stormwater Utility’s capital improvements program for the fiscal year 2022; the program totals an estimated and proposed $8,530,500. - Collection mains upgrades on 1700 South from 2100 East to its intersection with Emigration Creek are budgeted for $2,200,000 in fiscal year 2022. This is to address stormwater capacity on 1700 South during intense runoff, such as the summer rain events experienced in 2017. $1,100,000 had been projected for expenditure for this project during fiscal 2021 at the time of the proposed budget’s preparation. - A Riparian Corridor Assessment is budgeted at $50,000; various riparian corridor projects are budgeted at $200,000. - An update to the Drainage Master Plan is still budgeted for $700,000. The existing Plan was completed in 1993 and outlines a number of upgrades to the Utility’s infrastructure that have taken place since. A new look at the Plan will involve changing climate conditions and green infrastructure. - The utility proposes to fund $50,000 in new crosswalks and ADA improvements. - Ongoing remediation for the Northwest Oil Drain Canal near the WRF will continue to incur costs, estimated this fiscal year at $68,000. - Total delayed or unplanned-but-quantified capital needs in the Stormwater Utility amount to an estimated $4,113,000 by this year’s projections. For the Street Lighting Utility: - A program will continue to provide matching grants for residents interested in certain kinds of privately maintained lights. The grant is funded by an annual transfer of $20,000 from the General Fund. - Other capital improvements in the Street Lighting Utility for the fiscal year 2022 are budgeted for $2,240,000; this is consistent for every year for which there are currently projections (through fiscal 2028). - The utility will return to the Council for another work session briefing on its proposed master plan after the plan is heard at the City’s Planning Commission. PUBLIC UTLITIES ANNUAL 2021-22 FISCAL BUDGET PROPOSAL March 25, 2021 WATER –SEWER –STORMWATER –STREET LIGHTING ENTERPRISE FUNDS SERVINGOURCOMMUNITY, PROTECTINGOURENVIRONMENT Table of Contents BUDGET SUMMARY FY 2022 ................................................................................................... 1 WATER UTILITY ENTERPRISE FUND.................................................................................. 5 WATER INFRASTRUCTURE BACKGROUND ............................................................................... 5 WATER UTILITY BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS FOR FY 2022 ............................................................. 5 SEWER UTILITY ENTERPRISE FUND .................................................................................. 9 SEWER INFRASTRUCTURE BACKGROUND ................................................................................ 9 SEWER UTILITY BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS FOR FY 2022 ............................................................ 10 STORMWATER UTILITY ENTERPRISE FUND ................................................................. 14 STORMWATER INFRASTRUCTURE BACKGROUND .................................................................. 14 STORMWATER UTILITY BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS FOR FY 2022 ............................................... 14 STREET LIGHTING UTILITY ENTERPRISE FUND ......................................................... 17 STREET LIGHTING INFRASTRUCTURE BACKGROUND ........................................................... 17 STREET LIGHTING UTILITY BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS FOR FY 2022 ........................................ 18 COMBINED UTILITIES- BUDGET SUMMARY AND CASH FLOW ............................... 21 WATER UTILITY- BUDGET SUMMARY AND CASH FLOW .......................................... 2 SEWER UTILITY- BUDGET SUMMARY AND CASH FLOW .......................................... STORMWATER UTILITY- BUDGET SUMMARY AND CASH FLOW ........................... STREET LIGHTING UTILITY- BUDGET SUMMARY AND CASH FLOW ................... APPENDIX A: RATE CHANGE COMPARISONS AND CUSTOMER IMPACTS ........... APPENDIX B: SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION ............................................................. APPENDIX C: RATIONALE FOR NEW POSITIONS ......................................................... BUDGET SUMMARY FY 2022 Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities (SLCDPU) is pleased to present its recommended budget for fiscal year 2021-2022 (FY 2022). The FY 2022 budget includes funding for operations, maintenance, and capital investments in the water, sewer, stormwater, and street lighting utilities. The budget also reflects the enhancement of operational programs to meet more stringent regulatory requirements for drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater. SLCDPU operates each of its utilities as separate enterprise funds. Summary of Expenditures and Revenues The total proposed FY 2022 budget is $420,480,027, an 8.44 % decrease from the FY 2021 amended budget of $459,216,205. The FY 2021 adopted budget was adjusted for FY 2020 carryover encumbrances for open contracts and purchase orders. Those changes are reflected in the amended budget amount. The proposed operating budget of $114,620,579 is $5,684,882 or 5.22% higher than the current year. The increase includes seventeen proposed new employees, and a 3% increase to accommodate employee compensation and benefit changes. Amounts paid to other departments for IMS charges, administrative service fees, payment in lieu of taxes, and risk management is projected to increase by $3,923,260. Operational costs also reflect an $494,337 increase to be paid to the Metropolitan Water District of Salt Lake and Sandy (MWDSLS) pursuant to their projected increased operational and capital needs. The proposed capital budget for FY 2022 is $282,674,161. Debt service is anticipated to be $23,185,287, including the cost of issuing new debt during the year. Total debt service for FY 2022 is increasing due to the cost of issuing new debt. Funding for capital projects in FY 2022 will be generated through rate revenue, the issuance of revenue bonds, and a federal loan. Total bonding planned for FY 2022 is $155,993,000. The timing of the planned issuance will be coordinated to meet cash flow needs. SLCDPU plans to use a federal loan under the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (WIFIA) to finance $93,890,000 of the new water reclamation facility (WRF) in FY 2022. There are proposed rate increases for the water, sewer, and stormwater utilities. This includes an 8% increase in water, an 18% increase in sewer, and a 10% increase in stormwater rates. Appendix A includes a summary of expected customer rate impacts. SLCDPU’s total anticipated revenues for FY 2022 are $420,480,027, an increase of $17,281,558. SLCDPU intends to transfer $784,760 to reserves from the remaining debt funds. 1 Summary of Additional Proposed Positions The proposed budget includes the addition of seventeen (17) new full time equivalent (FTE) positions. These recommended positions are identified to assist SLCDPU in meeting regulatory and programmatic requirements, increase in-house engineering capacity to reduce our reliance on consultant engineers, convert hard to fill seasonal positions, and supporting the economic and geographic growth within our service area. There are two Utility Funds FY 2022 Operations Capital Debt FundTotals Water 78,375,791 44,222,835 4,766,929 127,365,555 Sewer 24,274,620 227,462,826 16,476,350 268,213,796 Storm 8,704,042 8,748,500 1,748,471 19,201,013 Street 3,266,126 2,240,000 193,537 5,699,663 Total 114,620,579$ 282,674,161$ 23,185,287$ 420,480,027$ Summaryof Utilities FundBudgets Major Expenditure Categories Adopted Budget 2020 2021 Amended Budget 2020 2021 Proposed Budget 2021 2022 Difference Percent Change PersonalServices 41,961,790 42,360,790 45,645,184 3,284,394 7.75% Materials and Supplies 7,605,558 7,622,463 7,735,360 112,897 1.48% Charges for Services 56,271,884 58,952,444 61,240,035 2,287,591 3.88% DebtService 17,248,778 17,248,778 23,185,287 5,936,509 34.42% CapitalOutlay 4,769,726 5,397,151 6,167,835 770,684 14.28% CapitalImprovements 234,455,413 327,634,399 276,506,326 (51,128,073)15.61% Total 362,313,149$ 459,216,025$ 420,480,027$(38,735,998)$8.44% Proposed Department of Public Utilities Expenditures for FY 2021 22 Revenue Adopted Budget 2020 2021 Amended Budget 2020 2021 Proposed Budget 2021 2022 Difference Percent Change OperatingSales 135,312,126 135,312,126 158,309,402 22,997,276 17.00% Interest 1,915,867 1,915,867 728,700 (1,187,167)61.97% Permits 182,000 182,000 267,500 85,500 46.98% Interfund Charges 2,921,828 2,921,828 2,966,142 44,314 1.52% Other Revenues 831,770 1,269,382 2,087,930 818,548 64.48% ImpactFees 2,995,670 2,995,670 3,595,670 600,000 20.03% Contributions 4,031,640 4,033,428 3,426,443 (606,985)15.05% Bond/Loan Proceeds 186,730,000 186,730,000 249,883,000 63,153,000 33.82% From(To) Reserves 26,804,643 123,855,724 (784,760) (124,640,484)100.63% Total 361,725,544$ 459,216,025$ 420,480,027$(38,735,998)$8.44% Projected Department of Public Utilities Revenues for FY 2021 22 2 positions to highlight for the department that reflect new organizational functions within SLCDPU. The first is a proposed Chief Strategy and Innovations Officer (CSIO). The CSIO is proposed to help SLCDPU identify and secure strategic federal and state funding opportunities for major infrastructure projects, assist the Director and department leadership with federal, state, and local intergovernmental relationships, and provide needed capacity for innovations such as the City’s ERP, smart cities/street lighting, and water resource initiatives. Given the identified funding needs and gaps associated with aging infrastructure and the possible opportunities for infrastructure funding in the new federal administration, SLCDPU will be tasking the CSIO with identifying and implementing grants and low-interest loans to finance the projects to reduce the impact to our ratepayers. The second position to highlight reflects a new partnership with the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest (UWCNF). SLCDPU and the UWCNF have a long-standing partnership to manage the mountain watersheds that provide nearly 60% of the water supply to Salt Lake City and its water service area. A major and growing challenge is the upkeep and improvements of sanitary facilities in the watersheds due to significantly increased recreation visitation. Degraded sanitary facilities present a risk to water quality in our drinking water sources. The USFS is anticipating the receipt of federal Great American Outdoors Act (GAOA) funding to conduct projects within the UWCNF. Through a future agreement, the UWCNF will be allocating GAOA funds to SLCDPU to support the full cost of a project manager (under Water Quality) for two years to design and manage the construction of upgraded Forest Service-owned sanitary facilities within our watersheds. This agreement benefits both the UWCNF, which has limitations on hiring new employees, and SLCDPU which must maintain safe drinking water. It should be noted that the utilization of this position will be dependent on the completion of an executed agreement with the UWCNF. SLCDPU currently has 447.50 FTEs and is proposing the following positions to meet identified needs. Appendix C contains detailed cost-benefit information regarding the additional engineering requests. 3 Administration Water Sewer Stormwater Street Lighting Total CONSERVATION TECHNICIAN 1.00 1.00 CHIEF STRATEGY AND INNOVATIONS OFFICER 0.30 0.30 0.25 0.15 1.00 2.00 GIS and IT Systems LOCATOR MANAGER 0.50 0.30 0.20 1.00 1.00 Water Quality PROJECT MANAGER 1.00 1.00 WATERSHED RANGER 1.00 1.00 LEAD AND COPPERSUPERVISOR 1.00 1.00 3.00 Maintenance DRAINAGE MAINTENANCE WORKER II (LEAD)1.00 1.00 DRAINAGE MAINTENANCE WORKER III 1.00 1.00 WASTE WATERLIFT STATION LEAD WORKER 1.00 1.00 LANDSCAPE RESTORATION WKR 1.00 1.00 IRRIGATION OPERATOR II 1.00 1.00 5.00 Engineering ENGINEER V AssetManagement Coordinator 0.40 0.30 0.30 1.00 ENGINEER V Construction ManagementCoord.0.40 0.30 0.30 1.00 ENGINEER IV IN HOUSE DESIGN, CONST, ASSET MNG 0.40 0.30 0.30 1.00 ENGINEER IV IN HOUSE DESIGN, CONST, ASSET MNG 0.40 0.30 0.30 1.00 ENGINEER IV IN HOUSE DESIGN, CONST, ASSET MNG 0.40 0.30 0.30 1.00 ADMINISTRATIVE SECRETARY I 0.50 0.25 0.25 1.00 6.00 Total New FTEs 9.30 3.35 4.20 0.15 17.00 Proposed Personnel Adjustments FY 2021-2022 4 Water Utility Enterprise Fund Water Infrastructure Background The Salt Lake City water system is one of the oldest and largest systems west of the Mississippi River with over 1,125 miles of 12” or smaller distribution lines, and more than 180 miles of large transmission mains for a total asset inventory of 1,305 miles of pipe with over fifty pressure zones. The service area covers the Salt Lake City corporate boundaries as well as the east side of the Salt Lake Valley to the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon—a total of 141 square miles. This includes water supply to portions of other incorporated cities such as Mill Creek, Cottonwood Heights, Holladay, and small portions of Murray, Midvale, and South Salt Lake Cities. SLCDPU’s asset management program includes personnel and systems to assess the condition of the large water transmission mains, distribution mains, treatment and pumping plants, reservoirs, tanks, wells, canals, and other infrastructure to assure repair and replacement is completed with minimal impact to the public. Addressing aging water infrastructure through rehabilitation and replacement is a priority and is the primary reason behind gradual rate increases planned for the next few years in the water utility. For instance, each of SLCDPU’s three water treatment plants were originally constructed in the 1950’s and have undergone numerous upgrades. Based on recent condition assessments, SLCDPU is preparing a strategy to replace these treatment plants in future years to ensure this critical infrastructure remains viable for the long term protection of public health and can better withstand major seismic events. There is also a continual need to repair and replace pipe segments to maintain water service and reduce emergency repair costs and impacts to the public. Water Utility Budget Highlights for FY 2022 Anticipated Revenues The impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic over the last year continue to be evaluated. At this time, revenues in the water utility appear to not have been impacted significantly, although patterns of water use appear to have shifted slightly to reflect increased residential use and decreased commercial use. Due to anticipated drought responses this year leading to reduced water consumption, we are conservatively estimating revenues. SLCDPU intends to issue revenue bonds of $26,146,000 in FY 2022 designated for water. Additional bonding of $166,927,000 is anticipated from FY 2023 to FY 2026 meet water utility capital project objectives. The revenue budget is proposed to decrease by $35,267,065 or 21.69% from the FY 2021 budget. The proposed water utility budget for FY 2022 by major category is as follows: 5 Operating Sales: Revenue is expected to be 20.35% more than FY 2021 budgeted levels. The proposed budget is based on modeling done on 10-year water sales. The forecast anticipates a decrease in overall consumption from the average. FY 2021 actual sales outpaced the amended budget for the year. Interest Income: Interest earnings are expected to decrease as bond proceeds are spent during the year. Interfund Charges: The water utility is reimbursed by sewer, stormwater, street lighting, refuse, and the Hive program for services related to billing. Related revenue is anticipated to increase based on actual costs. Impact Fees: Impact fees are budgeted to increase $600,000 for new development. The FY 2022 budget is a conservative estimate based on historical and current trend information. Bond Proceeds: A bond issue of $26,146,000 is anticipated. Reserve Funds: SLCDPU plans to use $6,818,047 of reserve funds to balance the capital and operation needs. Budgeted use of reserve funds is $34,868,035 less than the FY 2021 amended budget or a decrease of 83.64% Proposed Expenditures The water utility’s FY 2022 budget includes an increase of $1,686,755 in charges for services and an increase of $2,497,506 in personal services. The increase in personal services is attributed to the addition of 9.30 FTEs and a 3% increase to accommodate employee compensation and benefit changes. The new FTEs requested will support the SLCDPU’s administration, water resources, maintenance, engineering, and water quality divisions to meet regulatory requirements and support continued economic activity. Metropolitan Water District of Salt Lake and Sandy (MWDSLS) is projecting to increase the current price levels for water for FY 2022 without increases to operational or assessment charges. A 3% increase is included in this budget. Pursuant to SLCDPU’s recent water supply and demand planning, the FY 2022 budget includes a scheduled Revenue Adopted Budget 2020 2021 Amended Budget 2020 2021 Proposed Budget 2021 2022 Difference Percent Change Operating Sales 71,013,328 71,013,328 85,462,346 14,449,018 20.35% Interest 715,896 715,896 398,000 (317,896)44.41% Interfund Charges 2,921,828 2,921,828 2,966,142 44,314 1.52% OtherRevenues 611,270 900,176 1,836,730 936,554 104.04% Impact Fees 1,184,670 1,184,670 1,784,670 600,000 50.65% Contributions 1,975,640 1,975,640 1,953,620 (22,020)1.11% Bond Proceeds 42,235,000 42,235,000 26,146,000 (16,089,000) From (To) Reserves 5,675,561 41,686,082 6,818,047 (34,868,035)83.64% Total 126,333,193$ 162,632,620$ 127,365,555$(35,267,065)$21.69% Projected Water Revenues for FY 2021 22 6 payment for the Central Utah Project Utah Lake System (ULS) petition for 3,100-acre feet of new water resources. The MWDSLS payment for the ULS petition of $844,223 is passed through to SLCDPU and is reflected in the SLCDPU FY 2022 proposed budget. SLCDPU plans to invest $39,600,000 in capital improvements for water utility infrastructure in FY 2022. The capital improvement program includes a prioritized balance of needed improvements to treatment plants, water lines, meter replacements, pump stations, wells, and other infrastructure. A portion of the water main replacements are being performed in conjunction with the General Fund bonded street repair projects. In FY 2021, the capital improvements budget was significantly reduced from earlier planned investments due to anticipated impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and the deferral of a planned rate increase. SLCDPU is now resuming its plans for gradual rate increases and significant investment into aging infrastructure this year. The expenditure budget for the water utility is proposed to decrease $35,267,065 or 21.69% from the FY 2021 amended budget. The proposed budget for FY 2022 by major category is as follows: Personal Services: Employee related costs are estimated to increase $2,497,506 or 9.69%. The water utility budget anticipates an increase of 9.30 FTEs. The FY 2022 budget includes a 3% increase to accommodate employee compensation and benefit changes . Materials & Supplies: The increase in this category is less than 1%. Charges for Services: The proposed budget for charges and services will increase $1,686,755 or 3.87%. The increase can be attributed to a proposed increase in MWDSLS rates of $494,337, increases in professional and consultants, and increased IMS costs. Debt Service: In compliance with current bond issues and in anticipation of additional debt, the budget for debt services is projected to increase by $1,881,155. Capital Outlay: The proposed budget for capital outlay for FY 2022 includes $1,500,000 for watershed purchases, $250,000 for water right and company purchases, $250,000 for water stock purchases, $150,000 for additional land purchases, $1,081,900 for 18 vehicles, $965,475 for field equipment, $180,000 for treatment plant equipment, $101,600 for office furniture and equipment, and $143,860 for other non-motive equipment. Major Expenditure Categories Adopted Budget 2020 2021 Amended Budget 2020 2021 Proposed Budget 2021 2022 Difference Percent Change Personal Services 25,518,196 25,774,546 28,272,052 2,497,506 9.69% Materials and Supplies 4,789,775 4,806,680 4,839,903 33,223 0.69% Charges for Services 41,493,558 43,577,081 45,263,836 1,686,755 3.87% Debt Service 2,885,774 2,885,774 4,766,929 1,881,155 65.19% Capital Outlay 3,715,890 3,820,671 4,622,835 802,164 21.00% Capital Improvements 47,930,000 81,767,868 39,600,000 (42,167,868)51.57% Total 126,333,193$ 162,632,620$ 127,365,555$(35,267,065)$21.69% Proposed Water Expenditures for FY 2021 22 7 Capital Improvements: The proposed capital improvement budget for FY 2022 is $39,600,000. A detailed list of capital improvement projects is included in the cash flow summaries for the water utility. A capital project summary by facility type is as follows: Typeof Project Proposed Budget 2021 2022 TreatmentPlants 7,350,000 WaterService Connections 5,450,000 PumpingPlant Upgrades 1,550,000 Reservoirs 4,000,000 WaterMainsand Hydrants 18,019,000 Wells 1,630,000 Culverts, Flumes, and Bridges 1,533,000 Landscaping 68,000 Total 2021 2022 CIP 39,600,000$ Proposed Water Capital ImprovementProgram for FY2021 22 8 Sewer Utility Enterprise Fund Sewer Infrastructure Background The City’s Water Reclamation Facility (WRF) was constructed in 1965 and has undergone numerous upgrades since. Nutrient removal regulations adopted by the Utah Department of Environmental Quality (UDEQ) in 2015 require a new sewage treatment process. After much study, SLCDPU determined that the WRF has reached the end of its useful life and adapting the 55- year old facility to meet the new nutrient removal requirements is not feasible. A new WRF is currently under construction, to be completed in order to meet UDEQ’s nutrient compliance date of January 1, 2025. SLCDPU has been implementing gradual rate increases and revenue bonding for the replacement of the WRF. The sewer collection system (654 miles of pipeline, and several pump stations) is a very challenging environment; hydrogen sulfide gases, sediment, roots and other factors affect the competency of the collection lines. SLCDPU’s asset management program includes personnel and systems to assess the condition of the sewer collection system, pump stations, and other infrastructure to assure repair and replacement is completed with minimal impact to the public. More than 50% of the sewer collection system is greater than 85 years old. SLCDPU is expanding capacity of the sewer collection system, in large part to meet growth requirements related to the new State Correctional Facility, the Airport expansion, and new development anticipated in the Northwest Quadrant of Salt Lake City. 9 Sewer Utility Budget Highlights for FY 2022 Total project costs for the WRF reconstruction are anticipated to be $711,653,000 when the project is completed. Construction began in FY 2020. SLCDPU has expended approximately $69.5 million to date on this project. Current financing for the new WRF is anticipated to be accomplished using a combination of revenue bonds, user rates, and a federal loan through the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (WIFIA). The loan will provide up to 49% of the cost of the new WRF. The interest rate at loan closing in 2020 was extremely favorable at 1.34%. This is expected to save SLCDPU’s ratepayers more than $100 million over the life of the project compared to revenue bonds. Anticipated Revenues A proposed 18% rate increase is anticipated to generate an additional $7,713,937 in sewer fees. Proposed sales revenues are based on the best estimates available. The additional revenue is required for the sewer utility to meet its capital and operations objectives. Rate increases in future years are also anticipated at this time. SLCDPU plans to issue bonds during FY 2022 with $123,687,000 designated for the sewer utility. Additional bonded debt of $134,748,000 is anticipated from FY 2023 to FY 2025 to meet capital objectives, primarily the reconstruction of the WRF. It is anticipated that WIFIA loan proceeds of $161,535,000 will be utilized during the same period. Debt will be used in conjunction with rate increases to blend pay as you go and borrowing strategies. The proposed debt is for a 30- year term creating intergenerational equity payback on the new WRF facility. The City’s professional financial advisors have been involved in the process to measure debt service and ratios to comply with external rating agency standards. SLCDPU intends to maintain its AAA rating to limit costs of borrowing. FY WIFIA Bonds Total 2019 2020 55,000,000 55,000,000 2020 2021 93,210,000 51,000,000 144,210,000 2021 2022 93,980,000 123,000,000 216,980,000 2022 2023 70,465,000 88,000,000 158,465,000 2023 2024 64,017,000 46,000,000 110,017,000 2024 2025 24,356,000 24,356,000 2025 2026 2,697,000 2,697,000 Total 348,725,000$ 363,000,000$ 711,725,000$ Sewer Planned Debt 10 The total revenue budget is expected to decrease by $556,101 or 0.21% to $268,213,796 from the FY 2021 amended budget. Bond issues and a federal loan are the expected to increase but are offset by a shift in utilization of reserves. The proposed budget for FY 2022 by major category is as follows: Sewer service fees: Sewer service fees are expected to increase $7,713,937 or 15.33%. SLCDPU assumes that due to the COVID-19 pandemic, revenue from sewer sales could decrease. AWC information was utilized to determine a reasonably anticipated sales base, and then applied the 18% rate increase. The proposed increase is approximately $6.32 per month for the representative resident, assuming winter water use of eight CCF. Winter water use of eight CCF is conservative as some of our residents use less than eight CCF during the winter months. The additional revenue from rates is required for the sewer utility to meet is capital and operations objectives while balancing debt. Interest Income: Interest earnings are expected to decrease with the spending of capital funds. Permit Fees: Increased to reflect actual historical collections. Other Revenues: Decreased to reflect estimate based on historical collections. Impact Fees: No change is anticipated. Bond / Note Proceeds: A bond issue of $123,687,000 is anticipated. The budget anticipates utilizing $93,890,000 in WIFIA loan proceeds. Contribution: Decreased to reflect updated collections information. Reserve Funds: Unspent bond proceeds of $10,513,964 will added to reserves for use on the WRF project. Proposed Expenditures The proposed sewer budget for FY 2022 includes $226,135,826 in planned projects. Of this amount $189,320,826 is designated for the new WRF, $1,725,000 for the existing WRF, and $35,090,000 for improvements to the sewer collections system. A portion of the Revenue Adopted Budget 2020 2021 Amended Budget 2020 2021 ProposedBudget 2021 2022 Difference Percent Change Operating Sales 50,321,000 50,321,000 58,034,937 7,713,937 15.33% Interest 992,301 992,301 171,000 (821,301)82.77% Permits 182,000 182,000 267,500 85,500 46.98% OtherRevenues 134,000 247,942 154,500 (93,442)37.69% Bond/ Loan Proceeds 144,495,000 144,495,000 217,577,000 73,082,000 50.58% Impact Fees 1,422,000 1,422,000 1,422,000 0.00% Contribution 1,684,000 1,684,000 1,100,823 (583,177)34.63% From (To) Reserves 13,408,098 69,425,654 (10,513,964) (79,939,618)115.14% Total 212,638,399$ 268,769,897$ 268,213,796$(556,101)$0.21% Projected SewerRevenues forFY 2021 22 11 sewer collection line replacements are being performed in c onjunction with the City’s general obligation bonded street repair projects. The sewer utility’s FY 2022 budget proposes an increase of $55,461,455 or 26.07% over the FY 2021 amended budget. The proposed budget for FY 2022 by major category is as follows: Personal Services: Employee related costs are estimated to increase $100,962 or .80%. The sewer utility budget anticipates an increase of 3.35 FTEs. The FY 2022 budget includes a 3% increase to accommodate employee compensation and benefit changes. The amended budget for FY 2021 included a generous estimate for overtime. FY 2022 amounts in this category have been updated. Materials & Supplies: The sewer utility’s budget for this category increases by $76,074. The increase is attributed to additional chemical purchases. Charges for Services: Increases in professional and contractual services, increases in IMS charges for services, and increased sludge management fees represent the largest portion of the budget increase in this category. Debt Service: The annual debt service budget is expected to increase by $3,768,881 in FY 2022. The increase is attributed to payments on existing debt and interest payments for new debt. Capital Outlay: The proposed capital outlay budget for FY 2022 includes $860,000 for vehicles and trucks, $269,000 for field maintenance equipment, $185,000 for treatment plant equipment, and $13,000 for other non-motive equipment. Capital Improvements: The proposed capital improvement budget for FY 2022 is $226,135,826, an decrease of $5,540,546 from the current year amended budget. A detailed list of capital improvement projects is included in the cash flow summary for the sewer utility. A capital project summary by facility type is as follows: MajorExpenditure Categories Adopted Budget 2020 2021 Amended Budget 2020 2021 Proposed Budget 2021 2022 Difference Percent Change Personal Services 12,590,497 12,698,997 12,799,959 100,962 0.80% Materials and Supplies 2,579,981 2,579,981 2,656,055 76,074 2.95% ChargesforServices 7,746,203 7,912,598 8,818,606 906,008 11.45% DebtService 12,707,469 12,707,469 16,476,350 3,768,881 29.66% Capital Outlay 671,836 1,194,480 1,327,000 132,520 11.09% Capital Improvements 176,342,413 231,676,372 226,135,826 (5,540,546)2.39% Total 212,638,399$ 268,769,897$ 268,213,796$(556,101)$0.21% Proposed SewerExpenditures forFY 2021 22 12 Proposed Budget 2021 2022 191,045,826 32,405,000 2,685,000 226,135,826$ Proposed Sewer Capital Improvement Program for FY 2021 22 Type of Project WRF Collection System Lift Stations Northwest Oil Drain Total 2021 2022 CIP 13 Stormwater Utility Enterprise Fund Stormwater Infrastructure Background The City’s stormwater system includes 350 miles of stormwater collection lines, 77 miles of canals and drainage ditches, 32 miles of open channel creeks and rivers, culverts, 27 lift stations, and 63 detention basins. These systems must be maintained to prevent flooding and to meet the water quality requirements in the Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) permit. SLCDPU is also responsible for all city facilities meeting MS4 requirements. A Drainage Master Plan was completed in 1993. The FY 2022 budget includes the continuation of on update of the Drainage Master Plan to include water quality and climate change issues, such as storm intensification, in addition to traditional conveyance. Stormwater Utility Budget Highlights for FY 2022 Anticipated Revenues A planned 10% rate increase was deferred in FY 2021 due to anticipated economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. SLCDPU is proposing a rate increase of 10% in FY 2022, and plans increases between 10% and 15% in future years through FY 2026 in order to maintain and rehabilitate infrastructure and meet more stringent water quality requirements. SLCDPU plans to issue bonds during FY 2022 with $6,160,000 designated for stormwater utility needs. This amount is primarily associated with stormwater collection system replacement in coordination with the City’s streets bond. The revenue budget is proposed to decrease by $3,192,015 or 14.25% from the FY 2021 amended budget. The proposed revenue budget for FY 2022 by major category is as follows: Revenue Adopted Budget 2020 2021 Amended Budget 2020 2021 Proposed Budget 2021 2022 Difference Percent Change OperatingSales 9,753,500 9,753,500 10,714,550 961,050 9.85% Interest 199,670 199,670 119,200 (80,470)40.30% Other Revenues 52,000 86,764 64,000 (22,764)26.24% Impact Fees 389,000 389,000 389,000 0.00% Contributions 352,000 352,000 352,000 0.00% Bond Proceeds 6,160,000 6,160,000 From (To) Reserves 6,628,085 11,612,094 1,402,263 (10,209,831)87.92% Total 17,374,255$ 22,393,028$ 19,201,013$(3,192,015)$14.25% Projected Storm Revenues for FY2021 22 14 Operating Sales: Revenue is expected to increase by approximately 10%. Interest Income: Interest earnings are expected to decrease due to spending of bond proceeds. Other Revenues: FY 2021 amended budget includes one-time CARES funding. Contributions: No change is anticipated. Impact Fees: No change is anticipated. Bond / Note Proceeds: A bond issue of $6,160,000 is anticipated. Reserve Funds: Reserves of $1,402,263 will be utilized for stormwater system improvements. These funds will come from the Series 2020 Bond proceeds. Proposed Expenditures The stormwater utility’s FY 2022 budget proposes capitalizing $8,530,500 to renovate portions of the stormwater collection system. The schedule for stormwater system improvements has been adjusted to perform work in conjunction with the general obligation bonded street repair projects. The FY 2022 capital improvements budget includes continued funding for this cooperative work. The expenditure budget for the stormwater utility is proposed to decrease $3,192,015 or 14.25%. The proposed budget for fiscal year FY 2022 by major category is as follows: Personal Services: Employee related costs are estimated to increase $554,203 or 15.14%. The stormwater utility budget anticipates an increase of 4.20 FTEs. The FY 2022 budget includes a 3% increase to accommodate employee compensation and benefit changes. Charges for Services: Studies and consultants are anticipated to decrease in FY 2022. Debt Service: The budget increases by $284,770 of 19.46% for interest payments required by the planned bond issue. Capital Outlay: The proposed capital outlay budget for FY 2022 includes $209,000 for vehicles and $9,000 for field maintenance equipment. Major Expenditure Categories Adopted Budget 2020 2021 Amended Budget 2020 2021 Proposed Budget 2021 2022 Difference Percent Change Personal Services 3,628,930 3,661,580 4,215,783 554,203 15.14% Materials and Supplies 228,808 228,808 232,408 3,600 1.57% Charges for Services 4,315,421 4,723,194 4,255,851 (467,343)9.89% Debt Service 1,463,701 1,463,701 1,748,471 284,770 19.46% Capital Outlay 382,000 382,000 218,000 (164,000)42.93% Capital Improvements 7,943,000 11,933,745 8,530,500 (3,403,245)28.52% Total 17,961,860$ 22,393,028$ 19,201,013$(3,192,015)$14.25% Proposed Storm Expenditures for FY 2021 22 15 Capital Improvements: The proposed capital improvement budget for FY 2022 is $8,530,500, a decrease of $3,403,245 from the FY 2021 amended budget. A detailed list of capital improvement projects is provided in the cash flow summary for the stormwater utility. The capital project summary by facility types are as follows: Proposed Budget 2021 2022 7,612,500 700,000 168,000 Detention Basins 50,000 8,530,500$ Lift Stations Landscaping Total 2021 2022 CIP Proposed Storm Capital Improvement Program for FY 2021 22 Type of Project Lines and Riparian Corridor Projects 16 Street Lighting Utility Enterprise Fund Street Lighting Infrastructure Background SLCDPU has updated the City’s 2006 Street Lighting Master Plan in order to focus on community safety and aesthetic needs, particularly since updating lights and conversion of streetlights to energy efficient bulbs has changed the character of lighting in some neighborhoods. In anticipation of the adoption of the updated master plan, SLCDPU anticipates revising the street lighting cost of service and rate study, as well as preparing a programmatic and systematic approach to implementation of the master plan. Of the 15,662 lights that the City maintains, 8,796 lights or 56% are now considered to be energy efficient. SLCDPU is in the seventh year of a ten-year plan to convert all the lights to high energy efficiency lamps. The FY 2022 budget funds continuing conversion to high efficiency lights. Ongoing conversions are anticipated in some neighborhoods once the Street Lighting Master Plan is completed to provide better guidelines related to lighting color and intensity. 17 Street Lighting Utility Budget Highlights for FY 2022 Anticipated Revenues No rate changes are proposed in the FY 2022 budget. The base lighting rates were established in 2013 at $3.73 per month for an average residential customer, or Equivalent Residential Unit (ERU), and are expected to remain unchanged for this fiscal year. Rates for enhanced tiers are Tier 1 $5.67, Tier 2 $15.94, and Tier 3 $43.82. Continuation of the private lights program is proposed in the FY 2022 budget. The program includes a $20,000 transfer from the General Fund and indicates the on-going desire of the City to provide a matching support to reduce the capital costs to neighborhoods installing private street lighting. SLCDPU administers this program. The revenue budget is proposed to increase by $279,183 from the FY 2021 budget. The proposed budget for FY 2022 by major category is as follows: Operating Sales: Rate changes are not proposed thus this category is expected to change significantly. The FY 2022 budget is based on actual sales revenue from FY 2020. Interest Income: Interest earnings budget was revised based on a review of historical and current year earnings. Other Revenues: The slight decrease is based on 5-year historical data. General Fund Contributions: FY 2021 amended budget included CARES funding. Reserve Funds: The FY 2021 budget anticipates using $1,508,894 from the utility’s reserve funds. Revenue Adopted Budget 2020 2021 Amended Budget 2020 2021 Proposed Budget 2021 2022 Difference Percent Change Operating Sales 4,224,298 4,224,298 4,097,569 (126,729)3.00% Interest 8,000 8,000 40,500 32,500 406.25% Other Revenues 34,500 34,500 32,700 (1,800)5.22% General Fund Contributions 20,000 21,788 20,000 (1,788)8.21% From (To) Reserves 1,092,899 1,131,894 1,508,894 377,000 33.31% Total 5,379,697$ 5,420,480$ 5,699,663$ 279,183$ 5.15% Projected Street Lighting Revenues for FY 2021 22 18 Proposed Expenditures Street lighting capital improvements totaling $2,240,000 are planned in the FY 2022 budget. The Street Lighting Capital Program focuses on high efficiency and system upgrades in neighborhood, arterial and collector streets. The expenditure budget for the street lighting utility is proposed to increase $279,183 or 5.15% from the FY 2021 amended budget. The proposed budget for FY 2022 by major category is as follows: Personal Services: Employee related costs are estimated to increase $131,723 or 58.37%. The street lighting utility budget anticipates an increased allocation of 1.15 FTE. The FY 2022 budget includes a 3% increase to accommodate employee compensation and benefit changes. Charges for Services: The proposed budget for charges and services increases $162,171 or 5.92% in FY 2022 with a budgeted increase in professional and contractual services. Debt Service: In compliance with the outstanding Series 2017 Bond, budgeted debt service payments will increase slightly from FY 2021. Capital Equipment: No expenditures of capital equipment are planned. Capital Improvements: The proposed capital improvement budget for FY 2022 is $2,240,000, a decrease of $16,414 from the FY 2021 amended budget. A capital projects summary by facility type is as follows for base lighting and all enhanced tiers: Major Expenditure Categories Adopted Budget 2020 2021 Amended Budget 2020 2021 Proposed Budget 2021 2022 Difference Percent Change Personal Services 224,167 225,667 357,390 131,723 58.37% Materials and Supplies 6,994 6,994 6,994 0.00% Charges for Services 2,716,702 2,739,571 2,901,742 162,171 5.92% Debt Service 191,834 191,834 193,537 1,703 0.89% Capital Improvements 2,240,000 2,256,414 2,240,000 (16,414)0.73% Total 5,379,697$ 5,420,480$ 5,699,663$ 279,183$ 5.15% Proposed Street Lighting Expenditures for FY 2021 22 Proposed Budget2021 2022 2,240,000 2,240,000.00$ Systemupgradesfor high efficiency and uniformity Base Tiers1 3 Total 2021 2022 CIP Type of Project Proposed Street LightingCapital Improvement Program for FY2021 22 19 20 Combined Utilities- Budget Summary and Cash Flow 21 PUBLIC UTILITIES WATER, SEWER, STORMWATER, AND STREET LIGHTING COMBINED BUDGET SUMMARY FY 2022-2024 AMENDED PROJECTED PROPOSED PROPOSED PROPOSED ACTUAL BUDGET ACTUAL BUDGET BUDGET BUDGET SOURCES 2019-20 2020-21 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 REVENUE & OTHER SOURCES REVENUES UTILITY SERVICE REVENUE 134,778,497$ 133,792,106$ 143,357,759$ 158,309,402$ 181,426,202$ 204,479,572$ INTEREST INCOME 1,867,054 1,915,867 1,933,000 728,700 562,830 733,800 OTHER REVENUES 4,615,608 5,109,649 5,109,649 5,237,231 5,237,231 5,237,231 TOTAL REVENUES 141,261,159$ 140,817,622$ 150,400,408$ 164,275,333$ 187,226,263$ 210,450,603$ OTHER SOURCES GRANTS & OTHER RELATED REVENUES 8,083,450$ 4,643,961$ 4,643,961$ 3,434,284$ 3,434,284$ 3,434,284$ SALE OF EQUIPMENT 300,109$ 155,260$ 155,260$ 56,500$ 56,500$ 56,500$ IMPACT FEES 4,710,332 2,995,670 3,511,006 3,595,670 3,595,670 3,595,670 TRANSFERS FROM GENERAL FUND - 21,788 21,788 20,000 20,000 20,000 WIFIA LOAN - 93,210,000 93,210,000 93,890,000 70,465,000 64,017,000 BOND PROCEEDS - 93,520,000 197,939,471 155,993,000 130,726,000 108,603,000 NON BOND FINANCING - - - - - - SHORT-TERM FINANCING - - - - - - COUNTY FLOOD CONTROL - - - - - - OTHER SOURCES - - - - - - TOTAL OTHER SOURCES 13,093,891$ 194,546,679$ 299,481,486$ 256,989,454$ 208,297,454$ 179,726,454$ TOTAL REVENUE & OTHER SOURCES 154,355,050$ 335,364,301$ 449,881,894$ 421,264,787$ 395,523,717$ 390,177,057$ EXPENSES & OTHER USES EXPENDITURES PERSONNEL SERVICES 34,309,801$ 42,360,790$ 42,360,790$ 45,645,184$ 47,188,269$ 48,784,598$ OPERATING & MAINTENANCE 4,939,908 7,622,463 7,622,463 7,735,360 7,890,067 8,047,870 TRAVEL & TRAINING 82,058 314,177 314,177 298,005 303,966 310,046 UTILITIES 2,823,062 5,101,677 5,101,677 5,172,058 5,275,499 5,381,009 TECHNICAL SERVICES 5,714,544 17,131,119 16,661,119 16,466,271 17,295,598 17,641,512 IMS SERVICES 2,549,270 2,503,000 2,503,000 4,332,073 4,418,715 4,507,090 PUBLIC SERVICES / STREET SWEEPING 819,605 819,605 819,605 819,605 835,997 852,717 FLEET MAINTENANCE 1,655,067 2,008,050 2,008,050 2,005,500 2,045,610 2,086,521 ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICE FEE 1,482,952 1,555,200 1,555,200 1,600,416 1,632,424 1,665,074 PAYMENT IN LIEU OF TAXES 1,126,697 1,393,358 1,393,358 1,413,775 1,442,051 1,470,892 RISK MANAGEMENT 748,481 1,913,500 1,913,500 1,949,300 1,988,286 2,028,051 TRANSFERS TO GENERAL FUND - 14,000 14,000 14,000 14,280 14,566 BILLING COST 1,684,523 1,502,571 1,502,571 1,618,882 1,651,259 1,684,284 NEW PLANT O&M COSTS - - - - 250,000 252,500 METRO. WATER PURCH & TREAT 15,668,662 16,474,663 16,474,663 16,969,000 17,308,380 17,654,548 METRO ASSESSMENT (CAPITAL) 7,021,892 7,866,115 7,866,115 7,866,115 7,866,115 7,866,115 OTHER CHARGES AND SERVICES (309,437) 355,410 355,410 715,035 729,335 743,926 TOTAL EXPENDITURES 80,317,085$ 108,935,698$ 108,465,698$ 114,620,579$ 118,135,851$ 120,991,319$ OTHER USES CAPITAL OUTLAY 6,219,965$ 5,397,151$ 5,397,151$ 6,167,835$ 5,539,814$ 5,553,794$ CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT BUDGET 99,066,592 327,916,537 325,125,792 276,506,326 242,547,052 253,697,248 COST OF DEBT ISSUANCE - 520,000 438,562 867,200 653,000 341,000 DEBT SERVICES 14,708,698 16,728,778 20,747,227 22,318,087 24,300,569 26,392,445 TOTAL OTHER USES 119,995,255$ 350,562,466$ 351,708,732$ 305,859,448$ 273,040,435$ 285,984,487$ TOTAL EXPENSE & OTHER USES 200,312,340$ 459,498,164$ 460,174,430$ 420,480,027$ 391,176,286$ 406,975,806$ EXCESS REVENUE AND OTHER SOURCES OVER (UNDER) USES (45,957,290)$ (124,133,863)$ (10,292,536)$ 784,760$ 4,347,431$ (16,798,749)$ OPERATING CASH BALANCES BEGINNING JULY 1 99,940,872$ 72,333,355$ 72,333,355$ 62,040,819$ 62,825,579$ 67,173,010$ RESTRICTED / DESIGNATED 18,349,773$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ ENDING JUNE 30 72,333,355$ (51,800,508)$ 62,040,819$ 62,825,579$ 67,173,010$ 50,374,261$ Cash Reserve Ratio 90% -48% 57%55%57% 42% Cash reserve goal above 14% Combined Rate Increase 18% Combined Rate Increase 15% Combined Rate Increase 13% 22 26 Water Utility- Budget Summary and Cash Flow 27 AMENDED PROJECTED PROPOSED FORECAST FORECAST ACTUAL BUDGET ACTUAL BUDGET BUDGET BUDGET SOURCES 2019-20 2020-21 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 REVENUE & OTHER SOURCES REVENUES METERED SALES 76,257,075$ 69,612,308$ 79,304,690$ 85,462,346$ 98,266,900$ 112,990,800$ INTEREST INCOME 583,230 715,896 715,896 398,000 184,530 165,000 OTHER REVENUES 4,197,718 4,530,048 4,530,048 4,762,372 4,762,372 4,762,372 TOTAL REVENUES 81,038,023$ 74,858,252$ 84,550,634$ 90,622,718$ 103,213,802$ 117,918,172$ OTHER SOURCES GRANTS & OTHER RELATED REVENUES 2,562,909$ 2,533,356$ 2,533,356$ 1,953,620$ 1,953,620$ 1,953,620$ IMPACT FEES 2,521,760 1,184,670 1,338,448 1,784,670 1,784,670 1,784,670 SALE OF EQUIPMENT 125,034 135,260 135,260 40,500 40,500 40,500 OTHER SOURCES - - - - - - BOND PROCEEDS - 42,235,000 77,129,992 26,146,000 42,235,000 62,346,000 TOTAL OTHER SOURCES 5,209,703$ 46,088,286$ 81,137,056$ 29,924,790$ 46,013,790$ 66,124,790$ TOTAL REVENUE & SOURCES 86,247,726$ 120,946,538$ 165,687,690$ 120,547,508$ 149,227,592$ 184,042,962$ EXPENSES & OTHER USES EXPENDITURES PERSONNEL SERVICES 21,571,541$ 25,774,546$ 25,774,546$ 28,272,052$ 29,120,215$ 29,993,822$ OPERATING & MAINTENANCE 3,731,042 4,806,680 4,806,680 4,839,903 4,936,702 5,035,437 TRAVEL & TRAINING 46,251 179,100 179,100 180,800 184,417 188,106 UTILITIES 1,251,633 2,845,999 2,845,999 2,857,150 2,914,294 2,972,580 TECHNICAL SERVICES 2,493,855 11,117,403 11,117,403 10,908,535 11,626,706 11,859,240 IMS SERVICES 1,463,176 1,408,000 1,408,000 2,486,100 2,535,822 2,586,538 FLEET MAINTENANCE 1,005,504 1,250,500 1,250,500 1,250,500 1,275,510 1,301,020 ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICE FEE 841,922 867,200 867,200 893,216 911,080 929,302 PAYMENT IN LIEU OF TAXES 365,000 385,780 385,780 428,864 437,441 446,190 METRO. WATER PURCH & TREAT 15,668,662 16,474,663 16,474,663 16,969,000 17,308,380 17,654,548 METRO ASSESSMENT (CAPITAL) 7,021,892 7,866,115 7,866,115 7,866,115 7,866,115 7,866,115 RISK MANAGEMENT 626,046 1,444,950 1,444,950 1,481,750 1,511,385 1,541,613 TRANSFERS TO GENERAL FUND - 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,200 10,404 OTHER CHARGES AND SERVICES (556,896) (272,628) (272,628) (68,194) (69,558) (70,948) TOTAL EXPENDITURES 55,529,628$ 74,158,308$ 74,158,308$ 78,375,791$ 80,568,709$ 82,313,967$ OTHER USES CAPITAL OUTLAY 4,109,586$ 3,820,671$ 3,820,671$ 4,622,835$ 4,622,835$ 4,622,835$ CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT BUDGET 30,538,705 82,050,006 82,050,006 39,600,000 68,462,800 88,923,500 COST OF DEBT ISSUANCE - 235,000 129,992 146,000 162,000 84,000 DEBT SERVICES 1,138,500 2,650,774 4,870,922 4,620,929 5,920,053 7,991,385 TOTAL OTHER USES 35,786,791$ 88,756,451$ 90,871,591$ 48,989,764$ 79,167,688$ 101,621,720$ TOTAL EXPENSE & OTHER USES 91,316,419$ 162,914,759$ 165,029,899$ 127,365,555$ 159,736,397$ 183,935,687$ EXCESS REVENUE AND OTHER SOURCES OVER (UNDER) USES ($5,068,693) ($41,968,221) $657,791 ($6,818,047)($10,508,805) $107,275 OPERATING CASH BALANCES BEGINNING JULY 1 23,684,887$ 28,197,285$ 28,197,285$ 28,855,076$ 22,037,029$ 11,528,224$ RESTRICTED / DESIGNATED 9,581,091 -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ AVAILABLE JUNE 30 28,197,285$ (13,770,936)$ 28,855,076$ 22,037,029$ 11,528,224$ 11,635,499$ Cash Reserve Ratio 51% -19% 39%28%14% 14% Cash reserve goal above 14% WATER UTILITY BUDGET SUMMARY FY 2022-24 Rate Increase 8% Rate Increase 15% Rate Increase 15% 28 CRITICALITY RATINGCONDITION RATING CRITICALITY RATINGCONDITION RATING CRITICALITY RATINGCONDITION RATING CRITICALITY RATINGCONDITION RATING CRITICALITY RATINGCONDITION RATING CRITICALITY RATINGCONDITION RATING CRITICALITY RATINGCONDITION RATING CRITICALITY RATINGCONDITION RATING CRITICALITY RATINGCONDITION RATING CRITICALITY RATINGCONDITION RATING CRITICALITY RATINGCONDITION RATING Sewer Utility- Budget Summary and Cash Flow 43 AMENDED PROJECTED PROPOSED FORECAST FORECAST ACTUAL BUDGET ACTUAL BUDGET BUDGET BUDGET SOURCES 2019-20 2020-21 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 REVENUE & OTHER SOURCES REVENUES METERED SALES 43,864,526$ 50,215,000$ 50,215,000$ 58,034,937$ 66,740,000 73,414,000$ INTEREST INCOME 1,035,061 992,301 992,301 171,000 232,000 444,000 OTHER REVENUES 343,367 519,942 519,942 406,000 406,000 406,000 TOTAL REVENUES 45,242,954$ 51,727,243$ 51,727,243$ 58,611,937$ 67,378,000 74,264,000$ OTHER SOURCES IMPACT FEES 1,700,183$ 1,422,000$ 1,783,558$ 1,422,000$ 1,422,000 1,422,000$ GRANTS & OTHER RELATED REVENUES 5,379,388 1,684,000 1,684,000 1,100,823 1,100,823 1,100,823 SALE OF EQUIPMENT 168,224 16,000 16,000 16,000 16,000 16,000 WIFIA LOAN - 93,210,000 93,210,000 93,890,000 70,465,000 64,017,000 NON BOND FINANCING - - - - 0 - BOND PROCEEDS - 51,285,000 106,285,000 123,687,000 88,491,000 46,257,000 TOTAL OTHER SOURCES 7,247,795$ 147,617,000$ 202,978,558$ 220,115,823$ 161,494,823 112,812,823$ TOTAL REVENUE & OTHER SOURCES 52,490,749$ 199,344,243$ 254,705,801$ 278,727,760$ 228,872,823 187,076,823$ EXPENSES & OTHER USES EXPENDITURES PERSONNEL SERVICES 9,619,797$ 12,698,997$ 12,698,997$ 12,799,959$ 13,311,956 13,844,435$ OPERATING & MAINTENANCE 947,769 2,579,981 2,579,981 2,656,055 2,709,175 2,763,357 TRAVEL & TRAINING 28,820 106,912 106,912 90,590 92,402 94,250 UTILITIES 484,153 1,001,180 1,001,180 1,039,090 1,059,871 1,081,067 TECHNICAL SERVICES 739,106 2,560,929 2,560,929 2,710,769 2,764,985 2,820,285 IMS SERVICES 611,351 640,000 640,000 1,040,533 1,061,344 1,082,571 FLEET MAINTENANCE 415,754 543,550 543,550 541,000 551,820 562,856 ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICE FEE 457,350 480,000 480,000 494,400 504,288 514,374 PAYMENT IN LIEU OF TAXES 661,263 809,149 809,149 851,386 868,414 885,782 BILLING COST 827,634 827,634 827,634 949,872 968,869 988,246 RISK MANAGEMENT 53,434 375,450 375,450 374,450 381,939 389,577 TRANSFERS TO GENERAL FUND - - - - - - NEW PLANT O&M COSTS - - - - 250,000 252,500 OTHER CHARGES AND SERVICES 286,086 567,794 567,794 726,516 741,045 755,865 TOTAL EXPENDITURES 15,132,517$ 23,191,576$ 23,191,576$ 24,274,620$ 25,266,108 26,035,165$ OTHER USES CAPITAL OUTLAY 1,681,191$ 1,194,480$ 1,194,480$ 1,327,000$ 698,979 712,959$ CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT BUDGET 63,108,908 231,676,372 231,676,372 226,135,826 166,619,252 157,103,748 COST OF DEBT ISSUANCE - 285,000 285,000 687,000 491,000 257,000 DEBT SERVICES 12,447,926 12,422,469 14,220,770 15,789,350 16,441,610 16,498,244 TOTAL OTHER USES 77,238,025$ 245,578,321$ 247,376,622$ 243,939,176$ 184,250,841 174,571,951$ TOTAL EXPENSE & OTHER USES 92,370,542$ 268,769,897$ 270,568,198$ 268,213,796$ 209,516,949 200,607,116$ EXCESS REVENUE AND OTHER SOURCES OVER (UNDER) USES (39,879,793)$ (69,425,654)$ (15,862,397)$ 10,513,964$ 19,355,874 (13,530,293)$ OPERATING CASH BALANCES BEGINNING JULY 1 63,159,779$ 30,581,040$ 30,581,040$ 14,718,643$ 25,232,607 44,588,481$ RESTRICTED / DESIGNATED 7,301,054$ -$ -$ -$ 0 -$ AVAILABLE JUNE 30 30,581,040$ (38,844,614)$ 14,718,643$ 25,232,607$ 44,588,481 31,058,188$ Cash Reserve Ratio 202% -167% 63%104%176% 119% Cash reserve goal above 14% SEWER UTILITY BUDGET SUMMARY FY 2022-24 Rate Increase 18% Rate Increase 18% Rate Increase 15% 44 CRITICALITY RATINGCONDITION RATING CRITICALITY RATINGCONDITION RATING CRITICALITY RATINGCONDITION RATING CRITICALITY RATINGCONDITION RATING CRITICALITY RATINGCONDITION RATING CRITICALITY RATINGCONDITION RATING CRITICALITY RATINGCONDITION RATING 54 Stormwater Utility- Budget Summary and Cash Flow 55 AMENDED PROJECTED PROPOSED FORECAST FORECAST ACTUAL BUDGET ACTUAL BUDGET BUDGET BUDGET SOURCES 2019-20 2020-21 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 REVENUE & OTHER SOURCES REVENUES METERED SALES 10,424,070$ 9,740,500$ 9,740,500$ 10,714,550$ 12,321,733$ 13,553,906$ INTEREST INCOME 129,047 199,670 199,670 119,200 105,800 84,300 OTHER REVENUES 74,273 53,000 53,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 TOTAL REVENUES 10,627,390$ 9,993,170$ 9,993,170$ 10,897,750$ 12,491,533$ 13,702,206$ OTHER SOURCES GRANTS & OTHER RELATED REVENUES 141,153$ 398,764$ 398,764$ $ 352,000 352,000$ 352,000$ SALE OF EQUIPMENT 6,851 4,000 4,000 - COUNTY FLOOD CONTROL - - - - - - IMPACT FEES 488,389 389,000 389,000 389,000 389,000 389,000 SHORT-TERM FINANCING - - - - - - BOND PROCEEDS - - 14,524,479 6,160,000 - - TOTAL OTHER SOURCES 636,393$ 791,764$ 15,316,243$ 6,901,000$ 741,000$ 741,000$ TOTAL REVENUE & OTHER SOURCES 11,263,783$ 10,784,934$ 25,309,413$ 17,798,750$ 13,232,533$ 14,443,206$ EXPENSES & OTHER USES EXPENDITURES PERSONNEL SERVICES 2,900,729$ 3,661,580$ 3,661,580$ $ 4,215,783 4,384,413$ 4,559,788$ OPERATING & MAINTENANCE 255,137 228,808 228,808 232,408 237,056 241,796 TRAVEL & TRAINING 4,033 25,165 25,165 23,615 24,087 24,568 UTILITIES 303,268 242,998 242,998 264,318 269,604 274,996 TECHNICAL SERVICES 462,758 1,859,672 1,389,672 1,019,263 1,039,648 1,060,441 PUBLIC SERVICES / STREET SWEEPING 819,605 819,605 819,605 819,605 835,997 852,717 IMS SERVICES 472,952 455,000 455,000 802,400 818,448 834,817 FLEET MAINTENANCE 233,809 214,000 214,000 214,000 218,280 222,645 ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICE FEE 147,606 160,000 160,000 164,800 168,096 171,458 PAYMENT IN LIEU OF TAXES 100,434 124,259 124,259 133,525 136,196 138,920 BILLING COST 856,889 674,937 674,937 669,010 682,390 696,038 RISK MANAGEMENT 68,741 92,100 92,100 92,100 93,942 95,820 TRANSFERS TO GENERAL FUND - 4,000 4,000 4,000 4,080 4,162 OTHER CHARGES AND SERVICES (42,858) 51,458 51,458 49,215 50,200 51,205 TOTAL EXPENDITURES 6,583,103$ 8,613,582$ 8,143,582$ 8,704,042$ 8,962,437$ 9,229,371$ OTHER USES CAPITAL OUTLAY 429,188$ 382,000$ 382,000$ $ 218,000 218,000$ 218,000$ CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT BUDGET 4,389,476 11,933,745 9,143,000 8,530,500 5,225,000 5,430,000 COST OF DEBT ISSUANCE - - 23,570 34,200 - - DEBT SERVICES 1,018,835 1,463,701 1,463,701 1,714,271 1,745,321 1,709,254 TOTAL OTHER USES 5,837,499$ 13,779,446$ 11,012,271$ 10,496,971$ 7,188,321$ 7,357,254$ TOTAL EXPENSE & OTHER USES 12,420,602$ 22,393,028$ 19,155,853$ 19,201,013$ 16,150,758$ 16,586,625$ EXCESS REVENUE AND OTHER SOURCES OVER (UNDER) USES (1,156,819)$ (11,608,094)$ 6,153,560$ $ (1,402,263)(2,918,225)$ (2,143,419)$ OPERATING CASH BALANCES BEGINNING JULY 1 7,815,254$ 7,504,567$ 7,504,567$ $ 13,658,127 12,255,864$ 9,337,639$ RESTRICTED / DESIGNATED 846,132$ -$ -$ $ - -$ -$ AVAILABLE JUNE 30 7,504,567$ (4,103,527)$ 13,658,127$ $ 12,255,864 9,337,639$ 7,194,220$ Cash Reserve Ratio 114% -48% 168% 141% 104% 78% Cash reserve goal above 14% STORMWATER UTILITY BUDGET SUMMARY FY 2022-2024 Rate increase 10% Rate increase 15% Rate increase 10% 56 CRITICALITY RATINGCONDITION RATING CRITICALITY RATINGCONDITION RATING Street Lighting Utility- Budget Summary and Cash Flow 61 AMENDED PROJECTED PROPOSED FORECAST FORECAST ACTUAL BUDGET ACTUAL BUDGET BUDGET BUDGET SOURCES 2019-20 2020-21 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 REVENUE & OTHER SOURCES REVENUES STREET LIGHTING FEES 4,232,826$ 4,224,298$ 4,097,569$ 4,097,569$ 4,097,569$ 4,520,866$ INTEREST INCOME 119,716 8,000 25,133 40,500 40,500 40,500 OTHER REVENUES 250 6,659 6,659 4,859 4,859 4,859 TOTAL REVENUES 4,352,792$ 4,238,957$ 4,129,361$ 4,142,928$ 4,142,928$ 4,566,225$ OTHER SOURCES GRANTS & OTHER RELATED REVENUES -$ 27,841$ 27,841$ 27,841$ 27,841$ 27,841$ TRANSFERS FROM GENERAL FUND - 21,788 21,788 20,000 20,000 20,000 IMPACT FEES - - - - - - BOND PROCEEDS - - --- - TOTAL OTHER SOURCES -$ 49,629$ 49,629$ 47,841$ 47,841$ 47,841$ TOTAL REVENUE & SOURCES 4,352,792$ 4,288,586$ 4,178,990$ 4,190,769$ 4,190,769$ 4,614,066$ EXPENSES & OTHER USES EXPENDITURES PERSONNEL SERVICES 217,734$ 225,667$ 225,667$ 357,390$ 371,685$ 386,553$ OPERATING & MAINTENANCE 5,960 6,994 6,994 6,994 7,134 7,280 TRAVEL & TRAINING 2,954 3,000 3,000 3,000 3,060 3,122 UTILITIES 784,008 1,011,500 1,011,500 1,011,500 1,031,730 1,052,366 TECHNICAL SERVICES 2,018,825 1,593,115 1,593,115 1,827,704 1,864,259 1,901,546 IMS SERVICES 1,791 - - 3,040 3,101 3,164 FLEET MAINTENANCE - - - - - - ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICE FEE 36,074 48,000 48,000 48,000 48,960 49,940 PAYMENT IN LIEU OF TAXES - 74,170 74,170 - - - RISK MANAGEMENT 260 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,020 1,041 TRANSFERS TO GENERAL FUND - - - - - - OTHER CHARGES AND SERVICES 4,231 8,786 8,786 7,498 7,648 7,804 TOTAL EXPENDITURES 3,071,837$ 2,972,232$ 2,972,232$ 3,266,126$ 3,338,597$ 3,412,816$ OTHER USES CAPITAL OUTLAY -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT BUDGET 1,029,503 2,256,414 2,256,414 2,240,000 2,240,000 2,240,000 DEBT SERVICES 103,437 191,834 191,834 193,537 193,585 193,562 TOTAL OTHER USES 1,132,940$ 2,448,248$ 2,448,248$ 2,433,537$ 2,433,585$ 2,433,562$ TOTAL EXPENSE & OTHER USES 4,204,777$ 5,420,480$ 5,420,480$ 5,699,663$ 5,772,182$ 5,846,378$ EXCESS REVENUE AND OTHER SOURCES OVER (UNDER) USES 148,015$ (1,131,894)$ (1,241,490)$ $ (1,508,894)(1,581,413)$ (1,232,312)$ OPERATING CASH BALANCES BEGINNING JULY 1 5,280,952$ 6,050,463$ 6,050,463$ $ 4,808,973 3,300,079$ 1,718,666$ RESTRICTED / DESIGNATED 621,496$ -$ -$ $ - -$ -$ AVAILABLE JUNE 30 6,050,463$ 4,918,569$ 4,808,973$ $ 3,300,079 1,718,666$ 486,354$ CASH RESERVE RATIO 197% 165% 162%101%51% 14% STREET LIGHTING UTILITY BUDGET SUMMARY FY 2022-2024 Cash reserve goal above 14% 62 APPENDIX A: Rate Change Comparisons and Customer Impacts 65 Water Rate Change Comparisons Meter 2021 2022 Size (inches) Current Rate Proposed Rate $ % 3/4 9.28 10.03 0.75 8.08% 1 12.14 13.12 0.98 8.07% 1 1/2 19.29 20.84 1.55 8.04% 2 27.88 30.12 2.24 8.03% 3 50.76 54.83 4.07 8.02% 4 76.50 82.62 6.12 8.00% 6 148.03 159.88 11.85 8.01% 8 233.85 252.56 18.71 8.00% 10 605.76 654.23 48.47 8.00% Meter 2021 2022 Size (inches)Current Rate Proposed Rate $ % 3/4 12.53 13.54 1.01 8.06% 1 16.39 17.71 1.32 8.05% 1 1/2 26.04 28.13 2.09 8.03% 2 37.64 40.66 3.02 8.02% 3 68.53 74.02 5.49 8.01% 4 103.28 111.54 8.26 8.00% 6 199.84 215.84 16.00 8.01% 8 315.70 340.96 25.26 8.00% 10 817.78 883.21 65.43 8.00% Comparison of Monthly Water Base Rate Options for City Customers Current to Proposed Comparison of Monthly Water Base Rate Options for County Customers Current to Proposed 66 2021 2022 Flat Rate or Block Current Rate per ccf Proposed Rate per ccf $ % Flat Rate 1.37 1.48 0.11 8.03% Block 1 1.37 1.48 0.12 8.42% Block 2 1.87 2.02 0.15 8.02% Block 3 2.59 2.80 0.21 8.11% Block 4 2.76 2.99 0.23 8.33% 2021 2021 Flat Rate or Block Current Rate per ccf Proposed Rate per ccf $ % Flat Rate 1.84 2.00 0.16 8.70% Block 1 1.84 2.00 0.16 8.70% Block 2 2.52 2.73 0.21 8.33% Block 3 3.50 3.78 0.28 8.00% Block 4 3.73 4.04 0.31 8.31% Block Current Flat Rate All Usage Block 1 1 - 10 ccf Block 2 11 - 30 ccf Block 3 31 - 60 ccf Block 4 >61 ccf Summer Rate Structure ( April - October) Rate Structure Summer Rate Structure ( April - October) Winter Rate Structure (November - March) Comparison of Water Monthly Usage Rate Options for City Residential Customers Current to Proposed Comparison of Water Monthly Usage Rate Options for County Residential Customers Current to Proposed Winter Rate Structure (November - March) 67 2021 2022 Flat Rate or Block Current Rate per ccf Proposed Rate per ccf $ % Flat Rate 1.49 1.61 0.12 8.1% Block 1 1.49 1.61 0.12 8.1% Block 2 2.04 2.21 0.17 8.3% Block 3 2.84 3.07 0.23 8.1% Block 4 3.01 3.26 0.25 8.3% 2021 2022 Flat Rate or Block Current Rate per ccf Proposed Rate per ccf $ % Flat Rate 2.01 2.17 0.16 8.1% Block 1 2.01 2.17 0.16 8.1% Block 2 2.75 2.98 0.23 8.5% Block 3 3.83 4.14 0.31 8.2% Block 4 4.06 4.40 0.34 8.4% Block Current Flat Rate All Usage Block 1 0-AWC Block 2 AWC-300% Block 3 300%-600% Block 4 >600% *CII= Commercial, Industrial, and Institutional Comparison of Monthly Usage Rate Options for County CII Customers *AWC = Average Winter Consumption. “AWC-300%” means usage greater than a customer’s AWC and less than or equal to 300% of the customer’s AWC Current to Proposed Winter Rate Structure (November - March) Summer Rate Structure ( April - October) Rate Structure Winter Rate Structure (November - March) Summer Rate Structure ( April - October) Comparison of Monthly Usage Rate Options for City CII Customers Current to Proposed 68 2021 2022 Flat Rate or Block Current Rate per ccf Proposed Rate per ccf $ % Flat Rate 1.80 1.94 0.14 8.00% Block 1 1.80 1.94 0.14 8.00% Block 2 2.50 2.70 0.20 8.00% Block 3 2.66 2.87 0.21 7.89% 2021 2022 Flat Rate or Block Current Rate per ccf Proposed Rate per ccf $ % Flat Rate 2.42 2.62 0.20 8.45% Block 1 2.42 2.62 0.20 8.45% Block 2 3.37 3.65 0.28 8.31% Block 3 3.59 3.87 0.28 7.80% Block Current Flat Rate All Usage Block 1 1CCF- Target Budget Block 2 Target Budget up to 300% of Target Budget Block 3 Over 300% of Target Budget Comparison of Water Monthly Usage Rate Options for City Irrigation Customers Current to Proposed * "Target budget" means the estimated amount of water consumed per acre, as established by the Public Utilities Director or his/her designee each year for customer based on factors including, but not limited to, evapotranspiration, and considering efficient water practices. A different target budget is established for each month of the irrigation season. Current to Proposed Winter Rate Structure (November - March) Summer Rate Structure ( April - October) Winter Rate Structure (November - March) Summer Rate Structure ( April - October) Comparison of Water Monthly Usage Rate Options for County Irrigation Customers Rate Structure 69 Proposed Water Rate Change Customer Impacts 70 71 Sewer Rate Change Comparisons 72 73 Proposed Sewer Rate Change Customer Impacts 74 Stormwater Rate Change Comparisons 75 Proposed Stormwater Rate Change Customer Impacts 76 APPENDIX B: Supplemental Information 77 Millions Millions 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 Millions 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 Millions 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 Millions 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 Millions Millions Per Capita Water Use (gpcd) 85,921 86,360 86,665 87,233 85,514 89,191 90,393 89,776 80,218 90,766 91,283 81,751 92,955 92,344 90,748 90,912 90,920 90,976 90,958 90,624 90,251 90,349 90,435 90,451 91,467 91,545 91,802 92,02692,500 92,50098,689# OF EMPLOYEES APPENDIX C: Rationale for New Positions 99 100 DEPARTMENT of PUBLIC UTILITIES ENGINEERING DIVISION TO: Laura Briefer, Director of Public Utilities Jesse Stewart, Deputy Director of Public Utilities Lisa Tarufelli, Chief Finance Officer of Public Utilities FROM: Jason Brown, P.E., Engineering Administrator DATE: March 15, 2021 SUBJECT: Request for additional Engineering staff This is an update to the original memorandum from 2017. We have been successful in obtaining a several new employees the need is still great. The objective of this memorandum is to provide a business case evaluation and recommendation for additional staff for the Engineering group within Public Utilities. We present three justifications for increasing the in-house staff FTE’s for the Engineering group: BACKGROUND (1) The current and past CIP workload justifies more in-house staff. As stated in previous staffing requests, in 1994 Hughes, Heiss & Associates conducted an audit of the Engineering group. They recommended increasing the staff based on the CIP program funding at that time and concluded that using Consultants to fill in the production gap was not “cost effective”. The total CIP program for water/sewer/drainage in 1994 when the audit was conducted was under $10M. Currently it is over $100M (excluding the NEW WRF) and the number of FTE’s has remained basically the same (Figure 1 & Figure 2) with some increases in the last several years. The demands on the current staff are increasing as public outreach, engagement and education are drawing away time that was typically allocated for design, construction and asset management. We have been able to temper some of these critical activities with advances in technologies but even with advances with technology, the technology requires additional staff time. (2) In-house staff is less expensive than using Consultants for the CIP workload. The average cost of the existing Engineering staff including overhead (7.72%) and labor additive (56.36%) is $51.68 per hour. The average hourly cost which will be charged by Consultants for project engineers based on the most recent General Services SOQ’s is approximately $160 per hour. Doing work with City staff is approximately a third of the cost of using a Consultant. With new staff position being limited, we have utilizing outside consultants for much of the additional inspection and design. This method of allows staff to manage approximately 2 to 4 times the number of projects depending on complexity. However, the costs to design and inspect the projects are generally 3 times more expensive because of reasons stated above. Currently we have 37 projects being managed by consultants with an average cost of approximately $58,000 and a total cost of $2,141,795. That translates into 28 DPU FTE or 8 consultant employees. (3) The projected future CIP workload already projected in the approved 5-year budget justifies more in-house staff. The CIP budget levels is projected to increase based on the current condition and criticality of the aging infrastructure. As the Asset Management program continues to mature and evaluate the infrastructure 101 MEMORANDUM Engineering staff for fiscal year 2022 of we are constantly prioritizing, re-prioritizing and categorizing every pipe, pump, well, manhole, valve, lift station, literally every asset that provides service to our customers. This systematic approach allows us to make sure that we are being fiscally responsible and constantly allows us to evaluate our approach to infrastructure replacement. We understand that capital funding is a limited resource and we want to make sure we are spending it on the right project at the right time and the time place. We are faced with an aging infrastructure, increasing demand, and increasing cost of work, Figures 3, 4 & 5. We must continually improve the condition of the infrastructure or we will continually be chasing breaks and the level of service will decrease. (4) Existing staff are jacks of all trades and masters of few. We have phenomenal staff. All of them share the desire to provide the rate payers with the highest quality services. They are responsible for evaluating and managing every aspect of a project from conception to completion. The major phases of project delivery are Asset management, Design and Construction. Asset Management is a systematic approach to inventory, evaluate criticality and determine condition of an asset. The results of this process is a list of projects with consistent evaluation of both criticality and condition. Design is the process of first developing a complete understanding of the project so a scope and estimated budget can be developed. Once the scope and budget are completed and the project has been awarded funding the project manager must further develop the scope, either with internal or external resources, to be able to complete a project manual (specifications and drawings) for bidding. After bidding the project manager is responsible, with the assistance of the inspection team, to make sure the project is constructed in accordance with the defined project manual and fee. The project manager has many different projects in all phases of delivery throughout the year. RECOMMENDATION We recommend that two new program level groups are created within Engineering based on the analysis discuss above. Specifically, we are recommending the following changes to the staffing document as outlined below. The changes that we are asking is for the creation of a Asset Management Program Manager and a Construction Program Manager. One of the primary objectives of these two positions is to relieve the burden of CM and AM from the existing staff so they can focus on the design phase of projects. Asset Management Program Every day our existing infrastructure gets a little older, Figure 3. Every year we have more projects than we have the ability to fund. The AMP workgroup will bring focus to a process that is very important to the development of the Capital Plan (CP). Within the first 6 months, the new AMP manager will review the existing AM efforts, and develop staffing and resource needs for future consideration. They will also assist in any current asset management efforts as well as make recommendations for the future asset management efforts. Through the development of the future needs this program many require future staffing. This program will mainly be responsible to apply consistent asset management practices across all four enterprise funds and develop the annual CP. Construction Management Program We propose forming a Construction Management group (CM) to support our Capital Improvement Program (CIP). This group would reside in SLCDPU’s Engineering group under management of the Chief Engineer. This new workgroup would be initiated by approving a new full-time employee to lead and develop this group. During the first 6 months this new manager would define the CM group including determining staffing and resources needed to support the CIP, review and refine existing in-house 102 MEMORANDUM Engineering staff for fiscal year 2022 of construction management practices, mentor and support the existing construction efforts and evaluate the most effective structure for this group. This group would be primarily responsible for project delivery after projects have been awarded for construction. This group would also provide constructability reviews prior to project being bid. Project delivery would include on-going coordination with the project manager, construction administration, public engagement and status updates to the administration. 103 MEMORANDUM Engineering staff for fiscal year 2022 of 104 MEMORANDUM Engineering staff for fiscal year 2022 of 105 MEMORANDUM Engineering staff for fiscal year 2022 of 106 MEMORANDUM Engineering staff for fiscal year 2022 of 107 108 Sum of Debit - Credit Column Labels Row Labels 51 52 53 Grand Total 2018 354,429.03 5,554.50 359,983.53 CLYDE SNOW SESSIONS & SWENSON 101,800.57 101,800.57 HANSEN ALLEN & LUCE INC 13,607.58 13,607.58 HOLLAND & HART L L P 1,763.00 5,554.50 7,317.50 MABEY WRIGHT & JAMES L L C 94,366.30 94,366.30 PARSONS BEHLE & LATIMER 2,135.00 2,135.00 RICHARDS BRANDT MILLER & NELSON 68,368.38 68,368.38 SNOW CHRISTENSEN & MARTINEAU 72,388.20 72,388.20 2019 302,424.25 3,818.00 306,242.25 CLYDE SNOW SESSIONS & SWENSON 67,636.32 67,636.32 HANSEN ALLEN & LUCE INC 145.88 145.88 HOLLAND & HART L L P 774.50 3,818.00 4,592.50 MABEY WRIGHT & JAMES L L C 80,005.89 80,005.89 SNOW CHRISTENSEN & MARTINEAU 153,711.66 153,711.66 (blank) 150.00 150.00 2020 162,255.13 8,113.50 10,079.00 180,447.63 CLYDE SNOW SESSIONS & SWENSON 31,517.18 31,517.18 HOLLAND & HART L L P 24,219.50 8,113.50 10,079.00 42,412.00 MABEY WRIGHT & JAMES L L C 46,084.70 46,084.70 SNOW CHRISTENSEN & MARTINEAU 60,433.75 60,433.75 2021 139,331.06 4,017.00 143,348.06 CLYDE SNOW SESSIONS & SWENSON 4,726.92 4,726.92 HOLLAND & HART L L P 88,684.24 4,017.00 92,701.24 MABEY WRIGHT & JAMES L L C 18,974.90 18,974.90 SNOW CHRISTENSEN & MARTINEAU 26,945.00 26,945.00 Grand Total 958,439.47 17,486.00 14,096.00 990,021.47 CITY COUNCIL OF SALT LAKE CITY 451 SOUTH STATE STREET, ROOM 304 P.O. BOX 145476, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84114-5476 SLCCOUNCIL.COM TEL 801-535-7600 FAX 801-535-7651 COUNCIL STAFF REPORT CITY COUNCIL of SALT LAKE CITY TO:City Council Members FROM: Ben Luedtke Budget & Public Policy Analyst DATE:April 13, 2021 RE: Federal HUD Grant Appropriations 2020-2021: Community Development Block Grants (CDBG), Emergency Solutions Grants (ESG), HOME Investment Partnership and Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA) NEW INFORMATION At the April 6 briefing, Council Members asked the questions below. These were sent to the Administration and responses were forthcoming at the time of publishing this staff report. -Council Member Valdemoros suggested shifting funding from HOPWA #1 County Housing Authority to HOPWA #4 Utah AIDS Foundation mental health services. Council Member Fowler asked: o What is the impact of decreasing funding to the County Housing Authority? o Could other federal funds make up that $50,000 difference? -Council Member Johnston requested clarification on why scoring wasn’t strictly followed for CDBG Public Services #18 Gail Miller Resource Center (score of 83.12 and $72,000 recommendations) and #20 Geraldine King Women’s Resource Center (score of 86.03 and no funding recommendations)? It would be helpful to understand the advisory board’s feedback about these two applications. o He also asked how these two CDBG applications and the similar ESG Part 1 #5 and #6 applications for the same resource centers are being considered together? -Council Member Wharton asked what training and other follow up was provided to Journey of Hope after last year? And, what concerns did the resident advisory board and Administration have with their application this year? -Council Member Dugan expressed an interest to find at least the $30,000 minimum for one or more of the following Public Services category applications: o CDBG #2 CCS Weigand data specialist o CDBG #3 English Skills program o CDBG #17 The Road Home, St Vincent de Paul overflow o CDBG #12 Shelter the Homeless, resource center meals o CDBG #16 The INN Between, hospice for homeless Project Timeline: Set Date: March 16, 2021 1st Briefing: March 23, 2021 Public Hearing: April 6, 2021 2nd Briefing: April 6, 2021 3rd Briefing: April 13, 2021 Potential Action: April 20, 2021 Page | 2 o In the draft table below Council staff summarized the CDBG Public Services applications that have funding recommendations above the $30,000 minimum. The right column estimates the impacts to reducing funding for each application. The impacts were estimated by Council staff after reviewing the applications and were sent to the Housing and Neighborhood Division for a review of accuracy and any important missing context. Applicant Amount Above $30k Minimum Estimated Impacts of Reduced Funding Advantage Services Provisional Supportive Employment Program $30,250 29 fewer homeless clients would receive supportive employment services at a cost of $1,037 per client First Step House Employment Preparation and Placement Program $11,700 551 fewer hours for employment specialist FTE at a wage of $21.22/hour First Step House Peer Support Services $18,000 823 fewer hours for peer support specialist FTE at a wage of $21.86/hour International Rescue Committee Digital Skills and Education for Refugees $24,400 The program would not be able to function below this funding level because the primary FTE would be almost completely unfunded Neighborhood House Association Early Education $8,449 One early education teacher would be partially funded and organization would need to cover expenses using other funds Salt Lake Donated Dental Services $14,400 33 fewer homeless and low income individuals would receive free dental services at an average cost of $442 per client Transportation Division Subsidized HIVE Passes $4,700 224 fewer subsidized HIVE passes at an individual subsidy of $21 per pass South Valley Sanctuary Domestic Violence Case Manager and Housing Assistance $70,000 23 fewer households would receive rental and utility assistance assuming $3,000 per client average Gail Miller Resource Center $42,000 One full-time housing advocate position would no longer be funded YWCA Women in Jeopardy Program $3,900 Approx. one-third of an FTE would be unfunded Information below was reviewed by the Council at the March 23 and April 6 briefings ISSUE AT-A-GLANCE The U.S. Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Department’s annual grant programs are one of the most significant ongoing funding sources the City receives from the Federal Government. Fiscal Year 2022 is subject to the new 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan which introduced new funding goals, strategies, and targeted area for spending CDBG dollars on public infrastructure and economic development. See the additional info section for the goals and strategies applications must advance to qualify for these grant funds and Attachment 3 for a map of the target area. The Council is scheduled to hold an electronic public hearing on Tuesday, April 6 to hear from the public and grant applicants regarding funding needs for the 2021-2022 funding cycle. As seen in most years, the requested funding from applicants is significantly greater than available funds. Requests are 137% of available funding: $9,198,059 is requested compared to $6,724,509 in available funding. HUD has provided Salt Lake City’s final grant award amounts. The table below summarizes requested and available funding by grant. Page | 3 Grant Request Available Requests as % of Funding Available CDBG $ 5,868,774 $ 4,091,332 143% ESG $ 799,502 $ 308,717 259% HOME $ 1,622,387 $ 1,649,789 98% HOPWA $ 907,396 $ 674,671 134% TOTAL $ 9,198,059 $ 6,724,509 137% Goal of the briefing: Discuss the Council’s federal grant priorities, ask questions about specific applications and allocate funding across eligible programs and projects. Minimum Funding Level Four years ago, the City established a minimum funding level for grant awards. HUD recommends a $35,000 minimum award for projects. Housing and Neighborhood Development (HAND) recommends $30,000 after consultations with applicants. The minimum award is aimed at maximizing community benefits from grant awards. The intent of this policy is to balance the burden for the Administration and recipient organizations to manage grant funds with the goal of having positive impacts in the community. This year, no applications were disqualified for requesting less than the minimum funding requirement. Scoring Applications and Funding Recommendations CDBG and ESG projects receive scores and funding recommendations from the Community Development and Capital Improvement Program (CDCIP) Board. HOME and HOPWA projects receive funding recommendations from the Housing Trust Fund (HTF) Advisory Board. The advisory board funding recommendations are provided to the Mayor and City Council. The Council receives another set of funding recommendations from the Mayor. The final decision is made by the Council for grant award amounts. Attachment 1 shows projects ranked by the combined score within each grant category. Attachment 2 is the funding log for all four federal grants which has more details than Attachment 1 such as project and program descriptions and prior year award amounts for returning applications. The funding log combines advisory board and Administration scores as shown in the far-right column where maximum potential scores are also shown. Funding Log Trends Council staff noticed the following trends after reviewing the funding logs. Differences between Advisory Boards and Mayoral Funding Recommendations A majority of board and mayoral recommendations are identical; however, 10 differences exist out of the 56 applications. Three of the 10 differences are greater than $10,000. Below is a table of applications where staff noticed a difference between recommendations. RecommendationsGrant Category Project # and Name Board Mayor Difference Between City Administration #1 Attorney's Office $29,827 $30,460 $633 City Administration #2 Finance Division $60,989 $61,623 $634 Housing #1 ASSIST Emergency Home Repair and Accessibility Community Design $425,000 $700,000 $275,000CDBG Public Services #9 Neighborhood House Early Education $37,025 $38,449 $1,424 Part Two #2 Salt Lake Community Action Rapid Re-housing Program $84,304 $82,022 -$2,282ESG Administration #1 Administrative Costs $22,630 $22,445 -$185 #4 HAND's HOME Development Fund $969,008 $984,634 $15,626HOME#5 Administrative Costs $95,750 $97,486 $1,736 Page | 4 #1 County Housing Authority Tenant Based Rental Assistance $469,765 $539,332 $69,567HOPWA #5 Program Administration $16,003 $20,240 $4,237 New Application/Programs This year there are 11 new applications for CDBG, one for ESG, one for HOPWA and no new applications for HOME. Disqualified Applications Two applications for CDBG were disqualified for not meeting consolidated plan goals. No applications were disqualified for the other three grants. Both disqualified applications are new and listed in the far-right column of the funding log in red text. Returning Applications without Funding Recommendations There are four applications who received grant awards in recent years but did not receive mayoral funding recommendations this year: - CDBG Public Services #3 English Skills Learning Center parents’ program - CDBG Public Services #6 Fourth Street Clinic medical outreach and services team - CDBG Public Services #16 The Inn Between homeless hospice and medical respite - ESG Part 2 #3 The Road Home rapid re-housing program POLICY QUESTIONS 1.Encouraging Behavioral Health and Mental Health Applications – The Council may wish to ask the Administration how more organizations can be encouraged to and assisted with submitting applications for the new behavioral health goal. This is a new goal under the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan and focuses on providing treatment and support for persons experiencing mental health challenges and substance abuse particularly the ongoing opioid crisis. Three behavioral health applications were submitted this year: CDBG Public Services #5 which is recommended for partial funding, and CDBG Public Services #10 and HOPWA #4 which do not have funding recommendations. 