Loading...
01/06/2022 - Minutes (2) PARKS,NATURAL LANDS, URBAN FORESTRY AND TRAILS ADVISORY BOARD of SALT LAKE CITY Formal Meeting Thursday,January 6,2022 5:00 p.m.—7:30 p.m. Public Lands Administrative Building:1965 W.500 S.Salt Lake City,UT 84104 Upstairs Parks Training Room-MASKS REQUIRED Or Join Via Webex: https://saltla kecity.webex.comisaltlakecity/j.php?MTID=m3d1d233692 f3e8d5c811e81908b0f3 42 Join by phone 1-408-418-9388 Access code:2499 490 8192 Meeting Minutes (Approved) 1-Convening the Meeting 5:00PM • Call to Order • Samantha Finch • Polly Hart • Jenny Hewson • Melanie Pehrson • Phil Carroll • Brianna Binnebose • CJ Whittaker • Ginger Cannon • Clayton Scrivner • Chair Comments Samantha Finch wished the PNUT Board a Happy New Year and thanked everyone for their flexibility in shifting to a remote meeting due to the rise in COVI D-19 cases. Ms. Finch also gave the board a friendly reminder to review the previous meetings minutes and get amendments back sooner rather than later. 2—Approval of Minutes 5:03PM • Approve December 2,2021 Meeting Minutes Phil Carroll motioned to approve the recently a mended December 2021 meeting minutes. Polly Hart seconded the motion. The motioned to approve the December 2021 meeting minutes passed unanimously. 3—Public Comment Period 5:05PM • Verbal comments are limited to no more than 3 minutes; 15 minutes total. Written comments are welcome. Jan Hemming Jan Hemming,Chair of the YalecrestCommunityCouncil stated that she had sent a letter to Public Lands and other government officials about problems and concerns the community has in relation to Miller Nature Park.Yalecrest will be hosting a public forum on January 13th to discuss the community's concerns and identify and secure the best resources to preserve the park. The Yalecrest CommunityCouncil would like to invite Public Lands staff and the PNUT board to attend. Ms. Hemming can be contacted at hemmingjan@gmail.com for more information. Prior to the meeting,Jan submitted the following email as a public comment: Luke: Please circulate this email and the attached letter sent to the city December 21,about deteriorating conditions in the Miller Bird Refuge and Nature Park — before tonight's meeting. Please confirm that the email was circulated. Thank you. Janet(Jan)Hemming Chair Yalecrest Neighborhood Council Dear PNUT Board Members: The Yalecrest Neighborhood Council has encountered deteriorating and unhealthy conditions in Miller Bird Refuge and Nature Park. We shared our concerns with Public Lands and city officials in a letter sent December 21, 2021. Below is a summary of what we uncovered in Miller Park. (The full letter sent to the city on December 21, 2021 is attached).City representatives,including Public Lands,will appear before the Yalecrest Neighborhood Council on January 13 at 7 p.m.to respond to the letter. If you want to join us, here's the ZOOM link: https://us06web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZl odeusgzopEtEpJotXkw8sgl Iful h ODIJu More can also be learned by going to our new website: ya lecrestneighborhood.org Serious issues uncovered in Miller Bird Refuge and Nature Park: • The removal of hundreds, perhaps even 1,500+or more trees from the park • The failure to replant new trees or vegetation over an 8-year period • Low or no water flow in the summer affected by a water rights dispute and adjudication • Uncertainty a bout the health and vibrancy of the bird population • A non-functioning or poorly maintained sprinkler and irrigation system • Use of poisonous herbicides and chemicals not recommended for a bird refuge • A streambed that no longer functions as a natural waterway due to poor reconstruction December21 letter to Salt Lake City Public Lands and City officials: Respectfully, Janet(Jan)Hemming Chair Yalecrest Neighborhood Council The full text of the letter that Jan referenced is included as an appendix to these minutes. Gwen Springmeyer Gwen Springmeyer,the chair of the Greater Avenues Community Council, expressed that Tyler Fona row did a wonderful job presenting at the Council's January 5,2022 meeting. Ms.Springmeyer wants the Board and Public Lands to be aware of his contributions. Anne Cannon Anne Cannon expressed that she is hoping to see progress in Miller Park,Wasatch Hollow and Allen Park this year. Dan Schelling Dan Schelling, a member of Save our Foothills, stated that on December 10,2021, a group of people from Save our Foothills met with Public Lands to share prospective visions on the Foothills. When they asked Public Lands to articulate their vision,the department was unable to articulate a plan and referred Save our Foothills to an Open Space Plan prepared in 1992. The 1992 plan fails to address current issues such as downhill mountain biking and E-bikes. The 2019 Foothills Trail Plan also includes features that directly contradict the values and policy measures in the 1992 document. Mr.Schelling encourages Public Lands to prepare an updated Open Space Plan and develop a comprehensive land use management and recreation management plan as soon as possible before moving forward with construction. Eric Edelman Eric Edelman thanked Public Lands for repairing the hillside at CityCreekCanyon. Mr. Edelman also expressed concern that two years into the Foothills Trail Project,the public has yet to see a plan for trail maintenance or a long-term plan for adding new trails and maintaining existing trails. Mr. Edelman expressed that these plans must be created before construction. Mr. Edelman also expressed that hydraulic issues in City Creek and a remediation of the trenches on the hillside at Morris Meadows have not yet been addressed by Public Lands.Similarly to Mr.Schelling, Mr. Edelman expressed that the trail's vision is out of date and needs to be addressed by Public Lands. 