2.Winter Overflow Shelter Application Disqualified (CDBG Housing #3) – The Council may wish to ask the Administration about efforts to identify winter overflow shelter in advance of next winter as well as how recent changes to state law related to homelessness funding and organization might impact this effort. This application for Switchpoint to again operate two emergency winter overflow shelters next winter was disqualified because it doesn’t meet the Consolidated Plan goals. Earlier this year, the Council awarded Switchpoint $750,000 of one-time CARES Act HUD grants to operate the Airport Inn and Millcreek temporary winter shelters. The one-time CARES Act funding will not be available next winter and the 2020- 2024 Consolidated Plan does not make such a use eligible for the ongoing annual HUD grants. The Council may wish to ask the administration if future federal dollars from the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan could be considered for this purpose. 3.HAND Housing Rehabilitation and West Side Node Improvements (CDBG Housing #5) – The Council may wish to ask how West Side business node improvement projects could be coordinated with the recently created 9-Line RDA project area. 4.HAND’s Targeted Repairs Pilot Program (CDBG Housing #7) – The Council may wish to ask the Administration how did the first year of the pilot program go? The Council awarded $500,000 last year and this year the advisory and Mayor are both recommending another $500,000. The Council may also wish to ask if these funds could provide the 25% match for homeowners to participate in the City’s Fix the Bricks seismic improvements program. 5.Low Income Transit Passes (CDBG Public Services #14) – The Council may wish to ask the Administration how this application relates to the City’s HIVE Pass program that provides discounted transit passes to any interested resident. 6.HAND’s HOME Development Fund (HOME #4) – The Council may wish to discuss with the Administration how the HOME Development Fund fits into the Council’s policy goal of a “one-stop shop” for Page | 5 affordable housing developers. The HOME Development Fund can be used for property acquisition, new construction, and rehabilitation of existing housing. ADDITIONAL & BACKGROUND INFORMATION 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan Goals and Strategies The City must report progress to HUD on how funding awards advance the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan goals. In past years, some applicants that received funding were not aligned with the five-year plan. As a result, the services provided by those organizations could not be reported to HUD. If a city does not adequately fund applications advancing the five-year plan then HUD could view the program as underperforming, lower future grant award amounts, and/or audit the city’s program. The below table summarizes the goals and strategies of the current consolidated plan. Goals Strategies Housing: Provide expanded housing options for all economic and demographic segments of Salt Lake City’s population while diversifying housing stock within neighborhoods 1. Support housing programs that address the needs of aging housing stock through targeted rehabilitation efforts and diversifying the housing stock within the neighborhoods 2. Support affordable housing development that increases the number and types of units available for qualified residents 3. Support programs that provide access to home ownership 4. Support rent assistance programs to emphasize stable housing as a primary strategy to prevent and/or end homelessness 5. Support programs that provide connection to permanent housing upon exiting behavioral health programs 6. Provide housing and essential supportive services to persons with HIV/AIDS Transportation: Promote accessibility and affordability of multimodal transportation options 1. Within eligible target areas, improve bus stop amenities as a way to encourage the accessibility of public transit and enhance the experience of public transit 2. Within eligible target areas, expand and support the installation of bike racks, stations, and amenities as a way to encourage use of alternative modes of transportation 3. Support access to transportation, prioritizing very low- income and vulnerable populations Community Resiliency: Provide tools to increase economic and/or housing stability 1. Support job training and vocational rehabilitation programs that increase economic mobility 2. Improve visual and physical appearance of deteriorating commercial buildings - limited to CDBG Target Area 3. Provide economic development support for microenterprise businesses 4. Direct financial assistance to for-profit businesses 5. Expand access to early childhood education to set the stage for academic achievement, social development, and change the cycle of poverty 6. Promote digital inclusion through access to digital communication technologies and the internet 7. Provide support for programs that reduce food insecurity for vulnerable population Homeless Services: Expand access to supportive programs that help ensure homelessness is rare, brief and non- reoccurring 1. Expand support for medical and dental care options for those experiencing homelessness Page | 6 Goals Strategies 2. Provide support for homeless services including Homeless Resource Center Operations and Emergency Overflow Operations 3. Provide support for programs undertaking outreach services to address the needs of those living an unsheltered life 4. Expand case management support as a way to connect those experiencing homelessness with permanent housing and supportive services Behavioral Health: Provide support for low income and vulnerable populations experiencing behavioral health concerns such as substance abuse disorders and mental health challenges 1. Expand treatment options, counseling support, and case management for those experiencing behavioral health crisis CDBG Public Infrastructure and Economic Development Target Area in 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan (Attachment 3) The target area creates geographic boundaries for spending CDBG funding on economic development and public infrastructure improvements. These applications are included in the CDBG Neighborhood Improvements category on the funding log. Examples of these project types includes business façade improvement grants, road reconstructions and creation of ADA ramps. The geographic target areas do not apply to housing or public services category applications. Focusing federal grants in these target areas is intended to maximize community impact and stimulate investments from other entities into the neighborhoods. Summary of Available Funding by Grant The table below shows funding sources by grant. Note that only the HOME grant program sees some funds returned as program income from loans. When prior year grant awards are recaptured it means the program or project was unable to use the funding as intended which happens for various reasons. Grant Source Amount HUD Award $ 3,518,665Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)Recaptured Funding $ 572,667 HUD Award $ 299,267Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG)Recaptured Funding $ 9,450 HUD Award $974,863 Recaptured Funding $ 0HOME Investment Partnership Program Income $ 674,926 HUD Award $674,671Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA) Recaptured Funding $ 0 Community Development and Block Grant (CDBG) Total CDBG Funding Requests: $5,868,774 (143% of available) Total Available for Allocation: $4,091,332 CDBG funds focus on community development with an emphasis on physical improvements. The Community Development & Capital Improvement Programs Advisory Board (CDCIP) submits funding recommendations for this grant. CDBG funds are allocated to organizations in four categories: - City Administration (limited to 20% of the annual grant award) Page | 7 - Housing - Neighborhood Improvements: transportation and economic development infrastructure - Public Services (limited to 15% of the annual grant award) Public Services This category is directed to services for individuals in need and not necessarily to physical improvements. This is typically the most competitive category. Funding is awarded to non-profits and governmental entities that provide programming to meet the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan’s goals. This category is limited to 15% of the annual CDBG award. The Mayor has recommended funding requests that add up to the 15% maximum. If the Council would like to allocate money to any application beyond the Mayor’s recommended funding in this category, then those funds must be shifted from another public services application. Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) Total ESG Funding Requests: $799,502 (259% of available) Total Available for Allocation: $308,717 ESG funds focus on preventing homelessness and providing services to persons experiencing homelessness. The Community Development & Capital Improvement Programs Advisory Board (CDCIP) submits funding recommendations for this grant. ESG funds are allocated to organizations providing services in two categories: - Street Outreach and Emergency Shelter (Part 1) - Homelessness Prevention, Rapid Re-Housing, Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS) (Part 2) HOME Investment Partnership Total HOME Funding Requests: $1,622,387 (98% of available) Total Available for Allocation: $1,649,789 HOME Investment Partnership focuses on expanding the supply of quality affordable housing for moderate- and low-income residents. The Housing Trust Fund (HTF) Advisory Board submits funding recommendations for this grant. This year every applicant received full or partial funding for their request. Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA) Total HOPWA Funding Requests: $907,396 (134% of available) Total Available for Allocation: $674,671 HOPWA is the only federal program dedicated entirely to the housing needs of people living with HIV/AIDS. The Housing Trust Fund (HTF) Advisory Board submits funding recommendations for this grant. ATTACHMENTS 1. FY 2021-22 Grant Recommendations by Combined Score 2. FY 2021-22 Funding Log 3. CDBG Public Infrastructure and Economic Development Target Area Map for 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan ACRONYMS AMI – Area Median Income CDBG – Community Development Block Grant CDCIP – Community Development and Capital Improvement Programs Advisory Board CIP – Capital Improvement Program CAN – Community and Neighborhoods Department ESL – English as a Second Language ESG – Emergency Solutions Grant FSH – First Step House FOF – Funding Our Future FY – Fiscal Year HAND – Housing and Neighborhood Development HMIS – Homeless Management Information System Page | 8 HOME – HOME Investment Partnership HOPWA – Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS HTF – Housing Trust Fund Advisory Board HUD – Housing and Urban Development UTA – Utah Transit Authority VOA – Volunteers of America YWCA – Young Women’s Christian Association CATEGORYCDBG NEIGH IMPROVEMENTCDBG HOUSINGCDBG PUBLIC SERVICES CATEGORYPART 2: HOMELESS PREVENTION RAPID REHOUSING & ADMINCDBG ADMINCATEGORYHOMECATEGORYHOPWAPART 1:SHELTER OPERATIONS ERIN MENDENHALL DEPARTMENT of COMMUNITY Mayor and NEIGHBORHOODS BLAKE THOMAS Director SALT LAKE CITY CORPORATION 451 SOUTH STATE STREET, ROOM 404 WWW.SLC.GOV P.O. BOX 145460, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84114-5460 TEL 801.535.6230 CITY COUNCIL TRANSMITTAL ________________________Date Received: _________________ Lisa Shaffer, Chief Administrative Office Date sent to Council: _________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ TO:Salt Lake City Council DATE: 03/05/2021 Amy Fowler, Chair FROM: Blake Thomas, Director, Department of Community and Neighborhoods (CAN) __________________________ SUBJECT:Appropriation Resolution adopting the One-Year Annual Action Plan for Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding, Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) funding, HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME) funding, and Housing Opportunities for Person With AIDS (HOPWA) funding for Fiscal Year 2021-2022 and approval of the signing of an Interlocal Cooperation Agreement between Salt Lake City and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). STAFF CONTACT:Lani Eggertsen-Goff, Director of Housing and Neighborhood Development (HAND) 801-535-6240, lani.eggertsen-goff@slcgov.com Tony Milner, Policy and Program Manager, HAND 801-535-6168, tony.milner@slcgov.com DOCUMENT TYPE: Resolution RECOMMENDATION: Approve the included resolution and set the following schedule for work sessions and required public hearing. This will help the Administration ensure compliance with HUD regulations requiring submission of the 2021-2022 One-Year Annual Action Plan (Action Plan) by May 15, 2021. We also request the City Council: 1. Schedule the following required public hearing: a.April 6, 2021 Public Hearing to accept the Mayor’s grant recommendations and to hear comments from the public and applicants on the Action Plan. 1. Schedule the following work sessions: a.March 23, 2021 first full briefing/funding discussion. b.April 13, 2021 follow-up briefing/funding discussion. c. April 20, 2021 if needed, follow-up briefing/funding discussion. 2. Schedule the formal adoption of the One-Year Action Plan: a. April 20, 2021 formal meeting: to potentially adopt the Action Plan as outlined in the attached resolution for CDBG, ESG, HOME, and HOPWA funds as provided through HUD. BUDGET IMPACT: No impact to City General Fund. Grant funds will be received from HUD for 2021-2022. BACKGROUND/DISCUSSION: The City is an entitlement entity and eligible under Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 24, Part 91, et. al., to receive 2021-2022 CDBG funds in the amount of $3,518,665, ESG funds in the amount of $299,267, HOME funds in the amount of $974,863, and HOPWA funds in the amount of $674,671 from HUD for the 2021-2022 program year. In addition, the City will also reallocate CDBG funds in the amount of $572,667, and ESG funds in the amount of $9,450; and will also allocate HOME program income in the amount of $674,926. To receive and reallocate these funds, the City is required to adopt the Action Plan allocating HUD funds that benefit residents. The following table represents the entitlement funding the City will receive for the 2021-2022 program year. Grant Amount Community Development Block Grant $ 3,518,665 Emergency Solutions Grant $ 299,267 HOME Investment Partnership Program $ 974,863 Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS $ 674,671 The following table represents the dollar amounts for funds that will be recaptured and available for reallocation for the 2021-2022 program year. Grant Amount Community Development Block Grant $ 572,667 Emergency Solutions Grant $ 9,450 The following table represents the dollar amounts of program income that will be made available for allocation for the 2021-2022 program year. Grant Amount HOME Investment Partnership Program $ 674,926 The City Attorney’s Office reviewed the included resolution (Exhibit A) and approves it as to form. The Community Development and Capital Improvement Program (CDCIP) Advisory Board and the Housing Trust Fund Advisory Board (HTFAB) reviewed applications for CDBG and ESG and HOME and HOPWA respectively. After thorough review and scoring each board made funding recommendations. The boards use an estimated amount of funding for each grant, based upon the grant award from the prior federal funding year. The boards also included recommendations on projects that should receive more, or less, funding if the final allocation amounts would be different than amounts estimated at the time of the board meetings. The boards’ recommendations were forwarded to the Mayor for review and consideration. The final 2021-2022 One-Year Annual Action Plan funding log (attached to Exhibit A) for all grants will be attached to the resolution after the City Council has made final funding decisions. The City had the unique opportunity to provide emergency funding to address the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. While the requests expressed in the 2021-22 One Year Action Plan Funding Recommendations Log are not in response to the pandemic, there is some overlap for agencies that received funding from the City. The table below represents the COVID-19 pandemic resources that have been deployed over the last twelve months. These grants are administered by HAND. Funding Council Approval Date Purpose Amount SLC Housing Stability (General Fund) June 2020 Housing Stability $1,100,000 Funding Our Future* (Sales Tax) July 2020 Housing Stability $3,400,000 CARES Act HUD CV Grants February 2021 Housing Stability, Community Stabilization, Homelessness $7,138,203 COVID Relief Bill Treasury Housing Assistance March/April 2021 Housing Stability $6,067,033 *Funding Our Future programs are not in direct response to COVID-19, however, many of the housing stability needs were amplified due to the pandemic and FOF supports are provided currently. PUBLIC PROCESS: From July to October 2020, HAND staff conducted a survey to engage members of the public and receive input on how federal funding could be prioritized. In the past HAND staff would have attended over a dozen in-person community events. Due to COVID-19 precautions, HAND Staff worked with the City’s Civic Engagement team and pivoted to an online community engagement survey, reaching out electronically to Salt Lake City’s resident, Recognized Community Organizations, and over 100 non-profits and community partners. The survey was offered in English and Spanish. Additionally, to hear from vulnerable populations without access to computers, paper versions of the survey were safely collected at the Homeless Resources Centers, two adult Detox locations, the Homeless Youth Resource Center, the Sorensen Community Center, and two local food banks. A total of 879 responses were received. The public was asked to give input on their top priorities of the goals identified in the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan. Priority ranking for each goal of the Consolidated Plan were provided, as follows: Housing - Build new affordable housing and homeownership for low income populations. Transportation - Provide transit passes to low-income populations. Build Community Resiliency - Provide access to affordable and healthy food. Homeless Services - Homeless Resources Centers operations and emergency shelter. Behavioral Health - Resources for individuals with behavioral health needs. The CDCIP and HTFAB Boards considered these priorities and how they align with the goals of the 2020-2024 Consolidated Plan when identifying projects to be recommended for the 2021- 2022 program year. A General Needs Hearing was held on November 5, 2020 as a required HUD forum to allow the public an opportunity to voice general ideas or concerns regarding community needs. This hearing is an opportunity for the CDCIP Board to consider the public’s ideas and how these ideas align with the goals of the Consolidated Plan. The ideas presented during a General Needs Hearing are typically discussed during subsequent CDCIP meetings to help identify which funding requests would be recommended by the board. At the General Needs Hearing held on November 5, 2020, no public comments were received. The HOME and HOPWA applications were reviewed during a public meeting by the HTFAB on December 9, 2020. The CDBG and ESG applications were reviewed during public meetings by the CDCIP on December 17, 2020, January 7, January 21, and January 28, 2021. On March 2, 2021 CAN and HAND leadership met with Mayor Mendenhall to review the CDCIP and HTFAB recommendations. The Mayor identified several applications that she preferred to modify the potential award amount. The changes are outlined in the funding log It is proposed that the Council hold a Public Hearing on April 6, 2021 to receive feedback from the general public, including applicants, regarding HUD funding for the 2021-2022 year. EXHIBIT: A. Resolution 2021-2022 Federal Grant Award and One-Year Action Plan; attached with 2021-22 One Year Action Plan Funding Recommendation Logs 1 RESOLUTION NO.________ OF 2021 An appropriations resolution adopting the One-Year Annual Action Plan for 2021-2022 that includes Community Development Block Grant funding, Emergency Solutions Grant funding, HOME Investment Partnerships Program funding, Housing Opportunities For Persons with AIDS funding, and approving the signing of an Interlocal Cooperation agreement between Salt Lake City and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. WHEREAS, Salt Lake City (City) is eligible under Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 24, Part 91, et. al., to receive 2021-2022 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds in the amount of $3,518,665, Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) funds in the amount of $299,267, HOME Investment Partnerships Program (HOME) funds in the amount of $974,863, and Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) funds in the amount of $674,671 from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for the program year; WHEREAS, the City will also reallocate CDBG funds in the amount of $572,667, and ESG funds in the amount of $9,450; WHEREAS, the City will also allocate HOME program income in the amount of $674,926; WHEREAS, it is in the best interests of the people of Salt Lake City that the City file an application with HUD for said funds in accordance with 24 CFR Part 91; WHEREAS, in order to receive said funds, the City is required to adopt a One-Year Annual Action Plan; WHEREAS, the public notices, hearings, and other pre-submission requirements as set forth in 24 CFR Part 91 have been accomplished by the City, including but not limited to the following: A City Council public hearing was held _____________, 2021 to consider the projects funded through the 2021-2022 One-Year Annual Action Plan; and WHEREAS, the City Council does now meet on this day of , 2021 to adopt the City’s 2021-2022 One-Year Action Plan for CDBG, ESG, HOME, and HOPWA funds. NOW, THEREFORE, be it resolved by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah, as follows: 1. That the City hereby adopts the 2021-2022 One-Year Annual Action Plan for CDBG, ESG, HOME and HOPWA funds as set forth in Exhibit “A” attached hereto and made a part hereof by this reference. 2. That the Mayor, as the official representative of Salt Lake City, or her designee, is hereby authorized to submit the 2021-2022 One-Year Annual Action Plan for CDBG, ESG, HOME, and HOPWA funds together with such additional 2 information and certifications as may be required under 24 CFR Part 91 to the U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development. 3. That the Mayor, as the official representative of Salt Lake City, or her designee, is hereby authorized to sign and execute a grant agreement with HUD (the “HUD Grant Agreement”) regarding the aforementioned federal grant funds, and any and all subsequent agreements between the City and other public entities resulting from and consistent with the HUD Grant Agreement, subject to final approval as to form by the City Attorney. Passed by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah, this day of , 2021. SALT LAKE CITY COUNCIL By _____________________________ CHAIR Approved as to form: __________________________ Kimberly Chytraus Salt Lake City Attorney’s Office Date: ___________________________ ATTEST: _________________________________ CITY RECORDER March 1, 2021 3 EXHIBIT “A” Funding Recommendations for 2021-2022. Exhibit “A” attached hereto, shall include Funding Recommendations for the CDBG Program, Funding Recommendations for the ESG Program, Funding Recommendations for the HOME Program, and Funding Recommendations for the HOPWA Program (the Funding Recommendations are collectively referred to as the “One-Year Annual Action Plan”). CITY COUNCIL OF SALT LAKE CITY 451 SOUTH STATE STREET, ROOM 304 P.O. BOX 145476, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84114-5476 SLCCOUNCIL.COM TEL 801-535-7600 FAX 801-535-7651 COUNCIL STAFF REPORT CITY COUNCIL of SALT LAKE CITY TO:City Council Members FROM: Russell Weeks Senior Policy Analyst DATE:April 12, 2021 at 7:19 PM RE: OFF-STREET PARKING REGULATIONS NEW INFORMATION This report is for a follow-up briefing to the City Council’s February 9, 2021, work session briefing and March 16, 2021, public hearing on a proposed rewrite of the City’s off-street parking regulations. The City Council at its initial work session briefing identified several issues raised by Council Members and the Planning Division. Eight people spoke at the March 16 public hearing. Of that six people spoke in favor of the proposed ordinance, and raised three points: o They supported increased parking for bicycles, particularly around transit. o Two speakers advised that the final version of the proposed ordinance should be “ground- truthed” to reflect actual land use and traffic patterns. o One speaker said District 5 community councils have decried a loss of parking and would like to see a parking study that, the speaker said, is in progress. In addition, Council Member Darin Mano has proposed two amendments to the proposed ordinance. This update attempts to divide the issues raised into three categories: o Informational o Issues raised by Council Members. o Issues in which the Planning Division is seeking Council direction. Item Schedule: Briefing: February 16, 2021, April 13, 2021 Set Date: February 16, 2021 Public Hearing: March 16, 2021 Potential Action: TBD Page | 2 Informational Issues The City Council said it would like to compare the proposed ordinance with a study commissioned by the Transportation Division of on-street parking in the Central Ninth area. Currently, the Central Ninth area is designated as a Transit Context area. The context limits off-street parking because of the Central Ninth area’s nearness to mass transit lines, including light rail and a bus line on 900 South. However, some people have raised concerns about the availability of vehicle parking in the area. It should be noted that this item also was raised by the Planning Division as requesting City Council direction on whether to allow more off-street parking in the Central Ninth area, or change the context instead of the Transit Context in the proposed ordinance.1 According to the Transportation Division, the Division is still a few months away from completing the final report and recommendations for the 900 South area on-street parking analysis. The Division also notes that the study is limited to the small sample size of on-street parking usage data collected in the Central Ninth, and Ninth and Ninth business districts, and management strategies that are supported by these communities in alleviating current on-street parking concerns. Division Director Jon Larsen said he would be available at the April 13 work session to answer questions the City Council may have.2 Questions: Based on available information, should the context for the Central Ninth area be changed, or should allowed off-street parking increased? Issues raised by Council Members At the February 9 briefing the City Council discussed a two-part idea included in the original City Council staff report: 1.) The potential for including in the ordinance language that would give developers with fairly immediate projects in the works a choice of starting the projects under the existing ordinance or under the proposed ordinance. 2.) Or setting a future date for the ordinance to take effect to give developers a choice to decide whether to start projects under the current or a future ordinance. Question: Should one or the other of the ideas be included in the ordinance? Council Member Darin Mano has proposed the following amendment to the proposed ordinance: 21A.44.020.A 4. Exemptions or Reductions from Parking Requirements The following shall be exempt from providing the minimum parking required by Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off-Street Parking, but shall comply with maximum parking allowed and location and design standards in Section 21A.44.060 if parking is provided: a. Lots created prior to April 12,1995 that are less than five thousand (5,000) square feet in lot area, except those being used for single-family, two-family, and twin home dwelling uses; b. Expansions or enlargements that increase the square footage of usable floor area of an existing structure or parking requirements for the use by twenty-five percent (25%) or less, provided that existing off street parking and loading areas are not removed. The following shall be required to provide fifty percent (50%) of the minimum parking required by Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking, but shall comply with maximum parking allowed and location and design standards in Section 21A.44.060 if parking is provided: a. Lots created prior to April 12,1995 that are greater than or equal to five thousand (5,000) square feet but less than ten thousand (10,000) square feet in lot area, except those being used for single-family, two-family, and twin home dwelling uses.3 According to the Council Member, “The reasoning is that small infill lots will have a difficult time being utilized under the new ordinance. In District 5 this occurs along Main Street, 1100 East, 2100 South, or 900 Page | 3 South streets. These are residential sized lots but in commercial zones. Residential sized lots will have a difficult time providing off-street parking, and those homes will become almost impossible to use. A lot of these are between 5,000 and 10,000 square feet so the 50 percent reduction will help.4 Here is the Planning Division’s response to the proposal: Concern 1: Small lots (5,000 – 10,000 square feet) along certain corridors (1100 East, Main, 900 South etc.) would have a difficult time providing parking if redeveloped. Summary of Proposed Solution from Council Member Mano: Allow lots between 5,000- 10,000 square feet to provide 50 percent of required minimum parking shown in table 21A.44.040.A. Feedback from Planning Pros: Could help in redevelopment of underutilized properties without needing parcel combinations. Supports smaller scale development. Could provide more development opportunities with less land devoted to parking Could aid in encouraging more affordable housing. Cons: Has not gone through a public input process. Combining with draft alternatives could result in reduction up to 90 ninety percent of minimum off-street parking requirements. Could add further strain to limited on-street parking. Could increase tension between surrounding neighborhoods as on-street parking demand increases.5 It should be noted that the Planning Division has expressed particular concern with how the proposed 50 percent reduction of required minimum parking for lots between 5,000 and 10,000 square feet interacts with the other allowed off-street parking reductions in the proposed ordinance, and if the reduction for lots between 5,000 and 10,000 square feet would be combined with other minimum parking reductions.6 Council Member Mano also has proposed the following amendment to the ordinance: Include the South Salt Lake State Street Corridor Overlay in Street Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off-Street Parking Neighborhood Center Context so the table reads: RB, SNB, CB, CN, RMU-35, R- MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE, SSSC OVERLAY.7 According to the Council Member, “The reasoning for adding the SSSC is that Ballpark/State Street is currently in the general context requiring the most parking. Nick Norris mentioned that he agrees and thinks that it will be resolved when the whole neighborhood is rezoned, but we all know that might take years. So adding the overlay into the context will be a good stop-gap.”8 Here is the Planning Division’s response: Concern 2: The Ballpark area would be part of the General Context and limit development potential until it was rezoned at an unknown time. Summary of Proposed Solution from Council Member Mano: Include South State Street Corridor (SSSC) Overlay in the Neighborhood Center Context until the Ballpark area is rezoned. Pros: o Supports transit along State Street. Page | 4 o Could help resolve current situation of less than ideal zoning in Ballpark area. o Quick solution to reduce parking requirements in SSSC area- rezoning is slow o Parking would be more in line with the desired development for the SSSC Overlay o Could encourage redevelopment o Could aid in encouraging more affordable housing Cons: o Has not gone through a public process. o Could lead to spill over-parking in adjacent neighborhoods that are not accustomed to it. o Would not help all Ballpark areas. o Uses an overlay to set parking standards where that is not done with other overlays. It is unknown what impacts this may have.9 General Comments pertaining to both proposed amendments: o Proposed ordinance already eliminates need for lots under 5,000 square feet to provide parking. o Proposed ordinance already includes parking alternatives (21A.44.050) which could be used to reduce parking requirements up to 40 percent. o Neither of these potential changes were included in the draft ordinance, so the public has not had opportunity for comment. o Direction for any additional analysis or case studies would need to come from the Council as a whole and be subject to available resources to complete.10 Questions: Does the City Council support the proposed amendment No. 1? Does the City Council support the proposed amendment No. 2? Issues in which the Planning Division is seeking Council direction The ordinance in the transmittal contains two sections that the Administration on reflection would like to amend. The first involves a different formula for bicycle parking for commercial and industrial land uses. The second involves a different calculation of vehicle loading spaces at multi-family housing. According to the Administration, “The proposed method for calculating bicycle parking is based on use, context, and building size or residential unit count, which is the same method used to calculate vehicle parking. … However, the required bike parking for commercial uses in the General Context area is low.”11 The Administration proposes changing bicycle parking space requirements in the General Context category from one per 20,000 square feet in commercial uses to one per 10,000 square feet. It also proposes for areas zoned for industrial uses to change from having no bicycle parking requirement to the following requirements: General Context – 1 space per 15,000 square feet. Neighborhood Center Context – 1 space per 8,000 square feet. Urban Center Context – 1 space per 5,000 square feet. Transit Context – 1 space per 3,000 square feet.12 The Administration has proposed the revised amendments “to be more consistent with city-wide goals related to air-quality and bike-friendliness.”13 After receiving comments about the amount of proposed space for vehicle loading spaces, the Administration is recommending the following changes for loading berths in areas zoned for multi-family residential uses: Instead of requiring one loading berth in buildings with 40 to 150 units per building; two loading spaces for buildings with 151 to 300 units per building; and one extra loading berth for every 200 units above 300 units, Page | 5 the Administration recommends requiring one loading berth in buildings with 80 to 200 units, and an extra loading berth per 200 units for buildings with more than 200 units.14 Question: Does the City Council support the two changes recommended by the Planning Division? During the February 16 work session briefing, Planning Director Nick Norris noted that under the current parking ordinance, property developers can reduce their off-street parking requirements to zero by meeting alternatives that allow reductions in off-street parking requirements.15 The proposed ordinance still would allow parking reductions but limit reductions to 40 percent of minimum parking requirements. According to the proposed ordinance, “The adjustments listed in Subsections 21A.44.050.B through 21A.44.050.G may be used in any combination, but shall not be combined to reduce the minimum required parking established in Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking“, by more than forty percent (40%).” However, the Planning Division also requested City Council direction on whether it has an opinion on whether alternatives to minimum off-street parking requirements have a priority, and if so, what is the priority? Two particular requirements appear to City Council staff to have drawn the most interest from the City Council involved proximity to fixed-rail transit, and multifamily affordable and senior housing. Here is the language in the proposed ordinance: C. Proximity to Fixed-Rail Transit: Required parking for a development located within one-quarter mile (when measured radially in a straight line from the subject property line) of a fixed-rail transit station platform in the General Context, Neighborhood Center Context, and Urban Center Context areas may be reduced by up to twenty-five percent (25%). This shall not apply to single or two-family uses including: single-family (attached or detached), twin homes, or two-family. D. Affordable and Senior Housing (Multi-Family Structures): The minimum number of required off street parking spaces for multi-family residential developments with at least ten (10) dwelling units may be reduced by twenty-five percent (25%) if the multi-family development has: 1. A minimum of twenty-five percent (25%) of the dwelling units are restricted to residents with no greater than sixty percent (60%) area median income (AMI) 87 for leased units; or 2. A minimum of thirty-five percent (35%) of the dwelling units are restricted to residents with no greater than eighty percent (80%) AMI for sale units; or 3. A minimum of seventy-five percent (75%) of the dwelling units are restricted to persons sixty-five (65) years of age or older. For a development that meets any of the scenarios above, an additional reduction of up to fifteen percent (15%) may be allowed when the development is located within one-quarter mile (when measured radially in a straight line from the subject property line) of a bus stop that is serviced by the same route at least every fifteen (15) minutes during daytime hours, Monday - Saturday. Developers also can receive reductions in minimum parking requirements for the following: o Participating in shared parking for two or more uses o Providing parking for car pool and car share vehicles o Providing valet parking o Providing a parking study demonstrating different parking needs. (Please see attached section of proposed ordinance.) Questions: Is the proposed 40 percent limit on minimum off-street parking reductions sufficient to achieve the City goals for the proposed ordinance, or should the City place a priority on ways minimum off-street parking can be reduced? Are the proposed minimum parking reductions for affordable housing sufficient, or should they be increased? (A City Council question.) The final issue involves the tables below this text. During the February 16 work session there was discussion about the amount of parking in multifamily structures. Some of the discussion involved the amount of parking available in multifamily structures where mass transit was a significant presence in the four proposed Page | 6 parking contexts. Planning Division Director Norris noted that Salt Lake City’s current and proposed ordinances have maximum parking limits lower than many U.S. cities that are more “transit rich.” However, he said he also was hesitant to start requiring parking in TSA core areas because they are the zones closest to transit.16 The question left at the briefing was: What are appropriate maximum requirements for off-street parking in multi-family units? The tables below show the maximum parking allowed in in the proposed ordinance. Information below this sentence has appeared in a previous Council staff report. ISSUE AT-A-GLANCE Goal of the briefing: To review proposed amendments to the City’s off-street parking regulations. o The proposed ordinance is a rewrite of current ordinances regulating off-street parking. o The proposed ordinance divides off-street parking into four “contexts” – general, neighborhood center, urban center, and transit. (Please see table in Additional Background and Information section of this report, and attached map.) The contexts are intended to regulate off-street parking based on land-uses in those categories. Page | 7 o The proposed ordinance amends minimum and maximum allowable parking spaces in many areas. o The primary goals of the revisions include “updating parking requirements to better reflect market demand and city objectives; simplifying how the ordinance reads and is administered; updating and simplifying technical requirements; and establishing a framework that allows the ordinance to be responsive to changing City dynamics,” according to the Administration.17 o The Administration has proposed two amendments to the ordinance in the transmittal – one regulating parking spaces for bicycles in areas zoned for commercial or industrial use; the other for loading berths for multi-family residential structures. o The proposed rewrite includes a new parking standards manual as a guide to technical specifications (such as dimensional requirements) of the off-street parking regulations. POLICY QUESTIONS 1. The proposed rewrite is significant. Should developers with fairly immediate projects in the works have a choice of starting the projects under the existing ordinance or under the proposed ordinance – if the City Council adopts the revisions? Or, should the City Council set a future date for the ordinance to take effect to give developers a choice to decide whether to start projects under the current or a future ordinance, if it’s adopted? 2. Are the proposed changes to increase required bicycle parking for industrial and commercial land uses and to change the ratio of vehicle loading spaces in multi-family buildings suggest by the Planning Division acceptable to the City Council? 3. What might be the effect on the parking revisions of future overlay zones that are under way or under study? 4. Is the “General Context” designation too broad to accommodate smaller land uses such as infill development, and too car oriented in areas with commercial and industrial uses? 5. The proposed ordinance includes a provision that parking areas with four or fewer vehicle parking spaces are not required to identify an accessible parking space, but if parking is provided, at least one parking space would have to comply with the ADA standard dimensions. Should all the parking spaces in that category comply with ADA standard dimensions, and should those dimensions be for vehicles that can carry a motorized wheelchair? ADDITIONAL & BACKGROUND INFORMATION Mayor Jacqueline Biskupski filed the petition to amend the off-street parking section of the City’s zoning ordinance in September 2017. The Mayor filed the petition after the City advertised for and contracted with a company to research and then rewrite the off-street parking ordinance. The Administration’s phase of the public process to rewrite the ordinance started in September 2017 and ended on January 8, 2020, with a public hearing held by the Salt Lake City Planning Commission. After the hearing the Commission unanimously adopted a motion to forward a positive recommendation to the City Council. The stated purpose of the main revisions can be found in 21A.44.010: “This chapter is intended to require that new development and redevelopment projects provide off street parking and loading facilities in proportion to the parking, loading, and transportation demands of the buildings and land uses included in those projects. This chapter is also intended to help protect the public health, safety, and general welfare by: A.) Avoiding and mitigating traffic congestion and reducing the financial burden on taxpayer funded roadways; B.) Providing necessary access for service and emergency vehicles; C.) Providing for safe and convenient interaction between vehicles, bicycles, and pedestrians; D.) Providing flexible methods of responding to the transportation and access demands of various land uses in different areas of the city; E.) Reducing storm water runoff, reducing heat island effect from large expanses of pavement, improving water quality, and minimizing dust pollution; F.) Establishing context-sensitive parking standards to reflect the current and future built environment of neighborhoods; and Page | 8 G.) Avoiding and mitigating the adverse visual and environmental impacts of large concentrations of exposed parking,” As indicated in the previous section, a main feature of the proposed revisions is to tailor off-street regulations to the land-use contexts -- general, neighborhood center, urban center, and transit. Here are brief descriptions of the four contexts: General Context –includes zoning districts that tend to be more auto dependent and/or suburban in scale and parking needs. The context also applies broadly to all zoning districts that are not specifically listed in the other context areas. Areas that fall into the category are the 300 West commercial corridor, the Redwood Road commercial corridor, and other developments in zoning districts not identified in a specific context area in the ordinance’s Minimum and Maximum Off-Street Parking Table.18 Neighborhood Center: The context includes areas with small- or moderate-scale shopping, gathering, or activity spaces, often within or adjacent to General Context areas, but that are not necessarily well served by transit. The category includes zoning districts with pedestrian-scale development patterns, building forms, and amenities. Areas that fall into the category are the Ninth and Ninth commercial node, the Fifteenth and Fifteenth commercial node, and other moderate scale commercial and mixed-use developments within the zoning districts identified in the Minimum and Maximum Off-Street Parking Table.19 Urban Center: The context includes zoning districts with dense, pedestrian-oriented development within more intensely developed urban centers. Parking demand in the context is higher than in the Transit Center Context, but lower than areas in the Neighborhood Center Context. Areas that fall into this category are the Sugar House Business District, areas adjacent to Downtown, and other developments that are within the zoning districts identified in the Minimum and Maximum Off-Street Parking Table.20 Transit Context: The context includes zoning districts that immediately surround mass-transit facilities and/or are in the Downtown core. These areas have the lowest parking demand and may be exempt from minimum parking requirements or be required to provide minimal off-street parking. Areas that fall into this category are the Central Business District, Central Ninth, the North Temple/400 South transit corridor, and other developments that are within the zoning districts identified in the Minimum and Maximum Off-Street Parking Table.21 Here are the specific zoning districts within each context area. Page | 9 Besides the 300 West Street and Redwood Road commercial corridors, other zoning districts in the General Context category include areas zoned for single and two-family residential districts, mobile home park districts, manufacturing districts, research park districts, business park districts, airport district, institutional districts agricultural districts, public lands districts, and open space areas. Two Proposed Revisions The ordinance in the transmittal contains two sections that the Administration on reflection would like to amend. The first involves a different formula for bicycle parking for commercial and industrial land uses. The second involves a different calculation of vehicle loading spaces at multi-family housing. According to the Administration, “The proposed method for calculating bicycle parking is based on use, context, and building size or residential unit count, which is the same method used to calculate vehicle parking. … However, the required bike parking for commercial uses in the General Context area is low.”22 The Administration proposes changing bicycle parking space requirements in the General Context category from one per 20,000 square feet in commercial uses to one per 10,000 square feet. It also proposes for areas zoned for industrial uses to change from having no bicycle parking requirement to the following requirements: General Context – 1 space per 15,000 square feet. Neighborhood Center Context – 1 space per 8,000 square feet. Page | 10 Urban Center Context – 1 space per 5,000 square feet. Transit Context – 1 space per 3,000 square feet.23 The Administration has proposed the revised amendments “to be more consistent with city-wide goals related to air-quality and bike-friendliness.”24 After receiving comments about the amount of proposed space for vehicle loading spaces, the Administration is recommending the following changes for loading berths in areas zoned for multi-family residential uses: Instead of requiring one loading berth in buildings with 40 to 150 units per building; two loading spaces for buildings with 151 to 300 units per building; and one extra loading berth for every 200 units above 300 units, the Administration recommends requiring one loading berth in buildings with 80 to 200 units, and an extra loading berth per 200 units for buildings with more than 200 units.25 Other Items The proposed revisions are extensive. Using the Administration’s transmittal letter and Planning Division staff report to the Planning Commission, Council staff has taken some items that should be noted. Minimum and Maximum Parking Requirements – The Minimum and Maximum Off-Street Parking Table lists numerous land uses. Specific minimum and maximum parking requirements can be found in section 21A.44.040.A (Page 61 of the proposed ordinance; Page 65 of the transmittal.) Exemptions from Parking Requirements – According to the Administration, the current zoning code exempts nonresidential uses in buildings smaller than 1,000 square feet within commercial districts and the D-2 and D-3 zoning districts from having to provide parking. The exemption is now expanded to apply city-wide to all uses on lots (other than single-family or two-family dwellings) created prior to April 12, 1995, that are smaller than 5,000 square feet. The proposed change would add another level of flexibility for small property and business owners that would otherwise not be able to use or develop the lot due to parking constraints. However, any development that is exempt from providing parking, but that elects to provide parking, will be required to comply with all location and design standards adopted by the City.26 Accessible Parking – Parking areas with four (4) or fewer vehicle parking spaces are not required to identify an accessible parking space; however, if parking is provided, a minimum of one (1) parking space shall comply with the ADA standard dimensions.27 Changes of Use – Any change of use outside of the Urban Center Context area or Transit Center Context area (the largest portions affected by the proposed revisions) that would require an increase in the minimum number of off-street parking spaces by 10 or more spaces or by 25 percent or more spaces, would be required to provide additional parking in compliance with the parking regulations. However, older buildings (built prior to 1944) would not require additional parking to be provided for changes in use. The provision is intended to encourage adaptive reuse of older buildings.28 Parking Calculations – The current zoning ordinance assigns a “catch-all” minimum parking requirement of three (3) spaces per 1,000 square feet for “all other uses.” The proposed section retains that minimum and adds a maximum parking allowed requirement of five (5) spaces per 1,000 square feet. Two additional means have also been introduced by which parking requirements can be assigned to an unlisted use. The Planning Director now has the authority to assign a minimum or maximum number of off- street parking spaces required for an unlisted use based on a listed use with similar operating characteristics, occupancy classification or other factors. The Director can also determine the parking and loading requirements for any use based on a parking study submitted by the applicant that demonstrates the anticipated demand for the proposed development.29 Parking Garages – According to the Administration, parking provided in structures such as parking garages is proposed to include maximum parking allowed. … Well located and planned parking garages can provide shared parking solutions for multiple properties. ... The intent of the proposed provision is to encourage and facilitate parking solutions that serve multiple properties. In addition, “discussions with The Downtown Alliance also Page | 11 indicated that national employers may insist on certain parking counts being provided for their employees. In this sense, parking garages can be a tool to incentivize employers to relocate downtown .”30 Shared Parking – The current maximum distance allowed for shared parking areas of 500 feet has been proposed to increase between 600-1,200 feet, based on parking context and to reflect national trends and Salt Lake City’s large block sizes. The proposed approach would allow mixed-use development the opportunity to reduce the minimum number of required parking spaces to better reflect the parking demands of a mixed-use development.31 1 Videotape, Nick Norris, City Council work session, February 16, 2021, 1:40. 2 Email, Jon Larson, April 5, 2021. 3 Email, Darin Mano, March 17, 2021. 4 Email, Darin Mano. 5 Memorandum, Eric Daems, April 5, 2021. 6 Email, Nick Norris, April 8, 2021. 7 Email, Darin Mano. 8 Email, Darin Mano. 9 Email, Eric Daems. 10 Email, Eric Daems. 11 Administration transmittal letter, Page 2. 12 Administration transmittal letter, Page 3. 13 Administration transmittal letter, Page 2. 14 Administration transmittal letter, Page 3. 15 Videotape, Nick Norris, City Council work session, February 16, 2021, 1:45. 16 Videotape, Nick Norris, 1:45. 17 Administration transmittal letter, Eric Daems, November 2, 2020, Page 2. 18 Planning Division Staff Report, Eric Daems, January 8, 2020, Page 5. 19 Planning Division Staff Report, Page 5. 20 Planning Division Staff Report, Page 6. 21 Planning Division Staff Report, Page 6. 22 Administration transmittal letter, Page 2. 23 Administration transmittal letter, Page 3. 24 Administration transmittal letter, Page 2. 25 Administration transmittal letter, Page 3. 26 Planning Division Staff Report, Page 4. 27 Planning Division Staff Report, Page 8. 28 Planning Division Staff Report, Page 4. 29 Planning Division Staff Report, Page 4 30 Planning Division Staff Report, Page 7. 31 Planning Division Staff Report, Page 8. Amended Ordinance 21A.44.030: CALCULATION OF PARKING: A. Generally: 1. All parking and loading requirements that are based on square footage shall be calculated on the basis of usable floor area of the subject use, unless otherwise specified in Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking“. 2. Parking spaces shall not be counted more than once for required off-site, shared, and/or alternative parking plans, except where the development 58 complies with off-site, shared, and/or alternative parking standards. 3. Parking spaces designed or designated exclusively for motorcycles, scooters, and other two wheeled vehicles shall not count toward the number of minimum required or maximum allowed off street parking spaces. 4. Parking spaces intended for storage of business vehicles, such as fleet vehicles, delivery vehicles, or vehicles on display associated with sales or rental shall not count toward the number of minimum required or maximum allowed off street parking spaces unless otherwise stated in Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking“. 5. Parking spaces designed or designated exclusively for recreational vehicles shall not count toward the number of minimum required or maximum allowed off street parking spaces. 6. When calculations of the number of required off street parking spaces for vehicles or bicycles result in a fractional number, any fraction of 0.5 or larger shall be rounded up to the next higher whole number. Calculations for more than one use in a project shall be calculated for each individual use and may be rounded individually and added, or added then rounded as determined by the applicant. 7. Lots containing more than one (1) use may provide parking and loading based on the shared parking calculations in Subsection 21A.44.050.B, “Shared Parking”. B. Unlisted Uses: For uses not listed in Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking” the planning director is authorized to do any of the following: 1. Apply the minimum or maximum off street parking space requirement specified in Table 21A.44.040- A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking“, for the listed use that is deemed most similar to the proposed use as determined by the planning director based on operating characteristics, the most similar related occupancy classification, or other factors related to potential parking demand determined by the director. 2. Apply a minimum parking requirement of three (3) spaces per one thousand (1,000) square feet of usable floor area for the use and a maximum parking allowance of five (5) spaces per one thousand (1,000) square feet of useable floor area for the use. 3. Establish the minimum off street parking space and loading requirements based on a parking study prepared by the applicant according to Subsection 21A.44.050.F 21A.44.040: REQUIRED OFF STREET PARKING: A. Minimum and Maximum Parking Spaces Required: 1. Unless otherwise provided in this code, each development or land use subject to this chapter pursuant to Section 21A.44.020 shall provide at least the minimum number, and shall not provide more than the maximum number, of off street parking spaces required by Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking“. 2. A parking standard shown in Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking”, is not an indication of whether the use is allowed or prohibited in the respective zoning district or context area. See Chapter 21A.33, “Land Use Tables” for allowed and prohibited uses. 3. The maximum parking limit does not apply to parking provided in parking garages, stacked or racked parking structures, or to off-site parking that complies with all other requirements of this title. 4. The maximum parking limit does not apply to properties in the M-1, M-2, BP, or Airport zoning districts that are located west of the centerline of Redwood Road. 5. If a conditional use is approved by the planning commission in accordance with Chapter 21A.54, “Conditional Uses”, and the conditional use approval states a different parking requirement than that required by this Chapter 21A.44, and is determined necessary to mitigate a detrimental impact, then the parking requirement in the conditional use approval shall apply. 6. All uses with vehicle stacking and/or drive-through facilities shall comply with Section 21A.44.080, “Drive-Through Facilities and Vehicle Stacking Areas”, in addition to the requirements of Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking“. 7. All uses with outdoor sales, display, leasing, and/or auction areas shall also provide one-half (1/2) parking space and no more than two (2) parking spaces per one thousand (1,000) sq. ft. of outdoor sales, display, leasing, and/or auction area. This additional parking shall not count toward the maximum allowed per Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking”, when a maximum is specified. Context Approach: Salt Lake City has a wide variety of development contexts that make any single approach to minimum and maximum parking requirements ineffective. The parking demand for a downtown area served by transit will be much lower than a downtown adjacent neighborhood or suburban shopping center. To ensure that minimum and maximum parking requirements reflect the built context (and future built context) of the area, we created four distinct “context areas”, and then tailored minimum and maximum parking standards to each. The Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking Table below lists the specific zoning districts included in each context area. The following is a brief narrative introducing each context area: 1. General Context: This category includes the city’s zoning districts that tend to be more auto- dependent and/or suburban in scale and parking needs. This context applies broadly to all of the zoning districts that are not specifically listed in the other context areas. 2. Neighborhood Center: This category includes areas with small- or moderate-scale shopping, gathering, or activity spaces, often within or adjacent to General Context areas, but that are not necessarily well served by transit. This category includes zoning districts with pedestrian-scale development patterns, building forms, and amenities. 3. Urban Center: This category includes zoning districts with dense, pedestrian-oriented development within more intensely developed urban centers. The parking demand in this context is higher than in the Neighborhood Center Context, but lower than areas with good transit service. 4. Transit Context: This category includes those zoning districts that immediately surround mass-transit facilities and/or are in the downtown core. These areas have the lowest parking demand and may be exempt from minimum parking requirements or be required to provide minimal off street parking. D. Bicycle Parking: 1. Applicability: The following regulations apply to all uses except for single family, two-family, and twin home residential uses and nonresidential uses having less than one thousand square feet (1,000 sq. ft.) of usable floor area. 2. Calculation of Minimum Required Bicycle Parking Spaces: The number of required bicycle spaces shall be based on the use within the defined parking contexts as shown in Table 21A.44.040-C, “Minimum Bicycle Parking Requirements”, unless another city standard requires a different number of bicycle parking spaces for a specific use, in which case the use-specific bicycle parking standard shall apply. 3. Building Expansions or Changes of Use: Building expansions or changes of use that require additional vehicle parking spaces pursuant to Section 3. Building Expansions or Changes of Use: Building expansions or changes of use that require additional vehicle parking spaces pursuant to Section 84 21A.44.020 and Section 21A.44.040 shall provide additional bicycle parking spaces based on the calculations in Table 21A.44.040-C, “Minimum Bicycle Parking Requirements”, for the entire use. 4. Secure/Enclosed Bicycle Parking: Each one (1) bicycle parking space that is within a secure/enclosed bicycle parking facility may be used to satisfy the requirement of two (2) required bicycle parking spaces. 5. Existing Public Bicycle Parking Facilities: Permanent public bicycle racks or bike corrals located within fifty feet (50’) of the primary entrance to the principal building may be used to satisfy up to two (2) required bicycle parking spaces. 6. Accessory and Temporary Uses: No bicycle parking spaces are required for accessory or temporary uses. 21A.44.050: ALTERNATIVES TO MINIMUM AND MAXIMUM PARKING CALCULATIONS: The amount of off street vehicle parking required pursuant to Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking”, may be adjusted by the factors listed in this section. These adjustments may be applied as part of the calculation of parking requirements and do not require discretionary approval by the City. A. Limitations on Adjustments to Minimum Required Parking: The adjustments listed in Subsections 21A.44.050.B through 21A.44.050.G may be used in any combination, but shall not be combined to reduce the minimum required parking established in Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking“, by more than forty percent (40%). B. Shared Parking: 1. Shared Parking for Two or More Uses: a. Where two (2) or more uses listed in Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking”, share a parking garage or parking lot that is located on one of the properties that is sharing parking, or is located within the maximum permitted distance of all of the properties sharing parking shown in Table 21A.44.060-B, “Maximum Distances for Off-Site Parking”, the total minimum off street parking requirement for those uses may be reduced by the factors shown in Table 21A.44.050-A, “Shared Parking Reduction Factors“. b. The minimum number of off street parking spaces shall be the sum of the parking requirements for the uses divided by the factor shown in Table 21A.44.050-A, “Shared Parking Reduction Factors”, for that combination of uses Example: If a 5,000 square foot art gallery shared a parking lot with a 5,000 square foot retail goods establishment, and a 100 unit multi-family residential use in the Urban Center Context, the minimum off street parking required would be calculated as follows: Use 1: Art Gallery 0.5 per 1,000 sq. ft. x (5,000 sq. ft.) = 3 parking spaces Use 2: Retail Goods Establishment 1 per 1,000 sq. ft. x (5,000 sq. ft.) = 5 parking spaces Use 3: Multi-Family Residential 0 per studio unit x (20 studio units) = 0 parking spaces 0.5 per 1 bedroom unit x (36 1 bedroom units) = 18 parking spaces 1 per 2+ bedroom units x (44 2+ bedroom units) = 44 parking spaces 0+18+44 = 62 parking spaces Sum of two largest minimum parking requirements: 5 (retail goods establishment)+ 62 (multi-family) = 67 parking spaces Reduction Factor (two largest minimums): 67 ÷ 1.2 reduction factor = 55.8 or 56 parking spaces Add Remaining Minimum(s): 56 (retail & multi-family) + 3 (art gallery) = 59 parking spaces required 2. Documentation Required: a. The owners of record involved in the joint use of shared parking shall submit written documentation of the continued availability of the shared parking arrangement to the Transportation Director for review. b. The Director shall approve the shared parking arrangement if the Director determines that the documentation demonstrates the continued availability of the shared parking facility for a reasonable period of time. No zoning or use approval shall be issued until the Director has approved the shared parking documentation. c. If the shared parking arrangement is later terminated or modified and the Director determines that the termination or modification has resulted in traffic congestion, overflow parking in residential neighborhoods, or threats to pedestrian, bicycle, or vehicle safety, the property owners involved in the shared parking arrangement may be held in violation of this chapter. C. Proximity to Fixed-Rail Transit: Required parking for a development located within one-quarter mile (when measured radially in a straight line from the subject property line) of a fixed-rail transit station platform in the General Context, Neighborhood Center Context, and Urban Center Context areas may be reduced by up to twenty-five percent (25%). This shall not apply to single or two-family uses including: single-family (attached or detached), twin homes, or two-family. D. Affordable and Senior Housing (Multi-Family Structures): The minimum number of required off street parking spaces for multi-family residential developments with at least ten (10) dwelling units may be reduced by twenty-five percent (25%) if the multi-family development has: 1. A minimum of twenty-five percent (25%) of the dwelling units are restricted to residents with no greater than sixty percent (60%) area median income (AMI) 87 for leased units; or 2. A minimum of thirty-five percent (35%) of the dwelling units are restricted to residents with no greater than eighty percent (80%) AMI for sale units; or 3. A minimum of seventy-five percent (75%) of the dwelling units are restricted to persons sixty-five (65) years of age or older. For a development that meets any of the scenarios above, an additional reduction of up to fifteen percent (15%) may be allowed when the development is located within one-quarter mile (when measured radially in a straight line from the subject property line) of a bus stop that is serviced by the same route at least every fifteen (15) minutes during daytime hours, Monday - Saturday. E. Car Pool and Carshare Parking: 1. For parking lots with one hundred (100) or more parking spaces, each off street parking space designated and signed for the exclusive use of a shared car pool vehicle shall count as three (3) spaces toward the satisfaction of minimum off street vehicle parking requirements. 2. For parking lots with one hundred (100) or more parking spaces, each off street parking space designated and signed for the exclusive use of a shared vanpool vehicle shall count as seven (7) spaces toward the satisfaction of minimum off street vehicle parking requirements. 3. For parking lots of any size, each off street parking space designated and signed for the exclusive use of a carshare vehicle shall count as four (4) spaces toward the satisfaction of minimum off street vehicle parking requirements. F. Valet Parking Services: Modifications to minimum on-site parking spaces may occur on a one-to-one basis if off site valet parking is provided and: 1. The design of the valet parking does not cause customers who do not use the valet services to park off the premises or cause queuing in the right-of-way; 2. The availability of valet parking service is clearly posted outside the establishment and near the main entrance; and 3. The applicant provides adequate written assurances for the continued operation of the valet parking, and a written agreement to notify future owners and tenants of the property of the duty to continue to provide off-site valet parking. G. Parking Study Demonstrating Different Parking Needs: 1. The transportation director, in consultation with the planning director, may authorize a change in the amount of off street parking spaces. The authorization shall be based on the applicant submitting a parking study that demonstrates a different off street parking demand for the proposed development, use, or combination of uses than calculated from Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking“, and subject to the overall limits on parking adjustments in Subsection 21A.44.050.A above. 2. The transportation director and planning director shall determine whether the information and assumptions used in the study are reasonable and whether the study accurately reflects anticipated off street parking demand for the proposed development, use, or combination of uses. 3. Considerations for an alternative parking requirement (parking provided below the minimum required or exceeding the maximum allowed) shall be granted only if the following findings are determined: a. That the proposed parking plan will satisfy the anticipated parking demand for the use; b. That the proposed parking plan will be at least as effective in maintaining traffic circulation patterns, reducing the visibility of parking areas and facilities as would strict compliance with the otherwise applicable off street parking standards; c. That the proposed parking plan does not have a materially adverse impact on adjacent or neighboring properties; d. That the proposed parking plan includes mitigation strategies for any potential impact on adjacent or neighboring properties; and e. That the proposed alternative parking plan is consistent with applicable city plans and policies. ERIN MENDENHALL Mayor DEPARTMENT of COMMUNITY and NEIGHBORHOODS BLAKE THOMAS CITY COUNCIL TRANSMITTAL Date Received: Lisa Shaffer, Chief Administrative Officer Date sent to Council: TO:Salt Lake City Council DATE: Chris Wharton, Chair FROM: Blake Thomas, Director, Department of Community & Neighborhoods SUBJECT: Petition PLNPCM2017-00753 – Off-Street Parking, Mobility, and Loading Zoning Text Amendments STAFF CONTACT: Eric Daems, Senior Planner (801) 535-7236, eric.daems@slcgov.com DOCUMENT TYPE: Ordinance RECOMMENDATION: The City Council adopt the proposed parking modifications including the complete re-write of Chapter 21A.44 and all associated ordinance language as has been recommended by the Planning Commission. BUDGET IMPACT: None BACKGROUND/DISCUSSION:As transportation and land uses change over time, the demand for parking changes. Cities frequently struggle to strike a balance between too much parking and inadequate parking. Parking requirements that are too high can waste land, increase development costs, lead to demolition of structures to meet parking requirements, increase stormwater runoff, compromise water quality, and discourage pedestrian activity. Parking requirements that are too low may lead to increased traffic congestion, difficulty leasing or selling property, and spillover parking onto adjacent residential streets. Beginning in June 2017, the Planning Division started working with consulting firm Clarion and Associates to perform a comprehensive review and update of Chapter 21A.44 Off Street Parking, Mobility, and Loading and associated sections of the zoning ordinance. The provisions reviewed determine the parking regulations in all areas of the City, but do not include regulations for on- street parking. The process included internal meetings with City divisions most closely involved with the parking chapter and a thorough public engagement plan that is outlined in Attachment G of the Staff Report (Exhibit 4b). Following the completion of the work of the consultant, Planning SALT LAKE CITY CORPORATION 451 SOUTH STATE STREET, ROOM 404 WWW.SLC.GOV P.O. BOX 145460, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84114-5460 TEL 801.535.6230 Staff worked to address commentary received, finish the public engagement efforts, and to produce a fully revised parking ordinance. Primary goals of the rewrite includeupdating parking requirements to better reflect market demand and city objectives, simplifying how the ordinance reads and is administered, updating and simplifying technical requirements, and establishing a framework that allows the ordinance to be responsive to changing City dynamics. The Planning Commission Staff Report in Exhibit 4b provides a comprehensive overview and detailed analysis of the proposed zoning text amendments. Additional Considerations:Since the time when the public hearing was held, Planning Staff has identified several items that may warrant additional consideration from the City Council. Bicycle Parking: The current parking ordinance bases bicycle parking standards on vehicle parking stalls provided. The trouble with this approach is that, as reductions to parking are granted through various alternatives, required bicycle parking is also reduced. The approach was creating reduced bicycle parking when it was most needed. The proposed method for calculating bicycle parking is based on use, context, and building size or residential unit count, which is the same method used to calculate vehicle parking. The basic table is shown below: The table reflects progressive and generally increased bicycle parking requirements for most uses in most of the context areas; however, the required bike parking for commercial uses in the General Context area is low (1 per 20,000 sq. ft.) and no minimum bicycle parking is required for industrial uses in all context areas. The original reasoning behind this was that these uses in these areas may not generate as much bicycle traffic, so bicycle parking would be provided by the developer/business owner on an as-needed basis. In order to be more consistent with city-wide goals related to air-quality and bike-friendliness, the City Council may want to consider increasing the minimum required bicycle parking for industrial and commercial uses. Planning Staff recommends the table be revised as follows: ) Use General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, R-MU-35, R-MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE D-2, MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1, CSHBD2 D-1, D-3, D-4, G-MU, TSA-C, UI, FB-UN2, FB-UN3, FB-SC, R- MU Residential Uses 1 per 5 units 1 per 4 units 1 per 3 units 1 per 2 units Public, Institutional, and Civic Uses 1 per 10,000 sq. ft. 1 per 5,000 sq. ft. 1 per 5,000 sq. ft. 1 per 3,000 sq. ft. Commercial Uses 1 per 10,000 sq. ft. 1 per 5,000 sq. ft 1 per 4,000 sq. ft. 1 per 2,000 sq. ft. Industrial Uses 1 per 15,000 sq. ft.1 per 8,000 sq. ft.1 per 5,000 sq. ft.1 per 3,000 sq. ft. *For all uses: In determining the minimum number of bicycle parking spaces required, fractional spaces are rounded to the nearest whole number, with one-half counted as an additional space Loading Berths:Two of the attached letters (Exhibit 4e) present a concern with the proposed requirements for off street loading berths for multi-family residential uses. The current ordinance bases the requirement on building size (square feet) rather than unit count. The current requirement is 1 short berth for buildings between 100,,000-200,000 square feet and 1 additional berth for each 200,000 square feet. The 100,000 square foot starting point was placing a burden on the public right-of-way for smaller buildings that still had a high unit count. To that end, the new requirements were developed and are shown below: These standards are based off similar size cities with newer parking ordinances. However, after re-examining it, Planning Staff agrees that these may be too demanding and may require too much space to be dedicated to loading berths and therefore inhibit City housing and development goals. The City Council may want to consider a higher threshold for requiring the initial or additional loading berths. Planning Staff recommends the table be revised as follows: Multi- Family Residential 86 # of Dwelling Units (Per Building) Number and Size of Berths 80-200 1 short Greater than 200 1 additional short per 200 units PUBLIC PROCESS: Development of the proposed Parking Ordinance and associated amendments was the result of a robust community engagement process that involved targeted stakeholders as well as the general public through numerous engagement activities. Attachment G in the Planning Commission Staff Report (Exhibit 4b) provides a summary of the public engagement activities that were conducted throughout the ordinance revision process. The Planning Commission held a public hearing on January 8, 2020. Five people spoke at the public hearing with varying level of support or concern to the proposed ordinance amendments. A summary of those concerns has been included in this memo (Exhibit 4c). The Planning Commission voted unanimously to forward a positive recommendation the City Council to adopt the Chapter 21A.44 Off Street Parking and associated zoning text amendments. Since the Public Hearing, Planning Staff has received six letters from the public in regard to the proposed amendments. Two of the letters reflect comments made during the Public Hearing for the Planning Commission. All of the letters have been included in this memo (Exhibit 4e). EXHIBITS: 1. Project Chronology 2. Notice of City Council Hearing 3. Planning Commission- January 8, 2020 a. Agenda Notice b. Staff Report c. Agenda & Minutes d. Staff Presentation Slides e. Additional Public Comments Received 4. Original Petition 1 SALT LAKE CITY ORDINANCE No. _____ of 202_ (An ordinance amending various sections of the Salt Lake City Code pertaining to off street parking regulations) An ordinance amending various sections of the Salt Lake City Code pursuant to Petition No. PLNPCM2017-00753 pertaining to off street parking regulations. WHEREAS, the Salt Lake City Planning Commission held a public hearing on January 8, 2020 to consider a petition submitted by then-Mayor Jacqueline Biskupski (“Applicant”) (Petition No. PLNPCM2017-00753) to amend portions of Chapters 18.80 (Buildings and Construction: Parking Lot Construction); 20.56 (Subdivisions and Condominiums: Condominiums); 21A.24 (Zoning: Residential Districts); 21A.26 (Zoning: Commercial Districts); 21A.30 (Zoning: Downtown Districts); 21A.31 (Zoning: Gateway Districts); 21A.32 (Zoning: Special Purpose Districts); 21A.36 (Zoning: General Provisions); 21A.37 (Zoning: Design Standards); 21A.38 (Zoning: Nonconforming Uses and Noncomplying Structures); 21A.40 (Zoning: Accessory Uses, Buildings and Structures); 21A.44 (Zoning: Off Street Parking, Mobility and Loading); 21A.52 (Zoning: Special Exceptions); 21A.60 (Zoning: List of Terms); and 21A.62 (Zoning: Definitions) of the Salt Lake City Code to modify regulations pertaining to off street parking; and WHEREAS, at its January 8, 2020 meeting, the planning commission voted in favor of transmitting a positive recommendation to the Salt Lake City Council on said petition; and WHEREAS, after a public hearing on this matter the city council has determined that adopting this ordinance is in the city’s best interests. NOW, THEREFORE, be it ordained by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah: 2 SECTION 1. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Section 18.80.020. That Section 18.80.080 of the Salt Lake City Code (Buildings and Construction: Parking Lot Construction: Permit; Required for Construction; Issuance Conditions) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: 18.80.020: PERMIT; REQUIRED FOR CONSTRUCTION; ISSUANCE CONDITIONS: No parking lot or parking area shall be constructed without first obtaining a permit authorizing such construction. No permit shall be issued without first securing the recommendations of the city transportation engineer and no permit shall be issued until the applicant has complied with the provisions of this chapter. SECTION 2. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Subsection 20.56.060.B. That Subsection 20.56.060.B of the Salt Lake City Code (Subdivisions and Condominiums: Condominiums: Condominium Conversion Process: Planning Official Duties and Responsibility) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: B. Planning Official Duties and Responsibility: 1. Coordination of Review: The planning official shall review the application material submitted for accuracy and completeness and transmit the submittal to pertinent departments for review and comment. 2. Consistent with State Law: The planning official shall review the application and related documents to determine compliance with requirements of the Utah Condominium Ownership Act, Title 57, Chapter 7 of the Utah Code, and applicable provisions of this chapter. 3. Previous Conditions: The planning official shall review applicable conditions on the use or building imposed by ordinances, variances, and conditional uses. 4. Site Improvements: The planning official shall review the proposed building and site plans and shall have the authority to require additional improvements to be made to the existing site including, but not limited to, landscaping, exterior repairs, and improvements to common areas. This review shall include an analysis of the parking, including internal circulation issues, such as surfacing and control curbs. The analysis shall also include the number of existing parking stalls, noting any deviation from current standards. Based upon this information, the planning official may require 3 construction of additional parking stalls on the site, or may require reasonable alternative parking solutions as outlined in Section 21A.44.050 “Alternatives to Minimum and Maximum Parking Calculations”, of this code. Any additional parking developed on site or alternative parking solutions may not increase the parking impacts on neighboring properties, and will not develop existing common areas used as open space or green space. Additionally, any remodeling proposal which increases the number of bedrooms would require compliance with existing parking requirements. The total number of parking stalls available to the owners of the project shall be disclosed on the condominium plat. SECTION 3. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Subsection 21A.24.164.H. That Subsection 21A.24.164.H of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Residential Districts: R-MU-35 Residential/Mixed Use District: Parking Structures) shall be, and hereby is DELETED. SECTION 4. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Subsection 21A.24.168.H. That Subsection 21A.24.168.H of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Residential Districts: R-MU-45 Residential/Mixed Use District: Parking Structures) shall be, and hereby is DELETED. SECTION 5. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Subsection 21A.24.170.E. That Subsection 21A.24.170.E of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Residential Districts: R-MU Residential/Mixed Use District: Parking Structures) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: E. Minimum Yard Requirements: 1. Single-Family Detached Dwellings: a. Front Yard: Fifteen feet (15’). b. Corner Side Yard: Ten feet (10’). c. Interior Side Yard: (1) Corner lots: Four feet (4’). 4 (2) Interior lots: Four feet (4’) on one side and ten feet (10’) on the other. d. Rear Yard: Twenty five percent (25%) of the lot depth, but need not be more than twenty feet (20’). 2. Single-Family Attached, Two-Family and Twin Home Dwellings: a. Front Yard: Fifteen feet (15’). b. Corner Side Yard: Ten feet (10’). c. Interior Side Yard: (1) Single-family attached: No yard is required, however if one is provided it shall not be less than four feet (4’). (2) Two-family: (A) Interior lot: Four feet (4’) on one side and ten feet (10’) on the other. (B) Corner lot: Four feet (4’). (3) Twin home: No yard is required along one side lot line. A ten foot (10’) yard is required on the other. d. Rear Yard: Twenty five percent (25%) of lot depth or twenty five feet (25’), whichever is less. 3. Multi-Family Dwellings and Any Other Residential Uses: a. Front Yard: No setback is required. b. Corner Side Yard: No setback is required. c. Interior Side Yard: No setback is required. d. Rear Yard: Twenty five percent (25%) of lot depth, but need not exceed thirty feet (30’). 4. Nonresidential Development: a. Front Yard: No setback is required. b. Corner Side Yard: No setback is required. c. Interior Side Yard: No setback is required. 5 d. Rear Yard: Twenty five percent (25%) of lot depth, but need not exceed thirty feet (30’). 5. Existing Lots: Lots legally existing on the effective date hereof, April 12, 1995, shall be considered legal conforming lots. 6. Minimum Lot Area Exemptions: For multiple-unit residential uses, nonresidential and mixed uses, no minimum lot area is required. In addition, no front, corner side or interior side yards or landscaped setbacks are required; except where interior side yards are provided, they shall not be less than four feet (4’). 7. Existing Buildings: For buildings legally existing on the effective date hereof, required yards shall be no greater than the established setback line. 8. Maximum Setback: For single-family, two-family, and twin home dwellings, at least twenty five percent (25%) of the building facade must be located within twenty five feet (25’) of the front lot line. For all other uses, at least twenty five percent (25%) of the building facade must be located within fifteen feet (15’) of the front lot line. Exceptions to this requirement may be authorized as design review, subject to the requirements of Chapter 21A.59 of this title, and the review and approval of the planning commission. The planning director, in consultation with the transportation director, may modify this requirement if the adjacent public sidewalk is substandard and the resulting modification to the setback results in a more efficient public sidewalk. The planning director may waive this requirement for any addition, expansion, or intensification, which increases the floor area or parking requirement by less than fifty percent (50%) if the planning director finds the following: a. The architecture of the addition is compatible with the architecture of the original structure or the surrounding architecture. b. The addition is not part of a series of incremental additions intended to subvert the intent of the ordinance. Appeal of administrative decision is to the planning commission. SECTION 6. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Subsection 21A.26.020.F. That Subsection 21A.26.020.F of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Commercial Districts: CN Neighborhood Commercial District: Minimum Yard Requirements) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: F. Minimum Yard Requirements: 6 1. Front or Corner Side Yard: A fifteen foot (15’) minimum front or corner side yard shall be required. Exceptions to this requirement may be authorized as design review, subject to the requirements of Chapter 21A.59 of this title, and the review and approval of the planning commission. 2. Interior Side Yard: None required. 3. Rear Yard: Ten feet (10’). 4. Buffer Yards: Any lot abutting a lot in a Residential District shall conform to the buffer yard requirements of Chapter 21A.48 of this title. 5. Accessory Buildings and Structures in Yards: Accessory buildings and structures may be located in a required yard subject to Section 21A.36.020, Table 21A.36.020.B of this title. 6. Maximum Setback: A maximum setback is required for at least sixty five percent (65%) of the building facade. The maximum setback is twenty five feet (25’). Exceptions to this requirement may be authorized through the design review process, subject to the requirements of Chapter 21A.59 of this title, and the review and approval of the planning commission. The planning director, in consultation with the transportation director, may modify this requirement if the adjacent public sidewalk is substandard and the resulting modification to the setback results in a more efficient public sidewalk. The planning director may waive this requirement for any addition, expansion, or intensification, which increases the floor area or parking requirement by less than fifty percent (50%) if the planning director finds the following: a. The architecture of the addition is compatible with the architecture of the original structure or the surrounding architecture. b. The addition is not part of a series of incremental additions intended to subvert the intent of the ordinance. Appeal of administrative decision is to the planning commission. SECTION 7. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Subsection 21A.26.025.F. That Subsection 21A.26.025.F of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Commercial Districts: SNB Small Neighborhood Business District: Yard Requirements) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: F. Yard Requirements: 7 1. Front and Corner Side Yard: Front and corner side yard setbacks shall be equal to the required yard areas of the abutting zoning district along the block face. When the property abuts more than one zone the more restrictive requirement shall apply. 2. Interior Side Yard: Interior side yard equal to the required yard areas of the abutting zoning district along the block face. When the property abuts more than one zone the more restrictive requirement shall apply. 3. Rear Yard: Rear yard setbacks shall be equal to the required yard areas of the abutting zoning district along the block face. When the property abuts more than one zoning district the more restrictive requirement shall apply. 4. Buffer Yards: Any lot abutting a lot in a Residential District shall conform to the buffer yard requirements of Chapter 21A.48, “Landscaping and Buffers”, of this title. 5. Accessory Buildings and Structures in Yards: Accessory buildings and structures may be located in a required yard subject to Section 21A.36.020, Table 21A.36.020.B, “Obstructions in Required Yards”, of this title. SECTION 8. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Subsection 21A.26.030.F. That Subsection 21A.26.030.F of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Commercial Districts: CB Community Business District: Minimum Yard Requirements) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: F. Minimum Yard Requirements: 1. Front or Corner Side Yard: No minimum yard is required. If a front yard is provided, it shall comply with all provisions of this title applicable to front or corner side yards, including landscaping, fencing, and obstructions. 2. Interior Side Yard: None required. 3. Rear Yard: Ten feet (10’). 4. Buffer Yards: Any lot abutting a lot in a Residential District shall conform to the buffer yard requirements of Chapter 21A.48 of this title. 5. Accessory Buildings and Structures in Yards: Accessory buildings and structures may be located in a required yard subject to Section 21A.36.020, Table 21A.36.020B of this title. 8 6. Maximum Setback: A maximum setback is required for at least seventy five percent (75%) of the building facade. The maximum setback is fifteen feet (15’). Exceptions to this requirement may be authorized through the design review process, subject to the requirements of Chapter 21A.59 of this title, and the review and approval of the planning commission. The planning director, in consultation with the transportation director, may modify this requirement if the adjacent public sidewalk is substandard and the resulting modification to the setback results in a more efficient public sidewalk. The planning director may waive this requirement for any addition, expansion, or intensification, which increases the floor area or parking requirement by less than fifty percent (50%) if the planning director finds the following: a. The architecture of the addition is compatible with the architecture of the original structure or the surrounding architecture. b. The addition is not part of a series of incremental additions intended to subvert the intent of the ordinance. Appeal of administrative decision is to the planning commission. SECTION 9. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Section 21A.26.078. That Section 21A.26.078 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Commercial Districts: TSA Transit Station Area District) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: 21A.26.078: TSA TRANSIT STATION AREA DISTRICT: A. Purpose Statement: The purpose of the TSA Transit Station Area District is to provide an environment for efficient and attractive transit and pedestrian oriented commercial, residential and mixed use development around transit stations. Redevelopment, infill development and increased development on underutilized parcels should include uses that allow them to function as part of a walkable, mixed use district. Existing uses that are complementary to the district, and economically and physically viable, should be integrated into the form and function of a compact, mixed use pedestrian oriented neighborhood. Each transit station is categorized into a station type. These typologies are used to establish appropriate zoning regulations for similar station areas. Each station area will typically have two (2) subsections: the core area and the transition area. Due to the nature of the area around specific stations, the restrictions of overlay zoning districts, and the neighborhood vision, not all station areas are required to have a core area and a transition area. 1. Core Area: The purpose of the core area is to provide areas for comparatively intense land development with a mix of land uses incorporating the principles of sustainable, transit oriented development and to enhance the area closest to a transit station as a 9 lively, people oriented place. The core area may mix ground floor retail, office, commercial and residential space in order to activate the public realm. 2. Transition Area: The purpose of the transition area is to provide areas for a moderate level of land development intensity that incorporates the principles of sustainable transit oriented development. The transition area is intended to provide an important support base to the core area and transit ridership as well as buffer surrounding neighborhoods from the intensity of the core area. These areas reinforce the viability of the core area and provide opportunities for a range of housing types at different densities. Transition areas typically serve the surrounding neighborhood and include a broad range of building forms that house a mix of compatible land uses. Commercial uses may include office, retail, restaurant and other commercial land uses that are necessary to create mixed use neighborhoods. B. Station Area Types: A station area typology is the use of characteristics, such as building types, mix of land use, transit service and street network to create generalizations about an area that can be used to define a common vision for development of a transit station area. Each typology recognizes the important difference among places and destinations and takes into account the local context of a station and its surroundings. Refer to the official Salt Lake City zoning map to determine the zoning of the land within each station area. 1. Urban Center Station (TSA-UC): An urban center station contains the highest relative intensity level and mix of uses. The type of station area is meant to support downtown Salt Lake and not compete with it in terms of building scale and use. 2. Urban Neighborhood Station (TSA-UN): An evolving and flexible development pattern defines an urban neighborhood station area. Urban neighborhoods consist of multilevel buildings that are generally lower scale than what is found in the urban center station area. The desired mix of uses would include ground floor commercial or office uses with the intent of creating a lively, active, and safe streetscape. 3. Mixed Use Employment Center Station (TSA-MUEC): A mixed use employment station is an area with a high concentration of jobs that attract people from the entire region. Buildings are often large scale in nature and may have large footprints. Land uses that support the employment centers such as retail sales and service and restaurants are located throughout the station area and should occupy ground floor space in multi-story buildings oriented to the pedestrian and transit user. A mix of housing types and sizes are appropriate to provide employees with the choice to live close to where they work. Building types should trend toward more flexible building types over time. Connectivity for all modes of travel is important due to the limited street network. 4. Special Purpose Station (TSA-SP): The special purpose station is typically centered on a specific land use or large scale regional activity. These areas are generally served by a mix of transit options. Land uses such as restaurants and retail support the 10 dominant land use and attract people to the area. A mix of housing types and sizes are appropriate in certain situations. Future development should be aimed at increasing the overall intensity and frequency of use in the station area by adding a mix of uses that can be arranged and designed to be compatible with the primary use. C. Review Process: The review process for all new development and redevelopment within the Transit Station Area Zoning District is based on the development score which is generated by the “Transit Station Area Development Guidelines” hereby adopted by reference. 1. The following types of development are required to go through this review process: a. Any addition of one thousand (1,000) square feet or more that extend a street facing building facade or are located to the side of a building and are visible from a public space; or b. Additions that increase the height of an existing building or change the existing roofline; c. Additions to the rear of buildings that are not adjacent to a public street, trail or other public space are not required to obtain a development score but must comply with all other applicable regulations. Signs, fences, accessory structures and any other structure or addition not listed in this section are not required to obtain a development score. d. Single-family detached dwellings and two-family dwellings are not required to obtain a development score. 2. Application process steps: a. Presubmittal Conference: All applicants for development within the TSA Transit Station Area Zoning District are required to attend a presubmittal conference with the planning division. The purpose of the presubmittal conference is to notify the applicant of the goals of the station area plans, the standards in this section, and the review and approval process. b. Development Review Application: After a presubmittal conference, the developer can submit a development review application. This application and all submittal requirements will be used to determine the development score. The application shall include a score sheet on which the development guidelines and their assigned values are indicated and two (2) checklists: one for the applicant’s use and one for the planning division’s use. c. Public Noticing: A notice of application for a development review shall be provided in accordance with Chapter 21A.10 of this title. 11 d. Application Review: Table 21A.26.078.C.2.d of this Subsection C summarizes the application review process. All applications shall be processed as follows: (1) Tier 1 Planning Commission Review: If a project is assigned a score less than 125 points, the project can only be approved by the planning commission through the design review process in Chapter 21A.59 of this title. Once the applicant receives written notice of their score, they will be given thirty (30) days to notify the planning division of their intention to proceed with the project through the design review process or make necessary plan adjustments to increase their development score to the minimum level in order to go through an administrative review process. (2) Tier 2 Administrative Review: The planning director has the authority to approve a project scoring 125 points or more without holding a public hearing. The project shall be allowed to go through the standard building permit process. A public hearing is not required because the project incorporates adequate development guidelines or development incentives to be deemed compliant with the vision for the station area. TABLE 21A.26.078.C.2.d APPLICATION REVIEW Development Score Review Process 0 - 124 points Planning commission design review process 125 or more points Administrative review D. Development Score: The purpose of the development score is to allow flexibility for designers while implementing the city’s vision of the applicable station area plans and the purpose of this zoning district. The development score measures the level of compatibility between a proposed project and the station area plan. A “station area plan” is a development, land use, urban design and place making policy document for the area around a specific transit station. The development score is based on the development guidelines and development incentives in the “Transit Station Area Development Guidelines” book, hereby adopted by reference. The “Transit Station Area Development Guidelines” shall be amended following the adopted procedures for zoning text amendments in Chapter 21A.50, “Amendments”, of this title. 1. Formulating the Score: The development score is formulated by calculating all of the development guideline values for a particular project. Each design guideline and incentive is given a value based on its importance. Some guidelines are considered more important and carry a higher value than others. All other applicable zoning regulations shall be complied with by all projects and are not calculated in the development score. 12 2. Project Review: A development score shall be assigned to all projects within the TSA Transit Station Area District after a complete development review application is submitted. The planning director shall provide, in writing, a copy of the review checklist and explanation of the outcome of the score to the applicant within thirty (30) days of submitting a complete application. 3. Appeals: The development score may be appealed. All appeals of the development score are heard by the appeals hearing officer. In hearing the appeal, the appeals hearing officer shall hold a public hearing in accordance with Section 21A.10.030 of this title. In deciding the appeal, the appeals hearing officer shall base its decision on its interpretation of the development guidelines and the development score. 4. Expiration: No development score shall be valid for a period longer than one year unless a building permit has been issued or complete building plans have been submitted to the Division of Building Services. E. Development Standards: 1. Application: The dimensional requirements of this section apply to all new buildings and developments as well as additions to existing buildings. Additions that bring the property closer to compliance are allowed. The following development standards apply to the core and transition areas of all station types. 2. Building Height: The minimum and maximum building heights are found in Table 21A.26.078.E.2, “Building Height Regulations”, of this Subsection E.2. The following exceptions apply: a. The minimum building height applies to all structures that are adjacent to a public or private street. The building shall meet the minimum building height for at least fifty percent (50%) of the width of the street facing building wall. b. Projects that achieve a development score that qualifies for administrative review are eligible for an increase in height. The increase shall be limited to one story of habitable space. The height of the additional story shall be equal to or less than the average height of the other stories in the building. This is in addition to the height authorized elsewhere in this title. TABLE 21A.26.078.E.2 BUILDING HEIGHT REGULATIONS Minimum Height1 Maximum Height Urban center: Core 40’ 90’2 Transition 25’ 60’ 13 Minimum Height1 Maximum Height Urban neighborhood: Core 25’ 75’ Transition 0’ 50’ Mixed use employment center: Core 25’ 75’ Transition 0’ 60’ Special purpose: Core 25’ 75’ Transition 0’ 60’ Notes: 1. Minimum building heights apply to those properties with frontage on the street where fixed rail transit is located. 2. Buildings with a roof that has at least 2 sloping planes may be allowed up to 105 feet. The slope of the plane must have a minimum slope of a 2 feet rise over a 12 foot run. The additional height may include habitable space. The sloping planes must be clearly visible and create a sloped roof shape. The sloping planes shall not be hidden by a parapet wall. 3. Setbacks: a. General Standards for Front/Corner Side Yards: (1) All portions of the yard not occupied by building, driveways, walkways or other similar features must be landscaped or include an active outdoor use, such as outdoor dining, plazas, courtyards or other similar outdoor use. See Subsection F of this section for specific front yard design requirements. (2) Walls up to three feet (3’) in height, patios and other similar elements intended to activate the sidewalk can be located to the property line. (3) Awnings or canopies may be located within any portion of the yard and are not subject to the front or corner side yard restrictions in Subsection 21A.36.020.B, Table 21A.36.020.B of this title. (4) Balconies may project up to two feet (2’) into the required yards and are not subject to the front or corner side yard restrictions in Subsection 21A.36.020.B, Table 21A.36.020.B of this title. 14 (5) All front and corner side yard standards in Table 21A.26.078.E.3.b of this Subsection E may be modified through the design review process of Chapter 21A.59 of this title, except that the front and corner side yard setback for 400 South shall not be reduced below the minimum. b. Table 21A.26.078.E.3.b Setback Standards: TABLE 21A.26.078.E.3.b SETBACK STANDARDS Property Frontage Front/Corner Side Yard Setback Interior Side Yard Rear Yard 400 South Minimum: 10’, and at least 50% of the street facing building facade must be built to the minimum. Minimum: None, except a 25’ setback is required when adjacent to an OS, R-1, R-2, SR, RMF-30, RMF-35 or RMF-45 zoning district. The minimum shall increase 1’ for every 1’ increase in building height above 25’ and is applied to the portion of the building over 25’ in height. Maximum setback: 20’, but may be increased if the additional setback is used for plazas, courtyards, or outdoor dining areas. In locations where the sidewalk is not a minimum of 10’ wide, additional sidewalk width shall be installed by the developer so there is a minimum width sidewalk of 10’. This applies to new buildings and to additions that increase the gross building square footage by more than 50%. This standard does not require removal of existing buildings or portions thereof. North Temple Minimum: 5’, and at least 50% of the street facing building facade must be built to the minimum. Maximum: 15’, but may be increased if the additional setback is used for plazas, courtyards, or outdoor dining areas. In locations where the sidewalk is not a minimum of 10’ wide, 15 Property Frontage Front/Corner Side Yard Setback Interior Side Yard Rear Yard additional sidewalk width shall be installed by the developer so there is a minimum width sidewalk of 10’. This applies to new buildings and to additions that increase the gross building square footage by more than 50%. This standard does not require removal of existing buildings or portions thereof. 300 South, 500 South, 600 East Minimum: Equal to the average setback of other principal buildings on the same block face. Streets with right- of-way width of 50’ or less with R- 1, R-2, SR, RMF- 30, RMF-35 or RMF-45 zoning district on either side of the street Minimum: 25% of lot depth, up to 25’. For buildings taller than 25’, setback shall increase 2’ for every 1’ of building height above 25’ and is applied to the portion of the building over 25’ in height. All other streets Minimum: None At least 50% of the street facing building facade shall be within 5’ of the front or corner side property line. c. Special Setback Provisions for Properties Adjacent to Jordan River: For properties that are adjacent to the Jordan River, the building setback from the Jordan River shall be fifty feet (50’), measured from the annual high water level as defined in Section 21A.34.130 of this title. For buildings over fifty feet (50’) in height, the setback shall increase one foot (1’) for every foot in height over fifty feet (50’) up to a maximum of seventy five feet (75’). Portions of buildings over fifty feet (50’) in height may be stepped back to comply with this standard. 4. Minimum Lot Area and Lot Width Requirements: 16 TABLE 21A.26.078.E.4 MINIMUM LOT AREA AND LOT WIDTH STANDARDS Standard Required Dimension Minimum lot area 2,500 square feet Minimum lot width 40 feet a. The minimum lot area applies to all new subdivisions of land and shall not be used to calculate residential density. b. Any legally existing lot may be developed without having to comply with the minimum lot size or width requirements. c. Lots subdivided for single-family detached, single-family attached, and two- family residential dwellings are exempt from minimum lot width requirements. d. Lots subdivided for single-family attached dwellings are exempt from minimum lot area provided that: (1) Parking for units shall be rear loaded and accessed from a common drive shared by all units in a particular development; (2) Driveway access shall connect to the public street in a maximum of two (2) locations; and (3) No garages shall face the primary street and front yard parking shall be strictly prohibited. 5. Open Space Area: Open space areas shall be provided at a rate of one square foot for every ten (10) square feet of land area included in the development, up to five thousand (5,000) square feet for core areas, and up to two thousand five hundred (2,500) square feet for transition areas. Open space areas includes landscaped yards, patios, public plazas, pocket parks, courtyards, rooftop and terrace gardens and other similar types of open space area amenities. All required open space areas shall be accessible to the users of the building(s). 6. Circulation and Connectivity: Development within the station area shall be easily accessible from public spaces and provide safe and efficient options for all modes of travel. Circulation networks, whether public or private, require adequate street, pedestrian and bicycle connections to provide access to development. The internal circulation network shall be easily recognizable, formalized and interconnected. a. All parking lots shall comply with the standards in Section 21A.44.020, “General Off Street Parking Regulations”, of this title. 17 b. Parking is prohibited between the street-facing building line and any front or corner side property line. This shall include any drive aisle that is not perpendicular to the front or corner side property line. c. Any new development shall provide a midblock walkway if a midblock walkway on the subject property has been identified in a master plan that has been adopted by the city. The following standards apply to the midblock walkway: (1) The midblock walkway must be a minimum of ten feet (10’) wide and include a minimum six foot (6’) wide unobstructed path. (2) The midblock walkway may be incorporated into the building provided it is open to the public. A sign shall be posted indicating that the public may use the walkway. 7. Accessory Structures: No accessory structure shall be located in a required front yard or between the primary building and a property line adjacent to a public street. F. Design Standards: 1. Development shall comply with the design standards in Chapter 21A.37 of this title when applicable as specified in that chapter. 2. All developments required to obtain a review score by Subsection C of this section shall comply with the following additional design standards. These specific standards may be modified through the design review in Chapter 21A.59 of this title if the modifications meet the intent of the specific design standard requested to be modified: a. EIFS and Stucco Limitation: Use of Exterior Insulation and Finishing System (EIFS) or traditional stucco is not allowed as a building material on the ground floor of street facing building facades. Use of EIFS and stucco is allowed for up to ten percent (10%) of the upper level street facing facades. b. Front and Corner Side Yard Design Requirements: (1) In yards greater than ten feet (10’) in depth, one shade tree shall be planted for every thirty feet (30’) of street frontage. For the purpose of this section, a shade tree is any tree that has a mature minimum tree canopy of thirty feet (30’) and a mature height that is forty feet (40’) or greater. (2) At least fifty percent (50%) of the front or corner side yards shall be covered in live plant material. This can include raised planter boxes. This percentage can be reduced to thirty percent (30%) if the yard includes outdoor dining, patios, outdoor public space, or private yards for ground floor residential uses 18 that cover at least fifty percent (50%) of the provided front or corner side yard. (3) At least thirty percent (30%) of the front or corner side yard shall by occupied by outdoor dining areas, patios, outdoor public space, or private yards for ground floor residential uses. (4) Driveways necessary for vehicle access to the site are allowed regardless of compliance with the minimum percentages required by this subsection. c. Entry Feature Requirements: All required building entries shall include at least one of the following features: (1) An awning or canopy over the entrance that extends a minimum of five feet (5’) from the street facing building facade; (2) A recessed entrance that is recessed at least five feet (5’) from the street facing facade; (3) A covered porch that is at least five feet (5’) in depth and at least forty (40) square feet in size; or (4) A stoop that is at least two feet (2’) above sidewalk level and that includes an awning or canopy that extends at least three feet (3’) from the street facing building facade. d. Ground Floor Use Requirement For 400 South and North Temple Boulevard: When facing 400 South or North Temple Boulevard, the ground floor use area required by Chapter 21A.37 of this title shall be built to accommodate an allowed commercial, institutional, or public use. Live/work uses qualify as a commercial use for this subsection. (1) Exception: Residential uses may be permitted within the required area in lieu of the required use, if the ground floor is designed so that it can be converted to an allowed commercial use in the future. To accommodate this conversion, the shell space of the ground floor shall be built to an occupancy standard required by the adopted building code that can accommodate conversion of the interior of the space to a future permitted commercial use. (2) The following additional requirements shall apply to the ground floor space if used for residential uses: (A) The shell space shall be at least twelve feet (12’) in height; (B) The street facing facade of each ground floor residential unit shall be at least sixty percent (60%) glass; 19 (C)Each ground floor unit shall have a direct entrance from the sidewalk to the unit; (D)Each ground floor unit shall be ADA accessible; and (E) Each ground floor unit shall include a porch, patio, stoop or other entrance feature that is a minimum depth of at least five feet (5’). G. Multiple Buildings on a Single Parcel: Multiple principal buildings on a single parcel are permitted provided each principal building meets the requirements of this chapter and each principal building obtained a separate development score. New principal buildings can be located toward the rear of a parcel provided there is an existing or additional new principal building that complies with the front yard building setbacks. If one principal building receives a development score lower than other principal buildings on the site, the project shall be processed based on the lowest development score obtained. Multiple single-family detached dwellings and two-family dwellings may be located on one lot and are not required to obtain a development score. H. Conflicting Regulations: In cases where the regulations of this section conflict with another section of this zoning ordinance, this section shall take precedence except in situations where the conflict is related to the use of the property, in which case the more restrictive regulation takes precedence. In station areas within an overlay district, the overlay district shall take precedence. I. Developments Over Five Acres: 1. Intent: Large scale developments have the potential to function as a self-contained mixed use neighborhood and could have both positive and negative impacts on nearby properties. All developments over five (5) acres in size shall be designed and planned to include a series of blocks and a network of public or private streets that connects to the existing public streets in the area and to adjacent development and neighborhoods. Buildings should be oriented to this street network. Regulating block size is necessary to provide development sites that are oriented to the pedestrian while accommodating other modes of transportation. A street network is required to ensure adequate circulation for pedestrians, bicycles, automobiles and service vehicles through the site, to adjacent sites and the public streets. 2. Application: These standards are in addition to all other applicable standards. In situations where the standards in this section conflict with a standard in another section, the standard in this section shall take precedence. A separate development score is required for each new principal building in a development over five (5) acres. a. Block Layout: The intent of regulating block size and dimension is to create a development pattern where all principal buildings have their primary facades facing a street, whether public or private. All developments over five (5) acres in size shall be designed to include a series of blocks based on the standards below: 20 (1) The maximum perimeter dimension of any block shall be one thousand six hundred feet (1,600’). The maximum length of any individual block face shall be four hundred forty feet (440’). (2) The maximum perimeter dimension of a block may be increased to two thousand four hundred (2,400) linear feet, and the maximum length of any block face increased to six hundred feet (600’) provided a mid block pedestrian network is included. The mid block pedestrian network must be a minimum of twenty feet (20’) wide and include pedestrian amenities such as lighting, benches, and other similar features. The mid block walkway shall connect to at least two (2) block faces or be extended to the property line to allow for future extension. b. Connectivity to Public Streets, Sidewalks, and Bicycle Lanes: In order to ensure that the development will be fully integrated into the transit station area, that safe and efficient travelways are provided, and to limit the impact on the primary transit street and other adjacent streets, the internal circulation system, including private streets, drive aisles, sidewalks and bicycle lanes shall connect to the public street, sidewalks and bicycle lanes. All new streets shall be designed as a “complete street” defined as a street that provides dedicated space for pedestrians, bicyclists and automobiles. c. Vehicle Access: Regulating access to private property from public streets is necessary for integrating private development and public spaces. Limiting the number of access points and spacing between access points reduces areas of conflict between vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles. Maximum access widths promote a development pattern that is oriented to pedestrians and bicyclists while accommodating vehicles. (1) Access points located on public streets intended for vehicles shall be spaced a minimum of one hundred feet (100’) apart. (2) No property shall have more than one (1) vehicle access point for every two hundred (200) linear feet of frontage on a public street. (3) No access drive shall be greater than twenty four feet (24’) wide. (4) The location of all vehicle access points is subject to approval from the transportation division of the city. The standards of this section may be modified by the Transportation Division when, in the opinion of the director of the transportation division, a different design would improve the overall safety for all modes of transportation or improve the efficiency of the transportation network. d. Internal Circulation: Internal circulation systems allow for vehicles, pedestrians and bicyclists to move safely and efficiently throughout a development site. A 21 logical, simple and well designed internal circulation system that connects with adjacent circulation networks provides room for vehicles, safe walking paths for pedestrians through the parking lot and the site to the public way, and well marked routes for bicycles traveling from public spaces to bicycle parking areas within a site. All new developments over five (5) acres are required to submit an internal circulation network plan. (1) Travel Lanes That Connect Parking Areas With a Public Street: All internal vehicle travel lanes that connect internal parking areas with a public street shall be designed to meet the minimum requirements in Section 21A.44.060.A.6 of this title. (2) Design Speed: The internal circulation system shall be designed to move vehicles at speeds of twenty (20) miles per hour or less. (3) Future Access to Adjacent Properties and Rights-Of-Way: All internal drive aisles, sidewalks, and paths shall be extended to property lines to allow for future cross access to adjacent properties when the adjacent property is undeveloped and to rights-of-way. (4) Centerlines: The centerline of all internal streets shall be in line with the centerline of a street on the opposite side of an intersecting street unless the intersecting street is divided by a median. Offset streets shall be a minimum of two hundred feet (200’) apart, measured from centerline to centerline. (5) Publicly Dedicated Streets: Any street that is to be publicly dedicated shall meet the city’s minimum construction and design standards (including street lighting, park strip, street trees, etc.). (6) Pedestrian Routes: Pedestrian routes that provide safe, comfortable, clear and direct access throughout the development shall be provided. Pedestrian paths shall be bordered by residential fronts, green space, active open space, or commercial storefronts. (7) Bicycle Paths: A coordinated system of bicycle paths should be provided. (8) Approval; Modification of Standards: The internal circulation network is subject to approval from the transportation division of the city. The standards of this section may be modified by the transportation division when, in the opinion of the director of the transportation division, a different design would improve the overall safety for all modes of transportation or improve the efficiency of the transportation network. e. Parking: Parking may be provided along any private street within a development over five (5) acres. The parking shall be counted toward the applicable off street parking standard when provided on private streets. All parking areas and 22 spaces must comply with the parking lane widths identified in Section 21A.44.060.A.6 of this title. f. Open Space Area: In order to provide space for passive and active recreation, public and private gatherings, offset storm drainage due to nonpermeable surfaces and as an amenity to individual developments and their residents, employees and customers, usable open space areas are required for all new developments. (1) Required: In the core and transition areas of all station areas, a minimum of ten percent (10%) of the site, up to fifteen thousand (15,000) square feet, shall be devoted to open space areas. “Usable open space area” is defined as landscaped areas, plazas, outdoor dining areas, terraces, rooftop gardens, stormwater retention areas, and any other similar type of area. (2) Connectivity to Adjacent Open Space Area: When adjacent to public open space areas, parks, trails and pathways, open space areas on developments over five (5) acres in size are encouraged to provide access to the public open space area. g. Landscaping: All areas not occupied by buildings, plazas, terraces, patios, parking areas, or other similar feature shall be landscaped. If a project is developed in phases, only those areas in a phase that is under construction shall be landscaped. Landscaping in future phases shall be installed as those phases develop. Areas in future phases may be used as community gardens or other active open space until such time as development of that phase begins. SECTION 10. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Subsection 21A.30.020.D. That Subsection 21A.30.020.D of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Downtown Districts: D-1 Central Business District: D-1 District General Regulations) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: D. D-1 District General Regulations: The regulations established in this section apply to the D-1 District as a whole. 1. Minimum Lot Size: No minimum lot area or lot width is required, except in block corner areas as specified in Subsection E.5 of this section. 2. Yard Requirements: a. Front and corner side yards: No minimum yards are required, however, no yard shall exceed five feet (5’) except as authorized through the design review process. Such design reviews shall be subject to the requirements of Chapter 21A.59 of 23 this title. Where an entire block frontage is under one ownership, the setback for that block frontage shall not exceed twenty five feet (25’). Exceptions to this requirement may be authorized through the design review process, subject to the requirements of Chapter 21A.59 of this title. b. Interior side and rear yards: None required. 3. Interior Plazas, Atriums and Galleries: Interior plazas, atriums and galleries shall be permitted throughout the D-1 Central Business District. 4. Location of Service Areas: All loading docks, refuse disposal areas and other service activities shall be located on block interiors away from view of any public street. Exceptions to this requirement may be approved through the site plan review process when a permit applicant demonstrates that it is not feasible to accommodate these activities on the block interior. If such activities are permitted adjacent to a public street, a visual screening design approved by the zoning administrator shall be required. 5. Landscape Requirements: All buildings constructed after April 12, 1995, shall conform to the special landscape requirements applicable to the D-1 Central Business District as contained in Chapter 21A.48 of this title. 6. Mid Block Walkways: As part of the city’s plan for the downtown area, it is intended that mid block walkways be provided to facilitate pedestrian movement within the area. To delineate the public need for such walkways, the city has formulated an official plan for their location and implementation, which is on file at the planning division office. All buildings constructed after the effective date hereof within the D- 1 Central Business District shall conform to this officially adopted plan for mid block walkways. 7. Landscape Requirements for Demolition Sites: Vacant lots, resulting from demolition activities where no replacement use is proposed, shall conform to Chapter 21A.48 of this title, special landscape requirements applicable to the D-1 Central Business District. SECTION 11. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Section 21A.30.030. That Section 21A.30.030 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Downtown Districts: D-2 Downtown Support District) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: 21A.30.030: D-2 DOWNTOWN SUPPORT DISTRICT: A. Purpose Statement: The purpose of the D-2 Downtown Support Commercial District is to provide an area that fosters the development of a sustainable urban neighborhood that 24 accommodates commercial, office, residential and other uses that relate to and support the D-1 Central Business District. Development within the D-2 Downtown Support Commercial District is intended to be less intensive than that of the D-1 Central Business District, with high lot coverage and buildings placed close to the sidewalk. This district is appropriate in areas where supported by applicable master plans. Design standards are intended to promote pedestrian oriented development with a strong emphasis on a safe and attractive streetscape. B. Uses: Uses in the D-2 Downtown Support District, as specified in Section 21A.33.050, “Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Downtown Districts”, of this title, are permitted subject to the general provisions set forth in Section 21A.30.010 of this chapter and this section. C. Lot Size Requirements: No minimum lot area or lot width shall be required. D. Maximum Building Height: The maximum permitted building height shall not exceed one hundred twenty feet (120’) subject to the following review process: Buildings over sixty five feet (65’) in height are subject to design review according to the requirements of Chapter 21A.59 of this title. E. Minimum Yard Requirements: 1. Front and Corner Side Yard: There is no minimum setback. The maximum setback is ten feet (10’). 2. Interior Side Yards: No minimum side yard is required except a minimum of fifteen feet (15’) side yard is required when the side yard is adjacent to a single or two family residential zoning district. 3. Rear Yard: No minimum rear yard is required except a minimum of twenty five feet (25’) rear yard is required when the rear yard is adjacent to a single or two family residential district. 4. Buffer Yards: Any lot abutting a lot in a residential district shall conform to the buffer yard requirements of Chapter 21A.48 of this title. F. Landscape Yard Requirements: If a front or corner side yard is provided, such yard shall be maintained as a landscaped yard. The landscaped yard can take the form of outdoor dining, patio, courtyard or plaza, subject to site plan review approval. G. Mid-Block Walkways: Any new development shall provide a midblock walkway if a midblock walkway on the subject property has been identified in a master plan that has been adopted by the city. The following standards apply to the midblock walkway: 1. The midblock walkway must be a minimum of ten feet (10’) wide and include a minimum six foot (6’) wide unobstructed path. 25 2. The midblock walkway may be incorporated into the building provided it is open to the public. A sign shall be posted indicating that the public may use the walkway. H. Ground Floor Uses: To activate the ground floor of structures, retail goods establishments, retail service establishments, public service portions of businesses, restaurants, taverns/brewpubs, bar establishments, art galleries, theaters or performing art facilities are required on the ground floor of structures facing State Street, Main Street, 800 South and 900 South. I. Existing Vehicle Sales or Lease Lots: 1. Vehicle Display Area: The parking provided in the vehicle display area will not be counted as off street parking when computing maximum parking requirements and is not considered to be a surface parking lot when determining required setbacks in this section. 2. Design Standards: Structures associated with accessory uses such as but not limited to repair shops or vehicle washing do not need to meet required design standards and may exceed the maximum front and corner side yard setbacks. Primary structures that contain sales floors and auto display areas must meet all design standards and setbacks. 3. Landscaping: A landscaped yard of at least ten feet (10’) in depth is required along any portion of the street frontage of the property that is not occupied by a permanent structure. All other landscaping requirements in Chapter 21A.48 remain applicable. 4. Multiple Buildings: Vehicle sales or lease lots may have multiple buildings on a parcel subject to all buildings being associated with the use of the lot as vehicles sales or lease. SECTION 12. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Section 21A.30.040. That Section 21A.30.040 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Downtown Districts: D-3 Downtown Warehouse/Residential District) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: 21A.30.040: D-3 DOWNTOWN WAREHOUSE/RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT: A. Purpose Statement: The purpose of the D-3 Downtown Warehouse/Residential District is to provide for the reuse of existing warehouse buildings for multi-family and mixed use while also allowing for continued retail, office and warehouse use within the district. The reuse of existing buildings and the construction of new buildings are to be done as multi- family residential or mixed use developments containing retail or office uses on the lower floors and residential on the upper floors. This district is appropriate in areas where supported by applicable master plans. The standards are intended to create a unique and 26 sustainable downtown neighborhood with a strong emphasis on urban design, adaptive reuse of existing buildings, alternative forms of transportation and pedestrian orientation. B. Uses: Uses in the D-3 Downtown Warehouse/Residential District as specified in Section 21A.33.050, “Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Downtown Districts”, of this title, are permitted subject to the provisions of this chapter and other applicable provisions of this title. C. Controls Over Mixed Use: The concept of mixed use is central to the nature of the D-3 Downtown Warehouse/Residential District. To ensure that mixed use developments provide for on site compatibility as well as neighborhood compatibility, the change of land use type or an increase in floor area by twenty five percent (25%) of existing principal buildings and the construction of buildings for new uses after April 12, 1995, shall conform to the following provisions. Construction related to the rehabilitation including remodeling or modification of existing uses, or the change of use to a similar use, shall not be subject to these provisions: 1. Buildings containing commercial/office uses located above the second story shall incorporate multi-family dwellings, boarding house, bed and breakfast, or hotel uses in the amount of at least fifty percent (50%) of the total floor area of the building; 2. Commercial/office uses shall be permitted as the sole use in two-story buildings only; and 3. Commercial/office uses in buildings of three (3) stories or more without multi-family dwellings shall be allowed only as a conditional use and then only when the applicant has demonstrated that the proposed location is not suitable for multi-family residential use. D. Lot Size Requirements: No minimum lot area or lot width shall be required. E. Maximum Building Height: No building shall exceed seventy five feet (75’). Buildings taller than seventy five feet (75’) but less than ninety feet (90’) may be authorized through the design review process, provided the additional height is supported by the applicable master plan, the overall square footage of the buildings is greater than fifty percent (50%) residential use, and subject to the requirements of Chapter 21A.59 of this title. F. Mid Block Walkways: As a part of the city’s plan for the downtown area, it is intended that mid block walkways be provided to facilitate pedestrian movement within the area. To delineate the public need for such walkways, the city has formulated an official plan for their location and implementation, which is on file at the planning division office. All buildings constructed within the D-3 Downtown Warehouse/Residential District shall conform to this plan for mid block walkways. 27 G. Minimum Open Space Area: All lots containing dwelling units shall provide common open space area in the amount of twenty percent (20%) of the lot area. This common open space area may take the form of ground level plazas, interior atriums, landscape areas, roof gardens and decks on top of buildings or other such forms of open space available for the common use by residents of the property. SECTION 13. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Section 21A.30.045. That Section 21A.30.045 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Downtown Districts: D-4 Downtown Secondary Central Business District) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: 21A.30.045: D-4 DOWNTOWN SECONDARY CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT: A. Purpose Statement: The purpose of the D-4 Downtown Secondary Central Business District is to foster an environment consistent with the area’s function as a housing, entertainment, cultural, convention, business, and retail section of the city that supports the D-1 Central Business District. Development is intended to support the regional venues in the district, such as the Salt Palace Convention Center, and to be less intense than in the D-1 Central Business District. This district is appropriate in areas where supported by applicable master plans. The standards are intended to achieve established objectives for urban and historic design, pedestrian amenities, and land use control, particularly in relation to retail commercial uses. B. Uses: Uses in the D-4 Downtown Secondary Central Business District as specified in Section 21A.33.050, “Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses for Downtown Districts”, of this title, are permitted subject to the general provisions set forth in Section 21A.30.010 of this chapter. In addition, all conditional uses in the D-4 Downtown Secondary Central Business District shall be subject to design evaluation and approval by the planning commission. C. D-4 Downtown Secondary Central Business District General Regulations: 1. Minimum Lot Size: No minimum lot area or lot width is required. 2. Yard Requirements: a. Front and Corner Side Yards: No minimum yards are required, however, no yard shall exceed five feet (5’) except as authorized through the design review process. Such designs shall be subject to the requirements of Chapter 21A.59 of this title. Where an entire block frontage is under one ownership, the setback for that block frontage shall not exceed twenty five feet (25’). Exceptions to this requirement may be authorized through the design review process subject to the requirements of Chapter 21A.59 of this title. 28 b. Interior Side And Rear Yards: None required. 3. Interior Plazas, Atriums and Galleries: Interior plazas, atriums and galleries shall be permitted throughout the D-4 Downtown Secondary Central Business District. 4. Location of Service Areas: All loading docks, refuse disposal areas and other service activities shall be located on block interiors away from view of any public street. Exceptions to this requirement may be approved through the site plan review process when a permit applicant demonstrates that it is not feasible to accommodate these activities on the block interior. If such activities are permitted adjacent to a public street, a visual screening design approved by the zoning administrator shall be required. 5. Landscape Requirements: All buildings constructed after April 12, 1995, shall conform to the special landscape requirements applicable to the D-4 Downtown Secondary Central Business District as contained in Chapter 21A.48 of this title. 6. Maximum Building Height: No building shall exceed seventy five feet (75’). Buildings taller than seventy five feet (75’) but less than one hundred twenty feet (120’) may be authorized through the design review process, subject to the requirements of Chapter 21A.59 of this title. Additional height may be allowed as specified below: a. Additional Permitted Height Location: Additional height greater than one hundred twenty feet (120’) but not more than three hundred seventy five feet (375’) in height is permitted in the area bounded by: (1) The centerlines of South Temple, West Temple, 200 South, and 200 West Streets; and (2) Beginning at the Southeast Corner of Block 67, Plat ‘A’, Salt Lake City Survey, and running thence along the south line of said Block 67, N89°54’02”W 283.86 feet; thence N00°04’50”E 38.59 feet; thence N10°46’51”W 238.70 feet; thence N24°45’15”W 62.98 feet; thence S89°54’02”E 355.45 feet to the east line of said Block 67; thence along said east line S00°06’35”W 330.14 feet to the point of beginning. Contains 102,339 square feet, or 2.349 acres, more or less. 29 b. Additional Permitted Height Conditions: Buildings may exceed the one hundred twenty foot (120’) height limit to a maximum height of three hundred seventy five feet (375’), provided they conform to the standards and procedures outlined in the design review process of Chapter 21A.59 of this title and the following requirements: (1) Additional Setback: To minimize excessive building mass at higher elevations and preserve scenic views, some or all of the building mass shall be subject to additional setback, as determined appropriate through the design review process. (2) Exception: The first fifty feet (50’) of height shall not be set back from the street front more than five feet (5’) except that setbacks greater than five feet (5’) may be approved through the design review process. (3) Ground Floor Uses: See Subsection 21A.37.050.A and Section 21A.37.060, Table 21A.37.060, Subsection D of this title for this requirement. 7. Mid Block Walkways: As a part of the city’s plan for the downtown area, it is intended that mid block walkways be provided to facilitate pedestrian movement within the area. To delineate the public need for such walkways, the city has formulated an official plan for their location and implementation, which is on file at the planning division office. All buildings constructed after the effective date hereof within the D-4 Downtown Secondary Central Business District shall conform to this plan for mid block walkways. 30 8. Mid Block Streets: Developments constructing mid block streets, either privately owned with a public easement or publicly dedicated, that are desired by an applicable master plan: a. May use a portion or all of the overhead and underground right-of-way of the new mid block street as part of their developable area irrespective of lot lines, subject to design review and approval of the planning commission. b. May increase the height of the building on the remaining abutting parcel, subject to the design review process in conformance with the standards and procedures of Chapter 21A.59 of this title. SECTION 14. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Section 21A.31.010. That Section 21A.31.010 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Gateway Districts: General Provisions) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: 21A.31.010: GENERAL PROVISIONS: A. Statement of Intent: The Gateway district is intended to provide controlled and compatible settings for residential, commercial, and industrial developments, and implement the objectives of the adopted gateway development master plan through district regulations that reinforce the mixed use character of the area and encourage the development of urban neighborhoods containing supportive retail, service commercial, office, industrial uses and high density residential. B. Uses: Uses in the Gateway district as specified in Section 21A.33.060, “Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses in the Gateway District”, of this title, are permitted subject to the general provisions set forth in this section. C. Permitted Uses: The uses specified as permitted uses, in Section 21A.33.060, “Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses in the Gateway District”, of this title are permitted; provided, that they comply with all requirements of this chapter, the general standards set forth in Part IV of this title, and all other applicable requirements of this title. D. Conditional Uses: The uses specified as conditional uses in Section 21A.33.060, “Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses in the Gateway District”, of this title, shall be permitted in the Gateway district provided they are approved pursuant to the standards and procedures for conditional uses set forth in Chapter 21A.54 of this title, and comply with all other applicable requirements of this title, including the urban design evaluation and/or the design review process established in this chapter and Chapter 21A.59 of this title. E. Site Plan Review; Design Review: In certain districts, permitted uses and conditional uses have the potential for adverse impacts if located and oriented on lots without careful 31 planning. Such impacts may interfere with the use and enjoyment of adjacent property and uses. Site plan review is a process designed to address such adverse impacts and minimize them where possible. The design may also be evaluated to address elements of urban design. Site plan review, pursuant to Chapter 21A.58 of this title, for all of the Gateway district, is required to protect the local economy, maintain safe traffic conditions, maintain the environment, and assure harmonious land-use relationships between commercial uses and more sensitive land uses in affected areas. Design evaluation is necessary to implement the policies of the urban design plan as adopted by the city council. Design review shall apply to conditional uses in the Gateway district. In the Gateway district, the design review process is used to evaluate and resolve urban design. F. Mid Block Walkways: As a part of the city’s plan for the downtown area, it is intended that mid block walkways be provided to facilitate pedestrian movement within the area. To delineate the public need for such walkways, the city has formulated an official plan for their location and implementation, which is on file at the planning division office. All buildings constructed after the effective date hereof within the G-MU Gateway-Mixed Use District shall conform to this plan for mid block walkways. G. Location of Service Areas: All loading docks and other service activities shall be located on block interiors away from view of any public street. Exceptions to this requirement may be approved through the site plan review process when a permit applicant demonstrates that it is not feasible to accommodate these activities on the block interior. If such activities are permitted adjacent to a public street, a visual screening design approved by the zoning administrator shall be required. H. Impact Controls and General Restrictions: 1. Refuse Control: Refuse containers must be covered and shall be stored within completely enclosed buildings or screened in conformance with the requirements of Chapter 21A.48 of this title. For buildings existing as of April 12, 1995, this screening provision shall be required if the floor area or parking requirements are increased by twenty five percent (25%) or more by an expansion to the building or change in the type of land use. 2. Lighting: On site lighting, including parking lot lighting and illuminated signs, shall be located, directed or designed in a manner to prevent glare on adjacent properties. I. Outdoor Sales, Display and Storage: “Sales and display (outdoor)” and “storage and display (outdoor)”, as defined in Chapter 21A.62 of this title, are allowed where specifically authorized in Section 21A.33.060, “Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses in the Gateway District”, of this title. These uses shall conform to the following: 32 1. Outdoor sales and display and outdoor storage may also be permitted when part of an authorized temporary use as established in Chapter 21A.42 of this title; 2. The outdoor permanent sales or display of merchandise shall not encroach into areas of required parking; 3. The outdoor permanent sales or display of merchandise shall not be located in any required yard area within the lot; 4. The outdoor sales or display of merchandise shall not include the use of banners, pennants or strings of pennants; and 5. Outdoor storage shall be allowed only where specifically authorized in the applicable district regulation and shall be required to be fully screened with opaque fencing not to exceed eight feet (8’) in height. J. Off Street Parking and Loading: All uses in the Gateway district shall comply with the provisions governing off street parking and loading in Chapter 21A.44 of this title. K. Environmental Performance Standards: All uses in the Gateway district shall conform to the environmental performance standards in Section 21A.36.180 of this title. L. Wall or Fencing: All uses in the Gateway district shall comply with the provisions governing fences, walls and hedges in Section 21A.40.120 of this title. M. Affordable Housing: 1. Notwithstanding the minimum height requirements identified above, any buildings that have ten (10) or more residential units with at least twenty percent (20%) of the units as affordable shall be allowed to have a minimum building height of thirty feet (30’). 2. Affordable housing units within a market rate development shall be integrated throughout the project in an architectural manner. N. Accessory Uses, Buildings and Structures: Accessory uses and structures are permitted in the Gateway district subject to the requirements of this chapter, Chapter 21A.36, Subsection 21A.36.020.B, Section 21A.36.030, and Chapter 21A.40 of this title. O. Urban Design: The urban design standards are intended to foster the creation of a rich urban environment that accommodates growth and is compatible with existing buildings and uses in the area. All general development and site plans shall be designed to complement the surrounding existing contiguous (historic) development. The following design standards will provide human scale through change, contrast, intricacy, color and materials where the lower levels of buildings face public streets and sidewalks. They will also spatially define the street space in order to concentrate pedestrian activity, create a 33 clear urban character and promote visibility of commercial activities at the ground level. The standards will also encourage diversity through the use of building forms and materials, while respecting the patterns, styles and methods of construction traditionally used in the gateway area. The following urban design standards will be reviewed as part of the site plan review process, with assistance from planning division staff as necessary: 1. Architectural Character and Materials: a. A differentiated base (on a building over 45 feet high) will provide human scale through change, contrast, and intricacy in facade form, color and/or material where the lower levels of the building face the sidewalk(s) and street(s). Scaling elements such as insets and projections serve to break up flat or monotonous facades, and respond to older nearby buildings. Therefore, all buildings in the Gateway district are subject to the following standards: (1) All buildings over forty five feet (45’) in height shall be designed with a base that is differentiated from the remainder of the building. The base shall be between one and three (3) stories in height, be visible from pedestrian view, and appropriately scaled to the surrounding contiguous historic buildings. The base shall include fenestration that distinguishes the lower from upper floors. Insets and/or projections are encouraged. (2) All new buildings in the Gateway district shall have a minimum of seventy percent (70%) of the exterior material (excluding windows) be brick, masonry, textured or patterned concrete and/or cut stone. With the exception of minor building elements (e.g., soffit, fascia) the following materials are allowed only through the design review process: EIFS, tilt-up concrete panels, corrugated metal, vinyl and aluminum siding, and other materials. (3) All buildings which have been altered over seventy five percent (75%) on the exterior facade shall comply with the exterior material requirement for new construction. Buildings older than fifty (50) years are exempt from this requirement if alterations are consistent with the existing architecture. (4) Two-dimensional curtain wall veneer of glass, spandrel glass or metal as a primary building material is prohibited. The fenestration of all new construction shall be three-dimensional (e.g., recessed windows, protruding cornice, etc.). b. The climate in Salt Lake City is such that in the summer months shade is preferred, and in the winter months protection from snow is preferred. By providing the pedestrian with a sidewalk that is enjoyable to use year round, a pedestrian oriented neighborhood is encouraged. Therefore, new construction in the gateway area is subject to the following standards: 34 (1) Arcades are permitted in the Gateway district, but where an arcade extends over the public way, a revocable permit is required. Where an arcade is on private property facing the street, the maximum setback for the building shall be measured to the supporting beams for the arcade or the facade of the upper floors, not the facade of the arcade level. (2) Awnings and/or marquees, with or without signage, are required over entry doors which are set back from the property line and may be allowed, under revocable permit, when an entry is at a property line. (3) Awnings, with or without signage, are permitted over ground level windows. Where awnings extend out over the public way, a revocable permit is required. 2. Windows and Building Fenestration: a. Buildings whose exteriors are smooth, and do not provide any three-dimensional details or fenestration are not appropriate in the Gateway district. Recessed windows will eliminate flat, sterile elevations. Highly reflective materials are distracting, and focus attention away from the positive qualities of the Gateway district. Therefore, all buildings in the Gateway district are subject to the following standards: (1) Buildings with completely smooth exterior surfaces shall not be permitted, all new construction shall have three-dimensional details on the exterior that includes cornices, windowsills, headers and similar features. (2) All windows shall be recessed from the exterior wall a minimum of three inches (3”). Bay windows, projecting windows, and balcony doors are exempt from this requirement. (3) The reflectivity of the glass used in the windows shall be limited to eighteen percent (18%) as defined by the ASTA standard. 3. Entrance and Visual Access: a. The intent in the Gateway district is to encourage pedestrian activity between the public street/sidewalk and buildings. Sidewalks shall provide continuous, uninterrupted interest to the pedestrian by providing visual interest and/or amenities. The gateway environment will benefit with increased pedestrian activity; this activity will only occur if opportunities are provided that make walking to a destination a preferred and an enjoyable pursuit. The use of blank building facade walls is discouraged. Therefore, all buildings in the gateway area are subject to the following standards: 35 (1) Minimum First Floor Glass: The first floor elevation facing a street of all new buildings or buildings in which the property owner is modifying the size of windows on the front facade within the Gateway district shall not have less than forty percent (40%) glass surfaces. All first floor glass shall be nonreflective. Display windows that are three-dimensional and are at least two feet (2’) deep are permitted and may be counted toward the forty percent (40%) glass requirement. Exceptions to this requirement may be authorized through the design review process, subject to the requirements of Chapter 21A.59 of this title, and the review and approval of the planning commission. The planning director may approve a modification to this requirement if the planning director finds: (A) The requirement would negatively impact the historic character of the building, or (B) The requirement would negatively impact the structural stability of the building. (C) The ground level of the building is occupied by residential uses, in which case the forty percent (40%) glass requirement may be reduced to twenty five percent (25%). Appeal of administrative decision is to the planning commission. (2) Facades: Provide at least one operable building entrance per elevation that faces a public street. Buildings that face multiple streets are only required to have one door on either street, if the facades for both streets meet the forty percent (40%) glass requirement. (3) Maximum Length: The maximum length of any blank wall uninterrupted by windows, doors, art or architectural detailing at the first floor level shall be fifteen feet (15’). (4) Screening: All building equipment and service areas, including on-grade and roof mechanical equipment and transformers that are readily visible from the public right-of-way, shall be screened from public view. These elements shall be sited to minimize their visibility and impact, or enclosed as to appear to be an integral part of the architectural design of the building. 4. Building Lines and Front Area Requirements: a. A continuity of building frontage adjacent and parallel to the street encourages a more active involvement between building uses and pedestrians. Leftover or ambiguous open space that has no apparent use or sense of place will not contribute positively to an active street life. Therefore, all buildings in the Gateway district are subject to the following standard: 36 (1) The majority of the ground level facade of a building shall be placed parallel, and not at an angle, to the street. 5. Public Amenities and Public Art: a. Amenities and works of art enhance quality of life as well as visual interest. Public amenities and public art encourage pedestrian activity and contribute to the pedestrian experience. A cohesive, unified lighting and amenity policy will help give the Gateway district its own distinctive identity. Therefore, public amenities and public art are subject to the following standards: (1) Sidewalks and street lamps installed in the public right-of-way shall be of the type specified in the sidewalk/street lighting policy document. (2) Public art (which may include artists’ work integrated into the design of the building and landscaping, sculpture, painting, murals, glass, mixed media or work by artisans), that is accessible or directly viewable to the general public shall be included in all projects requiring design review approval for a site or design standard. The plan to incorporate public art shall be reviewed by the Salt Lake Art Design Board. 6. Design Review Approval: A modification to the urban design provisions of this section may be granted through the design review process, subject to conformance with the standards and procedures of Chapter 21A.59 of this title. P. Definitions: For the purposes of this section, the following terms shall have the following meanings: AFFORDABLE HOUSING: Housing which persons of income below the County area median are able to afford. See definitions of moderate income, low income and very low income. BLOCK FACE: Structures that appear on one of four (4) sides of a block, the structures along a street that are between two (2) other streets. CONTIGUOUS: Next in sequence, touching or connected throughout an unbroken sequence. FACADE: The front of a building, or any other “face” of a building on a street or courtyard given special architectural treatment. FENESTRATION: The arrangement, proportioning and design of windows and doors in a building, an opening in a surface. LOW INCOME: Between fifty percent (50%) and eighty percent (80%) of the County area median income. 37 MASSING: The principal part or main body of matter, bulk. MODERATE INCOME: Between eighty percent (80%) and one hundred twenty percent (120%) of the County area median income. PROPORTION: The relation of one part to another or to the whole with respect to magnitude, quantity or degree. PROPORTIONAL: Corresponding in size, degree or intensity, having the same or a constant ratio. REMODEL: To alter the structure of, remake. SCALE: A proportion between two (2) sets of dimensions. STREETSCAPE: A general description of all structures along a street frontage that may include: multiple buildings, benches, works of art, and landscaping. VERY LOW INCOME: At or below fifty percent (50%) of the County area median income. SECTION 15. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Section 21A.31.020. That Section 21A.31.020 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Gateway Districts: G-MU Gateway- Mixed Use District) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: 21A.31.020: G-MU GATEWAY-MIXED USE DISTRICT: A. Purpose Statement: The G-MU Gateway-Mixed Use District is intended to implement the objectives of the adopted gateway development master plan and encourage the mixture of residential, commercial and assembly uses within an urban neighborhood atmosphere. The 200 South corridor is intended to encourage commercial development on an urban scale and the 500 West corridor is intended to be a primary residential corridor from North Temple to 400 South. Development in this district is intended to create an urban neighborhood that provides employment and economic development opportunities that are oriented toward the pedestrian with a strong emphasis on a safe and attractive streetscape. The standards are intended to achieve established objectives for urban and historic design, pedestrian amenities and land use regulation. B. Uses: Uses in the G-MU Gateway-Mixed Use District as specified in Section 21A.33.060, “Table of Permitted and Conditional Uses in the Gateway District”, of this title are permitted subject to the general provisions set forth in Section 21A.31.010 of this chapter and this section. 38 C. Planned Development Review: All new construction of principal buildings, uses, or additions that increase the floor area and/or parking requirement by twenty five percent (25%) in the G-MU Gateway-Mixed Use District may be approved only as a planned development in conformance with the provisions of Chapter 21A.55 of this title. D. Special Provisions: 1. Commercial Uses, 200 South: All buildings fronting 200 South shall have commercial uses that may include retail goods/service establishments, offices, restaurants, art galleries, motion picture theaters or performing arts facilities shall be provided on the first floor adjacent to the front or corner side lot line. The facades of such first floor shall be compatible and consistent with the associated retail or office portion of the building and other retail uses in the area. 2. Residential Units, 500 West: Buildings fronting on 500 West shall be required to have residential units occupying a minimum of fifty percent (50%) of the structure’s gross square footage. 3. Mid Block Street Development: Developments constructing mid block streets, either privately owned with a public easement or publicly dedicated, that are desired by an applicable master plan: a. May use a portion or all of the overhead and underground right-of-way of the new mid block street as part of their developable area irrespective of lot lines, subject to design evaluation and approval of the planning commission. b. May increase the height of the building on the remaining abutting parcel, subject to conformance with the standards and procedures of Chapter 21A.59, “Design Review”, of this title. 4. Design Reviews: A modification to the special provisions of this section may be granted through the design review process, subject to conformance with the standards and procedures of Chapter 21A.59 of this title. E. Building Height: The minimum building height shall be forty five feet (45’) and the 200 South Street corridor shall have a minimum height of twenty five feet (25’). The maximum building height shall not exceed seventy five feet (75’) except buildings with nonflat roofs (e.g., pitched, shed, mansard, gabled or hipped roofs) may be allowed, up to a maximum of ninety feet (90’) (subject to subsection I of this section). The additional building height may incorporate habitable space, but not for parking structures. 1. Design Review: A modification to the minimum building height or to the maximum building height (up to 120 feet) provisions of this section may be granted through the design review process, subject to conformance with the standards and procedures of Chapter 21A.59 of this title, and subject to compliance to the applicable master plan. 39 2. Height Exceptions: Spires, tower, or decorative noninhabitable elements shall have a maximum height of ninety feet (90’) and with design review approval may exceed the maximum height, subject to conformance with the standards and procedures of Chapter 21A.59 of this title. F. Minimum Lot Area and Lot Width: None required. G. Minimum Yard Requirements: No minimum setback requirements. There is not a maximum front yard or corner side yard setback except that a minimum of twenty five percent (25%) of the length of the facade of a principal building shall be set back no farther than five feet (5’) from the street right-of-way line. H. Signs: Signs shall be allowed in the Gateway district in accordance with provisions of Chapter 21A.46 of this title. I. Affordable Housing: Notwithstanding the maximum height requirements identified above, any buildings that have at least ten (10) or more residential units with at least twenty percent (20%) of the units as affordable shall be allowed a maximum building height of ninety feet (90’). The affordable units shall be integrated throughout the project in an architectural manner. SECTION 16. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Subsection 21A.32.130.E. That Subsection 21A.32.130.E of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Special Purpose Districts: MU Mixed Use District: Minimum Yard Area Requirements) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: E. Minimum Yard Area Requirements: 1. Single-Family Detached, Single-Family Attached, Two-Family, and Twin Home Dwellings: a. Front Yard: Ten feet (10’). b. Corner Side Yard: Ten feet (10’). c. Interior Side Yard: (1) Corner lots: Four feet (4’). (2) Interior lots: (A) Single-family attached: No yard is required, however if one is provided it 40 shall not be less than four feet (4’). (B) Single-family detached, two-family and twin home dwellings: Four feet (4’) on one side and ten (10) on the other. d. Rear Yard: Twenty five percent (25%) of the lot depth, but need not be more than twenty feet (20’). 2. Multi-Family Dwellings, Including Mixed Use Buildings With Less Than Twenty Five Percent Nonresidential Uses: a. Front Yard: Ten feet (10’) minimum. b. Corner Side Yard: Ten feet (10’). c. Interior Side Yard: Ten feet (10’). d. Rear Yard: Twenty five percent (25%) of the lot depth, but need not exceed thirty feet (30’), however, if one hundred percent (100%) of the off street parking is provided within the principal building and/or underground, the minimum required rear yard shall be fifteen feet (15’). 3. Nonresidential Development, Including Mixed Uses With Greater Than Twenty Five Percent Nonresidential Uses: a. Front Yard: Ten feet (10’) minimum. b. Corner Side Yard: Ten feet (10’). c. Interior Side Yard: No setback is required. d. Rear Yard: Twenty five percent (25%) of lot depth, but need not exceed thirty feet (30’). 4. Legally Existing Lots: Lots legally existing on the effective date hereof, April 7, 1998, shall be considered legal conforming lots. 5. Additions: For additions to buildings legally existing on the effective date hereof, required yards shall be no greater than the established setback line. 6. Maximum Setback: A maximum setback is required for at least seventy five percent (75%) of the building facade. The maximum setback is twenty feet (20’). Exceptions to this requirement may be authorized through the design review process, subject to the requirements of Chapter 21A.59 of this title, and the review and approval of the planning commission. The planning director, in consultation with the transportation director, may modify this requirement if the adjacent public sidewalk is substandard 41 and the resulting modification to the setback results in a more efficient public sidewalk. The planning director may waive this requirement for any addition, expansion, or intensification, which increases the floor area or parking requirement by less than fifty percent (50%) if the planning director finds the following: a. The architecture of the addition is compatible with the architecture of the original structure or the surrounding architecture. b. The addition is not part of a series of incremental additions intended to subvert the intent of the ordinance. Appeal of administrative decision is to the planning commission. SECTION 17. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Subsection 21A.36.161.B.13. That Subsection 21A.36.161.B.13 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: General Provisions: Mobile Food Courts: Qualifying Provisions) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: 13. Hard surface paving at the vehicular entrance to the mobile food court, and for each individual mobile food business is required. Alternatives to asphalt and cement may be approved as part of the conditional use process if the applicant is able to demonstrate that the alternative will not result in the accumulation of mud or debris on the city right-of-way. SECTION 18. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Subsection 21A.36.200.I. That Subsection 21A.36.200.I of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: General Provisions: Qualifying Provisions for an Urban Farm: Parking) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: I. Parking: Parking for an urban farm shall comply with the provisions governing off street parking and loading in Chapter 21A.44 of this title. All vehicular circulation, staging, and parking shall be on a hard surface. SECTION 19. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Section 21A.37.050. That Section 21A.37.050 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Design Standards: Design Standards Defined) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: 21A.37.050: DESIGN STANDARDS DEFINED: 42 The design standards in this chapter are defined as follows. Each design standard includes a specific definition of the standard and may include a graphic that is intended to help further explain the standard, however the definition supersedes any conflict between it and a graphic. A. Ground Floor Use and Visual Interest: This standard’s purpose is to increase the amount of active uses and/or visual interest on the ground floor of a building. There are two (2) options for achieving this, one dealing solely with the amount of ground floor use, and the other combining a lesser amount of ground floor use with increased visual interest in the building facade’s design. 1. Ground Floor Use Only: This option requires that on the ground floor of a new principal building, a permitted or conditional use other than parking shall occupy a minimum portion of the length of any street facing building facade according to Section 21A.37.060, Table 21A.37.060 of this chapter. All portions of such ground floor spaces shall extend a minimum of twenty five feet (25’) into the building. Parking may be located behind these spaces. a. For single-family attached uses, the required use depth may be reduced to ten feet (10’). b. For single-family or two-family uses, garages occupying up to fifty percent (50%) of the width of the ground floor building facade are exempt from this requirement. c. For all other uses, vehicle entry and exit ways necessary for access to parking are exempt from this requirement. Such accessways shall not exceed thirty feet (30’) in width. Individual dwelling unit garages do not qualify for this exemption. 2. Ground Floor Use and Visual Interest: This option allows for some flexibility in the amount of required ground floor use, but in return requires additional design requirements for the purpose of creating increased visual interest and pedestrian activity where the lower levels of buildings face streets or sidewalks. An applicant utilizing this option must proceed through the design review process for review of the project for determination of the project’s compliance with those standards, and in addition, whether it contributes to increased visual interest through a combination of increased building material variety, architectural features, facade changes, art, and colors; and, increased pedestrian activity through permeability between the building and the adjacent public realm using niches, bays, gateways, porches, colonnades, stairs or other similar features to facilitate pedestrian interaction with the building. B. Building Materials: 1. Ground Floor Building Materials: Other than windows and doors, a minimum amount of the ground floor facade’s wall area of any street facing facade shall be clad in durable materials according to Section 21A.37.060, Table 21A.37.060 of this chapter. Durable materials include stone, brick, masonry, textured or patterned concrete, and 43 fiber cement board. Other materials may be used for the remainder of the ground floor facade adjacent to a street. Other materials proposed to satisfy the durable requirement may be approved at the discretion of the planning director if it is found that the proposed material is durable and is appropriate for the ground floor of a structure. 2. Upper Floor Building Materials: Floors above the ground floor level shall include durable materials on a minimum amount of any street facing building facade of those additional floors according to Section 21A.37.060, Table 21A.37.060 of this chapter. Windows and doors are not included in that minimum amount. Durable materials include stone, brick, masonry, textured or patterned concrete, and fiber cement board. Other materials may be approved at the discretion of the planning director if it is found that the proposed material is durable and is appropriate for the upper floor of a structure. C. Glass: 1. Ground Floor Glass: The ground floor building elevation of all new buildings facing a street, and all new ground floor additions facing a street, shall have a minimum amount of glass, or within a specified percentage range, between three feet (3’) and eight feet (8’) above grade according to Section 21A.37.060, Table 21A.37.060 of this chapter. All ground floor glass shall allow unhampered and unobstructed visibility into the building for a depth of at least five feet (5’), excluding any glass etching and window signs when installed and permitted in accordance with Chapter 21A.46, “Signs”, of this title. The planning director may approve a modification to ground floor glass requirements if the planning director finds: a. The requirement would negatively affect the historic character of an existing building; b. The requirement would negatively affect the structural stability of an existing building; or c. The ground level of the building is occupied by residential uses that face the street, in which case the specified minimum glass requirement may be reduced by fifteen percent (15%). 2. Upper Floor Glass: Above the first floor of any multi-story building, the surface area of the facade of each floor facing a street must contain a minimum amount of glass according to Section 21A.37.060, Table 21A.37.060 of this chapter. D. Building Entrances: At least one operable building entrance on the ground floor is required for every street facing facade. Additional operable building entrances shall be required, at a minimum, at each specified length of street facing building facade according to Section 21A.37.060, Table 21A.37.060 of this chapter. The center of each additional entrance shall be located within six feet (6’) either direction of the specified 44 location. Each ground floor nonresidential leasable space facing a street shall have an operable entrance facing that street and a walkway to the nearest sidewalk. Corner entrances, when facing a street and located at approximately a forty five degree (45°) angle to the two (2) adjacent building facades (chamfered corner), may count as an entrance for both of the adjacent facades. E. Maximum Length of Blank Wall: The maximum length of any blank wall uninterrupted by windows, doors, art or architectural detailing at the ground floor level along any street facing facade shall be as specified according to Section 21A.37.060, Table 21A.37.060 of this chapter. Changes in plane, texture, materials, scale of materials, patterns, art, or other architectural detailing are acceptable methods to create variety and scale. This shall include architectural features such as bay windows, recessed or projected entrances or windows, balconies, cornices, columns, or other similar architectural features. The architectural feature shall be either recessed a minimum of twelve inches (12”) or projected a minimum of twelve inches (12”). F. Maximum Length of Street Facing Facades: No street facing building wall may be longer than specified along a street line according to Section 21A.37.060, Table 21A.37.060 of this chapter. A minimum of twenty feet (20’) is required between separate buildings when multiple buildings are placed on a single parcel according to Subsection 21A.36.010.B, “One Principal Building Per Lot”, of this title. The space between buildings shall include a pedestrian walkway at least five feet (5’) wide. G. Upper Floor Step Back: 1. For street facing facades the first full floor, and all additional floors, above thirty feet (30’) in height from average finished grade shall be stepped back a minimum horizontal distance from the front line of building, according to Section 21A.37.060, Table 21A.37.060 of this chapter. An alternative to this street facing facade step back requirement may be utilized for buildings limited to forty five feet (45’) or less in height by the zoning ordinance: those buildings may provide a four foot (4’) minimum depth canopy, roof structure, or balcony that extends from the face of the building toward the street at a height of between twelve feet (12’) and fifteen feet (15’) above the adjacent sidewalk. Such extension(s) shall extend horizontally parallel to the street for a minimum of fifty percent (50%) of the face of the building and may encroach into a setback as permitted per Section 21A.36.020, Table 21A.36.020.B, “Obstructions in Required Yards”, of this title. 2. For facades facing single- or two-family residential districts, a public trail or public open space the first full floor, and all additional floors, above thirty feet (30’) in height from average finished grade shall be stepped back a minimum horizontal distance from the corresponding required yard setback (building line) according to Section 21A.37.060, Table 21A.37.060 of this chapter. H. Exterior Lighting: All exterior lighting shall be shielded and directed down to prevent light trespass onto adjacent properties. Exterior lighting shall not strobe, flash or flicker. 45 I. Parking Lot Lighting: If a parking lot/structure is adjacent to a residential zoning district or land use, any poles for the parking lot/structure security lighting are limited to sixteen feet (16’) in height and the globe must be shielded and the lighting directed down to minimize light encroachment onto adjacent residential properties or into upper level residential units in multi-story buildings. Lightproof fencing is required adjacent to residential properties. J. Screening of Mechanical Equipment: All mechanical equipment for a building shall be screened from public view and sited to minimize their visibility and impact. Examples of siting include on the roof, enclosed or otherwise integrated into the architectural design of the building, or in a rear or side yard area subject to yard location restrictions found in Section 21A.36.020, Table 21A.36.020.B, “Obstructions in Required Yards”, of this title. K. Screening of Service Areas: Service areas, loading docks, refuse containers and similar areas shall be fully screened from public view. All screening enclosures viewable from the street shall be either incorporated into the building architecture or shall incorporate building materials and detailing compatible with the building being served. All screening devices shall be a minimum of one foot (1’) higher than the object being screened, and in the case of fences and/or masonry walls the height shall not exceed eight feet (8’). Dumpsters must be located a minimum of twenty five feet (25’) from any building on an adjacent lot that contains a residential dwelling or be located inside of an enclosed building or structure. L. Ground Floor Residential Entrances for Single-Family Dwellings: For the zoning districts listed in Section 21A.37.060, Table 21A.37.060 of this chapter all attached single-family dwellings, townhomes, row houses, and other similar single-family housing types located on the ground floor shall have a primary entrance facing the street for each unit adjacent to a street. Units may have a primary entrance located on a courtyard, mid block walkway, or other similar area if the street facing facades also have a primary entrance. M. Residential Character in RB District: 1. All roofs shall be pitched and of a hip or gable design except additions or expansions to existing buildings may be of the same roof design as the original building; 2. The remodeling of residential buildings for retail or office use shall be allowed only if the residential character of the exterior is maintained; 3. The front building elevation shall contain not more than fifty percent (50%) glass; 4. Signs shall conform with special sign regulations of Chapter 21A.46, “Signs”, of this title; 5. Building orientation shall be to the front or corner side yard; and 46 6. Building additions shall consist of materials, color and exterior building design consistent with the existing structure, unless the entire structure is resurfaced. N. Primary Entrance Design in SNB District: Primary entrance design shall consist of at least two (2) of the following design elements at the primary entrance, so that the primary entrance is architecturally prominent and clearly visible from the abutting street. 1. Architectural details such as arches, friezes, tile work, canopies, or awnings. 2. Integral planters or wing walls that incorporate landscape or seating. 3. Enhanced exterior light fixtures such as wall sconces, light coves with concealed light sources, or decorative pedestal lights. 4. A repeating pattern of pilasters projecting from the facade wall by a minimum of eight inches (8”) or architectural or decorative columns. 5. Recessed entrances that include a minimum step back of two feet (2’) from the primary facade and that include glass on the sidewalls. SECTION 20. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Section 21A.37.060. That Section 21A.37.060 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Design Standards: Design Standards Required in Each Zoning District) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: 21A.37.060: DESIGN STANDARDS REQUIRED IN EACH ZONING DISTRICT: This section identifies each design standard and to which zoning districts the standard applies. If a box is checked, that standard is required. If a box is not checked, it is not required. If a specific dimension or detail of a design standard differs among zoning districts or differs from the definition, it will be indicated within the box. In cases when a dimension in this table conflicts with a dimension in the definition, the dimensions listed in the table supersede those in the definition. TABLE 21A.37.060 A. Residential Districts: Standard (Code Section) District RMF- 30 RMF- 35 RMF- 45 RMF- 75 RB R- MU- 35 R- MU- 45 R- MU RO Ground floor use (%) (21A.37.050.A.1) 75 75 47 Standard (Code Section) District RMF- 30 RMF- 35 RMF- 45 RMF- 75 RB R- MU- 35 R- MU- 45 R- MU RO Ground floor use + visual interest (%) (21A.37.050.A.2) Building materials: ground floor (%) (21A.37.050.B.1) 80 80 Building materials: upper floors (%) (21A.37.050.B.2) Glass: ground floor (%) (21A.37.050.C.1) 60 60 40 Glass: upper floors (%) (21A.37.050.C.2) Building entrances (feet) (21A.37.050.D) 75 75 X Blank wall: maximum length (feet) (21A.37.050.E) 15 15 15 Street facing facade: maximum length (feet) (21A.37.050.F) Upper floor step back (feet) (21A.37.050.G) 10 Lighting: exterior (21A.37.050.H) Lighting: parking lot (21A.37.050.I) X X Screening of mechanical equipment (21A.37.050.J) X X X Screening of service areas (21A.37.050.K) X X X Ground floor residential entrances (21A.37.050.L) Parking garages or structures (21A.44.060.A.15.) 48 Standard (Code Section) District RMF- 30 RMF- 35 RMF- 45 RMF- 75 RB R- MU- 35 R- MU- 45 R- MU RO Residential character in RB Residential/Business District (21A.37.050.N) X B. Commercial Districts: Standard (Code Section) District SNB CN CB CS CC CSHBD CG TSA Ground floor use (%) (21A.37.050A.1) 80 Ground floor use + visual interest (%) (21A.37.050.A.2) 60/25 Building materials: ground floor (%) (21A.37.050.B.1) 90 Building materials: upper floors (%) (21A.37.050.B.2) 60 Glass: ground floor (%) (21A.37.050.C.1) 40 40 40 40 60 Glass: upper floors (%) (21A.37.050.C.2) Building entrances (feet) (21A.37.050.D) X X X X X X X 40 Blank wall: maximum length (feet) (21A.37.050.E) 15 15 15 15 15 Street facing facade: maximum length (feet) (21A.37.050.F) 200 49 Standard (Code Section) District SNB CN CB CS CC CSHBD CG TSA Upper floor step back (feet) (21A.37.050.G) 15 Lighting: exterior (21A.37.050.H) X X X Lighting: parking lot (21A.37.050.I) X X X X X X X X Screening of mechanical equipment (21A.37.050.J) X X X X X Screening of service areas (21A.37.050.K) X X X X Ground floor residential entrances (21A.37.050.L) X Parking garages or structures (21A.44.060.A.15) Primary entrance design SNB Small Neighborhood Business District (21A.37.050.O) X C. Manufacturing Districts: Standard (Code Section) District M-1 M-2 Ground floor use (%) (21A.37.050.A.1) Ground floor use + visual interest (%) (21A.37.050.A.2) Building materials: ground floor (%) (21A.37.050.B.1) Building materials: upper floors (%) (21A.37.050.B.2) Glass: ground floor (%) (21A.37.050.C.1) Glass: upper floors (%) (21A.37.050.C.2) 50 Standard (Code Section) District M-1 M-2 Building entrances (feet) (21A.37.050.D) Blank wall: maximum length (feet) (21A.37.050.E) Street facing facade: maximum length (feet) (21A.37.050.F) Upper floor step back (feet) (21A.37.050.G) Lighting: exterior (21A.37.050.H) X X Lighting: parking lot (21A.37.050.I) X X Screening of mechanical equipment (21A.37.050.J) Screening of service areas (21A.37.050.K) Ground floor residential entrances (21A.37.050.L) Parking garages or structures (21A.44.060.A.15) D. Downtown Districts: Standard (Code Section) District D-1 D-2 D- 3 D- 4 Ground floor use (%) (21A.37.050.A.1) 75 753 Ground floor use + visual interest (%) (21A.37.050.A.2) 60/25 Building materials: ground floor (%) (21A.37.050.B.1) 80 70 2 Building materials: upper floors (%) (21A.37.050.B.2) 50 70 2 Glass: ground floor (%) (21A.37.050.C.1) 40/60 1 40 40 40 Glass: upper floors (%) (21A.37.050.C.2) 25 Building entrances (feet) (21A.37.050.D) 50 Blank wall: maximum length (feet) (21A.37.050.E) 15 Street facing facade: maximum length (feet) (21A.37.050.F) 200 Upper floor step back (feet) (21A.37.050.G) 51 Standard (Code Section) District D-1 D-2 D- 3 D- 4 Lighting: exterior (21A.37.050.H) X Lighting: parking lot (21A.37.050.I) X Screening of mechanical equipment (21A.37.050.J) X Screening of service areas (21A.37.050K) X Ground floor residential entrances (21A.37.050.L) Parking garages or structures (21A.44.060.A.15) X Notes: 1. Minimum requirement is 60 percent when project is within the Main Street retail core. 2. In the D-3 Downtown Warehouse/Residential District this percentage applies to all sides of the building, not just the front or street facing facade. 3. This percentage applies only as a requirement as noted in Subsection 21A.30.045.C.7.b of this title for projects that are seeking conditional height. E. Special Purpose Districts: Standard (Code Section) District RP BP FP AG AG -2 AG -5 AG -20 PL PL- 2 I UI OS NOS MH EI MU Ground floor use (%) (21A.37.050.A.1) Ground floor use + visual interest (%) (21A.37.050.A.2) Building materials: ground floor (%) (21A.37.050.B.1) Building materials: upper floors (%) (21A.37.050.B.2) 52 Standard (Code Section) District RP BP FP AG AG -2 AG -5 AG -20 PL PL- 2 I UI OS NOS MH EI MU Glass: ground floor (%) (21A.37.050.C.1) 40- 70 Glass: upper floors (%) (21A.37.050.C.2) Building entrances (feet) (21A.37.050.D) X Blank wall: maximum length (feet) (21A.37.050.E) 15 Street facing facade: maximum length (feet) (21A.37.050.F) Upper floor step back (feet) (21A.37.050.G) Lighting: exterior (21A.37.050.H) X X X Lighting: parking lot (21A.37.050.I) X X Screening of mechanical equipment (21A.37.050.J) X Screening of service areas (21A.37.050.K) X Ground floor residential entrances (21A.37.050.L) Parking garages or structures (21A.44.060.A.15) 53 SECTION 21. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Section 21A.38.070. That Section 21A.38.070 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Nonconforming Uses and Noncomplying Structures: Legal Conforming Single-Family Detached Dwellings, Two-Family Dwellings, and Twin Homes) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: 21A.38.070: LEGAL CONFORMING SINGLE-FAMILY DETACHED DWELLINGS, TWO-FAMILY DWELLINGS, AND TWIN HOMES: Any legally existing single-family detached dwelling, two-family dwelling, or twin home located in a zoning district that does not allow these uses shall be considered legal conforming. Legal conforming status shall authorize replacement of the single-family detached dwelling, two-family dwelling, or twin home structure to the extent of the original footprint. A. Alterations, Additions or Extensions or Replacement Structures Greater Than the Original Footprint: In zoning districts other than M-1 and M-2, which do not allow detached single-family dwelling units, two-family dwelling units or twin homes, any alterations, extensions/additions or the replacement of the structure may exceed the original footprint by twenty five percent (25%) of the existing structure subject to the following standards: 1. Any alterations, extensions/additions or the replacement structure shall not project into a required yard beyond any encroachment established by the structure being replaced. 2. Any alterations, additions or extensions beyond the original footprint which are noncomplying are subject to special exception standards of Subsection 21A.52.030.A.15 of this title. 3. All replacement structures in nonresidential zones are subject to the provisions of Section 21A.36.190, “Residential Building Standards for Legal Conforming Single- Family Detached Dwellings, Two-Family Dwellings and Twin Homes in Nonresidential Zoning Districts”, of this title. Any alterations, additions or extensions or replacement structures which exceed twenty five percent (25%) of the original footprint, or alterations, additions or extensions or replacement of a single-family detached dwelling, two-family dwelling or twin home in an M-1 or M-2 zoning district may be allowed as a conditional use subject to the provisions of Chapter 21A.54 of this title. B. Off Street Parking: When replacing a legal conforming single-family detached dwelling, two-family dwelling or twin home, the number of new parking stalls 54 provided shall be in accordance with the parking spaces required by Section 21A.44.040. SECTION 22. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Section 21A.40.065. That Section 21A.40.065 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Accessory Uses, Buildings and Structures: Outdoor Dining) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: 21A.40.065: OUTDOOR DINING: “Outdoor dining”, as defined in Chapter 21A.62 of this title, shall be allowed within the buildable lot area, in all zoning districts where such uses are allowed, as either a permitted or conditional use. Outdoor dining in the public way shall be permitted subject to all city requirements. Outdoor dining is allowed within the required landscaped yard or buffer area, in commercial and manufacturing zoning districts where such uses are allowed. Outdoor dining is allowed in the RB, CN, MU, R-MU, RMU-35 and the RMU-45 zones and for nonconforming restaurants and similar uses that serve food or drinks through the provisions of the special exception process (see Chapter 21A.52 of this title). All outdoor dining shall be subject to the following conditions: A. All requirements of Chapter 21A.48 and Section 21A.36.020 of this title are met. B. All required business, health and other regulatory licenses for the outdoor dining have been secured. C. A detailed site plan demonstrating the following: 1. All the proposed outdoor dining activities will be conducted on private property owned or otherwise controlled by the applicant and that none of the activities will occur on any publicly owned rights-of-way unless separate approval for the use of any such public rights-of-way has been obtained from the city; 2. The location of any paving, landscaping, planters, fencing, canopies, umbrellas or other table covers or barriers surrounding the area; 3. The proposed outdoor dining will not impede pedestrian or vehicular traffic; and 4. The main entry has a control point as required by state liquor laws. D. The proposed outdoor dining complies with all conditions pertaining to any existing variances, conditional uses or other approvals granted for property. 55 E. Live music will not be performed nor loudspeakers played in the outdoor dining area unless the decibel level is within conformance with the Salt Lake City noise control ordinance, Title 9, Chapter 9.28 of this Code. F. Smoking shall be prohibited within the outdoor dining area and within twenty five feet (25’) of the outdoor dining area. G. The proposed outdoor dining complies with the environmental performance standards as stated in Section 21A.36.180 of this title. H. Outdoor dining shall be located in areas where such use is likely to have the least adverse impacts on adjacent properties. SECTION 23. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Chapter 21A.44. That Chapter 21A.44 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Off Street Parking, Mobility and Loading) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: 21A.44.010: Purpose 21A.44.020: Applicability 21A.44.030: Calculation of Parking 21A.44.040: Required Off Street Parking 21A.44.050: Alternatives to Minimum and Maximum Parking Calculations 21A.44.060: Parking Location and Design 21A.44.070: Off Street Loading Areas 21A.44.080: Drive-Through Facilities and Vehicle Stacking Areas 21A.44.090: Modifications to Parking Areas 21A.44.100: Use and Maintenance 21A.44.110: Nonconforming Parking and Loading Facilities 21A.44.010: PURPOSE: This chapter is intended to require that new development and redevelopment projects provide off street parking and loading facilities in proportion to the parking, loading, and transportation demands of the buildings and land uses included in those projects. This chapter is also intended to help protect the public health, safety, and general welfare by: A. Avoiding and mitigating traffic congestion and reducing the financial burden on taxpayer funded roadways; B. Providing necessary access for service and emergency vehicles; 56 C. Providing for safe and convenient interaction between vehicles, bicycles, and pedestrians; D. Providing flexible methods of responding to the transportation and access demands of various land uses in different areas of the city; E. Reducing storm water runoff, reducing heat island effect from large expanses of pavement, improving water quality, and minimizing dust pollution; F. Establishing context-sensitive parking standards to reflect the current and future built environment of neighborhoods; and G. Avoiding and mitigating the adverse visual and environmental impacts oflarge concentrations of exposed parking. 21A.44.020: APPLICABILITY: A. Amounts of Parking, Loading, and Drive-Through Facilities Required: The standards of this chapter are intended to establish: minimum and maximum amounts of vehicle parking; minimum required bicycle parking, minimum required loading facilities, and minimum capacity of drive-through facilities and shall apply to projects involving the activities listed below. In some instances, other standards of this chapter providealternatives for required compliance. Certain exemptions are intended to encourage utilization of existing structures and preserve desirable characteristics of locations built prior to parking requirements. 1. New Development: Unless otherwise exempted by Section 21A.44.020.A.4, the standards in this chapter shall apply to all development and land uses upon adoption of this ordinance. 2. Expansion of Use or Structure: The number of off street parking and loading spaces for the expansion of a use or structure shall comply with the requirements of Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking“ and the standards of this chapter when: a. One or more additional dwelling units is created; or b. The addition to or expansion of one or more structures or uses that, when considered together with any other expansions during the previous two-year period, would increase the total usable floor area of the structure(s) by more than twenty- five percent (25%); or c. The addition to or expansion of one (1) or more structures or uses that requires conditional use permit approval. 3. Change of Use: 57 a. Except when located within an Urban Center or Transit Context, or as stated in Subsection b below, off street parking shall be provided pursuant to this chapterfor any change of use that increases the minimum number of required vehicle parking spaces by: (1) More than ten (10) parking spaces; or (2) More than twenty-five percent (25%) of the parking spaces that currently exist on-site or on permitted off-site locations. b. For changes in use in buildings built prior to 1944, no additional parking shall be required beyond what is existing. 4. Exemptions from Parking Requirements: The following shall be exempt from providing the minimum parking required by Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking“, but shall comply with maximum parking allowed and location and design standards in Section 21A.44.060 if parking is provided: a. Lots created prior to April 12,1995 that are less than five thousand (5,000) square feet in lot area, except those being used for single- family, two-family, and twin home dwelling uses; b. Expansions or enlargements that increase the square footage of usable floor area of an existing structure or parking requirements for the use by twenty-five percent (25%) or less, provided that existing off street parking and loading areas are not removed. B. Location and Design: Section 21A.44.060, “Parking Location and Design“, shall apply to all vehicle parking, bicycle parking, loading, and drive-through facilities, regardless of whether the project is subject to the requirements for additional parking spaces or other facilities pursuant to Subsection 21A.44.020.A above. Parking garages are subject to design standards found in Subsection 21A.44.060.A.16 and specific requirements of other zoning districts found in Subsection 21A.44.060.B. 21A.44.030: CALCULATION OF PARKING: A. Generally: 1. All parking and loading requirements that are based on square footage shall be calculated on the basis of usable floor area of the subject use, unless otherwise specified in Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking“. 2. Parking spaces shall not be counted more than once for required off-site, shared, and/or alternative parking plans, except where the development 58 complies with off-site, shared, and/or alternative parking standards. 3. Parking spaces designed or designated exclusively for motorcycles, scooters, and other two wheeled vehicles shall not count toward the number of minimum required or maximum allowed off street parking spaces. 4. Parking spaces intended for storage of business vehicles, such as fleet vehicles, delivery vehicles, or vehicles on display associated with sales or rental shall not count toward the number of minimum required or maximum allowed off street parking spaces unless otherwise stated in Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking“. 5. Parking spaces designed or designated exclusively for recreational vehicles shall not count toward the number of minimum required or maximum allowed off street parking spaces. 6. When calculations of the number of required off street parking spaces for vehicles or bicycles result in a fractional number, any fraction of 0.5 or larger shall be rounded up to the next higher whole number. Calculations for more than one use in a project shall be calculated for each individual use and may be rounded individually and added, or added then rounded as determined by the applicant. 7. Lots containing more than one (1) use may provide parking and loading based on the shared parking calculations in Subsection 21A.44.050.B, “Shared Parking”. B. Unlisted Uses: For uses not listed in Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking” the planning director is authorized to do any of the following: 1. Apply the minimum or maximum off street parking space requirement specified in Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking“, for the listed use that is deemed most similar to the proposed use as determined by the planning director based on operating characteristics, the most similar related occupancy classification, or other factors related to potential parking demand determined by the director. 2. Apply a minimum parking requirement of three (3) spaces per one thousand (1,000) square feet of usable floor area for the use and a maximum parking allowance of five (5) spacesper one thousand (1,000) square feet of useable floor area for the use. 3. Establish the minimum off street parking space and loading requirements based on a parking study prepared by the applicant according to Subsection 21A.44.050.F. 59 21A.44.040: REQUIRED OFF STREET PARKING: A. Minimum and Maximum Parking Spaces Required: 1. Unless otherwise provided in this code, each development or land use subject to thischapter pursuant to Section 21A.44.020 shall provide at least the minimum number, and shall not provide more than the maximum number, of off street parking spaces required by Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking“. 2. A parking standard shown in Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking”, is not an indication of whether the use is allowed or prohibited in the respective zoning district or context area. See Chapter 21A.33, “Land Use Tables” for allowed and prohibited uses. 3. The maximum parking limit does not apply to parking provided in parking garages, stacked or racked parking structures, or to off-site parking that complies with all other requirements of this title. 4. The maximum parking limit does not apply to properties in the M-1, M-2, BP, or Airport zoning districts that are located west of the centerline of Redwood Road. 5. If a conditional use is approved by the planning commission in accordance with Chapter 21A.54, “Conditional Uses”, and the conditional use approval states a different parking requirement than that required by this Chapter 21A.44, and is determined necessary to mitigate a detrimental impact, then the parking requirement in the conditional use approval shall apply. 6. All uses with vehicle stacking and/or drive-through facilities shall comply with Section 21A.44.080, “Drive-Through Facilities and Vehicle Stacking Areas”, in addition to the requirements of Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking“. 7. All uses with outdoor sales, display, leasing, and/or auction areas shall also provide one-half (1/2) parking space and no more than two (2) parking spaces per one thousand (1,000) sq. ft. of outdoor sales, display, leasing, and/or auction area. This additional parking shall not count toward the maximum allowed per Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking”, when a maximum is specified. Context Approach: 60 Salt Lake City has a wide variety of development contexts that make any single approach to minimum and maximum parking requirements ineffective. The parking demand for a downtown area served by transit will be much lower than a downtown adjacent neighborhood or suburban shopping center. To ensure that minimum and maximum parking requirements reflect the built context (and future built context) of the area, we created four distinct “context areas”, and then tailored minimum and maximum parking standards to each. The Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking Table below lists the specific zoning districts included in each context area. The following is a brief narrative introducing each context area: 1. General Context: This category includes the city’s zoning districts that tend to be more auto-dependent and/or suburban in scale and parking needs. This context applies broadly to all of the zoning districts that are not specifically listed in the other context areas. 2. Neighborhood Center: This category includes areas with small- or moderate-scale shopping, gathering, or activity spaces, often within or adjacent to General Context areas, but that are not necessarily well served by transit. This category includes zoning districts with pedestrian-scale development patterns, building forms, and amenities. 3. Urban Center: This category includes zoning districts with dense, pedestrian-oriented development within more intensely developed urban centers. The parking demand in this context is higher than in the Neighborhood Center Context, but lower than areas with good transit service. 4. Transit Context: This category includes those zoning districts that immediately surround mass-transit facilities and/or are in the downtown core. These areas have the lowest parking demand and may be exempt from minimum parking requirements or be required to provide minimal off street parking. 61 TABLE 21A.44.040-A: MINIMUM AND MAXIMUM OFF STREET PARKING: DU = dwelling unit sq. ft. = square feet Land Use Minimum Parking Requirement Maximum Parking Allowed General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, R-MU-35, R-MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE D-2, MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1. CSHBD2 D-1, D-3 D-4, G-MU, TSA-C, UI, FB-UN2, FB- UN3, FB-SC. R-MU Vehicle Stacking and Drive-Through Facilities: See Subsection 21A.44.040.A.6 Outdoor Sales/Display/Leasing/Auction Areas: See Subsection 21A.44.040.A.7 RESIDENTIAL USES Household Living Artists’ loft/studio 1.5 spaces per DU 1 space per DU 0.5 spaces per DU No Minimum No Maximum Manufactured home 2 spaces per DU 1 space per DU No Minimum All Contexts: 4 spaces, not including recreational vehicle parking spaces Mobile home Single-family (attached) Single-family (detached) Single-family cottage development building form 1 space per DU Twin home 2 spaces per DU Two-family 62 Multi-family Studio and 1 bedrooms: 1 space per DU, 2+ bedrooms 1.25 space per DU Studio and 1+ bedrooms: 1 space per DU Studio: No Minimum 1 bedroom: 0.5 space per DU 2+ bedrooms: 1 space per DU No Minimum All Contexts: Studio & 1 Bedroom: 2 spaces per DU 2+ bedrooms: 3 spaces per DU Group Living Assisted living facility 1 space for each 6 infirmary or nursing home beds; plus 1 space for each 4 rooming units; plus 1 space for each 3 DU See Table Note A 1 space for each 8 infirmary or nursing home beds; plus 1 space for each 6 rooming units; plus 1 space for each 4 DU See Table Note A No Minimum No Maximum Nursing care facility Eleemosynary facility 1 space per 4 persons design capacity; See Table Note A 1 space per 6 persons design capacity; See Table Note A 1 space per 4 persons design capacity; See Table Note A No Minimum All Contexts: 1 space per 3 persons design capacity; See Table Note A Group home Residential support Dormitory, fraternity, sorority 1 space per 2 persons design capacity 1 space per 3 persons design capacity 1 space per 4 persons design capacity No Minimum All Contexts: 1 space per 1 persons design capacity Rooming (boarding) house 1 space per 2 guest rooms 1 space per 3 guest rooms 1 space per 4 guest No Minimum No Maximum 63 rooms Shared housing 0.5 spaces per unit 0.25 spaces per unit No Minimum No Maximum PUBLIC, INSTITUTIONAL, AND CIVIC USES Community and Cultural Facilities Art gallery 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. 0.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum All Contexts: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Studio, Art Exhibition hall Museum Crematorium 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum No Maximum Daycare center, adult Daycare center, child Homeless resource center Library Community correctional facility, 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 2.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Community recreation center Jail Government facility 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office area 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. of office area No Minimum No Maximum Social service mission and charity dining hall 64 Municipal service use, including city utility use and police and fire station 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office area, plus 1 space per service vehicle 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. of office area, plus 1 space per service vehicle No Minimum No Maximum Club/lodge 1 space per 6 seats in main assembly area 1 space per 8 seats in main assembly area 1 space per 10 seats in main assembly area No Minimum All Contexts: 1 space per 4 seats in main assembly area Meeting hall of membership organization Convent/monastery 1 space per 4 persons design capacity 1 space per 6 persons design capacity 1 space per 8 persons design capacity No Minimum No Maximum Funeral home 1 space per 4 seats in main assembly area 1 space per 5 seats in main assembly area 1 space per 6 seats in main assembly area No Minimum Urban Center and Transit Center Context: 2 spaces per 4 seats in main assembly areas Neighborhood Center and General Context: No maximum Place of worship All Contexts: 65 1 space per 6 seats or 1 space per 300 sq. ft., whichever is less 1 space per 8 seats or 1 space per 400 sq. ft., whichever is less 1 space per 10 seats or 1 space per 500 sq. ft., whichever is less No Minimum 1 space per 3.5 seats or 1 space per 200 sq. ft., whichever is greater Fairground See Table Note B No Maximum Philanthropic use See Table Note B All Contexts: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office, plus 1 space per 6 seats in assembly areas Zoological park See Table Note B No Maximum Ambulance service Cemetery No Minimum Plazas Park Open space Educational Facilities College and university 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. office, research, and library area, plus 1 space per 6 seats in assembly areas 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. office, research, and library area, plus 1 space per 10 seats in assembly areas K - 12 private Elementary or Middle: 1 space per 20 students 66 K - 12 public design capacity High Schools: 1 space per 8 students design capacity No Minimum All Contexts: 4 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Dance/music studio 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 2.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. Music conservatory Professional and vocational Professional and vocational (with outdoor activities) Seminary and religious institute Healthcare Facilities Clinic (medical, dental) 4 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum All Contexts: 6 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft Blood donation center 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. Transit and Urban Center Context: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft Neighborhood Center and General Context: 6 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Hospital 1 space per 3 patient beds design capacity 1 space per 2 patient beds design capacity All Contexts: 1 space per 2 patient beds design capacity Hospital, including accessory lodging facility COMMERCIAL USES 67 Agricultural and Animal Uses Greenhouse 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum Transit and Urban Center Context: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft Neighborhood Center and Kennel Pound Veterinary office Cremation service, animal 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. Kennel on lots of 5 acres or larger Poultry farm or processing plant General Context: No Maximum Raising of furbearing animals Slaughterhouse Agricultural use No Minimum Community garden Farmer’s market Grain elevator Pet cemetery Stable Stockyard Urban farm Botanical garden See Table Note B Recreation and Entertainment Auditorium 1 space per 4 seats in assembly areas 1 space per 6 seats in 1 space per 8 seats in No Minimum All Contexts: 1 space per 3 seats in assembly Theater, live performance 68 Theater, movie assembly areas assembly areas areas Amphitheater See Table Note B Athletic Field Stadium Tennis court (principal use) 2 spaces per court No Minimum Transit and Urban Center Bowling 2 spaces per lane Context: 2 spaces per court or lane Neighborhood Center and General Context: No Maximum Convention center 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum All Contexts: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Swimming pool, skating rink or natatorium Health and fitness facility 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. All Contexts: 4 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Performing arts production facility Reception center Recreation (indoor) 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Recreational vehicle park (minimum 1 acre) 1 space per designated camping or RV spot No Maximum Amusement park See Table Note B Recreation (outdoor) See Table Note B 69 Food and Beverage Services Brewpub Indoor tasting/seating area: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft.; Outdoor tasting/seating area: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Indoor tasting/ seating area: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft.; Outdoor tasting/ se ating area: 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum Transit and Urban Center Context: 5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft indoor tasting/seating area Neighborhood Center and General Context: 7 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. indoor tasting/seating area All Contexts: Outdoor tasting/ seating area: 4 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Restaurant Tavern Social club 1 space per 6 seats in main assembly area, or 1 space per 300 sq. ft., whichever is less 1 space per 8 seats in main assembly area, or 1 space per 400 sq. ft., whichever is less 1 space per 10 seats in main assembly area, or 1 space per 500 sq. ft., whichever is less No Minimum All Contexts: 1 space per 4 seats in main assembly area, or 1 space per 200 sq. ft., whichever is greater Office, Business, and Professional Services Check cashing/payday loan business General Context: 70 Dental laboratory/ research facility 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum 4 spaces per 1,000 Neighborhood Center Context: 3 spaces per 1,000 Urban Center and Transit Center Contexts: 2 spaces per 1,000 Financial institution Research and laboratory facilities Office (excluding medical and dental clinic and office) 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Retail Sales & Services Photo finishing lab No Minimum 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum Transit and Urban Center Contexts: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Neighborhood Center and General Context: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Electronic repair shop Furniture repair shop Upholstery shop Radio, television station 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. 71 Store, Convenience 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum Transit and Urban Center Contexts: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Neighborhood Center: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. General Context: 5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Auction, Indoor 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Transit Context: 2 Store, Department Fashion oriented development 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Urban Center and Neighborhood Center Context: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. General Context: 4 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Flea market (indoor) Flea market (outdoor) Store, Mass merchandising Store, Pawn shop Store, Specialty Retail goods establishment Retail service establishment Store, Superstore and hypermarket Store, Warehouse club 72 Retail shopping center over 55,000 sq. ft. usable floor area Up to 100,000 sq. ft. : 2. spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. . Above 100,000 sq. ft. : sq. ft. 1.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Up to 100,000 sq. ft. : 1.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. . Above 100,000 sq. ft. : 1.25 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Transit and Urban Center Contexts: up to 100,000 sq. ft.: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft., above 100,000 sq. ft.: 1.75 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Neighborhood Center and General Context: Up to 100,000 sq. ft.: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft., above 100,000 sq. ft.: 2.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Plant and garden shop with outdoor retail sales area 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. Transit and Urban Center Contexts: 1.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Neighborhood Center: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. General Context: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 73 Lodging Facilities Bed and breakfast 1 space per guest bedroom 0.5 spaces per guest bedroom No Minimum All Contexts: 1.25 spaces per guest bedroom Hotel/motel All Contexts: 1.5 spaces per guest bedroom Vehicles and Equipment Vehicle Auction 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office area plus 1 space per service bay 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. of office area plus 1 space per service bay No Minimum No Maximum Automobile part sales 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of indoor sales/leasing/office area plus 1 space per service bay 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. of indoor sales/leas ing/ office area plus 1 space per service bay No Minimum All Contexts: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of indoor sales/leasing/ office area, plus 1 space per service bay Automobile and truck repair sales/rental and service Boat/recreational vehicle sales and service (indoor) Equipment rental (indoor and/or outdoor) Equipment, heavy (rental, sales, service) 74 Manufactured/mobile home sales and service Recreational vehicle (RV) sales and service Truck repair sales and rental (large) Car wash No Minimum Transit and Urban Center Contexts: 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. Neighborhood Center: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. General Context: 5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Car wash as accessory use to gas station or convenience store that sells gas Gas station 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum General Context: 5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Neighborhood Center Context: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Urban Center Context: 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. Bus line yard and repair facility 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. , plus 1 space per commercial fleet vehicle No Minimum No Maximum 75 Impound lot Limousine service Taxicab facility Tire distribution retail/wholesale Adult Entertainment Establishments Sexually oriented business 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum All Contexts: 5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. TRANSPORTATION USES Airport Determined by Airport Authority No Maximum Heliport Bus line station/terminal No Minimum Urban Center and Transit Contexts: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Neighborhood Center and General Context: 1 space per 150 average daily passenger boardings Intermodal transit passenger hub Railroad, passenger station Transportation terminal, including bus, rail and trucking Railroad, repair shop 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. , plus 1 space per fleet vehicle generally stored on-site No Minimum No Maximum Truck freight terminal Railroad, freight terminal facility No Minimum INDUSTRIAL USES 76 Manufacturing and Processing Artisan food production 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. of production area, plus 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office/retail 0.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of productio n area, plus 1.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office/ret ail No Minimum Transit and Urban Center Contexts: 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. of production area, plus 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office/retail Neighborhood Center and General Context: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of production area, plus 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office/retail Bakery, commercial Automobile salvage and recycling (outdoor) 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. of office 0.5 space per 1,000 sq. ft. of office No Minimum All Contexts: 7 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office/retail Processing center (outdoor) Automobile salvage and recycling (indoor) Blacksmith shop Bottling plant Brewery/Small Brewery 77 Chemical manufacturing and/or storage 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum No Maximum Commercial food preparation Distillery Drop forge industry Explosive manufacturing and storage Food processing Heavy manufacturing Incinerator, medical waste/hazardous waste Industrial assembly Jewelry fabrication Laundry, commercial Light manufacturing Manufacturing and processing, food Paint manufacturing Printing plant Processing center (indoor) Recycling Sign painting/ fabrication Studio, motion picture 78 Welding shop No Minimum Winery Woodworking mill Collection station No Minimum Concrete and/or asphalt manufacturing Extractive industry Manufacturing, concrete or asphalt Refinery, petroleum products Storage and Warehousing Air cargo terminals and package delivery facility 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. , plus 1 space per fleet vehicle generally stored on-site No Maximum Building materials distribution Flammable liquids or gases, heating fuel distribution and storage Package delivery facility Warehouse Warehouse, accessory to retail and wholesale business (maximum 5,000 square foot floor plate) Wholesale distribution 79 Storage, self 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office area, plus 1 space per 30 storage units 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office All Contexts: 1 space for every 15 storage units Contractor’s yard/office 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office area All Contexts: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office area Rock, sand and gravel storage and distribution No Minimum No Maximum Storage (outdoor) Storage and display (outdoor) Storage, public (outdoor) PUBLIC AND SEMI-PUBLIC UTILITY USES Utility: Building or structure No Minimum No Maximum Antenna, communication tower Antenna, communication tower, exceeding the maximum building height in the zone Large wind energy system Solar array Utility: Electric generation facility Utility: Sewage treatment plant 80 Utility: Solid waste transfer station Utility: Transmission wire, line, pipe or pole Wireless telecommunications facility ACCESSORY USES Accessory Dwelling Unit See Section 21A.40.200: Accessory Dwelling Units Accessory guest and servant’s quarter 1 space per DU No Minimum Living quarter for caretaker or security guard All Contexts: 4 spaces per DU Retail, sales and service accessory use when located within a principal building 2 spaces per 1,000 1 space per 1,000 Transit and Urban Center Contexts: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Neighborhood Center: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. General Context: 4 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Retail, sales and service accessory use when located within a principal building and operated primarily for the convenience of employees No Minimum Warehouse, accessory 0.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of warehouse/wholesale No Minimum 81 Accessory use, except those that are otherwise specifically regulated elsewhere in this title No Minimum No Maximum Heliport, accessory Reverse vending machine Storage, accessory (outdoor) TEMPORARY USES Mobile food business (operation in public right-of-way) No minimum, unless required by temporary use permit or as determined by the Zoning Administrator No Maximum Mobile food business (operation on private property) Mobile food court Vending cart, private property Vending cart, public property Farm stand, seasonal Table Notes: A. Facilities that are (a) occupied by persons who’s right to live together is protected by the federal Fair Housing Act, and that (b) occupy a building originally constructed for another residential use shall have the same parking requirements as the residential use for which the building was constructed. B. Parking requirements to be determined by the transportation director based on considerations of factors such as estimated facility use, vehicle traffic to the facility, transit use to the facility, potential traffic congestion, and likelihood of overflow parking in surrounding neighborhoods. B. Electric Vehicle Parking: Each multi-family use shall provide a minimum of one (1) parking space dedicated to electric vehicles for every twenty five (25) parking 82 spaces provided on-site. Electric vehicle parking spaces shall count toward the minimum required number of parking spaces. The electric vehicle parking space shall be: 1. Located in the same lot as the principal use; 2. Located as close to a primary entrance of the principal building as possible; 3. Signed in a clear and conspicuous manner, such as special pavement marking or signage, indicating exclusive availability to electric vehicles; and 4. Outfitted with a standard electric vehicle charging station. C. Accessible Parking: 1. The number and design of accessible (ADA) parking spaces shall be pursuant to the standards provided in the Salt Lake City Off Street Parking Standards Manual. 2. Parking areas with four (4) or fewer vehicle parking spaces are not required to identify an accessible parking space; however, if parking is provided, a minimum of one (1) parking space shall comply with the ADA standard dimensions. 3. The number of required accessible spaces shall be based on the total number of vehicle spaces provided to serve the principal uses, as shown below in Table 21A.44.040-B, “Accessible Parking Required“. TABLE 21A.44.040-B: ACCESSIBLE PARKING REQUIRED: Off Street Parking Spaces Provided Minimum Required Accessible Spaces 1 to 100 1 per 25 parking spaces 101 to 500 1 per 50 parking spaces 501 to 1,000 2 percent of total number of parking spaces 1,001 and more 20, plus 1 for each 100 parking spaces over 1,000 83 D. Bicycle Parking: 1. Applicability: The following regulations apply to all uses except for single- family, two-family, and twin home residential uses and nonresidential uses having less than one thousand square feet (1,000 sq. ft.) of usable floor area. 2. Calculation of Minimum Required Bicycle Parking Spaces: The number of required bicycle spaces shall be based on the use within the defined parking contexts as shown in Table 21A.44.040-C, “Minimum Bicycle Parking Requirements”, unless another city standard requires a different number of bicycle parking spaces for a specific use, in which case the use-specific bicycle parking standard shall apply. TABLE 21A.44.040-C: MINIMUM BICYCLE PARKING REQUIREMENTS*: (Calculation of Bicycle Parking Spaces to be Provided per Residential Unit or Based on Usable Floor Area) Use General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, R-MU-35, R-MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE D-2, MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1, CSHBD2 D-1, D-3, D-4, G-MU, TSA- C, UI, FB-UN2, FB- UN3, FB- SC, R-MU Residential Uses 1 per 5 units 1 per 4 units 1 per 3 units 1 per 2 units Public, Institutional, and Civic Uses 1 per 10,000 sq. ft. 1 per 5,000 sq. ft. 1 per 5,000 sq. ft. 1 per 3,000 sq. ft. Commercial Uses 1 per 20,000 sq. ft. 1 per 5,000 sq. ft 1 per 4,000 sq. ft. 1 per 2,000 sq. ft. Industrial Uses No requirement No requirement No requirement No Requirement *For all uses: In determining the minimum number of bicycle parking spaces required, fractional spaces are rounded to the nearest whole number, with one-half counted as an additional space 3. Building Expansions or Changes of Use: Building expansions or changes of use that require additional vehicle parking spaces pursuant to Section 84 21A.44.020 and Section 21A.44.040 shall provide additional bicycle parking spaces based on the calculations in Table 21A.44.040-C, “Minimum Bicycle Parking Requirements”, for the entire use. 4. Secure/Enclosed Bicycle Parking: Each one (1) bicycle parking space that is within a secure/enclosed bicycle parking facility may be used to satisfy the requirement of two (2) required bicycle parking spaces. 5. Existing Public Bicycle Parking Facilities: Permanent public bicycle racks or bike corrals located within fifty feet (50’) of the primary entrance to the principal building may be used to satisfy up to two (2) required bicycle parking spaces. 6. Accessory and Temporary Uses: No bicycle parking spaces are required for accessory or temporary uses. 21A.44.050: ALTERNATIVES TO MINIMUM AND MAXIMUM PARKING CALCULATIONS: The amount of off street vehicle parking required pursuant to Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking”, may be adjusted by the factors listed in this section. These adjustments may be applied as part of the calculation of parking requirements and do not require discretionary approval by the City. A. Limitations on Adjustments to Minimum Required Parking: The adjustments listed in Subsections 21A.44.050.B through 21A.44.050.G may be used in any combination, but shall not be combined to reduce the minimum required parking established in Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking“, by more than forty percent (40%). B. Shared Parking: 1. Shared Parking for Two or More Uses: a. Where two (2) or more uses listed in Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking”, share a parking garage or parking lot that is located on one of the properties that is sharing parking, or is located within the maximum permitted distance of all of the properties sharing parking shown in Table 21A.44.060-B, “Maximum Distances for Off-Site Parking”, the total minimum off street parking requirement for those uses may be reduced by the factors shown in Table 21A.44.050-A, “Shared Parking Reduction Factors“. b. The minimum number of off street parking spaces shall be the sum of the parking requirements for the uses divided by the factor shown in Table 21A.44.050-A, “Shared Parking Reduction Factors”, for that combination of uses. 85 Example: If a 5,000 square foot art gallery shared a parking lot with a 5,000 square foot retail goods establishment, and a 100 unit multi-family residential use in the Urban Center Context, the minimum off street parking required would be calculated as follows: Use 1: Art Gallery 0.5 per 1,000 sq. ft. x (5,000 sq. ft.) = 3 parking spaces Use 2: Retail Goods Establishment 1 per 1,000 sq. ft. x (5,000 sq. ft.) = 5 parking spaces Use 3: Multi-Family Residential 0 per studio unit x (20 studio units) = 0 parking spaces 0.5 per 1 bedroom unit x (36 1 bedroom units) = 18 parking spaces 1 per 2+ bedroom units x (44 2+ bedroom units) = 44 parking spaces 0+18+44 = 62 parking spaces Sum of two largest minimum parking requirements: 5 (retail goods establishment)+ 62 (multi-family) = 67 parking spaces Reduction Factor (two largest minimums): 67 ÷ 1.2 reduction factor = 55.8 or 56 parking spaces Add Remaining Minimum(s): 56 (retail & multi-family) + 3 (art gallery) = 59 parking spaces required TABLE 21A.44.050-A: SHARED PARKING REDUCTION FACTORS: Property Use Multi-Family Residential Public, Institutional, or Civic Food and Beverage, Recreation and Entertainment, or Lodging Retail Sales Other Non- Residential Multi-Family Residential [1] Public, Institutional and Civic 1.1 Food and Beverage, Recreation and Entertainment, or 1.1 1.2 86 Lodging Retail Sales 1.2 1.3 1.3 Other Non-Residential 1.3 1.5 1.7 1.2 [1] Applies to multi-family residential, assisted living facility (large), group home (large), and residential support (large) uses 2. Documentation Required: a. The owners of record involved in the joint use of shared parking shall submit written documentation of the continued availability of the shared parking arrangement to the Transportation Director for review. b. The Director shall approve the shared parking arrangement if the Director determines that the documentation demonstrates the continued availability of the shared parking facility for a reasonable period of time. No zoning or use approval shall be issued until the Director has approved the shared parking documentation. c. If the shared parking arrangement is later terminated or modified and the Director determines that the termination or modification has resulted in traffic congestion, overflow parking in residential neighborhoods, or threats to pedestrian, bicycle, or vehicle safety, the property owners involved in the shared parking arrangement may be held in violation of this chapter. C. Proximity to Fixed-Rail Transit: Required parking for a development located within one-quarter mile (when measured radially in a straight line from the subject property line) of a fixed-rail transit station platform in the General Context, Neighborhood Center Context, and Urban Center Context areas may be reduced by up to twenty-five percent (25%). This shall not apply to single or two-family uses including: single-family (attached or detached), twin homes, or two-family. D. Affordable and Senior Housing (Multi-Family Structures): The minimum number of required off street parking spaces for multi-family residential developments with at least ten (10) dwelling units may be reduced by twenty-five percent (25%) if the multi-family development has: 1. A minimum of twenty-five percent (25%) of the dwelling units are restricted to residents with no greater than sixty percent (60%) area median income (AMI) 87 for leased units; or 2. A minimum of thirty-five percent (35%) of the dwelling units are restricted to residents with no greater than eighty percent (80%) AMI for sale units; or 3. A minimum of seventy-five percent (75%) of the dwelling units are restricted to persons sixty-five (65) years of age or older. For a development that meets any of the scenarios above, an additional reduction of up to fifteen percent (15%) may be allowed when the development is located within one-quarter mile (when measured radially in a straight line from the subject property line) of a bus stop that is serviced by the same route at least every fifteen (15) minutes during daytime hours, Monday - Saturday. E. Car Pool and Carshare Parking: 1. For parking lots with one hundred (100) or more parking spaces, each off street parking space designated and signed for the exclusive use of a shared car pool vehicle shall count as three (3) spaces toward the satisfaction of minimum off street vehicle parking requirements. 