4—Staff Discussion and Agenda Items 5:20PM • May We Have Peace land acknowledgement presentation-Taylor Knuth 10 mins Taylor Knuth, the assistant director of the Salt Lake City Arts Council, presented to the PNUT Board about Salt Lake City's Public Art Program and the use of acknowledgements in public art spaces. Salt Lake City's public art program continually seeks new ways of integrating artwork, by both experienced and emerging artists, into everyday life in our urban surroundings. The program is committed to understanding and recognizing that Salt Lake City is situated on the traditional territory of many nations,including Shoshone, Paiute, Goshute and Ute peoples,and is also home to many diverse Indigenous peoples from all over the world. Public art can be an evocative entry point into this conversation—helping to restore visibility to Salt Lake City's Indigenous communities,creating a greater sense of place and belonging, and sparking dialogue about the legacy of colonialism,and a shared path forward. Salt Lake City's Public Art Program would like to institute a policy that will inform the ways in which we incorporate land acknowledgements in the didactic plaques that accompany our public art projects throughout the city. The program would like to start with the sculpture May We Have Peace by Indigenous artist Alan Houser located in the northeast corner of the City and County building grounds.This is a highly visible sculpture that needs to have its plaque replaced.The program has sought consent from the artist's estate in incorporating a land acknowledgement for its future plaque. The Salt Lake City Public Art Program is seeking feedback from the board on the May We Have Peace land acknowledgement and other project. The City and County conservation board is in support of the efforts and other engagements will happen with transportation,engineering and others who have a role. Mr.Carroll asked what is a land acknowledgement? Mr. Knuth responded that it is an opportunity to recognize that the land the City occupies was once the territory of various Indigenous communities.A land acknowledgement is a valuable wayto spark dialogue surrounding the legacy of colonialism and how we can honor Indigenous communities. Ginger Cannon asked if Salt Lake City has adopted a land acknowledgement?Mr. Knuth responded that there currently is not.The Salt Lake City Arts Council hopes that the addition of land acknowledgement plaques is a step in creating a larger city-wide initiative. Ms.Cannon also asked who is involved in writing a land acknowledgement? Mr. Knuth responded that the Salt Lake City Arts Council researched what other public art programs in the country are doing in partnership with Tribal communities.They also met with Tribal leaders to gauge the temperature on whether land acknowledgements are effective. In the Salt Lake City Arts Council's experience,the local Indigenous communities that they spoke with all expressed support. Ms.Cannon expressed to the board a word of caution regarding not having an overall umbrella of a land acknowledgement from City Council. Ms. Finch asked for more details regarding the plaque's language. Mr. Knuth stated that the new language for the plaque had been approved by the estate of artist Alan Houser. Jenny Hewson asked if the list of Indigenous communities listed in Mr. Knuth's presentation is inclusive of all Indigenous communities in the area?Mr. Knuth responded that the list is. Bri Binnebose asked that if the board has a good path forward,what will be the role of Indigenous communities in the process? Mr. Knuth stated that Indigenous communities have been involved with the preliminary concept. The Salt Lake City Arts Council is starting land acknowledgements with May We Have Peace because the plaque is missing and needs replacement.The Arts Council is hoping to start with this piece and change the way plaques are approached by adding things such as land acknowledgements. Mr. Knuth also agrees with Ms.Cannon's feedback of approaching land acknowledgements as a top-down approach. Ms. Hart noted that the May We Have Peace sculpture is located on Washington Square. When thinking about context,would it be possible to rename the block? CJ Whittaker asked how the new trails in the Foothills will be named? It will be important to think about the discussion of land acknowledgement when Public Lands decides. Ms. Finch suggested that the board tables further discussion of land acknowledgement for another meeting. • Glendale Regional Park Update—Nancy Monteith 20 mins Nancy Monteith,Senior Landscape Architect with engineering, provided the PNUT board with an update on the Glendale Regional Park. Currently, Public Lands is in the process of demolishing the old water parkthat occupied the project site. Public Lands has elected to keep 580 linear feet of water slide sections stored onsite for potential reuse.These slides may be used for wheeled sports or repurposed into