2. For parking lots with one hundred (100) or more parking spaces, each off street parking space designated and signed for the exclusive use of a shared vanpool vehicle shall count as seven (7) spaces toward the satisfaction of minimum off street vehicle parking requirements. 3. For parking lots of any size, each off street parking space designated and signed for the exclusive use of a carshare vehicle shall count as four (4) spaces toward the satisfaction of minimum off street vehicle parking requirements. F. Valet Parking Services: Modifications to minimum on site parking spaces may occur on a one-to-one basis if off site valet parking is provided and: 1. The design of the valet parking does not cause customers who do not use the valet services to park off the premises or cause queuing in the right-of-way; 2. The availability of valet parking service is clearly posted outside the establishment and near the main entrance; and 3. The applicant provides adequate written assurances for the continued operation of the valet parking, and a written agreement to notify future owners and tenants of the property of the duty to continue to provide off-site valet parking. G. Parking Study Demonstrating Different Parking Needs: 88 1. The transportation director, in consultation with the planning director, may authorize a change in the amount of off street parking spaces. The authorization shall be based onthe applicant submitting a parking study that demonstrates a different off street parking demand for the proposed development, use, or combination of uses than calculated from Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking“, and subject to the overall limits on parking adjustments in Subsection 21A.44.050.A above. 2. The transportation director and planning director shall determine whether the information and assumptions used in the study are reasonable and whether the study accurately reflects anticipated off street parking demand for the proposed development, use, or combination of uses. 3. Considerations for an alternative parking requirement (parking provided below the minimum required or exceeding the maximum allowed) shall be granted only if the following findings are determined: a. That the proposed parking plan will satisfy the anticipated parking demand for the use; b. That the proposed parking plan will be at least as effective in maintaining traffic circulation patterns, reducing the visibility of parking areas and facilities as would strict compliance with the otherwise applicable off street parking standards; c. That the proposed parking plan does not have a materially adverse impact on adjacent or neighboring properties; d. That the proposed parking plan includes mitigation strategies for any potential impact on adjacent or neighboring properties; and e. That the proposed alternative parking plan is consistent with applicable cityplans and policies. 21A.44.060: PARKING LOCATION AND DESIGN: All required parking areas shall be located and designed in accordance with the standards in this Chapter 21A.44: Off Street Parking, Mobility, and Loading and the standards in the Off Street Parking Standards Manual. Modifications to the standards of this Section 21A.44.060 may be granted through the design review process, subject to conformance with the standards and procedures of Chapter 21A.59: Design Review. A. Generally: 1. Parking Located on Same Lot as Use or Building Served: All parking spaces required to serve buildings or uses erected or established after the 89 effective date of this ordinance shall be located on the same lot as the building or use served, unless otherwise allowed pursuant to Subsection 21A.44.060.A.4, “Off-Site Parking Permitted”. 2. Biodetention and Landscape Islands in General and Neighborhood Center Contexts: For parking lots with one hundred (100) or more parking spaces in the General Context and Neighborhood Center Context areas, parking lot islands or biodetention areas shall be provided on the interior of the parking lot to help direct traffic flow and to provide landscaped areas within such lots. 3. Parking Location and Setbacks: All parking shall comply with the parking restrictions within yards pursuant to Table 21A.44.060-A, “Parking Location and Setback Requirements”. TABLE 21A.44.060-A: PARKING LOCATION AND SETBACK REQUIREMENTS: N = parking prohibited between lot line and front line of the principal building Zoning District Front Lot Line Corner Side Lot Line Interior Side Lot Line Rear Lot Line GENERAL CONTEXT Residential (FR Districts, RB, RMF, RO) FR N Parking in driveways that comply with all applicable city standards is exempt from this restriction. 6 ft. 0 ft. R-1, R-2, SR-1, SR-2 0 ft. RMF-30 N 0 ft.; or 10 ft. when abutting any 1-2 family residential district RMF-35, RMF- 45, RMF-75, RO 0 ft.; or 10 ft. when abutting any 1-2 family residential district. Limited to 1 side yard except for single- family attached lots. 90 Commercial and Manufacturing (CC, CS, CG, M-1, M-2, SNB) CC 15 ft. 0 ft.; or 7 ft. when abutting any residential district CS 0 ft.; or 15 ft. when abutting any residential districtCG 10 ft. M-1 15 ft.M-2 0 ft.; or 50 ft. when abutting any residential district Special Purpose Districts A 0 ft. 0 ft.AG, AG-2, AG- 5, AG-20 N BP 8 ft.; or 30 ft. when abutting any residential district EI 10 ft. 30 ft. 30 ft. 20 ft. FP 20 ft. 6 ft. 0 ft. I 0 ft.; or 15 ft. when abutting any residential district MH 0 ft. OS 30 ft. 10 ft. PL 0 ft.; or 10 ft. when abutting any residential district PL-2 20 ft. RP 30 ft. 8 ft.; or 30 ft. when abutting any residential district NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER CONTEXT CB , CN, SNB N 0 ft.; or 7 ft. when abutting any 1-2 family residential district 91 R-MU-35, R- MU-45 Surface Parking: N Parking Structures: 45’ or located behind principal building Limited to 1 side yard, 0 ft.; or 10 ft. when abutting any 1-2 family residential district 0 ft.; or 10 ft. when abutting any 1-2 family residential district RB, SR-3, FB- UN1, FB-SE N 0 ft. URBAN CENTER CONTEXT CSHBD1 N 0 ft.; or 7 ft. when abutting any residential district CSHBD2 0 ft.; or 7 ft. when abutting any 1-2 family residential district D-2 Surface Parking: 20 ft. Parking Structures: N 0 ft. MU Surface Parking: 25 ft. or located behind principal structure Parking Structures: 45 ft. or located behind principal structure 0 ft.; limited to 1 side yard 0 ft. TSA-T See Subsection 21A.44.060.B.2 0 ft. TRANSIT CONTEXT D-1 See Subsection 21A.44.060.B.1 D-3 D-4 See Subsection 21A.44.060.B.1 0 ft. G-MU FB-UN2, FB- UN3, FB-SC N TSA-C See Subsection 21A.44.060.B.2 92 R-MU Surface Parking: 30 ft. Parking Structures: 45 ft. or located behind principal structure 0 ft.; or 10 ft. when abutting any 1-2 family residential district Surface parking at least 30 ft. from front lot line. 0 ft.; or 10 ft. when abutting any 1-2 family residential district UI 0 ft; Hospitals: 30 ft. 0 ft.; or 15 ft. when abutting any 1-2 family residential district; Hospitals: 10 ft. 0 ft.; or 15 ft. when abutting any 1-2 family residential district; Hospitals: 10 ft. 4. Off-Site Parking Permitted: When allowed as either a permitted or conditional use per Chapter 21A.33, “Land Use Tables”, off-site parking facilities may be used to satisfy the requirements of this chapter and shall comply with the following standards: a. Maximum Distance of Off-Site Parking: Off-site parking shall be located according to the distance established in Table 21A.44.060-B, “Maximum Distances for Off-Site Parking” (measured in a straight line from the property boundary of the principal use for which the parking serves to the closest point of the parking area). Table 21A.44.060-B: Maximum Distances for Off-Site Parking: Context Maximum Distance to Off-Site Parking Neighborhood Center 600 ft. General Legal Nonconforming Use in Residential District Urban Center 1,200 ft. 93 Transit 1,000 ft. b. Documentation Required: (1) The owners of record involved in an off-site parking arrangement shall submit written documentation of the continued availability of the off-site parking arrangement to the planning director for review. (2) The planning director shall approve the off-site parking arrangement if the director determines the location meets the standards of this section. No zoning or use approval shall be issued until the director has approved the off-site parking arrangement and the documentation has been recorded in the office of the Salt Lake County Recorder. (3) If the off-site parking arrangement is later terminated or modified and the planning director determines that the termination or modification has resulted in traffic congestion, overflow parking in residential neighborhoods, orthreats to pedestrian, bicycle, or vehicle safety, the property owners of the uses for which the off-site parking was provided may be held in violation of this chapter. 5. Circulation Plan Required: Any application for a building permit shall include a site plan, drawn to scale, and fully dimensioned, showing any off street parking or loading facilities to be provided in compliance with this title. A tabulation of the number of off street vehicle and bicycle parking, loading, and stacking spaces required by this chapter shall appear in a conspicuous place on the plan. 6. Driveways and Access: a. Compliance with Other Adopted Regulations: (1) Parking lots shall be designed in compliance with applicable city codes, ordinances, and standards, including but not limited to Title 12 of this code: Vehicles and Traffic and the Off Street Parking Standards Manual to the maximum degree practicable, with respect to: (a) Minimum distances between curb cuts; (b) Proximity of curb cuts to intersections; (c) Provisions for shared driveways; (d) Location, quantity and design of landscaped islands; and (e) Design of parking lot interior circulation system. 94 (2) Notwithstanding the provisions of Subsection 21A.44.060.A.6.a(1) above, relocation of a driveway for a single-family, two-family, or twin home residence in any zoning district shall only be required when the residence is replaced, and shall not be required when the residence is expanded or renovated in compliance with the city code. b. Access Standards: Access to all parking facilities shall comply with the following standards: (1) To the maximum extent practicable, all off street parking facilities shall be designed with vehicular access to a street or alley that will least interfere with automobile, bicycle, and pedestrian traffic movement. (2) Parking facilities in excess of five (5) spaces that access a public street shall be designed to allow vehicles to enter and exit the lot in a forward direction. (3) Parking facilities on lots with less than one hundred feet (100’) of street frontage shall have only one (1) curb cut, and lots with one hundred feet (100’) of street frontage or more shall be limited to two (2) curb cuts, unless the transportation director determines that additional curb cuts are necessary to ensure pedestrian, bicycle, and vehicle safety or to comply with the fire code. Public safety uses shall be exempt from limitations on curb cuts. (4) All vehicular access roads/driveways shall be surfaced as required in accordance with Subsection 21A.44.060.A.8, “Surface Materials”. c. Driveway Standards: All driveways shall comply with the following standards: (1) Driveway Location in Residential Zoning Districts: With the exception of legal shared driveways, driveways shall be at least twenty feet (20’) from street corner property lines and five feet (5’) from any public utility infrastructure such as power poles, fire hydrants, and water meters. Except for entrance and exit driveways leading to approved parking areas, no curb cuts or driveways are permitted. (2) Driveway Widths: All driveways serving residential uses shall be a minimum eight feet wide and shall comply with the standards for maximum driveway widths listed in Table 21A.44.060-C, “Minimum and Maximum Driveway Width”. TABLE 21A.44.060-C: MINIMUM AND MAXIMUM DRIVEWAY WIDTH: Zoning District Minimum Driveway Width (in front and corner side yard) Maximum Driveway Width* (in front and corner side 95 yard) SR-1, SR-2 and SR-3 8 ft. 22 ft. MH 8 ft. 16 ft. Other Residential Zoning Districts 8 ft. 30 ft. M-1 and M-2 12 ft. single lane and 24 ft. for two-way 50 ft. Other Non-Residential Zoning Districts 12 ft. single lane and 24 ft. for two-way 30 ft. * Maximum width is for all driveways combined when more than one driveway is provided (3) Shared Driveways: Shared driveways, where two (2) or more properties share one (1) driveway access, may be permitted if the transportation director determines that the design and location of the shared driveway access will not create adverse impacts on traffic congestion or public safety. (4) Driveway Surface: All driveways providing access to parking facilities shall be improved and maintained pursuant to the standards in the Off Street Parking Standards Manual. 7. Minimum Dimensional Standards: All parking spaces shall comply with the dimensional standards in the Off Street Parking Standards Manual. 8. Surface Materials: All parking spaces shall comply with the standards for surfacing of access, driving, and parking surfacing in the Off Street Parking Standards Manual. 9. Grading and Stormwater Management: All surface parking areas shall comply with city grading and stormwater management standards and shall be reviewed for best management practices by Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities. Refer to the Salt Lake City Stormwater Master Plan, Storm Drainage Manual, and Green Infrastructure Toolbox for additional information. 10. Sight Distance Triangles: All driveways and intersections shall comply with the sight distance triangle standards as defined in the Off Street Parking Standards Manual. 11. Landscaping and Screening: All parking areas and facilities shall comply with the landscaping and screening standards in Chapter 21A.48, “Landscaping and Buffers”. 96 12. Lighting: Where a parking area or parking lot is illuminated, the light source shall be shielded so that the light source is not directly visible from any abutting property or abutting private or public street. 13. Signs: All signs in parking areas or related to parking facilities shall comply with Chapter 21A.46, “Signs”, and applicable provisions of the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD). 14. Pedestrian Walkways: a. Surface parking lots with between twenty-five (25) and one hundred (100) parking spaces shall provide a pedestrian walkway or sidewalk through the parking lot to the primary entrance of the principal building. Pedestrian walkways shall be identified by a change in color, material, surface texture, or grade elevation from surrounding driving surfaces. b. Parking lots with more than one hundred (100) parking spaces shall provide: (1) One (1) or more grade-separated pedestrian walkway(s), at least five feet (5’) in width, and located in an area that is not a driving surface, leading from the farthest row of parking spaces to the primary entrance of the principal building. (2) Vehicles shall not overhang the pedestrian walkway(s). (3) Where the walkway(s) crosses a drive aisle, pedestrian walkway(s) shall be identified by a change in color, material, surface texture, or grade elevation from surrounding driving surfaces. (4) One (1) pedestrian walkway meeting these standards shall be provided for each one hundred (100) parking spaces provided on site or part thereof, after the first one hundred (100) parking spaces. 15. Parking Garages: The following standards shall apply to all above-ground parking garages except those located in the FB zones subject to Subsection 21A.27.030.C.4, whether freestanding or incorporated into a building: a. Each façade or a parking garage adjacent to a public street or public space shall have an external skin designed to conceal the view of all parked cars. Examples include heavy gauge metal screen, precast concrete panels, live green or landscaped walls, laminated or safety glass, or decorative photovoltaic panels. b. No horizontal length of the parking garage façade shall extend longer than 40 feet without the inclusion of architectural elements such as decorative grillwork, louvers, translucent screens, alternating building materials, and other external features to avoid visual monotony. Facade elements shall align with parking 97 levels. c. Internal circulation shall allow parking surfaces to be level (without any slope) along each parking garage facade adjacent to a public street or public space. All ramps between levels shall be located along building facades that are notadjacent to a public street or public space, or shall be located internally so that they are not visible from adjacent public streets or public spaces. d. The location of elevators and stairs shall be highlighted through the use of architectural features or changes in façade colors, textures, or materials so that visitors can easily identify these entry points. e. Interior parking garage lighting shall not produce glaring sources toward adjacent properties while providing safe and adequate lighting levels. The use of sensor dimmable LEDs and white stained ceilings are recommended to control light levels on-site while improving energy efficiency. f. In the Urban Center Context and Transit Context areas, the street-level facades of all parking garages shall be designed to meet applicable building code standards for habitable space to allow at least one (1) permitted or conditional use, other than parking, to be located where the parking garage is located. g. Vent and fan locations shall not be located on parking garage facades facing public streets or public spaces, or adjacent to residential uses, to the greatest extent practicable. 16. Tandem Parking: Where more than one (1) parking space is required to be provided for a residential dwelling unit, the parking spaces may be designed as tandem parking spaces, provided that: a. No more than two (2) required spaces may be included in the tandem parking layout; and b. Each set of two (2) tandem parking spaces shall be designated for a specific residential unit. 17. Cross-Access between Adjacent Uses: The transportation director may require that access to one or more lots be through shared access points or cross-access through adjacent parcels when the transportation director determines that individual access to abutting parcels or limited distance between access points will create traffic safety hazards due to traffic levels on adjacent streets or nearby intersections. Such a determination shall be consistent with requirements of state law regarding property access from public streets. Required cross- access agreements shall be recorded with the Salt Lake County Recorder’s Office. B. Zone Specific Location and Design Standards: 98 1. D-1, D-3, D-4, and G-MU Zoning Districts: The following regulations shall apply to surface or above-ground parking facilities. No special design and setback restrictions shall apply to below-ground parking facilities. a. Block Corner Areas: (1) Within the D-1 zoning district, above-ground parking facilities located within the block corner areas and on Main Street, shall be located behind principal buildings and: a. All above-ground parking facilities that front a street shall contain uses other than parking along the entire length of the building façade and along all stories or levels of the building. b. Vehicle access to parking shall be located to the side of the building or as far from the street corner as possible unless further restricted by this title. (2) Within the D-3, D-4, or G-MU zoning districts, above-ground parking facilities shall be located behind principal buildings, or at least seventy-five feet (75’) from front and corner side lot lines, and shall be landscaped to minimize visual impacts. b. Mid-Block Areas: (1) Within the D-1 zoning district, above-ground parking facilities shall be located behind the front line of principal buildings or shall be located at least seventy- five feet (75’) from front and corner side lot lines. Parking lots proposed as a principal use to facilitate a building demolition are prohibited. (2) Within the D-3, D-4, or G-MU zoning districts, parking facilities shall be located behind principal buildings, or at least thirty feet (30’) from front and corner side lot lines. (3) Parking garages shall meet the following: a. Retail goods/service establishments, offices and/or restaurants shall be provided on the first floor adjacent to the front or corner side lot line. The facades of such first floors shall be compatible and consistent with the associated retail or office portion of thebuilding and other retail uses in the area. b. Levels of parking above the first level facing the front or corner side lot line shall have floors and/or facades that are horizontal, not sloped. c. Landscape Requirements: Surface parking lots, where allowed shall have a 99 minimum landscaped setback of fifteen feet (15’) and shall meet interior parking lot landscaping requirements as outlined in Chapter 21A.48, “Landscaping and Buffers”. 2. TSA Transit Station Area District: New uses and development or redevelopment within the TSA Transit Station Area District shall comply with the following standards. a. Surface Parking on Corner Properties: On corner properties, surface parking lots shall be located behind principal buildings or at least sixty feet (60’) from the intersection of the front and corner side lot lines. b. Surface Parking in the Core Area: Surface parking lots in the core area are required to be located behind or to the side of the principal building. (1) When located to the side of a building, the parking lot shall be: (a) Set back a minimum of thirty feet (30’) from a property line adjacent to a public street. The area between the parking lot and the property line adjacent to a public street shall be landscaped or activated with outdoor dining, plazas, or similar features; (b) Screened with a landscaped hedge or wall that is at least thirty-six inches (36”) above grade and no taller than forty-two inches (42”) above grade. Landscaping berms are not permitted; and (c) No wider than what is required for two (2) rows of parking and one (1) drive aisle as provided in the Off Street Parking Standards Manual. (2) Unless a second driveway is necessary to comply with the fire code, a maximum of one (1) driveway and drive aisle shall be permitted per street frontage. The access point shall be located a minimum of one hundred feet (100’) from the intersection of the front and corner side lot lines. If the front or corner side lot line is less than one hundred feet (100’) in length, then the edge of the drive approach shall be located within twenty feet (20’) of the side or rear property line. c. Surface Parking In the Transition Area: (1) Surface parking lots in the transition area are required to be located behind the principal building or to the side of a principal building. (2) When located to the side of a principal building, the parking lot shall be: (a) Set back so that no portion of the parking area (other than the driveway) shall be closer to the street than the front wall setback of the building. In cases where the front wall of the building is located within five feet (5’)of 100 a property line adjacent to a street, the parking lot shall be set back a minimum of eight feet (8’). The space between the parking lot and the property line adjacent to a street shall be landscaped or activated with outdoor dining, plazas, or similar features; and (b) Screened with a landscaped hedge or wall that is at least thirty-six inches (36”) above grade and no taller than forty-two inches (42”) above grade. Landscaped berms are not permitted. C. Recreational Vehicle Parking: 1. Generally: a. Recreational vehicle parking spaces shall be in addition to, and not in lieu of, required off street vehicle parking spaces. b. Recreational vehicles shall not be used for storage of goods, materials, or equipment other than those that are customarily associated with the recreational vehicle. c. All recreational vehicles shall be stored in a safe and secure manner. Any tie downs, tarpaulins, or ropes shall be secured from flapping in windy conditions. d. Recreational vehicles shall not be occupied as a dwelling while parked on the property. e. Recreational vehicle parking is permitted in any enclosed structure conforming to building code and zoning requirements for the zoning district in which it is located. f. Recreational vehicle parking outside of an approved enclosed structure shall be permitted for each residence and shall be limited to one motor home or travel trailer and a total of two (2) recreational vehicles of any type. g. Recreational vehicle parking outside of an enclosed structure shall comply with the standards in this section. 2. Front Yard Parking: Recreational vehicle parking is prohibited in any required or provided front yard. 3. Rear Yard Parking: Recreational vehicles may be parked in the rear yard when they are on a hard surfaced pad compliant with surfacing standards in the Off Street Parking Standards Manual and with access provided by either a hard surfaced driveway, hard surfaced drive strips or an access drive constructed of turf block materials with an irrigation system. 101 4. Side Yard Parking: Recreational vehicle parking in side yards shall be allowed only when topographical factors, the existence of mature trees, or the existence of properly permitted and constructed structures prohibit access to the rear yard. The existence of a fence or other structure that is not part of a building shall not constitute a lack of rear yard access. Any recreational vehicle parking area in a side yard shall: a. Be on a hard surface compliant with the Off Street Parking StandardsManual; b. Be accessed via a driveway compliant with driveway standards of this chapter; c. Not obstruct access to other required parking for the use. 21A.44.070: OFF STREET LOADING AREAS: A. Number and Size of Loading Areas Required: 1. Unless otherwise specified, a required off street loading berth shall be at least ten feet (10’) in width by at least thirty-five feet (35’) in length for short berths, and twelve feet (12’) in width by at least fifty feet (50’) in length for long berths, exclusive of aisle and maneuvering space. Maneuvering aprons of appropriate width and orientation shall be provided and shall be subject to approval by the transportation director. 2. All loading areas shall have a vertical clearance of at least fourteen feet (14’). 3. Off street loading facilities for new developments or for expansion of an existing development shall be provided at the rate specified for a particular use, or if multiple uses, at the rate of the uses combined, in Table 21A.44.070-A, “Off Street Loading Requirements”. Regardless of the combination of uses, all buildings with a gross floor area over 50,000 square feet shall have a minimum of 1 short berth. TABLE 21A.44.070-A: OFF STREET LOADING REQUIREMENTS: Use Gross Floor Area (Square Feet) Number and Size of Berths Hotels, Institutions, and Institutional Living 50,000 - 100,000 1 short Each additional 100,000 1 short 50,000 - 100,000 1 short 102 Office/Commercial Each additional 100,000 up to 500,000 1 short Retail 50,000 - 100,000 1 long Each additional 100,000 1 long Industrial 25,001 - 50,000 1 long 50,001 - 100,000 2 long Each additional 100,000 1 long Multi- Family Residential # of Dwelling Units (Per Building) Number and Size of Berths 40-150 1 short 151-300 2 short Greater than 300 1 additional short per 200 units B. Location and Design of Loading Areas: 1. All required loading berths shall be located on the same development site as the use(s) served. 2. No loading berth shall be located within thirty feet (30’) of the nearest point of intersection of any two (2) streets. 3. No loading berth shall be located in a required front yard. 4. Each required loading berth shall be located and designed to: a. Allow all required vehicle maneuvering and backing movements on-site; b. Minimize conflicts with pedestrian, bicycle, and traffic movement or encroachments into any pedestrian walkway, bicycle lane, public right-of-way, and fire lane; and c. Avoid the need to back into a public street while leaving the site to the maximum extent practicable, as determined by the planning director and the transportation director. 103 5. Landscaping and screening of all loading berths shall be provided to comply with the requirements of Chapter 21A.48, “Landscaping and Buffers”. 6. Where a loading berth is illuminated, the light source shall be shielded so that the light source is not directly visible from any abutting property or abutting private or publicstreet. 7. All signs in loading areas shall comply with Chapter 21A.46, “Signs”, and applicable provisions of the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices. 8. All required loading berths shall comply with the surfacing standards of the OffStreet Parking Standards Manual. 21A.44.080: DRIVE-THROUGH FACILITIES AND VEHICLE STACKING AREAS: A. Number of Stacking Spaces Required: The following standards apply for all uses with vehicle stacking and/or drive-through facilities. 1. All uses with drive-through facilities shall provide the minimum number of on-site stacking spaces indicated in Table 21A.44.080-A, “Required Vehicle Stacking Spaces”. TABLE 21A.44.080-A: REQUIRED VEHICLE STACKING SPACES: Use General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, R-MU-35, R-MU-45, SR- 3, FB-UN1, FB- SE D-2, MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1, CSHBD2 D-1, D-3, D-4, G-MU, TSA- C, UI, FB- UN2, FB- UN3, FB-SC, R-MU Car Wash, Self-Service 3 spaces per bay or stall 2 spaces per bay or stall Car Wash, Automated 4 spaces per lane or stall 3 spaces per lane or stall Food and Beverage Service Uses 5 spaces per service lane 4 spaces per service lane Other Uses 3 spaces per service lane 3 spaces per service lane 104 B. Location and Design of Drive-Through Facilities: 1. In zoning districts where uses with drive-through facilities are allowed and where no front or corner side yard setback is required, the drive-through lanes shall not be located between the front or corner side lot line and any walls of the principal building. 2. Drive-through lanes shall be arranged to avoid conflicts with site access points, access to parking or loading spaces, and internal circulation routes, to the maximum extent practicable. 3. In the General Context zoning districts, a by-pass lane, driveway, or other circulation area around a drive-through facility stacking lane shall be provided for all uses other than automated car washes. financial institutions and restaurant/retail uses. 4. All required stacking spaces shall measure nine (9) feet by twenty (20) feet and shall be counted from the point of service, or final service window. 5. Air quality: Drive through facilities shall post idle-free signs pursuant to Chapter 12.58 of this code. 6. When a drive through use adjoins any residential use or any residential zoning district, a minimum six foot (6’) high masonry wall shall be erected and maintained along such property line. 7. Drive through facility will not result in adverse impacts upon the vicinity after giving consideration to the hours of operation, noise and light generation, traffic circulation, and the site plan. 21A.44.090: MODIFICATIONS TO PARKING AREAS: Applicants requesting development permits or approvals may request adjustments to the standards and requirements in this Chapter 21A.44, “Off Street Parking, Mobility, and Loading“, and the city may approve adjustments to those standards, as described below. A. Administrative Modifications: The planning director or transportation director may approve the following types of modifications without requiring approval of a special exception, provided that the director determines that the adjustment will not create adverse impacts on pedestrian, bicycle, or vehicle safety and that the adjustment is required to accommodate an unusual site feature (such as shape, topography, utilities, or access point constraints) and that the need for the adjustment has not been created by the actions of the applicant. 105 1. Modification to dimensions or geometries of parking, loading, or stacking space, aisles, or maneuvering areas otherwise required by this chapter, other city regulations, or the Off Street Parking Standards Manual; provided that those modifications are consistent with federal and state laws regarding persons with disabilities, including but not limited to the Americans with Disabilities Act. 2. Modifications to bicycle parking or loading berth location or design standards. B. Special Exceptions: The following types of exceptions may be approved through the Special Exception process in Section 21A.52.040, provided that the application meets the criteria for approval of a Special Exception in Section 21A.52.060 in addition to the standards provided in this section. 1. Exceptions Permitted: a. Front Yard Parking Exception: For any zoning district, if front yard parking is prohibited in Table 21A.44.060-A, “Parking Location and Setback Requirements”, it may be allowed if all of the following conditions are met: (1) The rear or side yards cannot be reasonably accessed by vehicles, specifically: (a) Clearance for a driveway could not be provided in the side yard on either side of the building that is free from obstructions that cannot reasonably be avoided, such as utilities, window-wells, a specimen tree, a direct elevation change of three feet (3’) or greater, or retaining walls three feet (3’) high or greater; and (b) There is not a right-of-way or alley adjacent to the property with established rights for access, where: a. The travel distance to the property line is less than one hundred feet (100’) from an improved street and the right-of-way or alley has at least a minimum twelve foot (12’) clearance that is, or could be paved; or b. The travel distance to the property line is more than one hundred feet (100’) from an improved street and the right-of- way or alley has an existing minimum twelve foot (12’) wide paved surface. (2) It is not feasible to build an attached garage that conforms to yard area and setback requirements; (3) Parking is limited to an area that is surfaced in compliance with the Off 106 Street Parking Standards Manual; (4) The parking area is limited to nine feet (9’) wide by twenty feet (20’)deep; (5) Vehicles using the parking area will not project across any sidewalk or into the public right-of-way; and (6) Parking is restricted to passenger vehicles only. b. Vehicle and Equipment Storage Surfacing Exception: Vehicle and equipment storage without hard surfacing may be permitted in the CG, M- 1, M-2 and EI zoning districts provided that: (1) The lot is used for long-term vehicle storage, not for regular parking and/or maneuvering; (2) The vehicles or equipment stored are large and/or are built on tracks that could destroy normal hard surfacing; (3) The parking surface is compacted with six inches (6”) of road base and other semi-hard material with long lasting dust control chemical applied annually; (4) A hard-surfaced cleaning station is installed to prevent tracking of mud and sand onto the public right-of-way; and (5) Any vehicles or equipment that contain oil are stored with pans, drains, or other means to ensure that any leaking oil will not enter the soil. 21A.44.100: USE AND MAINTENANCE: A. Use of Parking Areas: Except as otherwise provided in this section, required off street parking facilities provided for uses listed in Table 21A.44.040-A, “Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking” shall be solely for the parking of automobiles or authorized temporary uses. B. Maintenance: 1. Space allocated to any off street loading berth or related access or maneuvering area shallnot be used to satisfy the parking space requirements for any off street parking. 2. Except in the M-1, M-2, CG, and D districts, no cleaning or maintenance of loading areas using motorized equipment may be performed between ten 107 o’clock (10:00) P.M. andseven o’clock (7:00) A.M. each day, except for snow removal. 21A.44.110: NONCONFORMING PARKING AND LOADING FACILITIES: Nonconforming parking and loading facilities shall be subject to the standards established in Chapter 21A.38, “Nonconforming Uses and Noncomplying Structures”, and the criteria established in this section. A. Continuation of Nonconforming Parking and Loading Facilities: Any parking spaces, loading facilities, or access to public rights-of-way that were lawfully existing or created prior to the effective date of this ordinance, but that have since become nonconforming with the provisions of this chapter through the actions of the city or any governmental entity, shall be allowed to continue, but any expansion of the use or structure, or change of use, after the adoption date of this ordinance shall comply with the provisions of this Chapter 21A.44, “Off Street Parking, Mobility, and Loading“. B. Nonconformity Due to Governmental Acquisition: Where a lot, tract, or parcel is occupied by a lawful structure or use, and where the acquisition of right-of-way by eminent domain, dedication, or purchase by a city, county, state, or federal agency creates noncompliance of the parking, loading, or drive-through facilities with any requirement of this chapter, the parking, loading, or drive-through facility shall be deemed lawful and conforming. This designation shall apply only to noncompliance resulting directly from the acquisition of right-of-way. C. Damage or Destruction: Reconstruction, reestablishment, or repair of any nonconforming parking, loading, or drive- through area involuntarily damaged or destroyed by fire, collapse, explosion or other natural cause is not required to comply with the standards of this chapter. The parking and loading facilities may be restored or continued as they existed prior to the damage or destruction, or in a manner that reduces any nonconformity that existed prior to the damage or destruction. D. Legalization of Garages Converted to Residential Use: Garages attached to single-family and two-family residential structures converted to residential uses before April 12, 1995, and any associated front yard parking, may be legalized by complying with the following requirements: 1. The property owner shall obtain a building permit for all building modifications associated with converting the garage to residential use and the city shall inspect the conversion for substantial compliance with adopted life safety regulations. 2. The driveway leading to the converted garage shall not be removed without 108 replacing the same number of parking spaces (up to the minimum required by this chapter) in alocation authorized by this chapter. 3. Parking on the driveway in the front yard is restricted to passenger vehicles only. SECTION 24. Amending the text of Salt Lake City Code Section 21A.52.030. That Section 21A.52.030 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Special Exceptions: Special Exceptions Authorized) shall be, and hereby is amended to read as follows: 21A.52.030: SPECIAL EXCEPTIONS AUTHORIZED: A. In addition to any other special exceptions authorized elsewhere in this title, the following special exceptions are authorized under the provisions of this title: 1. Accessory building height, including wall height, in excess of the permitted height provided: a. The extra height is for architectural purposes only, such as a steep roof to match existing primary structure or neighborhood character. b. The extra height is to be used for storage of household goods or truss webbing and not to create a second level. c. No windows are located in the roof or on the second level unless it is a design feature only. d. No commercial use is made of the structure or residential use unless it complies with the accessory dwelling unit regulations in this title. 2. Accessory structures in the front yard of double frontage lots, which do not have any rear yard provided: a. The required sight visibility triangle shall be maintained at all times. b. The structure meets all other size and height limits governed by the zoning ordinance. 3. Additional height for fences, walls or similar structures may be granted to exceed the height limits established for fences and walls in Chapter 21A.40 of this title if it is determined that there will be no negative impacts upon the established character of the affected neighborhood and streetscape, maintenance of public and private views, and matters of public safety. Approval of fences, walls and other similar structures 109 may be granted under the following circumstances subject to compliance with other applicable requirements: a. Exceeding the allowable height limits; provided, that the fence, wall or structure is constructed of wrought iron, tubular steel or other similar material, and that the open, spatial and nonstructural area of the fence, wall or other similar structure constitutes at least eighty percent (80%) of its total area; b. Exceeding the allowable height limits on any corner lot; unless the city’s traffic engineer determines that permitting the additional height would cause an unsafe traffic condition; c. Incorporation of ornamental features or architectural embellishments which extend above the allowable height limits; d. Exceeding the allowable height limits, when erected around schools and approved recreational uses which require special height considerations; e. Exceeding the allowable height limits, in cases where it is determined that a negative impact occurs because of levels of noise, pollution, light or other encroachments on the rights to privacy, safety, security and aesthetics; f. Keeping within the character of the neighborhood and urban design of the city; g. Avoiding a walled-in effect in the front yard of any property in a residential district where the clear character of the neighborhood in front yard areas is one of open spaces from property to property; or h. Posing a safety hazard when there is a driveway on the petitioner’s property or neighbor’s property adjacent to the proposed fence, wall or similar structure. 4. Additional building height in commercial districts are subject to the standards in Chapter 21A.26 of this title. 5. Additional foothills building height, including wall height, shall comply with the standards in Chapter 21A.24 of this title. 6. Additional residential building height, including wall height, in the R-1 districts, R-2 districts and SR districts shall comply with the standards in Chapter 21A.24 of this title. 7. Barbed wire fences may be approved subject to the regulations of Chapter 21A.40 of this title. 8. Conditional home occupations subject to the regulations and conditions of Chapter 21A.36 of this title. 110 9. Dividing existing lots containing two (2) or more separate residential structures into separate lots that would not meet lot size, frontage width or setbacks provided: a. The residential structures for the proposed lot split already exist and were constructed legally. b. The planning director agrees and is willing to approve a subdivision application. c. Required parking equal to the parking requirement that existed at the time that each dwelling unit was constructed. 10. Use of the front yard for required parking when the rear or side yards cannot be accessed and it is not feasible to build an attached garage that conforms to yard area and setback requirements, subject to the standards found in Chapter 21A.44 of this title. 11. Grade changes and retaining walls are subject to the regulations and standards of Chapter 21A.36 of this title. 12. Ground mounted central air conditioning compressors or systems, heating, ventilating, pool and filtering equipment located in required side and rear yards within four feet (4’) of the property line. The mechanical equipment shall comply with applicable Salt Lake County Health Department noise standards. 13. Hobby shop, art studio, exercise room or a dressing room adjacent to a swimming pool, or other similar uses in an accessory structure, subject to the following conditions: a. The height of the accessory structure shall not exceed the height limit established by the underlying zoning district unless a special exception allowing additional height is allowed. b. If an accessory building is located within ten feet (10’) of a property line, no windows shall be allowed in the walls adjacent to the property lines. c. If the accessory building is detached, it must be located in the rear yard. d. The total covered area for an accessory building shall not exceed fifty percent (50%) of the building footprint of the principal structure, subject to all accessory building size limitations. 14. In line additions to existing residential or commercial buildings, which are noncomplying as to yard area or height regulations provided: a. The addition follows the existing building line and does not create any new noncompliance. 111 b. No additional dwelling units are added to the structure. c. The addition is a legitimate architectural addition with rooflines and exterior materials designed to be compatible with the original structure. 15. Operation of registered home daycare or registered home preschool facility in residential districts subject to the standards of Chapter 21A.36 of this title. 16. Outdoor dining in required front, rear and side yards subject to the regulations and standards of Chapter 21A.40 of this title. 17. Razor wire fencing may be approved subject to the regulations and standards in Chapter 21A.40 of this title. 18. Replacement or reconstruction of any existing noncomplying segment of a residential or commercial structure or full replacement of a noncomplying accessory structure provided: a. The owner documents that the new construction does not encroach farther into any required rear yard than the structure being replaced. b. The addition or replacement is compatible in design, size and architectural style with the remaining or previous structure. 19. Underground building encroachments into the front, side, rear and corner side yard setbacks provided the addition is totally underground and there is no visual evidence that such an encroachment exists. 20. Window mounted refrigerated air conditioner and evaporative swamp coolers located in required front, corner, side and rear yards within two feet (2’) of a property line shall comply with applicable Salt Lake County Health Department noise standards. 21. Vehicle and equipment storage without hard surfacing in the CG, M-1, M-2 or EI districts, subject to the standards in Chapter 21A.44 of this title. 22. Ground mounted utility boxes may be approved subject to the regulations and standards of Section 21A.40.160 of this title. 23. Legalization of excess dwelling units may be granted subject to the following requirements and standards: a. Purpose: The purpose of this subsection is to implement the existing Salt Lake City community housing plan. This plan emphasizes maintaining existing housing stock in a safe manner that contributes to the vitality and sustainability of neighborhoods within the city. This subsection provides a process that gives owners of property with one or more excess dwelling units not recognized by the 112 city an opportunity to legalize such units based on the standards set forth in this subsection. b. Review Standards: A dwelling unit that is proposed to be legalized pursuant to this subsection shall comply with the following standards. (1) The dwelling unit existed prior to April 12, 1995. In order to determine whether a dwelling unit was in existence prior to April 12, 1995, the unit owner shall provide documentation thereof which may include any of the following: (A) Copies of lease or rental agreements, lease or rent payments, or other similar documentation showing a transaction between the unit owner and tenants; (B) Evidence indicating that prior to April 12, 1995, the city issued a building permit, business license, zoning certificate, or other permit relating to the dwelling unit in question; (C) Utility records indicating existence of a dwelling unit; (D) Historic surveys recognized by the planning director as being performed by a trained professional in historic preservation; (E) Notarized affidavits from a previous owner, tenant, or neighbor; (F) Polk, Cole, or phone directories that indicate existence of the dwelling unit (but not necessarily that the unit was occupied); and (G) Any other documentation that the owner is willing to place into a public record which indicates the existence of the excess unit prior to April 12, 1995. (2) The excess unit has been maintained as a separate dwelling unit since April 12, 1995. In order to determine if a unit has been maintained as a separate dwelling unit, the following may be considered: (A) Evidence listed in Subsection A.24.b(1) of this section indicates that the unit has been occupied at least once every five (5) calendar years; (B) Evidence that the unit was marketed for occupancy if the unit was unoccupied for more than five (5) consecutive years; (C) If evidence of maintaining a separate dwelling unit as required by Subsections A.24.b(2)(A) and A.24.b(2)(B) of this section cannot be established, documentation of construction upgrades may be provided in lieu thereof. 113 (D) Any documentation that the owner is willing to place into a public record which provides evidence that the unit was referenced as a separate dwelling unit at least once every five (5) years. (3) The property where the dwelling unit is located: (A) Can accommodate on site parking as required by this title, or (B) Is located within a one-fourth ( 1/4) mile radius of a fixed rail transit stop or bus stop in service at the time of legalization. (4) Any active zoning violations occurring on the property must be resolved except for those related to excess units. c. Conditions of Approval: Any approved unit legalization shall be subject to the following conditions: (1) The unit owner shall apply for a business license, when required, within fourteen (14) days of special exception approval. (2) The unit owner shall allow the city’s building official or designee to inspect the dwelling unit to determine whether the unit substantially complies with basic life safety requirements as provided in Title 18, Chapter 18.50, “Existing Residential Housing”, of this code. Such inspection shall occur within ninety (90) days of special exception approval or as mutually agreed by the unit owner and the city. (3) All required corrections indicated during the inspection process must be completed within one year unless granted an extension by the zoning administrator. d. Application: In addition to the application requirements in this chapter, an applicant shall submit documentation showing compliance with the standards set forth in Subsection A.24.b of this section. 24. Designation, modification, relocation, or reinstatement of a vintage sign as per Chapter 21A.46 of this title. 25. Additional height for sports related light poles such as light poles for ballparks, stadiums, soccer fields, golf driving ranges and sport fields or where sports lights are located closer than thirty feet (30’) from adjacent residential structures. 114 SECTION 25. Amending the Text of Salt Lake City Code Section 21A.60.020. That Section 21A.60.020 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: List of Terms: List of Defined Terms), shall be and hereby is amended to read as follows: 21A.60.020: LIST OF DEFINED TERMS: A-frame sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Abutting. Access taper. Accessory building or structure. Accessory lot. Accessory structure. Accessory use. Accessory use (on accessory lot). Adaptive reuse of a landmark building. Administrative decision. Agricultural use. Air circulation system. See Section 21A.34.040 of this title. Airport. See also Section 21A.34.040 of this title. Airport elevation. See Section 21A.34.040 of this title. Airport hazard. See Section 21A.34.040 of this title. Airport master plan. See Section 21A.34.040 of this title. Airport reference point. See Section 21A.34.040 of this title. Alcohol, bar establishment. Alcohol, bar establishment (indoor). Alcohol, bar establishment (more than 2,500 square feet in floor area). See Alcohol, bar establishment. Alcohol, bar establishment (outdoor). Alcohol, bar establishment (2,500 square feet or less in floor area). See Alcohol, bar establishment. Alcohol, brewpub. Alcohol, brewpub (indoor). Alcohol, brewpub (more than 2,500 square feet in floor area). See Alcohol, brewpub. Alcohol, brewpub (outdoor). Alcohol, brewpub (2,500 square feet or less in floor area). See Alcohol, brewpub. Alcohol, distillery. Alcohol, liquor store. Alcohol related establishment. Alcohol, tavern. Alcohol, tavern (indoor). Alcohol, tavern (more than 2,500 square feet in floor area). See Alcohol, tavern. Alcohol, tavern (outdoor). Alcohol, tavern (2,500 square feet or less in floor area). See Alcohol, tavern. Alcohol, winery. 115 Alley. Alteration. Alteration, sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Alternative parking property. Ambulance service. Ambulance service (indoor). Ambulance service (outdoor). Amphitheater, formal. Amphitheater, informal. Amusement park. Ancillary mechanical equipment. Animal, cremation service. Animal, kennel. Animal, kennel on lots of five acres or larger. Animal, pet cemetery. Animal, pound. Animal, raising of furbearing animals. Animal rendering. Animal, stable (private). Animal, stable (public). Animal, stockyard. Animal, veterinary office. Animated sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Antenna. Antenna, communication tower. Antenna, communication tower, exceeding the maximum building height in the zone. See Antenna, communication tower. Antenna, low power radio service. Antenna, low power radio service - monopole with antennas and antenna support structures greater than two feet in width. Antenna, low power radio service - monopole with antennas and antenna support structures less than two feet in width. Antenna, roof mounted. Antenna, satellite dish. Antenna, stealth. Antenna, TV. Antenna, wall mounted. Antenna, whip. Apartment. Appeals Hearing Officer. Aquatic resource. Arcade. Architecturally incompatible. Art gallery. Artisan food production. Artists’ loft/studio. 116 Auction (indoor). Auction (outdoor). Auditorium. Automatic amusement device. Automobile. Awning. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Awning sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. BMP. Backflow preventer. Backlit awning sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Bakery, commercial. Balloon. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Banner, public event. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Banner, secured. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Banner, unsecured. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Base zoning district. Basement. Bed and breakfast. Bed and breakfast inn. Bed and breakfast manor. Bench sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Best Management Practice (BMP) (applies only to Chapter 21A.48 of this title). Billboard. See Subsection 21A.46.160.B of this title. Billboard bank. See Subsection 21A.46.160.B of this title. Billboard credit. See Subsection 21A.46.160.B of this title. Billboard (outdoor advertising sign). See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Billboard owner. See Subsection 21A.46.160.B of this title. Biodetention. Blacksmith shop. Block. Block corner. Block face. Blood donation center. Boarding house. Botanical garden. Bottling plant. Brewery. Buffer yard. Buildable area. Building. Building, accessory. Building connection. Building coverage. Building face. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Building, front line of. 117 Building height - in the FR-1, FR-2, FR-3, FP, R-1/5,000, R-1/7,000, R-1/12,000, R-2, SR-1 and SR-3 Districts. Building height - outside FR, FP, R-1, R-2 and SR Districts. Building line. Building materials distribution. Building official. Building or house numbers sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Building plaque sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Building, principal. Building, public. Building security sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Building sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Bulk. Bulk material storage. Bus line station/terminal. Bus line yard and repair facility. Business. Business, mobile. Business park. Caliper. See Subsection 21A.48.135.D of this title. Canopy. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Canopy, drive-through. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Canopy, drive-through, sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Canopy sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Car pool. Carshare. Car wash. Car wash as accessory use to gas station or convenience store that sells gas. Carpet cleaning. Carport. Cemetery. Certificate of appropriateness. Certificate of occupancy. Certificate, zoning. Change of use. Character Conservation District feasibility study. Character defining features. Charity dining hall. Check cashing/payday loan business. Chemical manufacturing and storage. City Council. City Forester. Clearance (of a sign). See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Clinic (medical/dental). Cold frame. Commercial Districts. 118 Commercial food preparation. Commercial service establishment. Commercial vehicle. Commercial video arcade. Common areas, space and facilities. Communication tower. Community correctional facility. Community correctional facility, large. Community correctional facility, small. Community garden. Community recreation center. Compatibility. Compatible design. Compatible land use. Complete demolition. Composting. Concept development plan. Concrete and/or asphalt manufacturing. Conditional use. Condominium - condominium project and condominium unit. Condominium Ownership Act of 1975. See title 20, cChapter 20.56 of this Code. Condominium Ownership Act of 1975 or Act. Condominium unit. Consensus. Construction period. Construction sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Contractor’s yard/office. Convent/monastery. Convention center. Conversion. Corner building. Corner lot. Corner side yard. Crematorium. Critical root zone. dbh. See Subsection 21A.48.135.D of this title. Daycare. Daycare center, adult. Daycare center, child. Daycare, nonregistered home. Daycare, registered home daycare or preschool. Decibel. Dental laboratory/research facility. Design capacity. Design review. Development. 119 Development entry sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Development pattern. Diameter at breast height. See Subsection 21A.48.135.D of this title. Directional or informational sign (private). See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Directory sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Disabled. District plan and design standards. Dormer. Drive-through facility. Drop forge industry. Dwell time. See Subsection 21A.46.160.B of this title. Dwelling. Dwelling, accessory guest and servants’ quarters. Dwelling, accessory unit. Dwelling, assisted living facility (large). Dwelling, assisted living facility (limited capacity). Dwelling, assisted living facility (small). Dwelling, fraternity, sorority. Dwelling, group home (large). Dwelling, group home (small). Dwelling, group home (small), when located above or below first story office, retail, or commercial use, or on the first story where the unit is not located adjacent to street frontage. See Dwelling, group home (small). Dwelling, living quarters for caretaker or security guard. Dwelling, living quarters for caretaker or security guard, limited to uses on lots one acre in size or larger and accessory to a principal use allowed by the zoning district. See Dwelling, living quarters for caretaker or security guard. Dwelling, manufactured home. Dwelling, mobile home. Dwelling, modular home. Dwelling, multi-family. Dwelling, residential support (large). Dwelling, residential support (small). Dwelling, rooming (boarding) house. Dwelling, single-family. Dwelling, single-family attached. Dwelling, single room occupancy. Dwelling, twin home and two-family. Dwelling, two-family. Dwelling unit. ET or ETo. ETAF. Ecological restoration project. Electronic billboard. See Subsection 21A.46.160.B of this title. Electronic changeable copy sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Electronic sign. See Subsection 21A.46.160.B of this title. 120 Eleemosynary facility. Elevation area. Elevation area, first floor. Emergency medical service facility. End of life care. Equipment rental (indoor and/or outdoor). Equipment rental, sales, and service, heavy. Evapotranspiration (ET) rate. Evergreen. Excess dwelling units. Exhibition hall. Existing billboard. See Subsection 21A.46.160.B of this title. Existing/established subdivision. Explosive manufacturing and storage. Externally illuminated sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Extractive industry. FAA. See Section 21A.34.040 of this title. Fairground. Family. Farmers’ market. Fee schedule. Fence. Fence, electric security. Fence, opaque or solid. Fence, open. Financial institution. Financial institution, with drive-through facility. Fixed dimensional standards. Flag, corporate. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Flag lot. Flag, official. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Flag, pennant. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Flammable liquids or gases, heating fuel distribution and storage. Flat sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Flea market (indoor). Flea market (outdoor). Floor. Floor area, gross. Floor area, usable. Food processing. Foot-candle. See Subsection 21A.46.160.B of this title. Freestanding sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Front yard. See Yard, front. Fuel center. Fugitive dust. Funeral home or mortuary. 121 Garage. Garage, attached. Garage/yard sale sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Gas price sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Gas pump sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Gas station. Gateway. See Subsection 21A.46.160.B of this title. General Plan. Golf course. Government facility requiring special design features for security purposes. Government office. Government sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Governmental facility. Grade, established. Grade, finished. Grade, natural. Grain elevator. Greenhouse. Gross floor area. Ground cover. Guest. Hard surfaced. Hazardous waste processing or storage. Health and fitness facility. Health hazard. Heavy manufacturing. Height. See Section 21A.34.040 of this title. Height, exterior wall. Height (of a sign). See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Height, sign face. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Heliport. Heliport, accessory. See Heliport. Historic buildings or sites. Historic Landmark Commission. Historic site. Historical marker. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Home occupation. Homeless resource center. Homeless shelter. Hoop house. Hospice. Hospital, including accessory lodging facility. Hotel/motel. House museum in landmark site. Hunting club, duck. Hydrozones. 122 Illegal sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Illuminance. See Subsection 21A.46.160.B of this title. Impact mitigation report. Impact statement. Impound lot. Incinerator, medical waste/hazardous waste. Incompatible use. See Section 21A.34.040 of this title. Industrial assembly. Infill. Inland port. Inland port land use application. Inland port use. Institution. Interior side yard. Interior sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Intermodal transit passenger hub. Internally illuminated sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Interpretation. Interpretation, use. Irrigation audit. Jail. Jewelry fabrication. Kiosk. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Laboratory, medical, dental, optical. Laboratory, testing. Land use. Land Use Appeal Authority. Land use applicant. Land use application. Land Use Authority. Land use type (similar land use type). Landfill. Landfill, commercial. Landfill, construction debris. Landfill, end use plan. Landfill, Municipal. Landmark site. Landscape area. Landscape BMPs manual. Landscape buffer. Landscape plan. Landscape yard. Landscaping. Lattice tower. Laundry, commercial. Legal conforming. 123 Letter sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Library. Light manufacturing. Limousine service. Limousine service (large). Limousine service (small). Locally grown. Lodging house. Logo. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Lot. Lot area. Lot area, net. Lot assemblage. Lot, corner. Lot depth. Lot, flag. Lot, interior. Lot line, corner side. Lot line, front. Lot line, interior side. Lot line, rear. Lot width. Low volume irrigation. Major streets. Manufactured home. Manufactured/mobile home sales and service. Manufacturing, heavy. Manufacturing, light. Marquee. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Marquee sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Master plan. Maximum extent practicable. See Subsection 21A.48.135.D of this title. Meeting hall of membership organization. Memorial sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Mid block area. Mixed use development. Mobile food business. Mobile food court. Mobile food trailer. Mobile food truck. Monument sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Motel/hotel. Motion. See Subsection 21A.46.160.B of this title. Mulch. Municipal service uses, including City utility uses and police and fire stations. Museum. 124 Nameplate sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Natural open space. Natural resource. Neighborhood identification sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Neon public parking sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. New billboard. See Subsection 21A.46.160.B of this title. New construction. New development sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Noncomplying lot. Noncomplying structure. Nonconforming billboard. See Subsection 21A.46.160.B of this title. Nonconforming sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Nonconforming use. See also Section 21A.34.040 of this title. Nonconformity. Nonprecision instrument runway. See Section 21A.34.040 of this title. Nursing care facility. Oasis. Obstruction. Off premises sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Off-site. Off street parking. Office. Office, accessory use supporting an institutional use. Office and/or reception center in landmark site. Office, excluding medical and dental clinic and office. Office, publishing company. Office, research related. Office, single practitioner medical, dental, and health. On premises sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Open air mall. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Open space. Open space area. Open space on lots less than four acres in size. Outdoor advertising sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Outdoor dining. Outdoor television monitor. Overlay district. Overspray. Owner occupant. Package delivery facility. Paint manufacturing. Parcel. Park. Park and ride lot. Park banner sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Park strip. 125 Park strip landscaping. Parking, commercial. Parking facility, shared. Parking garage. Parking garage, automated. Parking, intensified reuse. Parking, leased. Parking, leased - alternative parking. Parking lot. Parking, off-site. Parking, shared. Parking space. Parking study. Parking study - alternative parking. Parking, tandem. Parking, unbundled. Patio. Pedestrian connection. Perennial. Performance standards. Performing arts production facility. Person. See also Section 21A.34.040 of this title. Persons with disabilities. Philanthropic use. Pitched roof. Place of worship. Place of worship on lot less than four acres in size. Planned development. Planning commission. Planning director. Planting season. Plaza. Pole sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Political sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Portable sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Poultry farm or processing plant. Precision instrument runway. See Section 21A.34.040 of this title. Premises. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Prepared food, takeout. Primary entrance. Primary surface. See Section 21A.34.040 of this title. Printing plant. Projecting building sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Projecting business storefront sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Projecting parking entry sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Public safety sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. 126 Public transportation, employer sponsored. Quality of life. Radio, television station. Railroad, freight terminal facility. Railroad, passenger station. Railroad, repair shop. Rainwater harvesting. Real estate sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Rear yard. Reception center. Record of survey map. Recreation (indoor). Recreation (outdoor). Recreation vehicle park. Recreational (playground) equipment. Recycling collection station. Recycling container. Recycling processing center (indoor). Recycling processing center (outdoor). Refinery, petroleum products. Relocatable office building. Research and development facility. Research facility, medical. Research facility, medical/dental. Residential districts. Residential structure. Restaurant. Restaurant, with drive-through facility. Restaurant, with or without drive-through facility. Retail goods establishment. Retail goods establishment, plant and garden shop with outdoor retail sales area. Retail goods establishment, with drive-through facility. Retail goods establishment, with or without drive-through facility. Retail, sales and service accessory use when located within a principal building. Retail, sales and service accessory use when located within a principal building and operated primarily for the convenience of employees. Retail service establishment. Retail service establishment, electronic repair shop. Retail service establishment, furniture repair shop. Retail service establishment, upholstery shop. Retail service establishment, with drive-through facility. Retaining wall. Reuse water. Reverse vending machine. Rock, sand and gravel storage and distribution. Roof sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. 127 Runway. See Section 21A.34.040 of this title. Sales and display (outdoor). Salt Lake City landscape BMPs for water resource efficiency and protection. Salt Lake City plant list and hydrozone schedule. School, college or university. School, K - 12 private. School, K - 12 public. School, medical/nursing. School, music conservatory. School, professional and vocational. School, professional and vocational (with outdoor activities). School, professional and vocational (without outdoor activities). School, seminary and religious institute. Schools, public or private. Seasonal farm stand. Seasonal item sales. Setback. Sexually oriented business. Shopping center. Shopping center identification sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Shopping center pad site. Side yard. Sight distance triangle. Sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Sign face. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Sign face area. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Sign graphics. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Sign maintenance. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Sign master plan agreement. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Sign painting/fabrication. Sign painting/fabrication (indoor). Sign structure or support. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Single-family dwelling. Site development permit. Site plan. Sketch plan review. Slaughterhouse. Sludge. Small brewery. Smoke or smoking. Snipe sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Snow cone and shaved ice hut. Social service mission. Social service mission and charity dining hall. Soil amendment. Solar array. 128 Solar energy collection system, small. Sound attenuation. See Section 21A.34.040 of this title. Special event sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Special gateway. See Subsection 21A.46.160.B of this title. Special purpose districts. Specimen tree. See Subsection 21A.48.135.D of this title. Spot zoning. Stabilizing. Stable. Stadium. See also Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Storage, accessory (outdoor). Storage and display (outdoor). Storage (outdoor). Storage, public (outdoor). Storage, self. Store, convenience. Store, conventional department. Store, fashion oriented department. Store, mass merchandising. Store, pawnshop. Store, specialty. Store, specialty fashion department. Store, superstore and hypermarket. Store, warehouse club. Storefront. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Story (floor). Story, half. Street. Street frontage. Street trees. Streetscape. Structural alteration. Structural soil. Structure. See also Section 21A.34.040 of this title. Structure, accessory. Studio, art. Studio, motion picture. Subdivision. TV antenna. Taxicab facility. Temporarily irrigated area. Temporary embellishment. See Subsection 21A.46.160.B of this title. Temporary sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Temporary use. Theater, live performance. Theater, live performance or movie. 129 Theater, movie. Tier 2 water target. Tire distribution retail/wholesale. Transportation terminal, including bus, rail and trucking. Treasured landscape. Tree. See Section 21A.34.040 of this title. Tree protection fencing. See Subsection 21A.48.135.D of this title. Tree protection zone. See Subsection 21A.48.135.D of this title. Trellis. Truck freight terminal. Truck stop. Trucking, repair, storage, etc., associated with extractive industries. Turf. Twirl time. See Subsection 21A.46.160.B of this title. Two-family dwelling. Undevelopable area. Unique residential population. Unit. Unit legalization, implied permit. Unit legalization permit. Unit legalization, substantial compliance with Life and Safety Codes. Urban agriculture. Urban farm. Use, principal. Use, unique nonresidential. Used or occupied. Utility, building or structure. Utility, electric generation facility. Utility runway. See Section 21A.34.040 of this title. Utility, sewage treatment plant. Utility, solid waste transfer station. Utility, transmission wire, line, pipe or pole. Vacant lot. Vanpool. Vanpool, employer sponsored. Variance. Vegetation. Vehicle. Vehicle, auction. Vehicle, automobile and truck repair. Vehicle, automobile and truck sales and rental (including large truck). Vehicle, automobile part sales. Vehicle, automobile rental agency. Vehicle, automobile repair, major. Vehicle, automobile repair, minor. Vehicle, automobile sales/rental and service. 130 Vehicle, automobile sales/rental and service (indoor). Vehicle, automobile salvage and recycling (indoor). Vehicle, automobile salvage and recycling (outdoor). Vehicle, boat/recreational vehicle sales and service. Vehicle, boat/recreational vehicle sales and service (indoor). Vehicle, electric. Vehicle, recreational. Vehicle, recreational vehicle (RV) sales and service. Vehicle, truck repair (large). Vehicle, truck sales and rental (large). Vehicular sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Vending cart. Vending machine sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Vertical clearance. Vintage sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Visible. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Visual runway. See Section 21A.34.040 of this title. Wall sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Warehouse. Warehouse, accessory. Warehouse, accessory to retail and wholesale business (maximum 5,000 square foot floor plate). Water body/waterway. Water budget. Water feature. Welding shop. Wholesale distribution. Wind energy system, large. Wind energy system, small. Window sign. See Chapter 21A.46 of this title. Wireless telecommunications facility. Woodworking mill. Yard. Yard, corner side. Yard, front. Yard, interior side. Yard, rear. Yard, side. Zoning Administrator. Zoning districts. Zoning lot. Zoning map. Zoological park. 131 SECTION 26. Amending the Text of Salt Lake City Code Section 21A.62.040. That Section 21A.62.040 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Definitions: Definitions of Terms), shall be and hereby is amended as follows: a. Amending the definition of “Automobile.” That the definition of “Automobile” shall be amended to read as follows: AUTOMOBILE: A self-propelled vehicle with wheels that can legally operate within a public right-of-way. The term includes but is not limited to passenger cars, light trucks, and recreational vehicles. b. Amending the definition of “Alternative parking property.” That the definition of “Alternative parking property” shall be amended to read as follows: ALTERNATIVE PARKING PROPERTY: The property for which an alternative parking requirement is proposed, pursuant to Section 21A.44.050 of this title. c. Amending the definition of “Biodetention.” That the definition of “Biodetention” shall be amended to read as follows: BIODETENTION: A low impact development term also sometimes called a rain garden, biofilter or porous landscape detention that achieves on-site retention of stormwater through the use of vegetated depressions engineered to collect, store, and facilitate runoff infiltration. d. Amending the definition of “Car pool.” That the definition of “Car pool” shall be amended to read as follows: CAR POOL: A group of two or more commuters, including the driver, who share the ride to and from work or other destination on a regularly scheduled basis. e. Adding the definition of “Carshare.” That Section 21A.62.040 shall be amended to add the definition of “Carshare”, which shall read as follows: CARSHARE: A membership-based model of car use where people rent or borrow cars for short periods of time, often by the hour. Vehicles may be made available 132 through private individuals, a property owner/manager, or commercial companies, but are managed through a facilitator. f. Amending the definition of “Change of use.” That the definition of “Change of use” shall be amended to read as follows: CHANGE OF USE: The replacement of an existing use by a new use, or a change in the nature of an existing. A change of ownership, tenancy, name or management, or a change in product or service within the same use classification where the previous nature of the use, line of business, or other function is substantially unchanged is not a change of use. The conversion of existing residential units to condominiums is not a change of use. g. Amending the definition of “Commercial vehicle.” That the definition of “Commercial vehicle” shall be amended to read as follows: COMMERCIAL VEHICLE: A vehicle associated with a business that exceeds one (1) ton capacity. This includes but is not limited to buses, dump trucks, stake body trucks, step vans, tow trucks and tractor trailers. Taxis and limousines shall also be considered commercial vehicles. h. Adding the definition of “Design capacity.” That Section 21A.62.040 shall be amended to add the definition of “Design capacity”, which shall read as follows: DESIGN CAPACITY: The maximum occupancy of a building or structure based on the fire and/or building code, whichever allows occupancy by a larger group of people. i. Amending the definition of “Development.” That the definition of “Development” shall be amended to read as follows: DEVELOPMENT: A. The carrying out of any building activity, the making of any material change in the use or appearance of any structure or land, or the dividing of land into parcels by any person. The following activities or uses shall be taken for the purposes of these regulations to involve “development”: 1. The construction of any principal building or structure; 133 2. Increase in the intensity of use of land, such as an increase in the number of dwelling units or an increase in nonresidential use intensity that requires additional parking; 3. Alteration of a shore or bank of a pond, river, stream, lake or other waterway; 4. Commencement of drilling (except to obtain soil samples), the driving of piles, or excavation on a parcel of land; 5. Demolition of a structure; 6. Clearing of land as an adjunct of construction, including clearing or removal of vegetation and including any significant disturbance of vegetation or soil manipulation; and 7. Deposit of refuse, solid or liquid waste, or fill on a parcel of land. B. The following operations or uses shall not be taken for the purpose of these regulations to involve “development”: 1. Work by a highway or road agency or railroad company for the maintenance of a road or railroad track, if the work is carried out on land within the boundaries of the right-of-way; 2. Utility installations as stated in sSubsection 21A.02.050.B of this title; 3. Landscaping for residential uses; and 4. Work involving the maintenance of existing landscaped areas and existing rights-of-way such as setbacks and other planting areas. j. Amending the definition of “Floor area, gross.” That the definition of “Floor area, gross” shall be amended to read as follows: FLOOR AREA, GROSS: A. For determining size of establishment, the sum of the gross horizontal area of all floors of the building measured from the exterior face of the exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating two (2) buildings. The floor area of a building shall include basement floor area, penthouses, attic space having headroom of seven feet (7’) or more, interior balconies and mezzanines, enclosed porches, and floor area devoted to accessory uses. Space devoted to open air off street parking or loading shall not be included in floor area. 134 B. The floor area of structures devoted to bulk storage of materials including, but not limited to, grain elevators and petroleum storage tanks, shall be determined on the basis of height in feet (i.e., 10 feet in height shall equal 1 floor). k. Amending the definition of “Floor area, usable.” That the definition of “Floor area, usable” shall be amended to read as follows: FLOOR AREA, USABLE: For determining off street parking and loading requirements, the sum of the gross horizontal areas of all floors of the building, as measured from the outside of the exterior walls, devoted to the principal use, including accessory storage areas located within selling or working space such as counters, racks, or closets, and any floor area devoted to retailing activities, to the production or processing of goods or to business or professional offices. Floor area for the purposes of measurement for off street parking spaces shall not include: A. Floor area devoted primarily to mechanical equipment or unfinished storage areas; B. Floor area devoted to off street parking or loading facilities, including aisles, ramps, and maneuvering space. l. Amending the definition of “Garage.” That the definition of “Garage” shall be amended to read as follows: GARAGE: An accessory building or portion of a building designed or used for the storage of vehicles used by the occupants of the principle building. m. Amending the definition of “Garage, attached.” That the definition of “Garage, attached” shall be amended to read as follows: GARAGE, ATTACHED: A garage that has a roof or wall of which fifty percent (50%) or more is attached to and in common with a principal building. An attached garage shall be considered part of the principal building and shall be subject to all yard requirements of the principal building. n. Amending the definition of “Hard surfaced.” That the definition of “Hard surfaced” shall be amended to read as follows: 135 HARD SURFACED: A concrete, asphalt, brick, stone turf block, or other surface approved by the city engineer that is suitable for vehicle traffic. o. Amending the definition of “Off site.” That the definition of “Off site” shall be amended to read as follows: OFF-SITE: A lot that is separate from the lot on which the principal use is located. p. Amending the definition of “Off street parking.” That the definition of “Off street parking” shall be amended to read as follows: OFF STREET PARKING: A site or portion of a site devoted to the parking of automobiles in an area that is not a public or private street or other public right-of- way, including parking spaces, aisles, driveways, and associated landscaped areas. q. Amending the definition of “Outdoor dining.” That the definition of “Outdoor dining” shall be amended to read as follows: OUTDOOR DINING: A dining area with seats and/or table(s) located outdoors of a restaurant, brewpub, bar establishment, tavern, market, deli, or other retail sales establishment that sells food and/or drinks, and which is either: a) located entirely outside the walls of the building of the subject business, or b) enclosed on two (2) sides or less by the walls of the building with or without a solid roof cover, or c) enclosed on three (3) sides by the walls of the building without a solid roof cover. r. Adding the definition of “Park and ride lot.” That Section 21A.62.040 shall be amended to add the definition of “Park and ride lot”, which shall read as follows: PARK AND RIDE LOT: An area or structure intended to accommodate parked vehicles for the general public, where commuters park their vehicles and continue travel to another destination via public transit, carpool, vanpool, or bicycle. Parking lot may be shared with other uses or stand alone. s. Adding the definition of “Parking garage.” That Section 21A.62.040 shall be amended to add the definition of “Parking garage”, which shall read as follows: 136 PARKING GARAGE: A structure or part of a structure used primarily for the housing, parking, or storage of automobiles. t. Amending the definition of “Parking, intensified reuse.” That the definition of “Parking, intensified reuse” shall be amended to read as follows: PARKING, INTENSIFIED REUSE: “Intensified reuse parking” means the change of the use of a building or structure, the past or present use of which may or may not be legally nonconforming as to parking, to a use which would require a greater number of parking stalls available on site which would otherwise be required pursuant to Section 21A.44.040 of this title. Intensified parking reuse shall not include residential uses in residential zoning districts other than single room occupancy residential uses and unique residential populations. u. Amending the definition of “Parking, intensified reuse.” That the definition of “Parking, intensified reuse” shall be amended to read as follows: PARKING LOT: An area on the surface of the land used for the parking of more than four (4) automobiles. Areas designated for the display of new and used vehicles for sale are not included in this definition. v. Amending the definition of “Parking, off site” That the definition of “Parking, off site” shall be amended to read as follows: PARKING, OFF-SITE: An off-street parking area intended to serve one or more uses and that is located on a different parcel or lot than the use(s) it is intended to serve. w. Deleting the definition of “Parking, off site (to support nonconforming uses in a residential zone or uses in the CN or CB zones).” That Section 21A.62.040 shall be amended to delete the definition of “Parking, off site (to support nonconforming uses in a residential zone or uses in the CN or CB zones)”. x. Deleting the definition of “Parking, park and ride lot.” That Section 21A.62.040 shall be amended to delete the definition of “Parking, park and ride lot”. 137 y. Deleting the definition of “Parking, park and ride lot shared with existing use.” That Section 21A.62.040 shall be amended to delete the definition of “Parking, park and ride lot shared with existing use”. z. Amending the definition of “Parking, shared” That the definition of “Parking, shared” shall be amended to read as follows: PARKING, SHARED: Joint use of a parking lot or area for more than one principal use. aa. Amending the definition of “Parking space” That the definition of “Parking space” shall be amended to read as follows: PARKING SPACE: Space within a parking area of certain dimensions as defined in Chapter 21A.44 of this title, exclusive of access drives, aisles, ramps, columns, for the storage of one vehicle. bb. Amending the definition of “Parking study” That the definition of “Parking study” shall be amended to read as follows: PARKING STUDY: A study prepared by a licensed professional traffic engineer specifically addressing the parking demand generated by a use and which provides information necessary to determine whether proposed parking will have a material negative impact to adjacent or neighboring properties. cc. Amending the definition of “Parking, tandem” That the definition of “Parking, tandem” shall be amended to read as follows: PARKING, TANDEM: The in-line parking of one vehicle behind another in such a way that one parking space can only be accessed through another parking space. dd. Adding the definition of “Planning director.” That Section 21A.62.040 shall be amended to add the definition of “Planning director”, which shall read as follows: 138 PLANNING DIRECTOR: The director of the Salt Lake City Planning Division, or his/her designee. ee. Deleting the definition of “Planning official.” That Section 21A.62.040 shall be amended to delete the definition of “Planning official”. ff. Adding the definition of “Primary entrance.” That Section 21A.62.040 shall be amended to add the definition of “Primary entrance”, which shall read as follows: PRIMARY ENTRANCE: The entrance to a building, parcel, or development most used by the public for day-to-day ingress and egress. gg. Amending the definition of “Street” That the definition of “Street” shall be amended to read as follows: STREET: A vehicular way which may also serve for all or part of its width as a way for pedestrian traffic, whether called street, highway, thoroughfare, parkway, throughway, road, avenue, boulevard, lane, place, alley, mall or otherwise designated. hh. Amending the definition of “Vanpool” That the definition of “Vanpool” shall be amended to read as follows: VANPOOL: A group of seven (7) to fifteen (15) commuters, including the driver, who share the ride to and from work or other destination on a regularly scheduled basis. ii. Adding the definition of “Vehicle.” That Section 21A.62.040 shall be amended to add the definition of “Vehicle”, which shall read as follows: VEHICLE: A device by which any person or property may be transported upon a public highway except devices used exclusively upon stationary rails or tracks or exclusively moved by human power. 139 jj. Amending the definition of “Vehicle, electric” That the definition of “Vehicle, electric” shall be amended to read as follows: VEHICLE, ELECTRIC: A device which is considered a vehicle that uses electricity as its primary source of power, such as a plug-in electric vehicle or a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle. An electric vehicle does not include devices that are moved by human power. kk. Adding the definition of “Vehicle, recreational.” That Section 21A.62.040 shall be amended to add the definition of “Vehicle, recreational”, which shall read as follows: VEHICLE, RECREATIONAL: Any motorized vehicle and/or associated non- motorized equipment used for camping, traveling, boating, or other leisure activities including, but not limited to campers, boats, travel trailers, motor homes, snow mobiles, wave runners, and other vehicles designed for traveling on water (motorized and non-motorized). Trailers used for transporting this type of vehicle are also included within this definition. SECTION 27. Replacing Illustration I in Salt Lake City Code Section 21A.62.050. That Section 21A.62.050 of the Salt Lake City Code (Zoning: Definitions: Illustrations of Selected Definitions) shall be, and hereby is amended to replace Illustration I as follows: ILLUSTRATION I SIGHT DISTANCE TRIANGLE 140 SECTION 28. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall become effective on the date of its first publication. Passed by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah, this ______ day of ______________, 202_. ______________________________ CHAIRPERSON ATTEST AND COUNTERSIGN: ______________________________ CITY RECORDER Transmitted to Mayor on _______________________. 141 Mayor’s Action: _______Approved. _______Vetoed. ______________________________ MAYOR ______________________________ CITY RECORDER (SEAL) Bill No. ________ of 202_. Published: ______________. Ordinance amending parking regulations (final) APPROVED AS TO FORM Salt Lake City Attorney’s Office Date:__________________________________ By: ___________________________________ Paul C. Nielson, Senior City Attorney August 31, 2020 TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. PROJECT CHRONOLOGY 2. NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL HEARING 3. PLANNING COMMISSION A) AGENDA NOTICE B) STAFF REPORT C) AGENDA AND MINUTES D) STAFF PRESENTATION SLIDES E) ADDITIONAL PUBLIC COMMENTS RECEIVED 4. ORIGINAL PETITION 1. PROJECT CHRONOLOGY PARKING CHAPTER PROJECT CHRONOLOGY Petition: PLNPCM2017-00753 21A.44- Off Street Parking, Mobility and Loading Zoning Text Amendments May 2017 Planning staff developed and released a Request for Proposal to re-write Chapter 21A.44, Off Street Parking, Mobility and Loading Chapter of the zoning ordinance Clarion Associates submitted the lone response to the request June 2017 Selection committee awarded contract to Clarion Associates. Committee represented the following divisions/departments: Planning, Transportation, Redevelopment Authority, and Housing and Neighborhood Development July 2017 Contract finalized, and project kickoff meeting held with Clarion Associates to discuss issues and goals September 2017 Mayor initiates the petition PLNPCM2017-00753 regarding Chapter 21A.44 amendment Public Engagement Team conducts meeting with Clarion Associates and identified business and developer stakeholders to gather initial comments Collected comments from Bicycle Advisory Board at monthly meeting Internal meetings with the following divisions: Planning, Building Services, and Transportation divisions October 2017 Planning Commission briefing Business Advisory Board briefing November 2017 Public survey conducted online with results given to Clarion Associates for consideration December 2017 Public open house held at Liberty Senior Center February 2018 Draft chapter received from Clarion Associates March April 2018 Draft chapter circulated to city departments for review and comment Department comments sent to Clarion for incorporation into a public draft May 2018 Clarion provided first public draft and met with external steering group June Dec 2018 Project on hold due to changes in Planning staff, new project manager Jan June 2019 Planning staff re-started work on the project and began public outreach with The Downtown Alliance and community council presentations June July 2019 public contacts for review Planning staff conducted six public open houses to acquire public input - Main library (2) - Glendale library - Partners in the Park evening event - Sugar House fire station (2) September 2019 Planning staff held two work sessions with the Planning Commission (September 11 and September 25) January 2020 Public Hearing and Planning Commission recommendation for adoption 2. NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL HEARING NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Salt Lake City Council is considering Petition PLNPCM2017-00753 Off Street Parking, Mobility, and Loading Ordinance - A request by former Mayor Jackie Biskupski to modify Zoning Ordinance Chapter 21A.44 Off-Street Parking, Mobility, and Loading. The overall goal of the project is to make the parking chapter more user friendly while still accomplishing related citywide goals related to economic development, sustainability, and land use. The proposed text amendments to the Off Street Parking Ordinance include: 1. Updated parking requirements to better reflect current market demand in the City based on community feedback and previous parking studies commissioned by the City and RDA; 2. Simplify confusing parking regulations that are difficult for property owners to understand and use significant staff resource to interpret and administer; 3. Address technical issues that have been identified through the day to day administration of the parking chapter; and 4. Establish a framework that allows for a parking ordinance that can be responsive to the lopment patterns. The amendment will affect chapter 21A.44 of the zoning ordinance. Related parking provisions of Title 21A.44 may also be amended as part of this petition. As part of their study, the City Council is holding two advertised public hearings to receive comments regarding the petition. During these hearings, anyone desiring to address the City Council concerning this issue will be given an opportunity to speak. The Council may consider adopting the ordinance on the same night of the second public hearing. The hearing will be held electronically: DATE: Date #1 and Date #2 TIME: 7:00 p.m. PLACE: **This meeting will not have a physical location. **This will be an electronic meeting pursuant to the Salt Lake City Emergency Proclamation. If you are interested in participating in the Public Hearing, please visit our website at https://www.slc.gov/council/ to learn how you can share your comments during the meeting. Comments may also be provided by calling the 24- Hour comment line at (801)535-7654 or sending an email to council.comments@slcgov.com. All comments received through any source are shared with the Council and added to the public record. If you have any questions relating to this proposal or would like to review the file, please call Eric Daems at 801-535-7236 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday or via e-mail at eric.daems@slcgov.com People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodation no later than 48 hours in advance in order to participate in this hearing. Please make requests at least two business days in advance. To make a request, please contact the City Council Office at council.comments@slcgov.com , 801-535-7600, or relay service 711. 3. PLANNING COMMISSION A. Original Notice and Postmark December 30, 2019 3. PLANNING COMMISSION B. Staff Report January 8, 2020 PLANNING DIVISION COMMUNITY & NEIGHBORHOODS Staff Report TO:Salt Lake City Planning Commission FROM: Eric Daems, AICP, Principal Planner DATE: January 8th, 2020 RE: PLNPCM2017-00753- Off-Street Parking, Mobility, and Loading Ordinance Amendment ZONING TEXT AMENDMENT PROPERTY ADDRESS: City-Wide MASTER PLAN: Plan Salt Lake ZONING DISTRICTS: All REQUEST: A request by Mayor Jackie Biskupski to review and modify Zoning Ordinance Chapter 21A.44 Off- Street Parking, Mobility, and Loading. The overall goal of the project is to make the parking chapter more user friendly while still accomplishing related citywide goals related to economic development, sustainability, and land use. The proposed text amendments to the Off-Street Parking Ordinance include: 1. Updated parking requirements to better reflect current market demand in the City based on community feedback and previous parking studies commissioned by the City and RDA; 2. Simplify confusing parking regulations that are difficult for property owners to understand and use significant staff resource to interpret and administer; 3. Address technical issues that have been identified through the day to day administration of the parking chapter; and 4. Establish a framework that allows for a parking ordinance that can be responsive to the changing dynamics of Salt Lake City’s development patterns. RECOMMENDATION: Based on the information in this staff report and the factors to consider for zoning text amendments, Planning Staff recommends that the Planning Commission forward a positive recommendation to the City Council to adopt the proposed zoning ordinance text amendments with the following condition: 1. Ordinance language be amended as necessary to ensure consistency with other code sections and references in the zoning ordinance. ATTACHMENTS: A. Petition Initiation B. Proposed Parking Ordinance Page 1 C. Off-Street Parking Manual D. Parking Context Map E. Analysis of Standards F. Master Plan Compatibility G. Public Process Timeline H. Public Comments I. City Department Comments BACKGROUND: As transportation and land uses change over time, the demand for parking changes. Cities frequently struggle to strike a balance between too much parking and inadequate parking. Parking requirements that are too high can waste land, increase development costs, lead to demolition of structures to meet parking requirements, increase stormwater runoff, compromise water quality, and discourage pedestrian activity. Parking requirements that are too low may lead to increased traffic congestion, difficulty leasing or selling property, and spillover parking onto adjacent residential streets. In June 2017, the Planning Division hired consulting firm Clarion and Associates to perform a comprehensive review and update of Chapter 21A.44 Off-Street Parking, Mobility, and Loading of the zoning ordinance. The provisions of this chapter determine the parking regulations in all areas of the City, but do not include regulations for on-street parking. The process included internal meetings with City divisions most closely involved with the parking chapter and a thorough public engagement plan that is outlined in Attachment G of this report. Following the completion of the work of the consultant, Planning Staff worked to address commentary received, finish the public engagement efforts, and to produce a fully revised parking ordinance. The proposed revisions are primarily located within Chapter 21A.44, but other sections of the zoning code related to parking are also proposed to be amended. Project Scope: This project updates the City’s regulations for off-street parking including: Minimum and maximum number of parking stalls required/allowed Permitted alternatives to off-street parking requirements Parking lot design, access, and dimensional standards Purpose: Implement citywide goals related to economic development, sustainability, and land use including: Create parking regulations that reflect current market demand in the City Reinforce Salt Lake City as a place for people, not cars Eliminate barriers to economic growth and affordable/sustainable housing Allow for flexibility Reduce auto dependency – encourage safe and efficient alternatives Protect neighborhoods Minimize visual impacts of parking (surface and structured) Minimize pedestrian conflicts with vehicles Be environmentally friendly (emissions, water quality, heat island) Page 2 PROPOSED AMENDMENTS: General Comments The following sections introduce the proposed chapter 21A.44 and highlight significant changes. These changes are based on the cumulative feedback of the community and stakeholders, internal staff discussions, feedback from the Planning Commission, objectives identified in Salt Lake City’s various master plans, recommendations from project consultant Clarion & Associates, and industry best practices. The proposed ordinance is included in Attachment B. A version of the proposed ordinance which includes comprehensive footnotes documenting each proposed revision is available upon request from the Salt Lake City Planning department. 21A.44.010: Purpose This section outlines the objectives of the off-street parking chapter. The language has been updated from the previous ordinance to include the stated purpose of: A.Avoiding and mitigating traffic congestion and reducing the financial burden on taxpayer funded roadways; B.Providing necessary access for service and emergency vehicles; C.Providing for safe and convenient interaction between vehicles, bicycles, and pedestrians; D.Providing flexible methods of responding to the transportation and access demands of various land uses in different areas of the city; E.Reducing storm water runoff, reducing heat island effect from large expanses of pavement, improving water quality, and minimizing dust pollution; F.Establishing context-sensitive parking standards to reflect the current and future built environment of neighborhoods; and G.Avoiding and mitigating the adverse visual and environmental impacts of large concentrations of exposed parking. 21A.44.020: Applicability This section establishes the thresholds and requirements for when developments are required to comply with the parking regulations. All new development is required to comply. Expansions The current standards require compliance with the parking regulations for any expansions – large or small. A low threshold tends to discourage small expansion projects as the cost to improve and/or expand the parking facilities may outweigh the benefits of expanding the building or use. The proposed expansion threshold would require expansions (and cumulative expansions over a two-year period) that are larger than 25 percent of usable floor area to come into compliance with the parking regulations. Expansions less than 25 percent would not be required to comply with the proposed provisions. Developments would also be required to comply with the addition of one or more dwelling units, and the addition to or expansion of one or more structures that require conditional use permit approval. Change of Use This section proposes significant changes to the applicability thresholds for when a property changes from one type of land use to another. The current zoning code exempts development in the D-1, D-2, and D-3 zoning districts from needing to provide additional parking as a result of a change of use. To allow for broader flexibility and to encourage infill development and redevelopment, this exemption has been expanded to include all developments within the Urban Center Context and Transit Context areas. Page 3 Any change of use outside of the Urban Center Context area or Transit Center Context area that would require an increase in the minimum number of off-street parking spaces by 10 or more spaces or by 25 percent or more spaces, would be required to provide additional parking in compliance with the parking regulations. Older buildings (built prior to 1944) would not require additional parking to be provided for changes in use. This provision is intended to encourage adaptive reuse of older buildings. Exemptions from Parking Requirements This section also introduces changes to which developments are exempt from parking requirements all-together. The current zoning code exempts nonresidential uses in buildings smaller than 1,000 square feet within commercial districts and the D-2 and D-3 zoning districts from having to provide parking. This exemption is now expanded to apply city-wide to all uses on lots (other than single-family or two-family dwellings) created prior to April 12, 1995 that are smaller than 5,000 square feet. This adds another level of flexibility and relief for small property and business owners that would otherwise not be able to use or develop the lot due to parking constraints. Any development that is exempt from providing parking, but that elects to provide parking, will be required to comply with all location and design standards adopted by the City. 21A.44.030: Calculation of Parking This section explains how parking and loading requirements are calculated in the proposed parking chapter as well as identifies which types of parking spaces do not count toward minimum and maximum parking space requirements. This section has been mostly carried forward from the current code, with grammatical and formatting edits. All parking and loading requirements based on square footage are calculated using “usable floor area” as is current practice in Salt Lake City. Usable floor area includes all areas of a building with the exception of areas devoted to mechanical equipment and unfinished storage. The section includes a proposed procedure for how parking and loading requirements are determined for a land use that is not listed in the table of Minimum and Maximum Off-street Parking requirements. The current zoning ordinance assigns a “catch-all” minimum parking requirement of three (3) spaces per 1,000 square feet for “all other uses.” The proposed section retains that minimum and adds a maximum parking allowed requirement of five (5) spaces per 1,000 square feet. Two additional means have also been introduced by which parking requirements can be assigned to an unlisted use. The Planning Director now has the authority to assign a minimum or maximum number of off-street parking spaces required for an unlisted use based on a listed use with similar operating characteristics, occupancy classification or other factors. The Director can also determine the parking and loading requirements for any use based on a parking study submitted by the applicant that demonstrates the anticipated demand for the proposed development. 21A.44.040: Required Off-street Parking Context Areas The current parking ordinance largely treats minimum parking required and maximum parking allowed based solely on the use of the property. Yet, Salt Lake City has a wide variety of development contexts that make any single approach to minimum and maximum parking requirements ineffective. The parking demand for a downtown area served by transit will be lower Page 4 than a downtown adjacent neighborhood or suburban shopping center. To ensure that minimum and maximum parking requirements reflect the built context (and future built context) of the area, the proposed parking ordinance includes four distinct “context areas” with minimum and maximum parking standards tailored to each. The Minimum and Maximum Off-street Parking Table lists the specific zoning districts included in each context area. The following is a brief narrative introducing each context area: General Context: This context includes the City’s zoning districts that tend to be more auto dependent and/or suburban in scale and parking needs. This context applies broadly to all zoning districts that are not specifically listed in the other context areas. Areas that fall into this category are the 300 West commercial corridor, the Redwood Road commercial corridor, and other developments that are in zoning districts not identified in a specific context area in the Minimum and Maximum Off-Street Parking Table. Neighborhood Center: This context includes areas with small- or moderate-scale shopping, gathering, or activity spaces, often within or adjacent to General Context areas, but that are not necessarily well served by transit. This category includes zoning districts with pedestrian-scale development patterns, building forms, and amenities. Areas that fall into this category are the 9th and 9th commercial node, the 15th and 15th commercial node, and other moderate scale commercial and mixed-use developments that are within the zoning districts identified in the Minimum and Maximum Off-Street Parking Table. Image 1: Typical Development Patterns within General Context Image 2: Areas such as 9th and 9th are included as part of the Neighborhood Center Context Page 5 Urban Center: This context includes zoning districts with dense, pedestrian-oriented development within more intensely developed urban centers. The parking demand in this context is higher than in the Transit Center Context, but lower than areas in the Neighborhood Center Context. Areas that fall into this category are the Sugar House Business District, areas adjacent to Downtown, and other developments that are within the zoning districts identified in the Minimum and Maximum Off-Street Parking Table. Transit Context: This context includes those zoning districts that immediately surround mass-transit facilities and/or are in the downtown core. These areas have the lowest parking demand and may be exempt from minimum parking requirements or be required to provide minimal off-street parking. Areas that fall into this category are the Central Business District, Central Ninth, the North Temple/400 South transit corridor, and other developments that are within the zoning districts identified in the Minimum and Maximum Off-Street Parking Table. Image 3: Areas such as Sugar House are included as part of the Urban Center Context Image 4: Areas well serviced by mass-transit are included as part of the Transit Context Page 6 Required Parking Table This section replaces and consolidates the current tables in Section 21A.44.030.G(1): Schedule of Minimum Off-street Parking Requirements; Section 21A.44.030.G(2): Table of District Specific Minimum Off-street Parking Requirements; and Section 21A44.030.H(2): Table of District Specific Maximum Parking Allowance. This table includes all of the use types listed in current Section 21A.33: Land Use Tables, making it clear how much parking is required for each land use allowed in the City. To make the table more user-friendly, similar use types have been grouped into categories and subcategories. All land uses have been included in the table. The inclusion of a land use within the parking table does not authorize the use within a zone or context. Section 21A.33 will still be used to authorize land uses within a zoning district. Parking Minimums All minimum parking standards have been reviewed against those used in other large but relatively low-density cities, and numerous changes have been made. In many cases the minimum requirements have been reduced or eliminated altogether (Transit/Urban Center contexts), but in a few cases (notably retail and restaurant uses) the exceptionally low standards in the current ordinance have been increased in order to reduce overflow parking in neighborhoods. The concerns of “spill-over” parking within neighborhoods was a major concern brought to light by the public and within the neighborhood master plans. Parking Maximums In effort to limit excess parking on a lot, the current parking chapter limits the amount of parking that can be provide on a property to 125% of the minimum parking amount. The current 125 percent maximum parking standard has been replaced with tailored maximums, by context, and targeted at the limited number of land uses where excessive parking significantly undermines planning goals aimed at walkability and urbanism. Land uses that are not typically associated with over-parking, such as day cares, parks, warehouses, and several industrial uses, do not have maximum parking requirements in the revised chapter. The maximum parking standards column in the table of Minimum and Maximum Off-Street Parking clarifies whether the maximum standard applies to only one context area, a combination of context areas, or to all context areas. Parking provided in structures such as parking garages is proposed to include maximum parking allowed. Well located and planned parking garages can provide shared parking solutions for multiple properties. The placement and design of parking garages is already governed by the parking chapter and design standards of the zoning code. The intent of this provision is to encourage and facilitate parking solutions that serve multiple properties. Discussions with Downtown Alliance also revealed that national employers may insist on certain parking counts being provided for their employees. In this sense, parking garages can be a tool to incentivize employers to relocate downtown. Electric Vehicle Parking These standards were carried forward with minor grammatical and formatting edits. No substantive changes are proposed. Although not included as part of the proposed ordinance, Planning Staff worked closely with Salt Lake City’s Sustainability department on new language and standards for Electric Vehicle Readiness. The intent will be to propose requirements that multi-family developments provide a certain percentage of Electric Vehicle Ready parking stalls at the time of development. The language should be anticipated as part of a future ordinance revision and could be included in the design section of the parking ordinance. Page 7 Accessible Parking These standards were carried forward and simplified with minor grammatical and formatting edits. A proposed standard clarifies that parking areas with four (4) or fewer vehicle parking spaces are not required to identify an accessible space with signs or striping, but that a minimum of one (1) space needs to comply with ADA standard dimensions. The table of Accessible Parking Required was simplified. Bicycle Parking This section has been thoroughly revised as existing standards were not meeting the goals and objectives listed in the various City master plans. The existing bicycle parking standards are based on a percentage of vehicle parking provided. This meant that the less parking a development provided, whether through reductions or otherwise, the less bicycle parking that was required to be provided. That logic does not match the City’s goals to be more bikeable and less dependent on automobiles. The proposed standards are based on use and are categorized by context. They have been compared with cities of similar size and dynamic. When a development provides secure/enclosed bicycle parking, the requirement is reduced by half. 21A.44.050: Alternatives to Minimum and Maximum Parking Calculations To increase flexibility, this section is proposed to include new tools allowing by-right adjustments to parking requirements as well as authorizing the Planning Director to modify parking requirements based on an approved parking study. The adjustments allowed under this section can be used in any combination to reduce the minimum number of required parking spaces identified in the Minimum and Maximum Off-street Parking table by up to 40 percent. Certain alternatives are proposed to be removed from the current ordinance based on community feedback and internal observation. It was found that certain provisions were not reducing overall parking demand and that the burden was shifting from developers to neighboring properties, including along the public right-of-way. For example, the provision to allow on-street parking proved hard to administer and created a sense of ownership or entitlement to parking that should have been public. Removing the standard would allow for future flexibility within the public right- of-way. Those alternatives that are proposed to be eliminated include: credit for on-street parking, pedestrian friendly amenities, off-site parking (as a reduction tool), and use of excess parking in a park and ride lot. Many of the items currently listed as Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies are now included in other sections of the proposed parking chapter and are not listed in this section. Shared Parking These standards explain how much parking is required when two (2) or more uses share a parking area. A new system for calculating parking reductions is introduced that establishes reduction factors based on the land uses rather than the hours of operation (which is difficult to enforce and administer). The current maximum distance allowed for shared parking areas of 500 feet has been increased between 600-1,200 feet, based on parking context and to reflect national trends and Salt Lake City’s large block sizes. This proposed approach allows mixed-use development the opportunity to reduce the minimum number of required parking spaces to better reflect the parking demands of a mixed-use development. For reference, example calculations have been provided in the text to help users navigate the proposed methods for determining parking requirements. Standards for required documentation for shared parking facilities are introduced and are intended to simplify administration and avoid continued monitoring of cooperation agreements over time. Page 8 Proximity to Fixed-Rail Transit This standard is proposed to allow all multi-family or commercial properties (not just new development) within one-quarter (1/4) mile of a fixed transit station to reduce the number of minimum required parking spaces by 25 percent (down from 50%). The measurement technique is changed from “based on walking distance” to “measured radially in a straight line.” The reduction is available for all contexts except Transit, as the minimums in that context are already based on their proximity to transit. Affordable and Senior Housing These standards would allow for a reduction to the number of minimum parking spaces required if the development provides income restricted and/or age restricted units. The current reduction of 50 percent has been decreased to 25 percent to reflect the already reduced parking requirements and tailored minimums in the Minimum and Maximum Off-street Parking table. Eligibility requirements and thresholds are also clarified. New to this chapter is that qualifying affordable or senior housing projects could reduce their parking by an additional 15 percent when they are located within one-quarter mile of a bus stop that is serviced by a high-frequency bus route. Car Pool and Carshare Parking These proposed standards would allow developments with 100 or more parking spaces to count every dedicated van pool space towards seven of the minimum parking spaces required, and every car pool space to count towards three of the minimum parking spaces required. Working with the City Sustainability department, the section is proposed to include a provision to allow for parking lots of any size to count four spaces towards each designated carshare vehicle space. Valet Parking Services These provisions would allow for parking stalls be replaced on a one-to-one basis for each valet stall provided. The section clarifies qualifying standards but is largely carried over from the current code. Parking Study Demonstrating Different Parking Needs This standard is proposed to allow an applicant to submit a parking study to the Planning Director justifying adjustments to the minimum or maximum required parking standards. This provides a “relief valve” for unique projects that justify alternative parking requirements. 21A.44.060: Parking and Loading Location and Design The current parking and loading location and design standards are found throughout chapter 21A.44 and other parts of the zoning ordinance. This section proposes to consolidate those standards and update them to reflect the proposed context area approach. Notably, the table for parking setbacks has been reorganized into parking contexts and relocated to this section. Specific design standards for the D-1, D-3, D-4, G-MU, TSA, and parking garages have been relocated to this chapter with minor grammatical modifications. The provisions for recreational vehicle parking have been clarified and are located at the end of this section. Some standards were simplified and/or removed because they were no longer necessary as a result of other edits within the parking chapter. Technical standards were largely moved to the proposed Parking Standards Manual. 21A.44.070: Off-street Loading Areas This section includes the proposed standards for how many off-street loading areas are required for developments. These standards were revised to reflect current trends toward more frequent Page 9 deliveries by smaller trucks that do not require large spaces to load or unload without blocking traffic or parking areas. The standards were also clarified to include mixed-use buildings. 21A.44.080: Drive-Through Facilities and Vehicle Stacking Areas This section includes the standards regulating drive-through facilities and vehicle stacking areas. Standards were largely carried over from the existing code, however drive-through stacking spaces were organized by parking context. As part of this revision, redundant provisions for drive- through facilities found in chapter 21.A.40.060 have been proposed to be eliminated. 21A.44.090: Modifications to Parking Areas Administrative Adjustments This tool is largely carried over from the existing ordinance and would grant the Planning or Transportation Director the authority to make minor modifications to the standards in the parking chapter based on certain criteria. Examples include modifications to dimensions or geometries of parking, loading, or maneuvering areas. Special Exceptions The revised ordinance would eliminate the parking “catch-all” exception (#7), currently found in the Special Exceptions chapter 21A.52, as more specific standards have been incorporated into the provisions throughout. The two special exceptions that would continue to be authorized are for front yard parking and surfacing materials for vehicle and equipment storage. 21A.44.100: Use and Maintenance This section proposes standards for how parking areas can be used as well as the maintenance requirements. These standards were largely carried forward as-is with minimal edits. 21A.44.110: Nonconforming Parking and Loading Facilities This section includes the proposed standards addressing nonconforming parking and loading facilities. Chapter 21A.38: Nonconforming Uses and Noncomplying Structures, lays the foundation for how nonconformities are addressed in the zoning ordinance; however, there is some overlap with the standards provided in chapter 21A.44 specific to parking and loading facilities. The current 21A.38.070.B is proposed to be deleted as this content is now addressed in the proposed parking chapter. The ordinance includes proposed tools that will provide a level of flexibility that should address any concerns related to the reconstruction of parking and loading areas on challenging sites. It also introduces a standard that allows a site made nonconforming as a result of an acquisition of property by eminent domain for a right-of-way to be deemed lawful and conforming. This provides an outlet for a site that is made non-conforming when land area or setbacks are reduced by circumstances outside of their control. Parking Standards Manual City staff has elected to create a new Parking Standards Manual (Attachment C) in conjunction with this effort to relocate technical/engineering material from chapter 21A.44 into a technical design manual. This approach would simplify the zoning ordinance and remove details from the code that are of little/no interest to the general public. Including design and engineering minutia in the zoning code makes it more difficult for citizens to navigate and find what they are looking for. This approach would also allow the City to update minor technical/engineering standards without going through the zoning ordinance amendment procedure. It is important for the City to continue updating its technical standards as research and best practices emerge. Page 10 Grammar and Minor Corrections The proposed ordinance includes updated grammar and formatting throughout. Spelling errors, typos, or grammatical errors from the current regulations have been corrected. Definitions The revised chapter includes proposed parking-related definitions that were not previously included in chapter 21A.62: Definitions. KEY CONSIDERATIONS: The following key considerations have been identified for the Planning Commission’s review and potential discussion. 1. Align with the goals of Plan Salt Lake and the various neighborhood master plans 2. Encourage infill development and redevelopment 3. Simplify tobe more user-friendly and easier to implement 4. Modernize to reflect best practices and current market trends for parking 5. Reconsider the current “one-size fits all” approach in favor of “context based” parking 6. Required parking minimums for multi-family developments in General Context 7. Parking Reductions for Developments Adjacent to High-Frequency Bus Stops Consideration 1: Align with the goals of Plan Salt Lake and the various neighborhood master plans The various City master plans contain the collective goals and objectives of Salt Lake City. Many of these goals and adopted policies relate to how the City grows and how to provide balanced transportation networks that reduce automobile dependency while supporting economic growth and affordability. Goals of the City also focus on neighborhood vitality, providing transportation choices, and enhancing the public realm through design, architecture, and development that is context sensitive. Throughout the revision process, Staff sought to implement as many objectives within the master plans as possible. A comprehensive analysis of those standards and the proposed changes can be found in Attachment F of this report. Consideration2: Encourage infill development and redevelopment Infill development and the redevelopment of under-utilized properties are important components for economic growth within an established community like Salt Lake City. The proposed ordinance encourages these types of developments by: Establishing context-based parking standards that are responsive to the unique characteristics of Salt Lake City’s neighborhoods and development patterns Providingalternative methods to modify minimum and maximum parking Allowingparking reductions for affordable/senior housing Relaxing parking requirements for change or expansion of use Image 5: Master Plans such as Plan Salt Lake helped frame the proposed ordinance Page 11 Consideration 3: Simplify to be more user-friendly and easier to implement Improved ordinance usability was a focus of the revised parking chapter. The goal was to create a chapter that was clear for the public and developers to use but was also simpler to administer for City Staff. The proposed ordinance has been modified to include: Improved ordinance usability through the use of tables and the consolidation of parking standards that were previously scattered throughout the code New parking requirement tables with uses organized by category and context Simplified processes for adjustments to minor technical matters Clarified layout and language throughout Consideration 4: Modernize to reflect best practices and current market trends for parking The current parking ordinance for Salt Lake City has not evolved with modern planning practices. Many of the parking count figures are based on outdated models and have not considered the built context or alternative options to traditional parking. The proposed ordinance seeks to implement the latest planning practices and allow for more flexibility based on current market demands for parking. Specifically, the proposed ordinance includes: Tailored standards based on four parking contexts Market driven minimum and maximums, particularly where mass transit is available Adjusted standards for drive-through & loading areas based on best practices Revised method of calculating bicycle parking standards to match development activity New options for car/van-pool, car share, and shared parking Lowered overall required parking in effort to reduce surface area heat gain and water contamination from parking lots and to encourage alternative means of transportation to lower emissions Consideration 5: Reconsider the current “one-size fits all” approach in favor of “context based” parking The existing ordinance contains parking minimums and maximums that are largely based only on a proposed land use. In some cases, there were some minor modifications based on the underlying zoning designation, but it was still largely a one-size fits all approach. The idea of standards that were adaptive to their setting or context was a key consideration presented throughout the various master plans of the City and was a common theme throughout the public engagement process. To this end, the revised parking ordinance has been organized to include four parking contexts: Transit Center, Urban Center, Neighborhood Center, and General. These contexts will help the parking standards to be more responsive to the unique circumstances of the various neighborhoods within Salt Lake City. The proposed ordinance also establishes a frame work that would allow for additional parking contexts in the future if needed. Page 12 Consideration 6: Required parking minimums for multi-family developments in General Context Throughout the public engagement process, the minimum parking requirements for multi-family uses was listed at 2 stalls per dwelling unit, regardless of bedroom type. The public was generally supportive of this standard in each of the engagement events held. However, during the work sessions with the Planning Commission, most felt that this number was too high. Staff has now proposed 1 stall per unit for studio and 1-bedroom apartments and 1.25 stalls per unit for units with more than 1 bedroom. Staff felt this would provide some additional parking for residents that have more than 1 vehicle or for guest parking. Furthermore, these would only be the minimums. A development may choose to include surface parking for up to 2 spaces per dwelling unit for studio ad 1-bedroom units, or 3 stalls per unit for larger apartments. Typical multi-family developments in the general context are averaging about 1.6 stalls per unit. The proposed standards would still allow for that amount of parking to be provided but would not dictate that it had to be installed if the market demand was for less. Consideration 7: Parking Reductions for Developments Adjacent to High-Frequency Bus Stops This particular consideration has produced a split opinion throughout the revision process. Most residents felt that parking reductions should not be granted alone for proximity to high-frequency bus stops. The reasons cited included that they felt the stops lacked permanency and they feared the service was not reliable enough to be counted on for users other than commuters. This was discussed considerably in the work-sessions with the Planning Commission. Some commissioners agreed with public sentiment, while others felt it would be a lost opportunity considering the amount of investment Salt Lake City has made in these routes, particularly when the other goals of the City, such as improved air quality and providing affordable housing, are considered. Image 6: Proposed parking for Multi-family in General Context Page 13 Given these viewpoints, Staff has recommended to tie the reduction specifically to the goal for more affordable housing by allowing for an additional parking reduction of up to 15% for qualifying affordable housing developments located within one-quarter mile of a bus stop that is serviced by high- frequency routes (proposed 21A.44.050.D). Currently, this would include routes 2,9,21, and 200 (see map and chart below). As additional routes improve frequency, including for nights and weekends, they would also qualify for this provision. Bus Service Frequency Rte. Street Weekday Sat.Sun.After 7PM 2 200 S 15 min 15 min 30 min 30 min 9 900 S 15 min 15 min 30 min 30 min 21 21 st S 15 min 15 min 30 min 30 min 200 State St. North 15 min 15 min 30 min 30 wk/60 Sat 205 500 E 15 min 30 min 60 min 60 min 209 900 E 15 min 30 min 60 min 60 min 217 Redwood Rd.15 min 30 min 60 min 60 min 220 Highland/1300 E 15 min 30 min 60 min 30 wk./60 Sat Images 7 (map) & 8 (table): Existing and proposed high-frequency bus routes Page 14 NEXT STEPS: The City Council has the final authority to make changes to the text of the Zoning Ordinance. The recommendation of the Planning Commission for this petition will be forwarded to the City Council for their review and decision. Page 15 ATTACHMENT A: PETITION INITIATION Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 ATTACHMENT B: PROPOSED PARKING ORDINANCE The proposed ordinance revision is largely comprised of a re-written chapter 21A.44- Off-Street Parking, Loading, and Mobility. However, the following related sections of code are also proposed to be altered: Parking design elements from the D-1, D-3, D-4, G-MU, and TSA zoning chapters have been relocated to the proposed parking chapter with minor grammatical or other errors corrected Special Exception #7 (21A.52) is proposed to be eliminated Parking garage design standards (21A.37.050.M) has been relocated to the proposed parking chapter with minor grammatical or other errors corrected Some of the drive-through standards found in 21A.40.060 have been relocated to the proposed parking chapter and redundancies have been eliminated Page 19 Chapter 21A.44:Off Street Parking, Mobility, and Loading December 2019 (Document format provided for convenience of Planning Commission. Adopted format will be consistent with standard ordinance formatting) Page 20 Table of Contents Off Street Parking, Mobility, and Loading ............................. 1 21A.44.010 Purpose......................................................................................................................1 21A.44.020 Applicability ..............................................................................................................1 A. Amounts of Parking, Loading, and Drive-Through Facilities Required .............................................................................1 B. Location and Design...............................................................................................................................................................................2 21A.44.030 Calculation of Parking..............................................................................................2 A. Generally......................................................................................................................................................................................................2 B. Unlisted Uses..............................................................................................................................................................................................3 21A.44.040 Required Off Street Parking ....................................................................................3 A. Minimum and Maximum Parking Spaces Required ..................................................................................................................3 B. Electric Vehicle Parking.......................................................................................................................................................................18 C. Accessible Parking ................................................................................................................................................................................19 D. Bicycle Parking........................................................................................................................................................................................19 21A.44.050 Alternatives to Minimum and Maximum Parking Calculations.........................20 A. Limitations on Adjustments to Minimum Required Parking............................................................................................... 20 B. Shared Parking....................................................................................................................................................................................... 21 C. Proximity to Fixed-Rail Transit......................................................................................................................................................... 22 D. Affordable and Senior Housing (Multi-family Structures) ................................................................................................... 22 E. Car Pool and Carshare Parking........................................................................................................................................................ 22 F. Valet Parking Services......................................................................................................................................................................... 23 G. Parking Study Demonstrating Different Parking Needs....................................................................................................... 23 21A.44.060 Parking Location and Design.................................................................................24 A. Generally...................................................................................................................................................................................................24 B. Zone Specific Location and Design Standards..........................................................................................................................31 C. Recreational Vehicle Parking............................................................................................................................................................ 33 21A.44.070 Off Street Loading Areas........................................................................................34 A. Number and Size of Loading Areas Required...........................................................................................................................34 B. Location and Design of Loading Areas........................................................................................................................................34 21A.44.080 Drive-Through Facilities and Vehicle Stacking Areas..........................................35 A. Number of Stacking Spaces Required..........................................................................................................................................35 B. Location and Design of Drive-Through Facilities.....................................................................................................................35 21A.44.090 Modifications to Parking Areas.............................................................................36 A. Administrative Modifications........................................................................................................................................................... 36 B. Special Exceptions.................................................................................................................................................................................36 21A.44.100 Use and Maintenance.............................................................................................37 A. Use of Parking Areas............................................................................................................................................................................ 37 B. Maintenance............................................................................................................................................................................................ 38 21A.44.110 Nonconforming Parking and Loading Facilities..................................................38 A. Continuation of Nonconforming Parking and Loading Facilities ..................................................................................... 38 B. Nonconformity Due to Governmental Acquisition.................................................................................................................38 C. Damage or Destruction...................................................................................................................................................................... 38 D. Legalization of Garages Converted to Residential Use.........................................................................................................38 Definitions 1 Page 21 Off Street Parking, Mobility, and Loading 21A.44.010 Purpose This chapter is intended to require that new development and redevelopment projects provide off street parking and loading facilities in proportion to the parking, loading, and transportation demands of the buildings and land uses included in those projects. This chapter is also intended to help protect the public health, safety, and general welfare by: A.Avoiding and mitigating traffic congestion and reducing the financial burden on taxpayer funded roadways; B.Providing necessary access for service and emergency vehicles; C.Providing for safe and convenient interaction between vehicles, bicycles, and pedestrians; D.Providing flexible methods of responding to the transportation and access demands of various land uses in different areas of the city; E.Reducing storm water runoff, reducing heat island effect from large expanses of pavement, improving water quality, and minimizing dust pollution; F.Establishing context-sensitive parking standards to reflect the current and future built environment of neighborhoods; and G.Avoiding and mitigating the adverse visual and environmental impacts of large concentrations of exposed parking. 21A.44.020 Applicability A.Amounts of Parking, Loading, and Drive-Through Facilities Required The standards of this chapter are intended to establish: minimum and maximum amounts of vehicle parking; minimum required bicycle parking, minimum required loading facilities, and minimum capacity of drive-through facilities and shall apply to projects involving the activities listed below. In some instances, other standards of this chapter provide alternatives for required compliance. Certain exemptions are intended to encourage utilization of existing structures and preserve desirable characteristics of locations built prior to parking requirements. 1. New Development Unless otherwise exempted by Section 21A.44.020A.4, the standards in this chapter shall apply to all development and land uses upon adoption of this ordinance. 2. Expansion of Use or Structure The number of off street parking and loading spaces for the expansion of a use or structure shall comply with the requirements of Table 21A.44.040-A:Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking and the standards of this chapter when: a. One or more additional dwelling units is created; or b. The addition to or expansion of one or more structures or uses that, when considered together with any other expansions during the previous two-year period, would increase the total usable floor area of the structure(s) by more than twenty-five percent (25%); or Page 22 c. The addition to or expansion of one (1) or more structures or uses that requires conditional use permit approval. 3. Change of Use a. Except when located within an Urban Center or Transit Context, or as stated in subsection b below, off street parking shall be provided pursuant to this chapter for any change of use that increases the minimum number of required vehicle parking spaces by: (1) More than ten (10) parking spaces; or (2) More than twenty-five percent (25%) of the parking spaces that currently exist on-site or on permitted off-site locations. b. For changes in use in buildings built prior to 1944, no additional parking shall be required beyond what is existing. 4. Exemptions from Parking Requirements The following shall be exempt from providing the minimum parking required by Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking, but shall comply with maximum parking allowed and location and design standards in Section 21A.44.060 if parking is provided: a. Lots created prior to April 12,1995 that are less than five thousand (5,000) square feet in lot area, except those being used for single-family, two-family, and twin home dwelling uses; b. Expansions or enlargements that increase the square footage of usable floor area of an existing structure or parking requirements for the use by twenty-five percent (25%) or less, provided that existing off street parking and loading areas are not removed. B.Location and Design Section 21A.44.060: Parking Location and Design, shall apply to all vehicle parking, bicycle parking, loading, and drive-through facilities, regardless of whether the project is subject to the requirements for additional parking spaces or other facilities pursuant to Section 21A.44.020A above. Parking garages are subject to design standards found in 21A.44.060.A.16 and specific requirements of other zoning districts found in 21A.44.060.B. 21A.44.030 Calculation of Parking A.Generally 1.All parking and loading requirements that are based on square footage shall be calculated on the basis of usable floor area of the subject use, unless otherwise specified in Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking. 2.Parking spaces shall not be counted more than once for required off-site, shared, and/or alternative parking plans, except where the development complies with off-site, shared, and/or alternative parking standards. 3.Parking spaces designed or designated exclusively for motorcycles, scooters, and other two wheeled vehicles shall not count toward the number of minimum required or maximum allowed off street parking spaces. Page 23 4.Parking spaces intended for storage of business vehicles, such as fleet vehicles, delivery vehicles, or vehicles on display associated with sales or rental shall not count toward the number of minimum required or maximum allowed off street parking spaces unless otherwise stated in Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking. 5.Parking spaces designed or designated exclusively for recreational vehicles shall not count toward the number of minimum required or maximum allowed off street parking spaces. 6.When calculations of the number of required off street parking spaces for vehicles or bicycles result in a fractional number, any fraction of 0.5 or larger shall be rounded up to the next higher whole number. Calculations for more than one use in a project shall be calculated for each individual use and may be rounded individually and added, or added then rounded as determined by the applicant. 7.Lots containing more than one (1) use may provide parking and loading based on the shared parking calculations in section 21A.44.050BB: Shared Parking. B.Unlisted Uses For uses not listed in Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking the Planning Director is authorized to do any of the following: 1.Apply the minimum or maximum off street parking space requirement specified in Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking, for the listed use that is deemed most similar to the proposed use as determined by the Planning Director based on operating characteristics, the most similar related occupancy classification, or other factors related to potential parking demand determined by the Director. 2.Apply a minimum parking requirement of three (3) spaces per one thousand (1,000) square feet of usable floor area for the use and a maximum parking allowance of five (5) spaces per one thousand (1,000) square feet of useable floor area for the use. 3.Establish the minimum off street parking space and loading requirements based on a parking study prepared by the applicant according to Section 21A.44.050F. 21A.44.040 Required Off Street Parking A.Minimum and Maximum Parking Spaces Required 1.Unless otherwise provided in this Code, each development or land use subject to this chapter pursuant to Section 21A.44.020 shall provide at least the minimum number, and shall not provide more than the maximum number, of off street parking spaces required by Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking. 2.A parking standard shown in Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking, is not an indication of whether the use is allowed or prohibited in the respective zoning district or context area. See Chapter 21A.33: Land Use Tables for allowed and prohibited uses. 3.The maximum parking limit does not apply to parking provided in parking garages, stacked or racked parking structures, or to off-site parking that complies with all other requirements of this title. 4.The maximum parking limit does not apply to properties in the M-1, M-2, BP, or Airport zoning districts that are located west of the centerline of Redwood Road. Page 24 5.If a conditional use is approved by the Planning Commission in accordance with Chapter 21A.54: Conditional Uses, and the conditional use approval states a different parking requirement than that required by this Chapter 21A.44, and is determined necessary to mitigate a detrimental impact, then the parking requirement in the conditional use approval shall apply. 6.All uses with vehicle stacking and/or drive-through facilities shall comply with Section 21A.44.080: Drive-Through Facilities and Vehicle Stacking Areas, in addition to the requirements of Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking. 7.All uses with outdoor sales, display, leasing, and/or auction areas shall also provide one-half (1/2) parking space and no more than two (2) parking spaces per one thousand (1,000) sq. ft. of outdoor sales, display, leasing, and/or auction area. This additional parking shall not count toward the maximum allowed per Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking, when a maximum is specified. Context Approach Salt Lake City has a wide variety of development contexts that make any single approach to minimum and maximum parking requirements ineffective. The parking demand for a downtown area served by transit will be much lower than a downtown adjacent neighborhood or suburban shopping center. To ensure that minimum and maximum parking req context areas , and then tailored minimum and maximum parking standards to each. The Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking Table below lists the specific zoning districts included in each context area. The following is a brief narrative introducing each context area: 1. General Context: -dependent and/or suburban in scale and parking needs. This context applies broadly to all of the zoning districts that are not specifically listed in the other context areas. 2. Neighborhood Center: This category includes areas with small- or moderate-scale shopping, gathering, or activity spaces, often within or adjacent to General Context areas, but that are not necessarily well served by transit. This category includes zoning districts with pedestrian-scale development patterns, building forms, and amenities. 3. Urban Center: This category includes zoning districts with dense, pedestrian-oriented development within more intensely developed urban centers. The parking demand in this context is higher than in the Neighborhood Center Context, but lower than areas with good transit service. 4. Transit Context: This category includes those zoning districts that immediately surround mass-transit facilities and/or are in the downtown core. These areas have the lowest parking demand and may be exempt from minimum parking requirements or be required to provide minimal off street parking. Page 25 Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking DU = dwelling unit sq. ft. = square feet Land Use Minimum Parking Requirement Maximum Parking Allowed General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, R- MU-35, R-MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE D-2, MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1. CSHBD2 D-1, D-3 D-4, G-MU, TSA-C, UI, FB-UN2, FB-UN3, FB- SC. R-MU Vehicle Stacking and Drive-Through Facilities: See 21A.44.040A.6 Outdoor Sales/Display/Leasing/Auction Areas: See 21A.44.040A.7 Residential Uses Household Living Artists' loft/studio 1.5 spaces per DU 1 space per DU 0.5 spaces per DU No Minimum No Maximum Manufactured home 2 spaces per DU 1 space per DU No Minimum All Contexts: 4 spaces, not including recreational vehicle parking spaces Mobile home Single-family (attached) Single-family (detached) Single-family cottage development building form 1 space per DU Twin home 2 spaces per DU Two-family Multi-family Studio and 1 bedrooms: 1 space per DU, 2+ bedrooms 1.25 space per DU Studio and 1+ bedrooms: 1 space per DU Studio: No Minimum 1 bedroom: 0.5 space per DU 2+ bedrooms: 1 space per DU No Minimum All Contexts: Studio & 1 Bedroom: 2 spaces per DU 2+ bedrooms: 3 spaces per DU Group Living Assisted living facility 1 space for each 6 infirmary or nursing home beds; plus 1 space for each 4 rooming units; plus 1 space for each 3 DU See Table Note A 1 space for each 8 infirmary or nursing home beds; plus 1 space for each 6 rooming units; plus 1 space for each 4 DU See Table Note A No Minimum No Maximum Nursing care facility Eleemosynary facility 1 space per 4 persons design capacity; See Table Note A 1 space per 6 persons design capacity; See Table Note A 1 space per 4 persons design capacity; See Table Note A No Minimum All Contexts: 1 space per 3 persons design capacity; See Table Note A Group home Residential support Dormitory, fraternity, sorority 1 space per 2 persons design capacity 1 space per 3 persons design capacity 1 space per 4 persons design capacity No Minimum All Contexts: 1 space per 1 persons design capacity Page 26 Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking DU = dwelling unit sq. ft. = square feet Land Use Minimum Parking Requirement Maximum Parking Allowed General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, R- MU-35, R-MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE D-2, MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1. CSHBD2 D-1, D-3 D-4, G-MU, TSA-C, UI, FB-UN2, FB-UN3, FB- SC. R-MU Vehicle Stacking and Drive-Through Facilities: See 21A.44.040A.6 Outdoor Sales/Display/Leasing/Auction Areas: See 21A.44.040A.7 Rooming (boarding) house 1 space per 2 guest rooms 1 space per 3 guest rooms 1 space per 4 guest rooms No Minimum No Maximum Single room occupancy 0.5 spaces per unit 0.25 spaces per unit No Minimum No Maximum Public, Institutional, and Civic Uses Community and Cultural Facilities Art gallery 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. 0.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum All Contexts: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Studio, Art Exhibition hall Museum Crematorium 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum No Maximum Daycare center, adult Daycare center, child Homeless resource center Library Community correctional facility, 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 2.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Community recreation center Jail Government facility 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office area 1 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office area No Minimum No Maximum Social service mission and charity dining hall Municipal service use, including city utility use and police and fire station 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office area, plus 1 space per service vehicle 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. of office area, plus 1 space per service vehicle No Minimum No Maximum Club/lodge 1 space per 6 seats in main assembly area 1 space per 8 seats in main assembly area 1 space per 10 seats in main assembly area No Minimum All Contexts: 1 space per 4 seats in main assembly area Meeting hall of membership organization Convent/monastery 1 space per 4 persons design capacity 1 space per 6 persons design capacity 1 space per 8 persons design capacity No Minimum No Maximum Page 27 Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking DU = dwelling unit sq. ft. = square feet Land Use Minimum Parking Requirement Maximum Parking Allowed General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, R- MU-35, R-MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE D-2, MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1. CSHBD2 D-1, D-3 D-4, G-MU, TSA-C, UI, FB-UN2, FB-UN3, FB- SC. R-MU Vehicle Stacking and Drive-Through Facilities: See 21A.44.040A.6 Outdoor Sales/Display/Leasing/Auction Areas: See 21A.44.040A.7 Funeral home 1 space per 4 seats in main assembly area 1 space per 5 seats in main assembly area 1 space per 6 seats in main assembly area No Minimum Urban Center and Transit Center Context: 2 spaces per 4 seats in main assembly areas Neighborhood Center and General Context: No maximum Place of worship 1 space per 6 seats or 1 space per 300 sq. ft., whichever is less 1 space per 8 seats or 1 space per 400 sq. ft., whichever is less 1 space per 10 seats or 1 space per 500 sq. ft., whichever is less No Minimum All Contexts: 1 space per 3.5 seats or 1 space per 200 sq. ft., whichever is greater Fairground See Table Note B No Maximum Philanthropic use See Table Note B All Contexts: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office, plus 1 space per 6 seats in assembly areas Zoological park See Table Note B No Maximum Ambulance service Cemetery No Minimum Plazas Park Open space Educational Facilities College and university 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. office, research, and library area, plus 1 space per 6 seats in assembly areas 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. office, research, and library area, plus 1 space per 10 seats in assembly areas No Minimum All Contexts: 4 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. K - 12 private Elementary or Middle: 1 space per 20 students design capacity High Schools: 1 space per 8 students design capacity K - 12 public Dance/music studio 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 2.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. Music conservatory Professional and vocational Page 28 Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking DU = dwelling unit sq. ft. = square feet Land Use Minimum Parking Requirement Maximum Parking Allowed General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, R- MU-35, R-MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE D-2, MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1. CSHBD2 D-1, D-3 D-4, G-MU, TSA-C, UI, FB-UN2, FB-UN3, FB- SC. R-MU Vehicle Stacking and Drive-Through Facilities: See 21A.44.040A.6 Outdoor Sales/Display/Leasing/Auction Areas: See 21A.44.040A.7 Professional and vocational (with outdoor activities) Seminary and religious institute Healthcare Facilities Clinic (medical, dental) 4 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum All Contexts: 6 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft Blood donation center 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. Transit and Urban Center Context: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft Neighborhood Center and General Context: 6 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Hospital 1 space per 3 patient beds design capacity 1 space per 2 patient beds design capacity All Contexts: 1 space per 2 patient beds design capacity Hospital, including accessory lodging facility Commercial Uses Agricultural and Animal Uses Greenhouse 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum Transit and Urban Center Context: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft Neighborhood Center and General Context: No Maximum Kennel Pound Veterinary office Cremation service, animal 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. Kennel on lots of 5 acres or larger Poultry farm or processing plant Raising of furbearing animals Slaughterhouse Agricultural use No Minimum Community garden Farmer's market Grain elevator Pet cemetery Page 29 Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking DU = dwelling unit sq. ft. = square feet Land Use Minimum Parking Requirement Maximum Parking Allowed General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, R- MU-35, R-MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE D-2, MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1. CSHBD2 D-1, D-3 D-4, G-MU, TSA-C, UI, FB-UN2, FB-UN3, FB- SC. R-MU Vehicle Stacking and Drive-Through Facilities: See 21A.44.040A.6 Outdoor Sales/Display/Leasing/Auction Areas: See 21A.44.040A.7 Stable Stockyard Urban farm Botanical garden See Table Note B Recreation and Entertainment Auditorium 1 space per 4 seats in assembly areas 1 space per 6 seats in assembly areas 1 space per 8 seats in assembly areas No Minimum All Contexts: 1 space per 3 seats in assembly areas Theater, live performance Theater, movie Amphitheater See Table Note B Athletic Field Stadium Tennis court (principal use) 2 spaces per court No Minimum Transit and Urban Center Context: 2 spaces per court or lane Neighborhood Center and General Context: No Maximum Bowling 2 spaces per lane Convention center 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum All Contexts: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Swimming pool, skating rink or natatorium Health and fitness facility 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. All Contexts: 4 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Performing arts production facility Reception center Recreation (indoor) 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Recreational vehicle park (minimum 1 acre) 1 space per designated camping or RV spot No Maximum Amusement park See Table Note B Recreation (outdoor) See Table Note B Food and Beverage Services Brewpub Indoor tasting/seating area: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft.; Outdoor tasting/seating area: Indoor tasting/seating No Minimum Transit and Urban Center Context: 5 spaces per 1,000 Page 30 Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking DU = dwelling unit sq. ft. = square feet Land Use Minimum Parking Requirement Maximum Parking Allowed General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, R- MU-35, R-MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE D-2, MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1. CSHBD2 D-1, D-3 D-4, G-MU, TSA-C, UI, FB-UN2, FB-UN3, FB- SC. R-MU Vehicle Stacking and Drive-Through Facilities: See 21A.44.040A.6 Outdoor Sales/Display/Leasing/Auction Areas: See 21A.44.040A.7 Restaurant 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. area: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft.; Outdoor tasting/seating area: 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. sq. ft indoor tasting/seating area Neighborhood Center and General Context: 7 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. indoor tasting/seating area All Contexts: Outdoor tasting/ seating area: 4 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Tavern Social club 1 space per 6 seats in main assembly area, or 1 space per 300 sq. ft., whichever is less 1 space per 8 seats in main assembly area, or 1 space per 400 sq. ft., whichever is less 1 space per 10 seats in main assembly area, or 1 space per 500 sq. ft., whichever is less No Minimum All Contexts: 1 space per 4 seats in main assembly area, or 1 space per 200 sq. ft., whichever is greater Office, Business, and Professional Services Check cashing/payday loan business 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum General Context: 4 spaces per 1,000 Neighborhood Center Context: 3 spaces per 1,000 Urban Center and Transit Center Contexts: 2 spaces per 1,000 Dental laboratory/ research facility Financial institution Research and laboratory facilities Office (excluding medical and dental clinic and office) 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Retail Sales & Services Photo finishing lab No Minimum 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum Transit and Urban Center Contexts: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Electronic repair shop Furniture repair shop Upholstery shop Page 31 Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking DU = dwelling unit sq. ft. = square feet Land Use Minimum Parking Requirement Maximum Parking Allowed General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, R- MU-35, R-MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE D-2, MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1. CSHBD2 D-1, D-3 D-4, G-MU, TSA-C, UI, FB-UN2, FB-UN3, FB- SC. R-MU Vehicle Stacking and Drive-Through Facilities: See 21A.44.040A.6 Outdoor Sales/Display/Leasing/Auction Areas: See 21A.44.040A.7 Radio, television station 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. Neighborhood Center and General Context: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Store, Convenience 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum Transit and Urban Center Contexts: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Neighborhood Center: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. General Context: 5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Auction, Indoor 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. Transit Context: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Urban Center and Neighborhood Center Context: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. General Context: 4 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Store, Department Fashion oriented development Flea market (indoor) Flea market (outdoor) Store, Mass merchandising Store, Pawn shop Store, Specialty Retail goods establishment Retail service establishment Store, Superstore and hypermarket Store, Warehouse club Page 32 Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking DU = dwelling unit sq. ft. = square feet Land Use Minimum Parking Requirement Maximum Parking Allowed General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, R- MU-35, R-MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE D-2, MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1. CSHBD2 D-1, D-3 D-4, G-MU, TSA-C, UI, FB-UN2, FB-UN3, FB- SC. R-MU Vehicle Stacking and Drive-Through Facilities: See 21A.44.040A.6 Outdoor Sales/Display/Leasing/Auction Areas: See 21A.44.040A.7 Retail shopping center over 55,000 sq. ft. usable floor area Up to 100,000 sq. ft. : 2. spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. . Above 100,000 sq. ft. : sq. ft. 1.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Up to 100,000 sq. ft. : 1.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. . Above 100,000 sq. ft. : 1.25 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Transit and Urban Center Contexts: up to 100,000 sq. ft.: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft., above 100,000 sq. ft.: 1.75 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Neighborhood Center and General Context: Up to 100,000 sq. ft.: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft., above 100,000 sq. ft.: 2.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Plant and garden shop with outdoor retail sales area 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. Transit and Urban Center Contexts: 1.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Neighborhood Center: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. General Context: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Lodging Facilities Bed and breakfast 1 space per guest bedroom 0.5 spaces per guest bedroom No Minimum All Contexts: 1.25 spaces per guest bedroom Hotel/motel All Contexts: 1.5 spaces per guest bedroom Vehicles and Equipment Vehicle Auction 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office area plus 1 space per service bay 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. of office area plus 1 space per service bay No Minimum No Maximum Automobile part sales No Minimum All Contexts: Page 33 Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking DU = dwelling unit sq. ft. = square feet Land Use Minimum Parking Requirement Maximum Parking Allowed General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, R- MU-35, R-MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE D-2, MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1. CSHBD2 D-1, D-3 D-4, G-MU, TSA-C, UI, FB-UN2, FB-UN3, FB- SC. R-MU Vehicle Stacking and Drive-Through Facilities: See 21A.44.040A.6 Outdoor Sales/Display/Leasing/Auction Areas: See 21A.44.040A.7 Automobile and truck repair sales/rental and service 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of indoor sales/leasing/office area plus 1 space per service bay 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. of indoor sales/leasing/ office area plus 1 space per service bay 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of indoor sales/leasing/ office area, plus 1 space per service bay Boat/recreational vehicle sales and service (indoor) Equipment rental (indoor and/or outdoor) Equipment, heavy (rental, sales, service) Manufactured/mobile home sales and service Recreational vehicle (RV) sales and service Truck repair sales and rental (large) Car wash No Minimum Transit and Urban Center Contexts: 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. Neighborhood Center: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. General Context: 5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Car wash as accessory use to gas station or convenience store that sells gas Gas station 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum General Context: 5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Neighborhood Center Context: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Urban Center Context: 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. Bus line yard and repair facility 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. , plus 1 space per commercial fleet vehicle No Minimum No Maximum Impound lot Limousine service Taxicab facility Page 34 Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking DU = dwelling unit sq. ft. = square feet Land Use Minimum Parking Requirement Maximum Parking Allowed General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, R- MU-35, R-MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE D-2, MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1. CSHBD2 D-1, D-3 D-4, G-MU, TSA-C, UI, FB-UN2, FB-UN3, FB- SC. R-MU Vehicle Stacking and Drive-Through Facilities: See 21A.44.040A.6 Outdoor Sales/Display/Leasing/Auction Areas: See 21A.44.040A.7 Tire distribution retail/wholesale Adult Entertainment Establishments Sexually oriented business 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum All Contexts: 5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Transportation Uses Airport Determined by Airport Authority No Maximum Heliport Bus line station/terminal No Minimum Urban Center and Transit Contexts: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Neighborhood Center and General Context: 1 space per 150 average daily passenger boardings Intermodal transit passenger hub Railroad, passenger station Transportation terminal, including bus, rail and trucking Railroad, repair shop 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. , plus 1 space per fleet vehicle generally stored on-site No Minimum No Maximum Truck freight terminal Railroad, freight terminal facility No Minimum Industrial Uses Manufacturing and Processing Artisan food production 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. of production area, plus 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office/retail 0.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of production area, plus 1.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office/retail No Minimum Transit and Urban Center Contexts: 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. of production area, plus 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office/retail Page 35 Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking DU = dwelling unit sq. ft. = square feet Land Use Minimum Parking Requirement Maximum Parking Allowed General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, R- MU-35, R-MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE D-2, MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1. CSHBD2 D-1, D-3 D-4, G-MU, TSA-C, UI, FB-UN2, FB-UN3, FB- SC. R-MU Vehicle Stacking and Drive-Through Facilities: See 21A.44.040A.6 Outdoor Sales/Display/Leasing/Auction Areas: See 21A.44.040A.7 Bakery, commercial Neighborhood Center and General Context: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of production area, plus 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office/retail Automobile salvage and recycling (outdoor) 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. of office 0.5 space per 1,000 sq. ft. of office No Minimum All Contexts: 7 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office/retail Processing center (outdoor) Automobile salvage and recycling (indoor) 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. No Minimum No Maximum Blacksmith shop Bottling plant Brewery/Small Brewery Chemical manufacturing and/or storage Commercial food preparation Distillery Drop forge industry Explosive manufacturing and storage Food processing Heavy manufacturing Incinerator, medical waste/hazardous waste Industrial assembly Jewelry fabrication Laundry, commercial Light manufacturing Manufacturing and processing, food Paint manufacturing No Minimum Printing plant Page 36 Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking DU = dwelling unit sq. ft. = square feet Land Use Minimum Parking Requirement Maximum Parking Allowed General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, R- MU-35, R-MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE D-2, MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1. CSHBD2 D-1, D-3 D-4, G-MU, TSA-C, UI, FB-UN2, FB-UN3, FB- SC. R-MU Vehicle Stacking and Drive-Through Facilities: See 21A.44.040A.6 Outdoor Sales/Display/Leasing/Auction Areas: See 21A.44.040A.7 Processing center (indoor) Recycling Sign painting/ fabrication Studio, motion picture Welding shop Winery Woodworking mill Collection station No Minimum Concrete and/or asphalt manufacturing Extractive industry Manufacturing, concrete or asphalt Refinery, petroleum products Storage and Warehousing Air cargo terminals and package delivery facility 1 space per 1,000 sq. ft. , plus 1 space per fleet vehicle generally stored on-site No Maximum Building materials distribution Flammable liquids or gases, heating fuel distribution and storage Package delivery facility Warehouse Warehouse, accessory to retail and wholesale business (maximum 5,000 square foot floor plate) Wholesale distribution Storage, self 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office area, plus 1 space per 30 storage units 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office All Contexts: 1 space for every 15 storage units Contractor's yard/office 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office area All Contexts: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of office area Rock, sand and gravel storage and distribution No Minimum No Maximum Storage (outdoor) Page 37 Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking DU = dwelling unit sq. ft. = square feet Land Use Minimum Parking Requirement Maximum Parking Allowed General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, R- MU-35, R-MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE D-2, MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1. CSHBD2 D-1, D-3 D-4, G-MU, TSA-C, UI, FB-UN2, FB-UN3, FB- SC. R-MU Vehicle Stacking and Drive-Through Facilities: See 21A.44.040A.6 Outdoor Sales/Display/Leasing/Auction Areas: See 21A.44.040A.7 Storage and display (outdoor) Storage, public (outdoor) Public and Semi-Public Utility Uses Utility: Building or structure No Minimum No Maximum Antenna, communication tower Antenna, communication tower, exceeding the maximum building height in the zone Large wind energy system Solar array Utility: Electric generation facility Utility: Sewage treatment plant Utility: Solid waste transfer station Utility: Transmission wire, line, pipe or pole Wireless telecommunications facility Accessory Uses Accessory Dwelling Unit See Section 21A.40.200: Accessory Dwelling Units Accessory guest and servant's quarter 1 space per DU No Minimum All Contexts: 4 spaces per DU Living quarter for caretaker or security guard Retail, sales and service accessory use when located within a principal building 2 spaces per 1,000 1 space per 1,000 Transit and Urban Center Contexts: 2 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Neighborhood Center: 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. General Context: 4 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Retail, sales and service accessory use when located within a principal building and operated primarily for the convenience of employees No Minimum Page 38 Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking DU = dwelling unit sq. ft. = square feet Land Use Minimum Parking Requirement Maximum Parking Allowed General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, R- MU-35, R-MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE D-2, MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1. CSHBD2 D-1, D-3 D-4, G-MU, TSA-C, UI, FB-UN2, FB-UN3, FB- SC. R-MU Vehicle Stacking and Drive-Through Facilities: See 21A.44.040A.6 Outdoor Sales/Display/Leasing/Auction Areas: See 21A.44.040A.7 Warehouse, accessory 0.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of warehouse/wholesale No Minimum No Maximum Accessory use, except those that are otherwise specifically regulated elsewhere in this title No Minimum Heliport, accessory Reverse vending machine Storage, accessory (outdoor) Temporary Uses Mobile food business (operation in public right-of- way) No minimum, unless required by temporary use permit or as determined by the Zoning Administrator No Maximum Mobile food business (operation on private property) Mobile food court Vending cart, private property Vending cart, public property Farm stand, seasonal Table Notes: A. Facilities that are (a) occupy a building originally constructed for another residential use shall have the same parking requirements as the residential use for which the building was constructed. B. Parking requirements to be determined by Transportation Director based on considerations of factors such as estimated facility use, vehicle traffic to the facility, transit use to the facility, potential traffic congestion, and likelihood of overflow parking in surrounding neighborhoods. B.Electric Vehicle Parking Each multi-family use shall provide a minimum of one (1) parking space dedicated to electric vehicles for every twenty five (25) parking spaces provided on-site. Electric vehicle parking spaces shall count toward the minimum required number of parking spaces. The electric vehicle parking space shall be: 1.Located in the same lot as the principal use; 2.Located as close to a primary entrance of the principal building as possible; 3.Signed in a clear and conspicuous manner, such as special pavement marking or signage, indicating exclusive availability to electric vehicles; and Page 39 4.Outfitted with a standard electric vehicle charging station. C.Accessible Parking 1.The number and design of accessible (ADA) parking spaces shall be pursuant to the standards provided in the Salt Lake City Off-Street Parking Standards Manual. 2.Parking areas with four (4) or fewer vehicle parking spaces are not required to identify an accessible parking space; however, if parking is provided, a minimum of one (1) parking space shall comply with the ADA standard dimensions. 3.The number of required accessible spaces shall be based on the total number of vehicle spaces provided to serve the principal uses, as shown below in Table 21A.44.040-B: Accessible Parking Required Table 21A.44.040-B: Accessible Parking Required Off Street Parking Spaces Provided Minimum Required Accessible Spaces 1 to 100 1 per 25 parking spaces 101 to 500 1 per 50 parking spaces 501 to 1,000 2 percent of total number of parking spaces 1,001 and more 20, plus 1 for each 100 parking spaces over 1,000 D.Bicycle Parking 1. Applicability The following regulations apply to all uses except for single-family, two-family, and twin home residential uses and nonresidential uses having less than one thousand square feet (1,000 sq. ft.) of usable floor area. 2. Calculation of Mimimum Required Bicycle Parking Spaces31 The number of required bicycle spaces shall be based on the use within the defined parking contexts as shown in Table 21A.44.040-C: Minimum Bicycle Parking Requirements , unless another City standard requires a different number of bicycle parking spaces for a specific use, in which case the use-specific bicycle parking standard shall apply. Table 21A.44.040-C: Minimum Bicycle Parking Requirements* (Calculation of Bicyle Parking Spaces to be Provided per Residential Unit or Based on Usable Floor Area) Use General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, CSHBD2, R-MU-35, R-MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE D-2, D-3, MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1 D-1, D-4, G-MU, TSA-C, UI, FB-UN2, FB-SC, R-MU Residential Uses 1 per 5 units 1 per 4 units 1 per 3 units 1 per 2 units Page 40 Table 21A.44.040-C: Minimum Bicycle Parking Requirements* (Calculation of Bicyle Parking Spaces to be Provided per Residential Unit or Based on Usable Floor Area) Use General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, CSHBD2, R-MU-35, R-MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE D-2, D-3, MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1 D-1, D-4, G-MU, TSA-C, UI, FB-UN2, FB-SC, R-MU Public, Institutional, and Civic Uses 1 per 10,000 sq. ft. 1 per 5,000 sq. ft. 1 per 5,000 sq. ft. 1 per 3,000 sq. ft. Commercial Uses 1 per 20,000 sq. ft. 1 per 5,000 sq. ft 1 per 4,000 sq. ft. 1 per 2,000 sq. ft. Industrial Uses No requirement No requirement No requirement No Requirement *For all uses: In determining the minimum number of bicycle parking spaces required, fractional spaces are rounded to the nearest whole number, with one-half counted as an additional space 3. Building Expansions or Changes of Use Building expansions or changes of use that require additional vehicle parking spaces pursuant to section 21A.44.020 and section 21A.44.040 shall provide additional bicycle parking spaces based on the calculations in Table 21A.44.040-C: Minimum Bicycle Parking Requirements for the entire use. 4. Secure/Enclosed Bicycle Parking Each one (1) bicycle parking space that is within a secure/enclosed bicycle parking facility may be used to satisfy the requirement of two (2) required bicycle parking spaces. 5. Existing Public Bicycle Parking Facilities Permanent public bicycle racks or bike corrals located within fifty feet (50') of the primary entrance to the principal building may be used to satisfy up to two (2) required bicycle parking spaces. 6. Accessory and Temporary Uses No bicycle parking spaces are required for accessory or temporary uses. 21A.44.050 Alternatives to Minimum and Maximum Parking Calculations The amount of off street vehicle parking required pursuant to Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking, may be adjusted by the factors listed in this section. These adjustments may be applied as part of the calculation of parking requirements and do not require discretionary approval by the City. A.Limitations on Adjustments to Minimum Required Parking The adjustments listed in sections 21A.44.050B.B through 21A.44.050F.H may be used in any combination, but shall not be combined to reduce the minimum required parking established in Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking by more than forty percent (40%). Page 41 B.Shared Parking 1. Shared Parking for Two or More Uses a. Where two (2) or more uses listed in Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking share a parking garage or parking lot that is located on one of the properties that is sharing parking, or is located within the maximum permitted distance of all of the properties sharing parking shown in Table 21A.44.060-B: Maximum Distances for Off-Site Parking, the total minimum off street parking requirement for those uses may be reduced by the factors shown in Table 21A.44.050-A: Shared Parking Reduction Factors. b. The minimum number of off street parking spaces shall be the sum of the parking requirements for the uses divided by the factor shown in Table 21A.44.050-A: Shared Parking Reduction Factors for that combination of uses. Example: If a 5,000 square foot art gallery shared a parking lot with a 5,000 square foot retail goods establishment, and a 100 unit multi-family residential use in the Urban Center Context, the minimum off street parking required would be calculated as follows: Use 1: Art Gallery 0.5 per 1,000 sq. ft. x (5,000 sq. ft.) = 3 parking spaces Use 2: Retail Goods Establishment 1 per 1,000 sq. ft. x (5,000 sq. ft.) = 5 parking spaces Use 3: Multi-Family Residential 0 per studio unit x (20 studio units) = 0 parking spaces 0.5 per 1 bedroom unit x (36 1 bedroom units) = 18 parking spaces 1 per 2+ bedroom units x (44 2+ bedroom units) = 44 parking spaces 0+18+44 = 62 parking spaces Sum of two largest minimum parking requirements: 5 (retail goods establishment)+ 62 (multi-family) = 67 parking spaces Reduction Factor (two largest minimums): 67 ÷ 1.2 reduction factor = 55.8 or 56 parking spaces Add Remaining Minimum(s): 56 (retail & multi-family) + 3 (art gallery) = 59 parking spaces required Table 21A.44.050-A: Shared Parking Reduction Factors Property Use Multi-Family Residential Public, Institutional, or Civic Food and Beverage, Recreation and Entertainment, or Lodging Retail Sales Other Non- Residential Multi-Family Residential [1] Public, Institutional and Civic 1.1 Page 42 Food and Beverage, Recreation and Entertainment, or Lodging 1.1 1.2 Retail Sales 1.2 1.3 1.3 Other Non-Residential 1.3 1.5 1.7 1.2 [1] Applies to multi-family residential, assisted living facility (large), group home (large), and residential support (large) uses 2. Documentation Required a. The owners of record involved in the joint use of shared parking shall submit written documentation of the continued availability of the shared parking arrangement to the Transportation Director for review. b. The Director shall approve the shared parking arrangement if the Director determines that the documentation demonstrates the continued availability of the shared parking facility for a reasonable period of time. No zoning or use approval shall be issued until the Director has approved the shared parking documentation. c. If the shared parking arrangement is later terminated or modified and the Director determines that the termination or modification has resulted in traffic congestion, overflow parking in residential neighborhoods, or threats to pedestrian, bicycle, or vehicle safety, the property owners involved in the shared parking arrangement may be held in violation of this chapter. C.Proximity to Fixed-Rail Transit Required parking for a development located within one-quarter mile (when measured radially in a straight line from the subject property line) of a fixed-rail transit station platform in the General Context, Neighborhood Center Context, and Urban Center Context areas may be reduced by up to twenty-five percent (25%). This shall not apply to single or two-family uses including: single-family (attached or detached), twin homes, or two-family. D.Affordable and Senior Housing (Multi-family Structures) The minimum number of required off street parking spaces for multi-family residential developments with at least ten (10) dwelling units may be reduced by twenty-five percent (25%) if the multi-family development has: 1.A minimum of twenty-five percent (25%) of the dwelling units are restricted to residents with no greater than sixty percent (60%) area median income (AMI) for leased units; or 2.A minimum of thirty-five percent (35%) of the dwelling units are restricted to residents with no greater than eighty percent (80%) AMI for sale units; or 3.A minimum of seventy-five percent (75%) of the dwelling units are restricted to persons sixty-five (65) years of age or older. For a development that meets any of the scenarios above, an additional reduction of up to fifteen percent (15%) may be allowed when the development is located within one-quarter mile (when measured radially in a straight line from the subject property line) of a bus stop that is serviced by the same route at least every fifteen (15) minutes during daytime hours, Monday - Saturday. Page 43 E.Car Pool and Carshare Parking 1.For parking lots with one hundred (100) or more parking spaces, each off street parking space designated and signed for the exclusive use of a shared car pool vehicle shall count as three (3) spaces toward the satisfaction of minimum off street vehicle parking requirements. 2.For parking lots with one hundred (100) or more parking spaces, each off street parking space designated and signed for the exclusive use of a shared vanpool vehicle shall count as seven (7) spaces toward the satisfaction of minimum off street vehicle parking requirements. 3.For parking lots of any size, each off street parking space designated and signed for the exclusive use of a carshare vehicle shall count as four (4) spaces toward the satisfaction of minimum off street vehicle parking requirements. F.Valet Parking Services Modifications to minimum on site parking spaces may occur on a one-to-one basis if off site valet parking is provided and: 1.The design of the valet parking does not cause customers who do not use the valet services to park off the premises or cause queuing in the right-of-way; 2.The availability of valet parking service is clearly posted outside the establishment and near the main entrance; and 3.The applicant provides adequate written assurances for the continued operation of the valet parking, and a written agreement to notify future owners and tenants of the property of the duty to continue to provide off-site valet parking. G.Parking Study Demonstrating Different Parking Needs 1.The Transportation Director, in consultation with the Planning Director, may authorize a change in the amount of off street parking spaces. The authorization shall be based on the applicant submitting a parking study that demonstrates a different off street parking demand for the proposed development, use, or combination of uses than calculated from Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking, and subject to the overall limits on parking adjustments in Section 21A.44.050.A above. 2.The Directors shall determine whether the information and assumptions used in the study are reasonable and whether the study accurately reflects anticipated off street parking demand for the proposed development, use, or combination of uses. 3.Considerations for an alternative parking requirement (parking provided below the minimum required or exceeding the maximum allowed) shall be granted only if the following findings are determined: Page 44 a. That the proposed parking plan will satisfy the anticipated parking demand for the use; b. That the proposed parking plan will be at least as effective in maintaining traffic circulation patterns, reducing the visibility of parking areas and facilities as would strict compliance with the otherwise applicable off street parking standards; c. That the proposed parking plan does not have a materially adverse impact on adjacent or neighboring properties; d. That the proposed parking plan includes mitigation strategies for any potential impact on adjacent or neighboring properties; and e. That the proposed alternative parking plan is consistent with applicable City plans and policies. 21A.44.060 Parking Location and Design All required parking areas shall be located and designed in accordance with the standards in this Chapter 21A.44: Off Street Parking, Mobility, and Loading and the standards in the Off-Street Parking Standards Manual. Modifications to the standards of this section 21A.44.060 may be granted through the design review process, subject to conformance with the standards and procedures of Chapter 21A.59: Design Review. A.Generally 1. Parking Located on Same Lot as Use or Building Served All parking spaces required to serve buildings or uses erected or established after the effective date of this ordinance shall be located on the same lot as the building or use served, unless otherwise allowed pursuant to section 21A.44.060A.4 Off-Site Parking Permitted. 2. Biodetention and Landscape Islands in General and Neighborhood Center Contexts For parking lots with one hundred (100) or more parking spaces in the General Context and Neighborhood Center Context areas, parking lot islands or biodetention areas shall be provided on the interior of the parking lot to help direct traffic flow and to provide landscaped areas within such lots. 3. Parking Location and Setbacks All parking shall comply with the parking restrictions within yards pursuant to Table 21A.44.060-A: Parking Location and Setback Requirements Page 45 Table 21A.44.060-A: Parking Location and Setback Requirements N = parking prohibited between lot line and front line of building Zoning District Front Lot Line Corner Side Lot Line Interior Side Lot Line Rear Lot Line General Context Residential (FR Districts, RB, RMF, RO) FR N Parking in driveways that comply with all applicable City standards is exempt from this restriction. 6 ft. 0 ft. R-1, R-2, SR-1, SR-2 0 ft. RMF-30 N 0 ft.; or 10 ft. when abutting any 1-2 family residential district RMF-35, RMF-45, RMF-75, RO N ; 0 ft.; or 10 ft. when abutting any 1-2 family residential district. Limited to 1 side yard except for single-family attached lots. Commercial and Manufacturing (CC, CS, CG, M-1, M-2, SNB) CC 15 ft. 0 ft.; or 7 ft. when abutting any residential district CS 0 ft.; or 15 ft. when abutting any residential district CG 10 ft. M-1 15 ft. M-2 15 ft. 0 ft.; or 50 ft. when abutting any residential district Special Purpose Districts A 0 ft. 0 ft. AG, AG-2, AG-5, AG-20 N BP N 8 ft.; or 30 ft. when abutting any residential district EI 10 ft. 30 ft. 30 ft. 20 ft. FP 20 ft. 6 ft. 0 ft. I 20 ft. 0 ft.; or 15 ft. when abutting any residential district MH 20 ft. 0 ft. OS 30 ft. 10 ft. PL 30 ft. 0 ft.; or 10 ft. when abutting any residential district PL-2 20 ft. RP 30 ft. 8 ft.; or 30 ft. when abutting any residential district Neighborhood Center Context CB , CN, CSHBD2, SNB N 0 ft.; or 7 ft. when abutting any 1-2 family residential district R-MU-35, R-MU-45 Limited to 1 side yard, 0 ft.; or 10 ft. when abutting any 1-2 family residential district 0 ft.; or 10 ft. when abutting any 1-2 family residential district Page 46 Table 21A.44.060-A: Parking Location and Setback Requirements N = parking prohibited between lot line and front line of building Zoning District Front Lot Line Corner Side Lot Line Interior Side Lot Line Rear Lot Line RB, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE N 0 ft. Urban Center Context D-2 N 0 ft. D-3 See section 21A.44.060.B.1 MU N 0 ft.; limited to 1 side yard 0 ft. R-MU Surface Parking: 30 ft. Parking Garages: 45 ft. 0 ft.; or 10 ft. when abutting any 1-2 family residential district Surface parking at least 30 ft. from front lot line. Parking garages at least 45 ft. from front lot line 0 ft.; or 10 ft. when abutting any 1-2 family residential district TSA-T See section 21A.44.060B.22 0 ft. CSHBD1 N 0 ft.; or 7 ft. when abutting any residential district Transit Context D-1 See section 21A.44.060B.11 D-4 See section Error! Reference source not found.1 0 ft. FB-UN2, FB-SC N 0 ft. TSA-C See section 21A.44.060B.22 0 ft. G-MU See section Error! Reference source not found.1 0 ft. UI 0 ft; Hospitals: 30 ft. 0 ft.; or 15 ft. when abutting any 1-2 family residential district; Hospitals: 10 ft. 0 ft.; or 15 ft. when abutting any 1-2 family residential district; Hospitals: 10 ft. 4. Off-Site Parking Permitted When allowed as either a permitted or conditional use per Chapter 21A.33 Land Use Tables, off- site parking facilities may be used to satisfy the requirements of this chapter and shall comply with the following standards: a.Maximum Distance of Off-Site Parking Off-site parking shall be located according to the distance established in Table 21A.44.060-B: Maximum Distances for Off-Site Parking (measured in a straight line from the property boundary of the principal use for which the parking serves to the closest point of the parking area). Table 21A.44.060-B: Maximum Distances for Off-Site Parking Context Maximum Distance to Off-Site Parking Neighborhood Center 600 ft. General Page 47 Legal Nonconforming Use in Residential District Urban Center 1,200 ft. Transit 1,000 ft. b.Documentation Required (1) The owners of record involved in an off-site parking arrangement shall submit written documentation of the continued availability of the off-site parking arrangement to the Planning Director for review. (2) The Planning Director shall approve the off-site parking arrangement if the Director determines the location meets the standards of this section. No zoning or use approval shall be issued until the Director has approved the off-site parking arrangement and the documentation has been recorded in the office of the Salt Lake County Recorder. (3) If the off-site parking arrangement is later terminated or modified and the Planning Director determines that the termination or modification has resulted in traffic congestion, overflow parking in residential neighborhoods, or threats to pedestrian, bicycle, or vehicle safety, the property owners of the uses for which the off-site parking was provided may be held in violation of this chapter. 5. Circulation Plan Required Any application for a building permit shall include a site plan, drawn to scale, and fully dimensioned, showing any off street parking or loading facilities to be provided in compliance with this title. A tabulation of the number of off street vehicle and bicycle parking, loading, and stacking spaces required by this chapter shall appear in a conspicuous place on the plan. 6. Driveways and Access a.Compliance with Other Adopted Regulations (1) Parking lots shall be designed in compliance with applicable City codes, ordinances, and standards, including but not limited to title 12 of the City Code: Vehicles and Traffic and the Off-Street Parking Standards Manual to the maximum degree practicable, with respect to: (a) Minimum distances between curb cuts; (b) Proximity of curb cuts to intersections; (c) Provisions for shared driveways; (d) Location, quantity and design of landscaped islands; and (e) Design of parking lot interior circulation system. (2) Notwithstanding the provisions of 21A.44.060A.6.a(1) above, relocation of a driveway for a single-family, two-family, or twin home residence in any zoning district shall only be required when the residence is replaced, and shall not be required when the residence is expanded or renovated in compliance with the City code. b.Access Standards Access to all parking facilities shall comply with the following standards: Page 48 (1) To the maximum extent practicable, all off street parking facilities shall be designed with vehicular access to a street or alley that will least interfere with automobile, bicycle, and pedestrian traffic movement. (2) Parking facilities in excess of five (5) spaces that access a public street shall be designed to allow vehicles to enter and exit the lot in a forward direction. (3) Parking more shall be limited to two (2) curb cuts, unless the Transportation Director determines that additional curb cuts are necessary to ensure pedestrian, bicycle, and vehicle safety or to comply with the fire code. Public safety uses shall be exempt from limitations on curb cuts. (4) All vehicular access roads/driveways shall be surfaced as required in accordance with section 21A.44.060.A.8 Surface Materials. c.Driveway Standards All driveways shall comply with the following standards: (1)Driveway Location in Residential Zoning Districts With the exception of legal shared driveways, driveways shall be at least twenty feet (20') from street corner property lines and five feet (5') from any public utility infrastructure such as power poles, fire hydrants, and water meters. Except for entrance and exit driveways leading to approved parking areas, no curb cuts or driveways are permitted. (2)Driveway Widths All driveways serving residential uses shall be a minimum eight feet wide and shall comply with the standards for maximum driveway widths listed in Table 21A.44.060-C: Minimum and Maximum Driveway Width. Table 21A.44.060-C: Minimum and Maximum Driveway Width Zoning District Minimum Driveway Width (in front and corner side yard) Maximum Driveway Width* (in front and corner side yard) SR-1, SR-2 and SR-3 8 ft. 22 ft. MH 8 ft. 16 ft. Other Residential Zoning Districts 8 ft. 30 ft. M-1 and M-2 12 ft. single lane and 24 ft. for two-way 50 ft. Other Non-Residential Zoning Districts 12 ft. single lane and 24 ft. for two-way 30 ft. * Maximum width is for all driveways combined when more than one driveway is provided (3)Shared Driveways Shared driveways, where two (2) or more properties share one (1) driveway access, may be permitted if the Transportation Director determines that the design and location of the shared driveway access will not create adverse impacts on traffic congestion or public safety. Page 49 (4)Driveway Surface All driveways providing access to parking facilities shall be improved and maintained pursuant to the standards in the Off-Street Parking Standards Manual. 7. Minimum Dimensional Standards All parking spaces shall comply with the dimensional standards in the Off-Street Parking Standards Manual. 8. Surface Materials All parking spaces shall comply with the standards for surfacing of access, driving, and parking surfacing in the Off-Street Parking Standards Manual. 9. Grading and Stormwater Management All surface parking areas shall comply with City grading and stormwater management standards and shall be reviewed for best management practices by Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities. Refer to the Salt Lake City Stormwater Master Plan, Storm Drainage Manual, and Green Infrastructure Toolbox for additional information. 10. Sight Distance Triangles All driveways and intersections shall comply with the sight distance triangle standards as defined in the Off-Street Parking Standards Manual. 11. Landscaping and Screening All parking areas and facilities shall comply with the landscaping and screening standards in Chapter 21A.48: Landscaping and Buffers. 12. Lighting Where a parking area or parking lot is illuminated, the light source shall be shielded so that the light source is not directly visible from any abutting property or abutting private or public street. 13. Signs All signs in parking areas or related to parking facilities shall comply with Chapter 21A.46; Signs, and applicable provisions of the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD). 14. Pedestrian Walkways a. Surface parking lots with between twenty-five (25) and one hundred (100) parking spaces shall provide a pedestrian walkway or sidewalk through the parking lot to the primary entrance of the principal building. Pedestrian walkways shall be identified by a change in color, material, surface texture, or grade elevation from surrounding driving surfaces. b. Parking lots with more than one hundred (100) parking spaces shall provide: (1) One (1) or more grade- and located in an area that is not a driving surface, leading from the furthest row of parking spaces to the primary entrance of the principal building. (2) Vehicles shall not overhang the pedestrian walkway(s). Page 50 (3) Where the walkway(s) crosses a drive aisle, pedestrian walkway(s) shall be identified by a change in color, material, surface texture, or grade elevation from surrounding driving surfaces. (4) One (1) pedestrian walkway meeting these standards shall be provided for each one hundred (100) parking spaces provided on site or part thereof, after the first one hundred (100) parking spaces. 15. Parking Garages The following standards shall apply to all above-ground parking garages except those located in the FB zones subject to 21A.27.030.C.4, whether freestanding or incorporated into a building: a. Each façade or a parking garage adjacent to a public street or public space shall have an external skin designed to conceal the view of all parked cars. Examples include heavy gauge metal screen, precast concrete panels, live green or landscaped walls, laminated or safety glass, or decorative photovoltaic panels. b. No horizontal length of the parking garage façade shall extend longer than 40 feet without the inclusion of architectural elements such as decorative grillwork, louvers, translucent screens, alternating building materials, and other external features to avoid visual monotony. Facade elements shall align with parking levels. c. Internal circulation shall allow parking surfaces to be level (without any slope) along each parking garage facade adjacent to a public street or public space. All ramps between levels shall be located along building facades that are not adjacent to a public street or public space, or shall be located internally so that they are not visible from adjacent public streets or public spaces. d. The location of elevators and stairs shall be highlighted through the use of architectural features or changes in façade colors, textures, or materials so that visitors can easily identify these entry points. e. Interior parking garage lighting shall not produce glaring sources toward adjacent properties while providing safe and adequate lighting levels. The use of sensor dimmable LEDs and white stained ceilings are recommended to control light levels on-site while improving energy efficiency. f. In the Urban Center Context and Transit Context areas, the street-level facades of all parking garages shall be designed to meet applicable building code standards for habitable space to allow at least one (1) permitted or conditional use, other than parking, to be located where the parking garage is located. g. Vent and fan locations shall not be located on parking garage facades facing public streets or public spaces, or adjacent to residential uses, to the greatest extent practicable. 16. Tandem Parking Where more than one (1) parking space is required to be provided for a residential dwelling unit, the parking spaces may be designed as tandem parking spaces, provided that: a. No more than two (2) required spaces may be included in the tandem parking layout; and b. Each set of two (2) tandem parking spaces shall be designated for a specific residential unit. Page 51 17. Cross-Access between Adjacent Uses The Transportation Director may require that access to one or more lots be through shared access points or cross-access through adjacent parcels when the Transportation Director determines that individual access to abutting parcels or limited distance between access points will create traffic safety hazards due to traffic levels on adjacent streets or nearby intersections. Such a determination shall be consistent with requirements of state law regarding property access from public streets. Required cross-access agreements shall be recorded with the Salt Lake County Office. B.Zone Specific Location and Design Standards 1. D-1, D-3, D-4, and G-MU Zoning Districts The following regulations shall apply to surface or above-ground parking facilities. No special design and setback restrictions shall apply to below-ground parking facilities. a.Block Corner Areas (1)Within the D-1 zoning district, above-ground parking facilities located within the block corner areas and on Main Street, shall be located behind principal buildings and; a. All above-ground parking facilities that front a street shall contain uses other than parking along the entire length of the building façade and along all stories or levels of the building. b. Vehicle access to parking shall be located to the side of the building or as far from the street corner as possible unless further restricted by this Title. (2)Within the D-3, D-4, or G-MU zoning districts, above-ground parking facilities shall be located behind principal buildings, or at least seventy-five feet (75') from front and corner side lot lines, and shall be landscaped to minimize visual impacts. b.Mid-Block Areas (1)Within the D-1 zoning district, above-ground parking facilities shall be located behind the front line of principal buildings or shall be located at least seventy- five feet (75') from front and corner side lot lines; a. Parking lots proposed as a principal use to facilitate a building demolition are prohibited. (2)Within the D-3, D-4, or G-MU zoning districts, parking facilities shall be located behind principal buildings, or at least thirty feet (30') from front and corner side lot lines. (3)Parking garages shall meet the following: a. Retail goods/service establishments, offices and/or restaurants shall be provided on the first floor adjacent to the front or corner side lot line. The Page 52 facades of such first floors shall be compatible and consistent with the associated retail or office portion of the building and other retail uses in the area. b. Levels of parking above the first level facing the front or corner side lot line shall have floors and/or facades that are horizontal, not sloped. c.Landscape Requirements Surface parking lots, where allowed shall have a minimum landscaped setback of fifteen in Chapter 21A.48: Landscaping and Buffers. 2. TSA Zoning District New uses and development or redevelopment within the TSA zoning district shall comply with the following standards. a.Surface Parking on Corner Properties On corner properties, surface parking lots shall be located behind principal buildings or at least sixty feet (60') from the intersection of the front and corner side lot lines. b.Surface Parking in the Core Area Surface parking lots in the core area are required to be located behind or to the side of the principal building. (1)When located to the side of a building, the parking lot shall be: (a) Set back a minimum of thirty feet (30') from a property line adjacent to a public street. The area between the parking lot and the property line adjacent to a public street shall be landscaped or activated with outdoor dining, plazas, or similar features; (b) Screened with a landscaped hedge or wall that is at least thirty-six inches (36") above grade and no taller than forty-two inches (42") above grade. Landscaping berms are not permitted; and (c) No wider than what is required for two (2) rows of parking and one (1) drive aisle as provided in the Off-Street Parking Standards Manual. (2) Unless a second driveway is necessary to comply with the fire code, a maximum of one (1) driveway and drive aisle shall be permitted per street frontage. The access point shall be located a minimum of one hundred feet (100') from the intersection of the front and corner side lot lines. If the front or corner side lot line is less than one hundred feet (100') in length, then the edge of the drive approach shall be located within twenty feet (20') of the side or rear property line. c.Surface Parking In the Transition Area (1) Surface parking lots in the transition area are required to be located behind the principal building or to the side of a principal building. (2)When located to the side of a principal building, the parking lot shall be: (a) Set back so that no portion of the parking area (other than the driveway) shall be closer to the street than the front wall setback of the building. In cases where the front wall of the building is located within five feet (5') of a property line adjacent Page 53 to a street, the parking lot shall be set back a minimum of eight feet (8'). The space between the parking lot and the property line adjacent to a street shall be landscaped or activated with outdoor dining, plazas, or similar features; and (b) Screened with a landscaped hedge or wall that is at least thirty-six inches (36") above grade and no taller than forty-two inches (42") above grade. Landscaped berms are not permitted. C.Recreational Vehicle Parking 1. Generally a. Recreational vehicle parking spaces shall be in addition to, and not in lieu of, required off street vehicle parking spaces. b. Recreational vehicles shall not be used for storage of goods, materials, or equipment other than those that are customarily associated with the recreational vehicle. c. All recreational vehicles shall be stored in a safe and secure manner. Any tie downs, tarpaulins, or ropes shall be secured from flapping in windy conditions. d. Recreational vehicles shall not be occupied as a dwelling while parked on the property. e. Recreational vehicle parking is permitted in any enclosed structure conforming to building code and zoning requirements for the zoning district in which it is located. f. Recreational vehicle parking outside of an approved enclosed structure shall be permitted for each residence and shall be limited to one motor home or travel trailer and a total of two (2) recreational vehicles of any type. g. Recreational vehicle parking outside of an enclosed structure shall comply with the standards in this section. 2. Front Yard Parking Recreational vehicle parking is prohibited in any required or provided front yard. 3. Rear Yard Parking Recreational vehicles may be parked in the rear yard when they are on a hard surfaced pad compliant with surfacing standards in the Off-Street Parking Standards Manual and with access provided by either a hard surfaced driveway, hard surfaced drive strips or an access drive constructed of turf block materials with an irrigation system. 4. Side Yard Parking Recreational vehicle parking in side yards shall be allowed only when topographical factors, the existence of mature trees, or the existence of properly permitted and constructed structures prohibit access to the rear yard. The existence of a fence or other structure that is not part of a building shall not constitute a lack of rear yard access. Any recreational vehicle parking area in a side yard shall: a. Be on a hard surface compliant with the Off-Street Parking Standards Manual; b. Be accessed via a driveway compliant with driveway standards of this chapter; c. Not obstruct access to other required parking for the use. Page 54 21A.44.070 Off Street Loading Areas A.Number and Size of Loading Areas Required 1.Unless otherwise specified, a required off street loading berth shall be at least ten feet (10') in width by at least thirty-five feet (35') in length for short berths, and twelve feet (12') in width by at least fifty feet (50') in length for long berths, exclusive of aisle and maneuvering space. Maneuvering aprons of appropriate width and orientation shall be provided and shall be subject to approval by the Transportation Director. 2.All loading areas shall have a vertical clearance of at least fourteen feet (14'). 3.Off street loading facilities for new developments or for expansion of an existing development shall be provided at the rate specified for a particular use, or if multiple uses, at the rate of the uses combined, in Table 21A.44.070-A: Off Street Loading Requirements. Regardless of the combination of uses, all buildings with a gross floor area over 50,000 square feet shall have a minimum of 1 short berth. Table 21A.44.070-A: Off Street Loading Requirements Use Gross Floor Area (Square Feet) Number and Size of Berths Hotels, Institutions, and Institutional Living 50,000 - 100,000 1 short Each additional 100,000 1 short Office/Commercial 50,000 - 100,000 1 short Each additional 100,000 up to 500,000 1 short Retail 50,000 - 100,000 1 long Each additional 100,000 1 long Industrial 25,001 - 50,000 1 long 50,001 - 100,000 2 long Each additional 100,000 1 long Multi- Family Residential86 # of Dwelling Units (Per Building) Number and Size of Berths 40-150 1 short 151-300 2 short Greater than 300 1 additional short per 200 units B.Location and Design of Loading Areas 1.All required loading berths shall be located on the same development site as the use(s) served. 2.No loading berth shall be located within thirty feet (30') of the nearest point of intersection of any two (2) streets. 3.No loading berth shall be located in a required front yard. 4.Each required loading berth shall be located and designed to: Page 55 a. Allow all required vehicle maneuvering and backing movements on-site; b. Minimize conflicts with pedestrian, bicycle, and traffic movement or encroachments into any pedestrian walkway, bicycle lane, public right-of-way, and fire lane; and c. Avoid the need to back into a public street while leaving the site to the maximum extent practicable, as determined by the Planning Director and the Transportation Director. 5.Landscaping and screening of all loading berths shall be provided to comply with the requirements of Chapter 21A.48: Landscaping and Buffers. 6.Where a loading berth is illuminated, the light source shall be shielded so that the light source is not directly visible from any abutting property or abutting private or public street. 7.All signs in loading areas shall comply with Chapter 21A.46: Signs, and applicable provisions of the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices. 8.All required loading berths shall comply with the surfacing standards of the Off-Street Parking Standards Manual. 21A.44.080 Drive-Through Facilities and Vehicle Stacking Areas A.Number of Stacking Spaces Required The following standards apply for all uses with vehicle stacking and/or drive-through facilities. 1.All uses with drive-through facilities shall provide the minimum number of on-site stacking spaces indicated in Table 21A.44.080-A: Required Vehicle Stacking Spaces. Table 21A.44.080-A: Required Vehicle Stacking Spaces Use General Context Neighborhood Center Context Urban Center Context Transit Context All zoning districts not listed in another context area RB, SNB, CB, CN, CSHBD2, R-MU-35, R-MU-45, SR-3, FB-UN1, FB-SE D-2, D-3, MU, R- MU, TSA-T, CSHBD1 D-1, D-4, G-MU, TSA-C, UI, FB-UN2, FB-SC Car Wash, Self-Service 3 spaces per bay or stall 2 spaces per bay or stall Car Wash, Automated 4 spaces per lane or stall 3 spaces per lane or stall Food and Beverage Service Uses 5 spaces per service lane 4 spaces per service lane Other Uses 3 spaces per service lane 3 spaces per service lane B.Location and Design of Drive-Through Facilities 1.In zoning districts where uses with drive-through facilities are allowed and where no front or corner side yard setback is required, the drive-through lanes shall not be located between the front or corner side lot line and any walls of the principal building. 2.Drive-through lanes shall be arranged to avoid conflicts with site access points, access to parking or loading spaces, and internal circulation routes, to the maximum extent practicable. Page 56 3.In the General Context zoning districts, a by-pass lane, driveway, or other circulation area around a drive-through facility stacking lane shall be provided for all uses other than automated car washes. financial institutions and restaurant/retail uses. 4.All required stacking spaces shall measure nine (9) feet by twenty (20) feet and shall be counted from the point of service, or final service window. 5.Air quality: Drive through facilities shall post idle-free signs pursuant to Chapter 12.58 of the city code. 6.When a drive through use adjoins any residential use or any residential zoning district, a minimum six 7.Drive through facility will not result in adverse impacts upon the vicinity after giving consideration to the hours of operation, noise and light generation, traffic circulation, and the site plan. 21A.44.090 Modifications to Parking Areas Applicants requesting development permits or approvals may request adjustments to the standards and requirements in this Chapter 21A.44: Off Street Parking, Mobility, and Loading, and the City may approve adjustments to those standards, as described below. A.Administrative Modifications The Planning Director or Transportation Director may approve the following types of modifications without requiring approval of a Special Exception, provided that the Director determines that the adjustment will not create adverse impacts on pedestrian, bicycle, or vehicle safety and that the adjustment is required to accommodate an unusual site feature (such as shape, topography, utilities, or access point constraints) and that the need for the adjustment has not been created by the actions of the applicant. 1.Modification to dimensions or geometries of parking, loading, or stacking space, aisles, or maneuvering areas otherwise required by this chapter, other City regulations, or the Off-Street Parking Standards Manual; provided that those modifications are consistent with federal and state laws regarding persons with disabilities, including but not limited to the Americans with Disabilities Act. 2.Modifications to bicycle parking or loading berth location or design standards. B.Special Exceptions The following types of exceptions may be approved through the Special Exception process in section 21A.52.040, provided that the application meets the criteria for approval of a Special Exception in section 21A.52.060 in addition to the standards provided in this section. 1. Exceptions Permitted a.Front Yard Parking Exception For any zoning district, if front yard parking is prohibited in Table 21A.44.060-A: Parking Location and Setback Requirements, it may be allowed if all of the following conditions are met: Page 57 (1) The rear or side yards cannot be reasonably accessed by vehicles, specifically; (a) Clearance for a driveway could not be provided in the side yard on either side of the building that is free from obstructions that cannot reasonably be avoided, such as utilities, window-wells, a specimen tree, a direct elevation change of three feet (3') or greater, or retaining walls three feet (3') high or greater; and (b) There is not a right-of-way or alley adjacent to the property with established rights for access, where: a. The travel distance to the property line is less than one hundred feet (100') from an improved street and the right-of-way or alley has at least a minimum twelve foot (12') clearance that is, or could be paved; or b. The travel distance to the property line is more than one hundred feet (100') from an improved street and the right-of-way or alley has an existing minimum twelve foot (12') wide paved surface. (2) It is not feasible to build an attached garage that conforms to yard area and setback requirements; (3) Parking is limited to an area that is surfaced in compliance with the Off-Street Parking Standards Manual; (4) The parking area is limited to nine feet (9') wide by twenty feet (20') deep; (5) Vehicles using the parking area will not project across any sidewalk or into the public right-of-way; and (6) Parking is restricted to passenger vehicles only. b.Vehicle and Equipment Storage Surfacing Exception Vehicle and equipment storage without hard surfacing may be permitted in the CG, M-1, M- 2 and EI zoning districts provided that: (1) The lot is used for long-term vehicle storage, not for regular parking and/or maneuvering; (2) The vehicles or equipment stored are large and/or are built on tracks that could destroy normal hard surfacing; (3) The parking surface is compacted with six inches (6") of road base and other semi- hard material with long lasting dust control chemical applied annually; (4) A hard-surfaced cleaning station is installed to prevent tracking of mud and sand onto the public right-of-way; and (5) Any vehicles or equipment that contain oil are stored with pans, drains, or other means to ensure that any leaking oil will not enter the soil. 21A.44.100 Use and Maintenance A. Use of Parking Areas 1.Except as otherwise provided in this section, required off street parking facilities provided for uses listed in Table 21A.44.040-A: Minimum and Maximum Off Street Parking shall be solely for the parking of automobiles or authorized temporary uses. Page 58 B. Maintenance 1.Space allocated to any off street loading berth or related access or maneuvering area shall not be used to satisfy the parking space requirements for any off street parking. 2.Except in the M-1, M-2, CG, and D districts, no cleaning or maintenance of loading areas using motorized equipment may be performed between ten o'clock (10:00) P.M. and seven o'clock (7:00) A.M. each day, except for snow removal. 21A.44.110 Nonconforming Parking and Loading Facilities Nonconforming parking and loading facilities shall be subject to the standards established in Chapter 21A.38: Nonconforming Uses and Noncomplying Structures, and the criteria established in this section. A. Continuation of Nonconforming Parking and Loading Facilities Any parking spaces, loading facilities, or access to public rights-of-way that were lawfully existing or created prior to the effective date of this Ordinance, but that have since become nonconforming with the provisions of this chapter through the actions of the City or any governmental entity, shall be allowed to continue, but any expansion of the use or structure, or change of use, after the adoption date of this Ordinance shall comply with the provisions of this Chapter 21A.44: Off Street Parking, Mobility, and Loading. B. Nonconformity Due to Governmental Acquisition Where a lot, tract, or parcel is occupied by a lawful structure or use, and where the acquisition of right-of-way by eminent domain, dedication, or purchase by a City, county, state, or federal agency creates noncompliance of the parking, loading, or drive-through facilities with any requirement of this chapter, the parking, loading, or drive-through facility shall be deemed lawful and conforming. This designation shall apply only to noncompliance resulting directly from the acquisition of right-of- way. C. Damage or Destruction Reconstruction, reestablishment, or repair of any nonconforming parking, loading, or drive-through area involuntarily damaged or destroyed by fire, collapse, explosion or other natural cause is not required to comply with the standards of this chapter. The parking and loading facilities may be restored or continued as they existed prior to the damage or destruction, or in a manner that reduces any nonconformity that existed prior to the damage or destruction. D. Legalization of Garages Converted to Residential Use Garages attached to single-family and two-family residential structures converted to residential uses before April 12, 1995, and any associated front yard parking, may be legalized by complying with the following requirements: 1.The property owner shall obtain a building permit for all building modifications associated with converting the garage to residential use and the City shall inspect the conversion for substantial compliance with adopted life safety regulations. Page 59 2.The driveway leading to the converted garage shall not be removed without replacing the same number of parking spaces (up to the minimum required by this chapter) in a location authorized by this chapter. 3.Parking on the driveway in the front yard is restricted to passenger vehicles only. Page 60 Definitions AUTOMOBILE A self-propelled vehicle with wheels that can legally operate within a public right-of-way. The term includes but is not limited to passenger cars, light trucks, and recreational vehicles. BIODETENTION A low impact development term also sometimes called a rain garden, biofilter or porous landscape detention that achieves on-site retention of stormwater through the use of vegetated depressions engineered to collect, store, and facilitate runoff infiltration. CAR POOL A group of two or more commuters, including the driver, who share the ride to and from work or other destination on a regularly scheduled basis. CARSHARE129 A membership-based model of car use where people rent or borrow cars for short periods of time, often by the hour. Vehicles may be made available through private individuals, a property owner/manager, or commercial companies, but are managed through a facilitator. CHANGE OF USE The replacement of an existing use by a new use, or a change in the nature of an existing. A change of ownership, tenancy, name or management, or a change in product or service within the same use classification where the previous nature of the use, line of business, or other function is substantially unchanged is not a change of use. The conversion of existing residential units to condominiums is not a change of use. COMMERCIAL VEHICLE A vehicle associated with a business that exceeds one (1) ton capacity. This includes but is not limited to buses, dump trucks, stake body trucks, step vans, tow trucks and tractor trailers. Taxis and limousines shall also be considered commercial vehicles. DESIGN CAPACITY The maximum occupancy of a building or structure based on the Fire and/or Building Code, whichever allows occupancy by a larger group of people. DEVELOPMENT A. The carrying out of any building activity, the making of any material change in the use or appearance of any structure or land, or the dividing of land into parcels by any person. The following activities or uses shall be taken for the purposes of these regulations to involve "development": 1. The construction of any principal building or structure; 2. Increase in the intensity of use of land, such as an increase in the number of dwelling units or an increase in nonresidential use intensity that requires additional parking; 3. Alteration of a shore or bank of a pond, river, stream, lake or other waterway; 4. Commencement of drilling (except to obtain soil samples), the driving of piles, or excavation on a parcel of land; 5. Demolition of a structure; 6. Clearing of land as an adjunct of construction, including clearing or removal of vegetation and including any significant disturbance of vegetation or soil manipulation; and Page 61 7. Deposit of refuse, solid or liquid waste, or fill on a parcel of land. B. The following operations or uses shall not be taken for the purpose of these regulations to involve "development": 1. Work by a highway or road agency or railroad company for the maintenance of a road or railroad track, if the work is carried out on land within the boundaries of the right of way; 2. Utility installations as stated in subsection 21A.02.050.B of this title; 3. Landscaping for residential uses; and 4. Work involving the maintenance of existing landscaped areas and existing rights of way such as setbacks and other planting areas. FLOOR AREA, GROSS138 A. For determining size of establishment, the sum of the gross horizontal area of all floors of the building measured from the exterior face of the exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating two (2) buildings. The floor area of a building shall include basement floor area, penthouses, attic space having headroom of seven feet (7') or more, interior balconies and mezzanines, enclosed porches, and floor area devoted to accessory uses. Space devoted to open air off street parking or loading shall not be included in floor area. B. The floor area of structures devoted to bulk storage of materials including, but not limited to, grain elevators and petroleum storage tanks, shall be determined on the basis of height in feet (i.e., 10 feet in height shall equal 1 floor). FLOOR AREA, USABLE138 For determining off street parking and loading requirements, the sum of the gross horizontal areas of all floors of the building, as measured from the outside of the exterior walls, devoted to the principal use, including accessory storage areas located within selling or working space such as counters, racks, or closets, and any floor area devoted to retailing activities, to the production or processing of goods or to business or professional offices. Floor area for the purposes of measurement for off street parking spaces shall not include: A. Floor area devoted primarily to mechanical equipment or unfinished storage areas; B. Floor area devoted to off street parking or loading facilities, including aisles, ramps, and maneuvering space. GARAGE An accessory building or portion of a building designed or used for the storage of vehicles used by the occupants of the principle building. GARAGE, ATTACHED A garage that has a roof or wall of which fifty percent (50%) or more is attached to and in common with a principal building. An attached garage shall be considered part of the principal building and shall be subject to all yard requirements of the principal building. HARD SURFACED138 A concrete, asphalt, brick, stone, turf block, or other surface approved by the City Engineer that is suitable for vehicle traffic. Page 62 OFF STREET PARKING138 A site or portion of a site devoted to the parking of automobiles in an area that is not a public or private street or other public right-of-way, including parking spaces, aisles, driveways, and associated landscaped areas. OFF-SITE138 A lot that is separate from the lot on which the principal use is located. OUTDOOR DINING138 A dining area with seats and/or table(s) located outdoors of a restaurant, brewpub, social club, tavern, market, deli, or other retail sales establishment that sells food and/or drinks, and which is either: A. Located entirely outside the walls of the building of the subject business, or B. Enclosed on two (2) sides or less by the walls of the building with or without a solid roof cover, or C. Enclosed on three (3) sides by the walls of the building without a solid roof cover. PARKING GARAGE A structure or part of a structure used primarily for the housing, parking, or storage of automobiles. PARKING LOT An area on the surface of the land used for the parking of more than four (4) automobiles. Areas designated for the display of new and used vehicles for sale are not included in this definition. PARKING, OFF-SITE An off-street parking area intended to serve one or more uses and that is located on a different parcel or lot than the use(s) it is intended to serve. PARK AND RIDE LOT138 An area or structure intended to accommodate parked vehicles for the general public, where commuters park their vehicles and continue travel to another destination via public transit, carpool, vanpool, or bicycle. Parking lot may be shared with other uses or stand alone. PARKING, SHARED Joint use of a parking lot or area for more than one principal use. PARKING SPACE138 Space within a parking area of certain dimensions as defined in Chapter 21A.44 of this title, exclusive of access drives, aisles, ramps, columns, for the storage of one vehicle. PARKING STUDY A study prepared by a licensed professional traffic engineer specifically addressing the parking demand generated by a use and which provides information necessary to determine whether proposed parking will have a material negative impact to adjacent or neighboring properties. PARKING, TANDEM138 The in-line parking of one vehicle behind another in such a way that one parking space can only be accessed through another parking space. PLANNING DIRECTOR144 The director of the Salt Lake City Planning Division, or his/her designee. PRIMARY ENTRANCE The entrance to a building, parcel, or development most used by the public for day-to-day ingress and egress. Page 63 STREET144 A vehicular way which may also serve for all or part of its width as a way for pedestrian traffic, whether called street, highway, thoroughfare, parkway, throughway, road, avenue, boulevard, lane, place, mall or otherwise designated. VANPOOL A group of seven (7) to fifteen (15) commuters, including the driver, who share the ride to and from work or other destination on a regularly scheduled basis. VEHICLE138 A device by which any person or property may be transported upon a public highway except devices used exclusively upon stationary rails or tracks or exclusively moved by human power. VEHICLE, ELECTRIC A device which is considered a vehicle that uses electricity as its primary source of power, such as a plug- in electric vehicle or a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle. An electric vehicle does not include devices that are moved by human power. VEHICLE, RECREATIONAL138 Any motorized vehicle and/or associated non-motorized equipment used for camping, traveling, boating, or other leisure activities including, but not limited to campers, boats, travel trailers, motor homes, snow mobiles, wave runners, and other vehicles designed for traveling on water (motorized and non- motorized). Trailers used for transporting this type of vehicle are also included within this definition. Page 64 ATTACHMENT C: OFF-STREET PARKING MANUAL Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74 Page 75 Page 76 Page 77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80 Page 81 Page 82 Page 83 Page 84 ATTACHMENT D: PARKING CONTEXT MAP Page 85 2100 ATTACHMENT E: ANALYSIS OF STANDARDS As per section 21A.50.050, a decision to amend the text of this title or the zoning map by general amendment is a matter committed to the legislative discretion of the city council and is not controlled by any one standard. Factor Finding Rationale 1. Whether a proposed text amendment is consistent with the purposes, goals, objectives, and policies of the city as stated through its various adopted planning documents; Complies As outlined above in the ‘Key Considerations’ section, the proposed text amendments support multiple principles and initiatives of Plan Salt Lake (2015). In addition, the proposed amendments are consistent with many of the goals and objectives of Salt Lake City’s Neighborhood Master Plans. A comprehensive list of those goals can be found in Attachment F of this report. Staff finds that the proposed text amendments are consistent with City purposes, goals, and policies. 2. Whether a proposed text amendment furthers the specific purpose statements of the zoning ordinance; Complies The proposed text amendments advance the following purposes and intents of the Zoning Ordinance: …to promote the health, safety, morals, convenience, order, prosperity and welfare of the present and future inhabitants of Salt Lake City, to implement the adopted plans of the city… Specifically, the purposes are to: A. Lessen congestion in the streets or roads: By introducing four different parking contexts, the proposed ordinance encourages more multi-modal transportation solutions. Traditional development patterns are encouraged through a reduction of required surface parking, making areas more walkable and conducive to mass transit. In the Neighborhood Center context, parking minimums were increased for restaurant and retail uses. The intention is to reduce parking from spilling into neighboring residential streets. D. Classify land uses and distribute land development and utilization; The introduction of parking context areas would create more specific classifications for parking as a land use and allows for more efficient utilization of land for development. The general reductions of minimum parking requirements and revised parking alternatives are proposed to allow for Page 87 more remnantparcels or underutilized land to be redeveloped. E. Protect the tax base; The proposed standards encourage economic vitality by reducing constraints for the reuse of existing buildings and by lowering costs associated with installing parking that would otherwise not be in line with market demand. F. Secure economy in governmental expenditures; Low, wide, suburban style development yields a very inefficient use of a city’s tax dollars by requiring a large amount of service (road maintenance, snow removal, utility lines) for a very small percentage of users. Surface parking exasperates that inefficiency by spreading taxable entities over a larger area. By reducing excessive surface parking, the ordinance encourages tighter more traditional style development especially in the Transit, Urban Center, and Neighborhood Center context areas. That development pattern is intended to encourage a more efficient use of governmental expenditures. Additionally, the proposed ordinance has been streamlined in a way that is easier and less time consuming for City Staff to administer and interpret, which is anticipated to result in added governmental economy. G. Foster the city’s industrial, business and residential development. The City’s industrial areas are proposed within the General parking context. Many of the minimum and maximum parking requirements for common industrial and manufacturing uses are proposed to be removed. The intent is to allow the businesses to install parking according to their needs, rather than by an imposed number. Our studies show that most industrial businesses were required to provide more parking than they needed. Businesses can be more profitable by not spending money on parking that would not be utilized. Within the Transit and Urban Center contexts, many of the minimums and maximums parking requirements have been reduced. This would allow for more residential infill development and encourages use of alternative transportations solutions such as car share or mass transit. Page 88 Affordable housing has also been proposed with lower parking requirements in effort to encourage additional development. H. Protect the environment. The proposed amendments would foster increased mobility choices and allow for a reduced dependency on the automobile. They would reward development that chooses to locate in areas that are better serviced by mass transit. The standards are intended to encourage efficient development that does not devote large expanses to surface parking. These changes would help reduce impacts to air quality and the environment. 3. Whether a proposed text amendment is consistent with the purposes and provisions of any applicable overlay zoning districts which may impose additional standards; Complies The proposed parking standards are consistent with the purposes of the zoning overlays in that they are context based and therefore more tailored to the underlying zoning and development patterns of a given area. The lower proposed parking minimums and more flexible shared parking standards would help protect properties within the historic overlays that may be threatened by the need to provide large amounts of parking. 4. The extent to which a proposed text amendment implements best current, professional practices of urban planning and design. Complies Many of the elements of the proposed ordinance are derived from the research and principles presented in Parking Reform Made Easy by Chuck Marohn and The High Cost of Free Parking by Donald Shoup. These principles are supported by data and observation collected by Salt Lake City and Clarion Associates. Additionally, the American Planning Association (APA), Congress for New Urbanism (CNU), Urban Land Institute (ULI), and planning advocacy groups such as Strong Towns have all published numerous articles in support of reducing or eliminating parking minimums, capping maximums in certain situations, and general movement towards market-based parking solutions. The proposed text amendments implement best current planning practices for off-street parking and establish a framework for continued changes as the City continues to grow. In particular, the context-based parking approach, modified minimum and maximums, and revised parking alternatives would allow for more vibrant and walkable urban spaces. Page 89 ATTACHMENT F: MASTER PLAN COMPATABILITY Master Plan Principle or Initiative Additional Discussion PLAN SALT LAKE Guiding Principle #2: Growing responsibly while providing people with choices about where they live, how they live, and how they get around. The objectives of Plan Salt Lake were directly targeted with the proposed parking standards. The parking contexts, revised parking alternatives (including for affordable and senior housing), and the generally lower minimums and maximums would support the initiatives outlined in the plan. Growth Initiative #3: promote infill and redevelopment of underutilized land. Transportation and Mobility initiative #4: reduce automobile dependency and single occupancy vehicle trips. Transportation and Mobility initiative #7: Encourage transit-oriented development Air Quality initiative #3: increase mode share for public transit, cycling, walking and carpooling. Air Quality initiative #4 Minimize impact of car emissions. Beautiful City initiative #5: support and encourage architecture, development, and infrastructure that is people focused and responds to its surrounding context and enhances the public realm. Preservation initiative #1: preserve and enhance neighborhood and district character Equity initiative #3: support policies that providing housing choices, including affordability, accessibility and aging in place. Economy initiative #2; support the economic growth of Downtown Economy initiative #3: support the growth of small businesses, entrepreneurship, and neighborhood business nodes. TRANSPORTATION Focus on Public Transit: Examples of TDM programs include limiting development of new parking spaces in congested areas. On-street parking would no longer count toward required parking under the proposed provisions. The revised parking standards would help ensure appropriate parking is provided for each of the identified context areas of the City. On-street parking could be eliminated to provide bicycle lanes. SLC will lower the max allowable parking requirements in the downtown area, in conjunction with implementation of trip reduction strategies. Residential neighborhoods will be protected from the negative impact of overflow parking from adjacent uses. DOWNTOWN Challenge #1: unrealized development potential. Surface parking is a dominant land use, comprising 27% of all developable land downtown. Allowed surface parking would be greatly reduced in the Page 90 Vibrant and Active, Goal 3, initiative 3: On pedestrian oriented streets, active ground floor uses should be prioritized over parking uses. Structured parking should be designed to accommodate, where feasible, street level businesses and other active uses. downtown, however, structured parking would not include maximums. Although on-street parking would not count towards parking requirements, most of the downtown is part of the Transit or Urban Center parking context and would require very low or no minimum parking requirements. Is Connected Goal 4, initiative #1; examine parking policy to ensure adequate parking is provided. Initiative #2: update zoning regulations to locate surface parking lots in appropriate locations. Granary District Initiatives, is vibrant and active: rethink and reclaim public rights of way and find creative solutions to enabling people to use more of the right of way, including median parking. Is prosperous: allow on-street parking to count towards parking requirements South State District Initiatives, is prosperous: allow on- street parking to count towards parking requirements. AVENUES Guidelines for either redevelopment or a new use of existing structures: sufficient parking to meet realistic needs must be provided on site without encroaching into required yard Parking for reuse of existing structures is proposed with updated regulations and is more market-based which would help ensure that businesses have the flexibility to provide parking according to their needs. CAPITOL HILL Ensure adequate community parking while mitigating adverse effects of parking that comes from outside the community. The proposed parking contexts ensure more appropriate standards that provide for the needs of businesses and help reduce parking from spilling into the neighborhoods. Develop a parking plan for Marmalade, Kimball, and West Capitol Hill which analyses various solutions including the following: Shared parking arrangements Cut back on parking CENTRAL COMMUNITY Encourage commercial centers to minimize parking and traffic congestion impacts upon surrounding residential neighborhoods. The proposed increased parking maximums for retail and restaurants will provide a path for developments to provide more parking on-site. The proposed provisions for shared parking and the introduction of context- based parking help favor the use of mass transit and non- motorized transportation methods. Support shared parking facilities Encourage parking solutions to support commercial, neighborhood and transit-oriented development. Investigate the use of shared parking between day and evening land uses to encourage off-street parking. Develop transportation and parking policies that favor the use of mass transit and non-motorized transportation methods in order to help reduce cumulative air emissions. Commercial land uses: periodically evaluate municipal regulations to ensure zoning, business licensing and parking regulations do not hamper the success of small locally owned businesses. Page 91 Institutional land uses: provide tools like residential parking or shared parking lots to help mitigate the effect of traffic and parking congestion caused by existing institutional land uses. EAST BENCH Mitigate parking impacts on properties adjacent to neighborhood business districts. The proposed increases to the parking maximums for retail and restaurants would provide a path for developments to provide more parking on-site. NORTHWEST Reduction in parking requirements should not be granted The Northwest Master Plan is nearly 30 years old. The proposed chapter has fewer options for parking reductions but includes uses that are proposed to have no parking minimums and others that would qualify for reductions. This would be justified through the implementation of the goals and objectives listed in Plan Salt Lake, which is a much newer planning document that addresses current challenges facing Salt Lake City. NORTHWEST QUADRANT Restrict runoff from parking lots flowing directly into natural areas, wetlands, and green corridors The proposed parking requirements rely on more market-based parking counts that are intended to result in a reduction of excess parking for some uses. Minimize the size of parking lots SUGAR HOUSE High Intensity Mixed Use policies: Improve all modes of mobility including street and trail networks, transit, pedestrian and bicycle movement opportunities, and off- street cooperative parking facilities. The introduction of the proposed parking contexts would require parking that is more sensitive to the unique situations within Sugar House. The revised shared parking standards and elimination on maximum parking provided within parking structures would help make it more economically feasible for businesses Multifamily housing needs to provide open space amenities, adequate off-street parking, etc. Incorporate adequate off-street parking into development with identified access, proper buffering and landscaping and encourage coordinated and structured parking Provide for coordinated and structured parking, with underground parking wherever possible. Flexibility in parking requirements may be an option in the future as light rail develops in the area. Shared parking and parking structures should be encouraged. Page 92 Transportation demand management techniques should be used within the business district. to build shared parking garages to serve an area as a regional parking amenity. The proposed elimination of some TDM allowances will help ensure that multi- family projects provide enough parking to meet their demand. The proposed parking alternatives are intended to encourage more practical alternatives than are currently allowed. Encourage coordinated parking in the business district and around commercial nodes. Encourage structured and underground parking wherever feasible to minimize the impacts upon surrounding land uses and reduce the land area used. Require adequate parking for each development and flexibility on parking standards when served by other mobility options. A well-run and utilized transit system has many benefits, including a reduction in parking requirements Minimize cutbacks for on-street parking areas in order to maintain wider sidewalks and landscape areas. Locate parking lots behind buildings in every possible circumstance in order to encourage use of transit, facilitate pedestrian circulation and improve aesthetics Encourage coordinated or structured parking facilities with subsurface parking lots Encourage the implementation of shared parking agreements Evaluate the feasibility of reducing the parking requirements for new structures in the business district when coordinated with shared parking arrangements and alternatively mobility options WESTSIDE Neighborhood nodes contain little parking as they are not normally major attractions for residents outside of the neighborhood. These objectives are largely made possible through the more flexible provisions of the proposed ordinance and the proposed revisions to the shared parking section. Office and businesses should be integrated with one another to take advantage of shared parking to make more efficient use of developable land. Glendale Plaza should have flexible parking. Parking should be required for all uses but located behind or to the side of buildings and shared parking should be encouraged to maximize developable space. Redwood Rd section: residential development should be encouraged via parking reductions and other incentives. Page 93 ATTACHMENT G: PUBLIC PROCESS TIMELINE May 2017 Planning staff developed and released a Request for Proposal to re- write Chapter 21A.44, Off-street Parking, Mobility and Loading Chapter of the zoning ordinance Clarion Associates submitted the lone response to the request June 2017 Selection committee awarded contract to Clarion Associates. Committee represented the following divisions/departments: Planning, Transportation, Redevelopment Authority, and Housing and Neighborhood Development July 2017 Contract finalized, and project kickoff meeting held with Clarion Associates to discuss issues and goals September 2017 Mayor initiates the petition PLNPCM2017-00753 regarding Chapter 21A.44 amendment City’s Public Engagement Team conducts meeting with Clarion Associates and identified business and developer stakeholders to gather initial comments Collected comments from Bicycle Advisory Board at monthly meeting Internal meetings with the following divisions: Planning, Building Services, and Transportation divisions October 2017 Planning Commission briefing Business Advisory Board briefing November 2017 Public survey conducted online with results given to Clarion Associates for consideration December 2017 Public open house held at Liberty Senior Center February 2018 Draft chapter received from Clarion Associates March – April 2018 Draft chapter circulated to city departments for review and comment Department comments sent to Clarion for incorporation into a public draft May 2018 Clarion provided first public draft and met with external steering group June – Dec 2018 Project on hold due to changes in Planning staff, new project manager Page 94 Feb – June 2019 Planning staff re-started work on the project and began public outreach with The Downtown Alliance and community council presentations (Ballpark, Sugar House, ELPCO) May 2019 Draft chapter published on city’s website and emailed to more than 2,000 public contacts for review June – July 2019 Planning staff conducted six public open houses to acquire public input - Main library (2) - Glendale library - Partners in the Park evening event - Sugar House fire station (2) September 2019 Planning staff held two work sessions with the Planning Commission (September 11 and September 25) Page 95 ATTACHMENT H: PUBLIC COMMENTS Public Survey: As part of this update process, an online community survey was made available in November of 2017. Respondents were given the opportunity to offer their opinions and thoughts about off-street parking in Salt Lake City. Six questions were asked with the intended purpose of using the results to help inform future changes to the City’s Off-Street Parking Chapter. Over 700 people participated in the survey. Common themes of the survey: Minimize spill-over parking into residential neighborhoods. All projects (regardless of size) should provide adequate parking to meet the anticipated demand. The market should have a larger role in controlling the amount of parking provided. Elevate the level of quality and design required for large parking lots. Empower City Staff to approve minor adjustments to parking requirements if specific and consistent criteria are met. Community Councils: All recognized community-based organizations were notified of the proposed text amendments at the beginning of the project and once the draft ordinance was available. Most opted to direct their residents to our project website or to attend one of the open houses. Staff did attend community council meetings with Sugar House, ELPCO, and Ballpark Community Councils. Primarily they wanted an overview of the proposed changes and then to focus on the specifics of the parking contexts within their council areas, including parking counts for common land uses. Additionally, most were interested in the changes to alternative parking options. Most were pleased to see that the Transportation Demand Management options being eliminated as they felt that the provision was not resulting in decreased parking demand. They were also interested to see what provisions were put in place to encourage shared parking arrangements. The delicate balance of providing enough parking within neighborhood centers, without destroying character or spilling into the neighborhoods was also discussed. Focus Groups: Planning Staff met the following groups: Bicycle Advisory Board Business Advisory Board Downtown Alliance Developer Stakeholders The groups provided feedback at the onset of the project and in response to the draft ordinance. Some of the themes that emerged from these meetings includes that they want an ordinance that: Is clear and predictable Allows for more market driven parking counts Does not limit parking within parking garages Prioritizes alternative transportation methods where feasible Open Houses: Page 96 One open house was held as a kick-off for the project. Once the draft ordinance was made available, Staff held an additional six open house events in different parts of the City and at different times of day. Staff presented a summary of the proposed ordinance, the parking context map, and information sheets on each of the parking contexts. Although attendance was generally low, nearly all that came expressed support of the proposed revisions. The feedback was nearly unanimously positive. Commission Briefings: The following points and recommendations were made during the most recent briefings with the Planning Commission where they were asked for their direct feedback on the proposed changes: PC Briefing – September 2019 Project scope, purpose, and general updates Public process updates and key take-aways Proposed alternatives to parking calculations Parking minimums for Cottage Developments Parking minimums for Multi-Family Developments in the General Context Parking reductions for development located near high-frequency bus stops Planning Commission Notice of the public hearing for the proposal included: Agenda posted on the Planning Division and Utah Public Meeting Notice websites on Friday, December 20, 2019 Newspaper notice ran on Saturday, December 28, 2019. Page 97 ATTACHMENT I: CITY DEPARTMENT COMMENTS Throughout the revision process, Planning Staff has worked closely with applicable City divisions/departments, including: Housing and Neighborhood Development Fire Building Department Engineering Public Utilities Attorney’s Office Sustainability Police Department Transportation Zoning Each department has provided feedback and suggested revisions which have been incorporated into the various drafts. The comments below represent any final comments for the proposed off-street parking ordinance: Housing and Neighborhood Development: The section on affordable housing on page 23 (item D) covers all the groups of residents that HAND requested be included for consideration of parking requirement reductions. I’ll look forward to seeing what the Planning Commission and Council move ahead with. Public Utilities: Stormwater quality treatment is required for all off-street parking. Wherever possible low impact green infrastructure should be used. Interior landscape islands and park strips should be used for stormwater filtering and treatment. Best management practices for stormwater must be reviewed and approved by Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities. Refer to the SLC Stormwater Master Plan, Storm Drainage Manual, and Green Infrastructure Toolbox for additional information. Transportation: 1. In 21A.44.020A.3, Change of Use, a. – The first paragraph refers to subsections b and c, but there is no subsection c. Also, the existing ordinance says that only the incremental increase in parking is to be added. Does this ordinance state the project must provide the entire minimum parking requirement? 2. Table 21A.44.040. I am not sure what a single-family cottage development is. Also, it seems to me that there should at least two spaces required for single family developments in the Neighborhood Center Context. 3. There are some boxes in the Table 21A.44.040-A that are blank. 4. In some parts of the Table 21A.44.040-A, the maximum allowance does not cover all of the contexts. 5. In Table 21A.44.040-A, the minimum parking requirement for restaurants is listed as 2 per 1,000 sf. This number could be boosted up to maybe 3 per 1,000 sf. Page 98 6. Retail Sales and Service. There is no minimum parking requirement for Photo finishing lab, Electronics repair shop, Furniture repair shop and Upholstery shop. This causes employees and customers to park on street. There should be a minimum parking requirement. 7. Bicycle parking. This section has been substantially changed. I will need to run this by our bicycle coordinator, Becka, for her input. It would be safe to leave this part of the existing ordinance as is. 8. Valet Parking Services. “Modifications to on-site parking spaces may occur on a one- to-one basis…” I’m not sure what this means. 9. Table 21A.44.060-A. In some of the boxes in the table, there is the letter “N”. I’m assuming that this means “None”. It is unclear. 10. Sight Distance Triangle. We may need to adjust other ordinances (21A.40.120.E and 21A.62.050, Illustration I) so as not to be redundant or conflicting. 11. There is no mention in the ordinance of parking ramps (slopes and maximum breakover points). There should be a referral to the Off-streets Parking Standards Manual. Staff Discussion on Comments from Transportation: Minor corrections were made to the draft ordinance based on comments 1, 3, 4, & 10. Modifications to the required parking counts as mentioned in comments 2, 5, & 6 were not made as these counts have already gone through the public process and have been presented to the Planning Commission in work sessions without requests to be modified. Staff provided the reviewer with explanations requested in comments 1, 2, 8, & 10. The bicycle standards (comment 7) have not been modified since the draft was last sent for department review in May. Planning staff is inclined to present them to the Planning Commission as presented in the proposed ordinance attached to this report. Page 99 3. PLANNING COMMISSION C. Agenda/Minutes Minutes approved January 22, 2020 SALT LAKE CITY PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING AGENDA In Room 326 of the City & County Building January 8, 2020 at 5:30 p.m. (The order of the items may change ) FIELD TRIP - The field trip is scheduled to leave at 4:00 p.m. DINNER - Dinner will be served to the Planning Commissioners and Staff at 5:00 p.m. in Room 126 of the City and County Building. During the dinner break, the Planning Commission may receive training on city planning related topics, including the role and function of the Planning Commission. PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING WILL BEGIN AT 5:30 PM IN ROOM 326 APPROVAL OF MINUTES FOR DECEMBER 11, 2019 REPORT OF THE CHAIR AND VICE CHAIR REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR PUBLIC HEARINGS 1. Conditional Use for ADU 2651 S. Imperial Street - Andrea Palmer, representing the property owner and Modal Living, is requesting Conditional Use approval for a 432-square foot accessory dwelling unit (ADU) to be located to the back-northeast corner of the property at approximately at 2651 S. Imperial Street. The property zoned R-1/7,000 (Single-Family Residential), where ADUs must be processed as a conditional use. The property is located within District 7, represented by Amy Fowler. (Staff contact: Lauren Parisi at (801) 535-7226 or lauren.parisi@slcgov.com) Case number PLNPCM2019-00999 2. Zoning Map Amendment at approximately 1172 E Chandler Dr - Bruce Baird, representing the property owner, is requesting a Zoning Map Amendment to rezone the property at the above listed address from OS Open Space to FR-3/12,000 Foothills Residential. The intent of the rezone is to match the zoning of the property to the east, which is under the same ownership, in order to allow residential accessory uses on the property after the two lots are combined. The subject property is located within Council District 3, represented by Chris Wharton. (Staff contact: Mayara Lima at (801) 535-7118 or mayara.lima@slcgov.com) Case number PLNPCM2019-00795 3. Cleveland Court at approximately 1430 S 400 E - Cleveland Court LLC, property owner, is requesting approval from the City to develop a 7-unit rowhouse at the property located at approximately 1430 S 400 E. This project requires the following applications: a. Master Plan Amendment - The future land use map in the Central Community Master Plan designates the property as "Low Density Residential". The petitioner is requesting to amend the future land use map for the parcel to "Medium Density Residential". Case number PLNPCM2019-00189; b. Zoning Map Amendment - The property is currently zoned RMF-35 Moderate Density Multi-Family Residential, which would permit a 5-unit multifamily development on the lot. The petitioner is requesting to amend the zoning map designation to FB-UN1 Form Based Urban Neighborhood. Form based districts are intended to focus primarily on form, scale, placement, and orientation of buildings rather than density. Case number PLNPCM2019-00190; c. Planned Development The applicant is requesting modifications to the FB-UN1 building regulations allowing for reduced setbacks in front and rear yards and a reduced setback for an attached garage. Case number PLNSUB2019-00934. The subject property is located within City Council District 5, represented by Erin Mendenhall (Staff contact: Mayara Lima at (801) 535-7118 or mayara.lima@slcgov.com) 4. Off-Street Parking Chapter Ordinance Revision - A public hearing will be held in regard to the proposed revisions to the off-street parking chapter of the zoning ordinance. The parking chapter determines how much parking is required for each land use, where the parking can be located, bicycle parking requirements, and other similar requirements. The proposed amendments seek to: a. Update parking requirements to better reflect current market demand in the City based on community feedback, City master plans, and planning best practices; b. Simplify confusing parking regulations that are difficult for property owners to understand and use significant staff resource to interpret and administer; c. Address technical issues that have been identified through the day to day administration of the parking chapter; d. Establish a framework that allows for a parking ordinance that can be responsive to (Staff contact: Eric Daems at (801) 535-7236 or eric.daems@slcgov.com) Case number PLNPCM2017-00753 The files for the above items are available in the Planning Division offices, room 406 of the City and County Building. /planning for copies of the Planning Commission agendas, staff reports, and minutes. Staff Reports will be posted the Friday prior to the meeting and minutes will be posted two days after they are ratified, which usually occurs at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Planning Commission. Planning Commission Meetings may be watched live on SLCTV Channel 17; past meetings are recorded and archived and may be viewed at www.slctv.com. The City & County Building is an accessible facility. People with disabilities may make requests for reasonable accommodation, which may include alternate formats, interpreters, and other auxiliary aids and services. Please make requests at least two business days in advance. To make a request, please contact the Planning Office at 801-535-7757, or relay service 711. Salt Lake City Planning Commission January 8, 2020 Page 1 SALT LAKE CITY PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING City & County Building 451 South State Street, Room 326, Salt Lake City, Utah Wednesday, January 8, 2020 A roll is being kept of all who attended the Planning Commission Meeting. The meeting was called to order at 5:35:06 PM. Audio recordings of the Planning Commission meetings are retained for a period of time. Present for the Planning Commission meeting were: Chairperson Adrienne Bell, Vice Chairperson Brenda Scheer; Commissioners Maurine Bachman, Amy Barry, Carolynn Hoskins, Matt Lyon, Darin Mano, Andres Paredes, and Sara Urquhart. Commissioner Lee was excused. Planning Staff members present at the meeting were Nick Norris, Planning Director; Paul Nielson, Attorney; Lauren Parisi, Principal Planner; Mayara Lima, Principal Planner; Eric Daems, Principal Planner; and Marlene Rankins, Administrative Secretary. Field Trip A field trip was held prior to the work session. Planning Commissioners present were: Maurine Bachman, Carolynn Hoskins, Brenda Scheer and Sara Urquhart. Staff members in attendance were Nick Norris, and Mayara Lima. APPROVAL OF THE DECEMBER 11, 2019, MEETING MINUTES. 5:35:15 PM MOTION 5:35:25 PM Commissioner Bachman moved to approve the minutes from December 11, 2019. Commissioner Scheer seconded the motion. Commissioners Paredes, Lyon, Barry, Urquhart abstained from voting. The motion passed 7-1. REPORT OF THE CHAIR AND VICE CHAIR 5:36:00 PM Chairperson Bell informed the Commission that Weston Clark resigned from the Planning Commission due to his employment to the City. Vice Chairperson Scheer stated she had nothing to report. REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 5:36:27 PM Nick Norris, Planning Director, provided the Commission with updates: First, being that the Third District Court issued their decision on the City vs. the State regarding the inland port and unfortunately the court granted the State summary judgement. Second, he informed the and that it will be coming in the near future. 5:39:51 PM Conditional Use for ADU 2651 S. Imperial Street - Andrea Palmer, representing the property owner and Modal Living, is requesting Conditional Use approval for a 432-square foot accessory dwelling unit (ADU) to be located to the back-northeast corner of the property at approximately Salt Lake City Planning Commission January 8, 2020 Page 7 7:45:08 PM Off-Street Parking Chapter Ordinance Revision - A public hearing was held in regard to the proposed revisions to the off-street parking chapter of the zoning ordinance. The parking chapter determines how much parking is required for each land use, where the parking can be located, bicycle parking requirements, and other similar requirements. The proposed amendments seek to: a.Update parking requirements to better reflect current market demand in the City based on community feedback, City master plans, and planning best practices; b.Simplify confusing parking regulations that are difficult for property owners to understand and use significant staff resource to interpret and administer; c.Address technical issues that have been identified through the day to day administration of the parking chapter; d.Establish a framework that allows for a parking ordinance that can be responsive to terns. (Staff contact: Eric Daems at (801) 535-7236 or eric.daems@slcgov.com)Case number PLNPCM2017-00753 Eric Daems, Principal Planner, reviewed the petition as outlined in the Staff Report (located in the case file). He stated Staff recommended that the Planning Commission forward a positive recommendation to the City Council. The Commission and Staff discussed the following: Whether the map will have to be periodically updated Clarification on schedule for parking study What the maximum of the general context zone is Whether reducing the parking would discourage neighborhood from accepting affordable housing Clarification if there is additional reductions for affordable housing besides this one Whether general contract includes the street parking in front of a property How this changes the accessory dwelling units Whether staff considered making modifications for number of bedrooms for units PUBLIC HEARING 8:20:04 PM Chairperson Bell opened the Public Hearing; Raised concern that several of the proposed parking minimums were too low. was please the proposal fulfills many master plan objectives and the proposed parking alternatives. stated would like to see parking authority added to the revision. Salt Lake City Planning Commission January 8, 2020 Page 8 Stated the Sugar House business district should not be an example of urban context as some of the proposed parking minimums are too l ow. Requested the Commission not close the public hearing and believes there should be a lot more public comments and not to approve this until there is additional public outreach.Stated that parking minimums for some uses were too low. Stated why feels this project is still important. One is that the biggest obstacle to compatible infill is the need to store the cars. Secondly, the space required for storing cars reduces the potential density for housing. Third, developments thrive or fail based on the perceived availability of parking. Stated there is no public policy more damaging to the structure of cities than mandatory off-street parking limits and stated support of the ordinance change. Seeing no one else wished to speak; Chairperson Bell closed the Public Hearing. The Commission and Staff further discussed the following: Whether anything in the ordinance preclude the creation of parking authority in Sugar House or anywhere else in the City Clarification on public engagement process Additional detail on parking requirements Outreach steps that were taken for the business community and development community Clarification on future reviews of the ordinance Clarification on on-street parking MOTION 8:47:05 PM Commissioner Lyon stated, based on the information in the staff report, the information presented, and the input received during the public hearing, I move that the Planning Commission recommends approval of the Ordinance Amendment petition for PLNPCM2017-00753 off-street parking, mobility, and loading with the condition listed in the staff report. Commissioner Scheer seconded the motion. Commissioners Mano, Urquhart, Scheer, unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 8:48:18 PM 3. PLANNING COMMISSION D. Staff Presentation Slides 3. PLANNING COMMISSION E. Additional Public Comments Received From: To:Daems, Eric Cc:Norris, Nick; Larsen, Jonathan Subject:(EXTERNAL) I am against lowering off street parking requirements. Date:Wednesday, January 8, 2020 12:08:58 PM Despute public comments to increase parking requirements, the Commission pushed Planning to reduce parking minimums. The proposal ignores the large car lots that Salt Lake City encourages due to the large tax revenue that they generate. I am against these proposals: Building use or expansions of more than 25% would require new parking regulations with no additional parking in D1 D2 D3 and Urban Center context and Transit Context areas when there is a change of use. Buildings older than 1944 do not require more parking for adaptive reuse. All lots other than single or two family dwellings smaller than 5000 sq ft created prior to April 12, 1995 have exemptions to parking requirements but any parking needs City approval. Currently D2 and D3 less than 1000 sq ft is exempt from parking requirements. There is a minimum parking of 3 per 1000 sq ft (now)adds 5 max per 1000 sq ft. I disagree with these reductions in parking. "In many cases the minimum requirements have been reduced or eliminated altogether (Transit/Urban Center Contexts), but in a few cases (notably retail and restaurant uses) the exceptionally low standards in the current ordinance have been increased in order to reduce overflow parking in neighborhoods." "day cares, parks, warehouses, and several industrial uses, do not have maximum parking requirements in the revised chapter." I still disagree that parking requirements should be reduced. The parking proposal allows secure/enclosed bicycle parking to reduce parking in half; and the Planning Director can modify parking requirements, using approved adjustments to reduce requirements by up to 40%. I am against both of those. It increases shared parking from 500 ft away to up to 1200 ft. All multi-family or commercial properties within a 1/4 mile of a fixed transit station can reduce parking minimums 25% (used to be decreased 50%) (changed to radial straight line) (Transit Context minimums not changed). I am against that. Income restricted and/or age restricted units minimum parking reduced to 25%, with a further 15% reduction within a quarter mile of a high frequency bust route stop (2, 9, 200, 205, 209, 217 220). Developments with 100 or more parking spaces could reduce 7 spaces for each van pool space. Valet stalls can reduce parking one for one. Developers can submit parking studies to justify reducing parking. I am against that. During public engagement, the public wanted 2 spaces per unit. Planning Staff, under pressure from Planning Commission, reduced it to 1 per studio and 1 bedroom and 1.25 for more than 1 bedroom. I think that the citizens should be listened to and respected. It is important to note that in Salt Lake City, "Typical multi-family developments in the general context are averaging about 1.6 stalls per unit." That shows that parking requirements/minimums should not be reduced, especially in the Transit Context which has no minimum!! Lowering parking requirements will actually encourage residents to relocate to the suburbs, and, if done for stores, it will encourage driving to nearby cities to spend money and increase pollution. In addition, the pre-eminent study on fare elasticities (Booz Allen Hamilton) show that lack of parking at transit stations discourages mass transit ridership increases. Lowering parking requirements for residential units will discourage car owners and shift the units to mostly low income which will defeat the SLC housing policy of mixed income. Salt Lake City should slow down this process until the public are fully informed with a more thorough outreach. Otherwise, this process will be less popular than the recent so called Utah tax cut. From: To:Daems, Eric Subject:(EXTERNAL) Fwd: text amendments for off-street parking Date:Wednesday, January 8, 2020 5:13:39 PM Eric-I am bringing copies to the meeting. ---------- Forwarded message --------- From: Date: Wed, Jan 8, 2020 at 5:06 PM Subject: text amendments for off-street parking To: Why is this project so important? Three reasons: One is that the biggest obstacle to compatible infill is the need to store the cars somewhere. Secondly, the space required for storing cars reduces the potential density for housing. You can provide housing for a person or a couple very comfortably in the space required to park 3 cars. Third, developments thrive or fail based on the perceived availability of parking. Historically, parking for automobiles was in the rear of a property behind the owner's home. Now vehicles are accommodated on the front façade of a house, as if they were family members. Compliments to Eric Daems and J.P. Goates before him. It is challenging to get excited about a necessary evil. Here are some bullet points for your consideration. 1 Without question, you should earmark a review of the changes within 2-3 years of their adoption by the City Council. It is very clear that some of the previous strategies did not work. 2 p. 3 "Expansions less than 25 percent (of usable floor area) would not be required to comply with the proposed regulations." A business owner would not go through incremental expansions within a 2-year time frame because of the disruption to business and the inefficiency in terms of costs of construction. BUT incremental expansion is a viable business model which occurs over a longer period of time than 2 years and would certainly be used to circumvent the parking requirements. 3 Bravo for allowing historic buildings to continue with existing uses or adaptive reuses without modifications to parking. 4 Tricky on p. 2 If the City exempts a development from providing parking but then holds the developer to the current standards for voluntarily providing parking, that appears to be punishment for voluntarily providing parking to me. 5 Another sticky wicket: Eliminating of credit for on-street parking Yes, this option has been much abused and sent drivers into adjacent neighbors in search of parking because the on- street parking was already in use when the City allowed the developer to count it! HOWEVER, if the developer creates on-street parking spaces and pays for them by using cut- back parking or diagonal parking, then on-street parking created at the developer's expense should be considered. 6 Bravo for recognizing that affordable units do not have the same requirements for parking. The parking level at the Liberty Walk apartments Downtown is largely empty, no matter what time of day I check. Some Seniors do retain their cars after they stop driving, but certainly a reduction in the parking requirement would work for assisted living. The definition of "senior" varies from 50 to 60 in this County. A reduction is not warranted in projects targeting 'active Seniors.' 7 Thanks to staff for recognizing that the most frequent delivery is by a van or UPS/Fed Ex. 8 We all know that the parking requirement for restaurants has been inadequate, but the worst offenders in terms of demand for parking spaces are businesses which have overlapping appointments such as beauty salons and doctors' offices. When a beauty salon opened in one of three pads available in a project, its operation alone exceeded the parking required for all three pads. From: To:Daems, Eric Subject:(EXTERNAL) New parking ordinance Date:Sunday, January 26, 2020 9:33:27 AM Eric, I am in support of the new parking ordinance. When do you expect it will be approved? From: To:Daems, Eric Subject:(EXTERNAL) Parking ordinance Date:Wednesday, January 29, 2020 3:47:33 PM Hi Eric, I may be a day late on this, and you may not be the correct contact, but I just got word that you are working on modifying the parking ordinance by my colleagues on the I live about . It has always bothered me that the S-line was billed by Mayor Becker as a transit-oriented development corridor and yet no one has seemed to take that to heart over the years and enforce lower parking requirements while simultaneously incentivizing public transit use along the transit corridors. Is there some way to get UTA, SLC, and the property managers/owners of the units, particularly along the S-line, but also within a 1/4 mile radius of all rail transit lines in the city to build in UTA passes into HOA fees and rents? I have asked UTA about this they just keep saying "well check out the HIVE pass..." The HIVE pass does not seem like the right solution to this. The HIVE pass may be prohibitively expensive to most people, especially since rents are so high right now. However, if there was a way to get several high density developments on board, then the costs could be spread out over a larger segment of the population. This could help mitigate traffic, parking issues, and air pollution. I feel like UTA is stuck in this chicken and egg scenario - they can't increase service and routes because they don't have enough ridership but they can't increase ridership because the incentives for people to use transit are low and barriers are high. I don't know why no one is taking the opportunity to carve out a solution. We have all of these high density developments downtown and in Sugar House. There should be no reason the people living in those developments shouldn't be given a transit pass or some incentive to use transit. I realize you have zero control over UTA but I feel as though it is worthwhile to bring some folks to the table and really find some solutions not only to parking, but to air quality and transit as well. Thank you for your time and consideration on this. I apologize if this is out of your wheelhouse. Please let me know if there is anyone else I can reach out to in order to continue this conversation or be of assistance in building community support. I am happy to speak with Mayor Mendenhall, Councilwoman Fowler, and any one else you might feel would be interested. Thank you! From: To:Daems, Eric Subject:(EXTERNAL) New Salt Lake Parking Chapter Requirements 21A.44 Date:Friday, April 10, 2020 10:53:26 AM Hi Eric, I spoke with you a couple weeks ago regarding the upcoming parking requirements that are going to be changing in the near future. You asked me to send you a quick email with information regarding what is or isn't working with the new code that is being proposed. I appreciate the opportunity to weigh in. Overall I feel the new parking chapter is great. The main concern is the necessity of a loading birth for multi family complexes that are 40- 150 units. Referenced in Table 21A.44.070-A: Off Street Loading Requirements: We have 3 projects right now that range from 40 units to 90 units. All three of these projects are in the TSA zone and are on lots that are roughly .25 acres or smaller. The challenge we are running into is trying to fit a 10' x 35' x 14' tall loading birth into the design. These smaller lots just don't allow for it from a design or cost perspective, especially when you factor in the additional space needed to maneuver around this area. We just don't have the room to accommodate a loading birth and still be able to make the projects pencil. My humble suggestion (knowing that loading births are helpful and needed). Would be to increase the unit count, so that 1 loading birth is required for complexes that are 80-150 units (at the very least). If it would be possible to get that number up to 90-150 units, that would be even more helpful. But I feel if it isn't raised to at least 80 units minimum, then it will kill the potential for a vast majority of infill and smaller development opportunities. We definitely would not be able to do the 3 projects we are currently working on. Please let me know if you have any questions for me. Thank you again for the opportunity to weigh in on this. 4. ORIGINAL PETITION Petition PLNPCM2017-00753 CITY COUNCIL OF SALT LAKE CITY 451 SOUTH STATE STREET, ROOM 304 P.O. BOX 145476, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84114-5476 SLCCOUNCIL.COM TEL 801-535-7600 FAX 801-535-7651 COUNCIL STAFF REPORT CITY COUNCIL of SALT LAKE CITY TO:City Council Members FROM:Sam Owen, Policy Analyst DATE:April 13, 2021 RE:Resolution: Recycling Market Development Zone ISSUE AT-A-GLANCE Since 2010, Salt Lake City has participated in Utah’s Recycling Market Development Zone (RMDZ) program, enabled through a 1996 act of the State Legislature. The City Council is asked to pass a resolution like the one in the subject transmittal every five years for the City to continue participating. The program allows businesses located in the City’s designated RMDZ to potentially obtain state tax benefits (see background information section below). The City also provides “local contributions” pursuant to requirements in the statute. The program is intended to incentivize and reward recycling-related activities on a commercial or industrial scale. For this reason, Salt Lake City’s RMDZ is coextensive with the M1 and M2 manufacturing zoning areas, where that zoning occurs either north of 600 North, or west of I-215. POLICY QUESTIONS 1.Are the City-offered benefits that are part of this program sufficient to incentivize the type of business activity desired through the RMDZ program? These benefits currently include access to the City’s development review resources, other business development assistance and access to the City’s Economic Development Loan Fund. 2.Is there harm or inconvenience brought to the City’s westside residents and businesses as a result of incentivizing these businesses to locate in the M1 and M2 manufacturing areas west of I-216 and north of 600 North; in other words, would the businesses locate other places in the City and reduce the concentration of these larger-scale industrial operations if this incentive were not provided. Broadly, is there a quality of life impact to westside residents as a result of this program? 3.Is there community engagement or outreach conducted in regard to accessing this program? The transmittal indicates that negative community feedback has been minimal since the inception of the program. Is there positive or promotional activity that would usefully enhance knowledge about or access to this program? Item Schedule: Briefing: April 13, 2021 Public Hearing: Potential Action: Page | 2 Attachments 1.Administration’s transmittal ADDITIONAL AND BACKGROUND INFORMATION Businesses that engage in larger-scale commercial recycling or composting activity are eligible to locate in a Utah RMDZ and obtain tax credits related to their business activities. A City can attract these commercial enterprises by creating an RMDZ and offering competitive services to entities seeking to locate in the RMDZ. Furthermore, businesses already located, for example, within Salt Lake City’s M1 or M2 zones that engage in this type of eligible activity might be able to further expand their operations with the benefit of the tax credits. Businesses locating in a Utah RMDZ are provided potential access to the following State tax benefits (Utah DEQ website): 1. 5% Utah non-refundable tax credit on the purchase price of machinery and equipment used directly in commercial composting; or manufacturing facilities or plant units that manufacture, process, compound, or produce recycled items of tangible personal property for sale, or reduce or reuse post- consumer waste material; and 2. 20% Utah state income tax credit (up to $2,000) on eligible operating expenses, including payments made to third parties for rent, wages, supplies, tools, test inventory, and utilities, for establishing and operating recycling or composting technology in Utah. In keeping with the statutory requirements and as noted in the policy questions section, Salt Lake City provides the following support for businesses locating in its RMDZ (Administration’s transmittal): - Development Project Coordination The City will provide development assistance through its Development Review Team (DRT). The DRT assists developers by providing input in the early stages of a project to identify potential problems and to facilitate the project’s formal review. - Business Development Assistance Salt Lake City’s Economic Development Department and its Business Development team are dedicated to supporting new and established enterprises with loan funding, workforce development opportunities, and streamlined access to City business licensing and permitting processes. The Business Development team, which conducts onsite meetings with up to 300 businesses annually, actively promotes the City’s RMDZ among its suite of business incentives. - Salt Lake City’s Economic Development Loan Fund (EDLF) The EDLF’s purpose is to stimulate business development and expansion, create employment opportunities, and encourage private investment. The program’s overarching goal is to invest in viable businesses that produce strong economic returns and also provide positive social and environmental impacts. Startup businesses are eligible to apply for loans of up to $100,000 and existing business are eligible for loans of up to $350,000. Additionally, businesses are also eligible to apply for microloans of $25,000 or less. ERIN MENDENHALL MAYOR SUSTAINABILITY DEPARTMENT OFFICE of the DIRECTOR VICKI BENNETT DIRECTOR CITY COUNCIL TRANSMITTAL Date Received: Date sent to Council: TO:Salt Lake City Council DATE: March 23, 2021 Amy Fowler, Chair FROM: Vicki Bennett Sustainability Department Director _________________________ SUBJECT: Recycling Market Development Zone STAFF CONTACT:Debbie Lyons Deputy Director Debbie.Lyons@slcgov.com | 801.535.7795 DOCUMENT TYPE: Resolution RECOMMENDATION: , which will allow businesses to participate in the BUDGET IMPACT: No funding required BACKGROUND/DISCUSSION: The Recycling Market Development Zone Program is a state-sponsored program that assists qualifying businesses that collect, process, distribute or use recycled materials in their manufacturing operations, or compost by providing State income tax credits to such qualifying businesses. Local government entities must apply to participate in the rogram every five years so that qualifying businesses within their jurisdictions may access the tax credits. application must include documentation of written approval for the City to apply (or renew its application) to participate in the program. In 2010 the City Council and Mayor signed Joint Resolution 53 of 2010 approving the first application to the Program, which was approved by the State in December 2010. Jurisdictions are required to reapply every five years to continue participation in the program, so Council adopted resolution 43 of 2015 to renew the The City is not proposing any changes to its program in this 2021 application. its Program to businesses located within M-1 and M-2 zones. The rogram applies an overlay zone and does not alter what is currently allowed by zoning regulations. Page 2 of 2 Since 2010, four businesses have expanded or relocated within the Recycling Market Development Zone: Momentum Recycling, Spring Back Utah Mattress Recycling, Metech Recycling, and Advanced Technology Recycling. PUBLIC PROCESS Prior to the initial application in 2010, a thorough public process was conducted focused on the communities program. Since the passage of the program, there has not been any notable opposition to the program and participation by businesses remains steady. NEXT STEPS The Sustainability Department will submit the 2021 renewal application to the State if Council adopts the . would need to be included in the renewal application packet. The will be effective for the 2021 tax year if the state is able to . ATTACHMENTS Resolution Approving Submission of Development Zone Program Map of Recycle Market Development Zone Division of Waste Management and Radiation Control Solid Waste Management Program Mailing Address Office Location Phone (801) 536-0200 P.O. Box 144880 195 North 1950 West Fax (801) 536-0222 Salt Lake City, Utah 84114-4880 Salt Lake City, Utah 84116 www.deq.utah.gov Utah Recycling Market Development Zone Application for Counties and Municipalities Criteria for Designation: 1. An area may be designated as a recycling market development zone onlyif: a) the county or municipality agrees to make a qualifying local contribution under Section 19-13-105 (See Below); and b) the county or municipality provides for postconsumer waste collection for recycling within the county or municipality 2. The executive authority of any municipality or county desiring to be designated as a recycling market development zone shall: a) obtain the written approval of the municipality or county's legislative body; and b) file an application with the department demonstrating that the county ormunicipality meets the requirements of this part Section 19-13-105: Qualifying Local Contributions Qualifying local contributions to the recycling market development zone may vary depending on available resources, and may include: (1) Simplified procedures for obtaining permits; (2) Dedication of available government grants; (3) Waiver of business license or permit fees; (4) Infrastructure improvements; (5) Private contributions; (6) Utility rate concessions; (7) Suspension or relaxation of locally originated zoning laws or general plans;and (8) Other local contributions the office finds promotes the purpose of thispart Note: This is not an exhaustive list. Please consider any other contributions that your county/municipality may make and be sure to list them below. Recycling Market Development Zone Application for Counties and Municipalities County/Municipality Applicant: Salt Lake City Corporation Local Recycling Zone Coordinator: Peter Nelson Date of Application: Telephone Number: 801-535-6477 E-mail Address: peter.nelson@slcgov.com Mailing Address: 451 S. State Street, rm 415, Salt Lake City, UT 84111 Please provide all required documentation as an attachment to this application: 1. Identify the proposed recycling market development zone. You must provide information identifying the proposed area in the three following formats. a. Provide a GIS shapefile of the proposed area. b. Provide a .kml file of the proposed area (for use with Google Earth™ etc.). c. Provide a sufficient number of pdf maps to clearly show all extents of the proposed area. 2. Identify the local contributions meeting the requirements in Section 19-13-105 (see above). Development Project Coordination The City will provide development assistance through its Development Review Team (DRT). The DRT assists developers by providing input in the early stages of a project to identify potential problems and to facilitate the project’s formal review. Business Development Assistance Salt Lake City’s Economic Development Department and its Business Development team are dedicated to supporting new and established enterprises with loan funding, workforce development opportunities, and streamlined access to City business licensing and permitting processes. The Business Development team, which conducts onsite meetings with up to 300 businesses annually, actively promotes the City’s RMDZ among its suite of business incentives. Salt Lake City’s Economic Development Loan Fund (EDLF) The EDLF’s purpose is to stimulate business development and expansion, create employment opportunities, and encourage private investment. The program’s overarching goal is to invest in viable businesses that produce strong economic returns and also provide positive social and environmental impacts. Startup businesses are eligible to apply for loans of up to $100,000 and existing business are eligible for loans of up to $350,000. Additionally, businesses are also eligible to apply for microloans of $25,000 or less. 3. How does your county or municipality provide for postconsumer waste collection for recycling within the county or municipality? Salt Lake City’s Waste & Recycling Division provides four separate curbside collection services for approximately 42,000 residential properties: weekly curbside recycling, compost, garbage, and an annual bulk item collection through the Call 2 Haul program. The Waste & Recycling Division also provides annual holiday tree collection, a subscription curbside glass recycling service, and recycling drop-off sites for glass. A total of 39% of the residential waste stream was diverted from the landfill through recycling and composting in 2020. The Operations program also provides waste and recycling services for City parks and facilities, and curbside recycling for qualified small businesses and multi-family properties. Additionally, the City’s Recycling Education and Permits program provides education and outreach to the residents and employees of the city, and oversees implementation of the recycling requirements for the business, multifamily, construction, and special event communities in order to achieve the City’s ambitious waste diversion goals. 4. Identify and outline the following: a. The specific investment or development reasonably expected to take place: Some of the businesses already established that receive the RMDZ designation could expand their operations due to the savings they derive (as long as they comply with the requirements of the underlying land use zoning district). b. Any commitments obtained from businesses to participate, and in what capacities regarding recycling markets: Businesses that have participated in the Recycle Market Development Zone Program in Salt Lake City in the past include: ArborCare/Arborscape: Accepts wood waste and manufactures wood pellet fuel and wood pellet animal bedding. Momentum Recycling: Collects mixed recyclables from businesses, electronic waste, batteries and CFL lightbulbs. Collects and processes glass for recycling. The Recycle Market Development Zone program was instrumental in Momentum Recycling’s ability to expand from a recycling collection company, to a large processor of recovered glass that currently serves the intermountain west. Liberty Tire Recycling: Accepts tires of all sizes and manufactures crumb rubber for use in athletic fields and running tracks, recovers and recycles steel from tires. Varex Imaging: Manufactures x-ray tube and imaging products. Accepts end of useful life x-ray tubes and the containers they are shipped in. In 2019, Varex accepted 9,437 X-Ray tubes for recycling in their processes. Pallet Express/Streadbeck Enterprises: Accepts and recycles pallets, clean wood waste, cardboard and steel. Manufactures pallet components, colored landscape mulches, animal and plant bedding, and pellet stock. Metro Group, Inc: Accepts and recycles scrap metal. Western Metals Recycling: Accepts and recycles scrap metal. Spring Back Utah Mattress Recycling: Established in 2014, accepts, deconstructs, and recycles mattress and box spring components. Prior to their establishment in Salt Lake City, we had not had a local mattress recycler in Utah. c. List the names of any economic development plans that will be maintained on file with the local recycling zone coordinator as part of this application that demonstrate coordination between the recycling zone and overall development goals: Salt Lake City’s current Strategic Economic Development Plan prioritizes developing and maintaining a suite of incentives that enhance new business development and retention, as well as outlining a robust and active recruitment campaign to attract new businesses to the City. The RMDZ has been and will continue to be valuable incentive asset in Salt Lake City, where it is prominently featured among other incentives and policies in official City publications and websites, and is actively promoted by the City’s Business Development team. Salt Lake City’s Climate Positive 2040 sustainability plan addresses the City’s Zero Waste goal by specifically calling for continued improvement of “local recycling infrastructure and markets through strategic partnerships,” as well as working with state partners on continued recycling market development opportunities. The RMDZ serves as a foundational partnership program with the State and Salt Lake City in achieving these recycling market and infrastructure development goals. Within the City’s Sustainability Department, the E2 Business program works to engage existing Salt Lake City businesses in sustainable best practices, including business waste diversion and recycling. E2 Business program staff refer participating RMDZ businesses as opportunity paths for other Salt Lake City businesses seeking to divert their waste streams to recycled markets. Additionally, some RMDZ businesses are longtime members of the City’s E2 Business program, where they are promoted as models for future sustainably- minded businesses that Salt Lake City is seeking to attract. d. Demonstrate that sufficient portions of the proposed zone area are zoned as appropriate for the development of commercial, industrial, or manufacturing businesses. The proposed geographic area for the RMDZ requires an interested business to be located in M-1 or M-2 zoning districts, as these zoning classifications allow recycling activities. The business must also be located either west of I-215 or north of 600 North which creates a buffer between any residential or commercial zones and the highest concentration of manufacturing or recycling businesses. Economic development is best achieved if all companies abide by existing zoning, hence all benefits from the State and the City would be contingent on company compliance with current zoning regulations. e. Outline the county's or municipality's long-term waste management plan and evidence that the zone will be adequately served by the plan. In 2011, a joint resolution was signed by the City Council and the Mayor of Salt Lake City adopting waste reduction and diversion goals for Salt Lake City. The City adopted Zero Waste as a guiding principle for all City operations and the community. Goals were adopted to reach a 70% diversion by 2025 and eliminate waste by 2040. Salt Lake City currently diverts 39% of residential waste through recycling or composting. In 2016, Salt Lake City adopted a business and multifamily recycling ordinance (chapter 9.08.2), requiring businesses and multifamily properties that produce over 4 cubic yards of waste per week to have a recycling program in place. Salt Lake City’s Solid Waste and Recyclable Items ordinance (chapter 9.08.095) also dictates that recyclable items are not permitted to be placed in residential refuse containers and is enforceable as a civil violation. Strategic targets to meet waste diversion goals are further outlined in the City’s Climate Positive 2040 plan, and include: Improving price incentives to reduce waste and increase recycling; Engaging residents and businesses in waste reduction and recycling; Reducing contamination of recyclables and compost by enforcing refuse code; Increasing participation in glass recycling; Developing capacity for composting or recovering energy from food scraps f. Outline the county’s or municipalities postconsumer waste collection infrastructure: Curbside Recycling Salt Lake City has offered curbside collection of recyclables from residential homes since 1993. Participation in residential curbside recycling is mandatory. Recyclables are collected from a 90-gallon blue container, provided for the residents by the City, each week. Acceptable materials include: newspaper, magazines, corrugated cardboard, phone books, junk mail, paperboard, office paper, notebook paper, paper bags, plastic containers, aluminum beverage containers, and steel food cans. Yard Waste Recycling Salt Lake City introduced weekly yard waste collection service in March 2008. Participation in residential yard waste recycling is mandatory. Compostable material is collected from a 90-gallon brown container, provided for the residents by the City, each week. Acceptable materials include all yard waste, tea bags and coffee grounds, egg shells, and clean fruit and vegetable waste. Material is composted at the Salt Lake Valley Solid Waste Management Facility. Bulky Waste Recycling Salt Lake City’s Call 2 Haul program provides annual, scheduled collection of household bulky waste products for City residents. In 2020, the City collected and diverted 1,764 tons of material, including 216 tons of mattresses, electronics, appliances, tires and metal. Recyclers that have located in Salt Lake City and participate in the RMDZ are vendors Salt Lake City frequently uses to recycle these materials. Compostable material is processed at the Salt Lake Valley Solid Waste Management Facility. Salt Lake City also recycles green waste from the internal park maintenance program and golf course maintenance. Grass is mulched, and all other bulky green waste is taken to the compost facility. Glass Recycling Salt Lake City provides twenty drop off sites for glass recycling, and offers a voluntary curbside recycling program for glass, diverting over 1,604 tons of glass from the landfill in 2020. Construction and Demolition Waste Recycling Salt Lake City requires construction and demolition waste recycling on major projects permitted by the City. Special Event Waste Recycling Salt Lake City requires recycling amenities at all special events on city-owned property and permitted by the City. 5. Outline the county’s or municipality’s proposed means of assessing the effectiveness of the development plan or other programs implemented within the zone: Each business will be required to track and make available upon request a report to Salt Lake City documenting the amount of material being recycled by each businesses and amount of material being used for manufacturing. The number of businesses with the RMDZ designation will also be an indicator of its effectiveness. Our goal will be for this number to increase over time. 6. State whether within the zone either of the following will be established: a. commercial composting b. commercial manufacturing that will produce end products that consist of not less than 50% recovered materials, of which not less than 25% is post-consumer waste material Several businesses currently exist within Salt Lake City’s proposed zone that produce end products that consist of at least 50% recovered materials, and 25% postconsumer waste material. As described in the answer to Question 4.d, above, the proposed areas are zoned as appropriate for the development of commercial, industrial, or manufacturing businesses. Salt Lake City has established goals supporting economic development and sustainability. Salt Lake City strives to increase the number of environmentally conscious companies within City boundaries and to incentivize businesses to move towards sustainable operations. Several businesses have either been established or relocated to Salt Lake City’s zone with the assistance of RMDZ benefits. 7. Include any additional information the county or municipality considers relevant to its designation as a recycling market development zone. Salt Lake City has a broad and ambitious sustainability agenda, detailed in the Climate Positive 2040 Plan, which establishes the City’s commitment to protect resources, reduce pollution, slow climate change, and ensure greater resiliency and vitality for every aspect of our community. Maintaining a recycling market development zone within Salt Lake City will continue to be a valuable incentive we can offer for businesses looking to start up, or invest in growth and sustainably, and contribute to highest and best use of locally generated waste materials. 8. Attach the written approval from the municipality or county's legislative body of the recycling market development zone. Questions about the application process for Recycling Market Development Zone designation should be directed to Robert Windell, at rwindell@utah.gov or call 801-536- 0211. RESOLUTION NO. __ OF 2021 (A Resolution of the Salt Lake City Council Approving Submission of an Application to the State Recycling Market Development Zone Program) WHEREAS, the Utah Legislature has created the Utah Recycling Market Development Zone Program (“State Program”), which focuses on recycling as an economic development tool; and WHEREAS, the State Program provides certain incentives and benefits to qualified businesses that collect, process, distribute or use recycled materials in their manufacturing operations, or compost; and WHEREAS, the incentives and benefits under the State Program include, for example, a 5% state tax credit on machinery and equipment as well as a 20% state tax credit (up to $2,000) on eligible operating expenses; and WHEREAS, to be accepted into the State Program, cities and counties within Utah must formally apply to the program by submitting an application to the Utah Department of Environmental Quality; and WHEREAS, an application to the State Program is required every five years to set forth a local recycling market development zone program; and WHEREAS, the City has participated in the State Program since 2010; and WHEREAS, the City’s Sustainability Department intends to submit an updated application to the State on behalf of the City’s Recycling Market Development Zone Program; and WHEREAS, as proposed, the City’s Program will neither amend, alter, modify nor change allowed permitted land uses in Salt Lake City; and WHEREAS, the City’s Program currently allows businesses located in the Light Manufacturing (M-1) or Heavy Manufacturing (M-2) Districts that are either west of I-215 or north of 600 North, and that meet the other “Business Qualifications” as defined in the City’s Program application to the State to pa rticipate in the City’s Program; and WHEREAS, the Salt Lake City Council finds that recycling is currently allowed in the M-1 and M-2 zoning districts and limiting the City’s Program to businesses within the M-1 and M-2 zones that are either west of I-215 or north of 600 North will create a buffer between any residential or commercial zones and the highest concentration of manufacturing or recycling businesses near those areas; and WHEREAS, the Salt Lake City Council finds that the City’s Program and participation in the State Program will enhance the City’s ability to retain and recruit businesses that utilize or produce recycled products; and WHEREAS, the Salt Lake City Council finds that qualified businesses in the M-1 and M- 2 zoning districts in Salt Lake City may benefit from the incentives offered through the State Program; and WHEREAS, there are existing businesses in the corporate limits of Salt Lake City that will benefit from location in the area of the City’s Program; and WHEREAS, the Salt Lake City Council finds that qualified businesses in the M-1 and M- 2 zoning districts in Salt Lake City may benefit from the incentives offered through the State Program. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah: 1. It does hereby approve the Mayor’s execution and delivery of the application to the Utah Department of Environmental Quality to participate in the Utah Recycling Market Development Zone Program and establishment of a Recycling Market Development Program in the M-1 and M-2 zones, west of Interstate 215 or north of 600 North, within Salt Lake City. Passed by the City Council of Salt Lake City, Utah this _____ day of__________ 2021. SALT LAKE CITY COUNCIL ___________________________________ Amy Fowler, Chair ATTEST AND COUNTERSIGN: Salt Lake City Recorder’s Office ________________________ Cindy Lou Trishman City Recorder APPROVED AS TO FORM: Salt Lake City Attorney’s Office __________________________ Megan DePaulis Senior City Attorney 21 00 N 33 00 N 1820 S 1700 N 2100 S 200 S 50 0 S 50 0 S 2100 S 150 S 500 S 700 N 500 N 700 S 400 N North Te mp le 200 NNorth Te mp le 300 S 400 N Legend M1_M2 ZONING M-1 M-2