a public art piece. Public Lands has hired a team of consultants to assist in the project. Design Workshop will be utilized for planning,design and storytelling,Agora Partners will be utilized for operations, maintenance,and programming, David Evans and Associates will be utilized for community outreach and River Restoration will be utilized for ecology and restoration. So far, Public Lands has completed initial outreach conversations with City Council, Glendale Community Council and the Salt Lake City School District. Public Lands has also completed alternative development engagement. Specifically, Public Lands engaged with students at Glendale Middle School and Mountain View Elementary School through presenting an overview of the project to students and engaging in a curriculum supplied to teachers that allowed the students to construct multi-media deliverables that illustrated their ideas for the park. During these youth engagements,students expressed interest in active play features,water elements, natural ecological elements and wildlife river health. Other youth engagements conducted included workshops at the Salt Lake City Library and exercises with the Utah Division of Cultural Affairs. The next step of the plan will be alternatives evaluation.To complete this step, the development of a community advisory committee will take place.This committee's purpose will be to give clear and direct input on the development of the project moving forward. PNUT Board member Melanie Pehrson will be on this committee. Mr.Whittaker asked if there is any discussion of an Ampitheater in the park? Currently, Public Lands is considering all evaluations and is looking to hear ideas from the PNUT Board regarding what should and should not be included. Mr.Carroll asked if there are plans for the existing boat ramps on the site to be utilized? Ms. Monteith responded that there are no plans for removal. Public Lands wants to emphasize connectivity to the river in the project. In the alternatives evaluation,community members will be reviewing three very distinct ideas that will then be blended into a final concept based on feedback. The three ideas include 1. Great Outdoors—Capitalizes on the natural assets of the Jordan River 2. Active Park—Generates vibrant play 3. The Glendale Central—Connects neighbors and focuses on supporting community events Ms. Hart expressed concern with youth and other members of the public wanting to see water utilized in the project. Ms. Hart asked if Public Lands could take lead in educating the public that water elements are not sustainable in Salt Lake City's desert climate and drought conditions. Ms.Cannon asked what winter recreation activities could be available in the park to promote year-round use? Ms. Pehrson asked what is the process to ensure that a public event space in the park is properly maintained and is utilized by the community? Ms. Riker responded that maintenance would be provided through the Arts Council or by City Council after project completion. • CLOSED SESSION: Open Space Acquisition—Kat Maus 20 mins Ms. Finch solicited a motion from the board to close the session for discussion of an open space acquisition that contains financial information. Ms. Binnebose motioned to close the session. Ms. Hewson seconded the motion. The PNUT board voted unanimously to close the session. • Public Lands Budget Initiatives FY2023—Kristin Riker 20 mins Ms. Riker invited Public Lands Supervisors to share their FY2023 initiatives with the PNUT Board. Ms. Riker began by sharing the first initiative, inflationary cost. Every year a list of costs and cost increases for Public Lands is put together and forwarded to the Mayor.This year, Public Lands is requesting raising its starting wage from$13.15 to$15.00. Public Lands will also be asking for an increase to its supplies and materials budget to cover a rise in materials costs. Tony Gliot shared four budget initiatives from the Uban Forestry Division. The first budget initiative is a storm response recovery initiative. In response to the 2020 windstorm and 2021 snow event, Urban Forestry backlog is very behind. This budget initiative will allow for Urban Forestryto hire a contracted company to help relieve the Divisions backlog of services. The second budget initiative is a forest growth and preservation initiative.The first component of this initiative is funding to support the Mayor's 1,000 trees initiative. The second component seeks to hire a service coordinator position and secure funding to create a crew arborist position that will internalize Urban Forestry's tree health services. The third budget initiative is a golf course tree maintenance initiative.Salt Lake City's courses have about 6,000 trees that are currently not maintained by the city. This initiative will allow for a dedicated golf course maintenance crew to maintain and expand urban forest on Salt Lake City's golf courses. The final budget initiative is an Urban Wood Reutilization Initiative. Urban Forestry produces 2.8 million pounds of waste per year. In the divisions current system,this waste is discarded in the land fill. The urban wood reutilization initiative would allow Urban Forestryto construct the facilities and yard needed and hire the needed staff. Lee Bollwinkel shared two budget initiatives from the Parks Division. The first initiative is District 5 seasonal staffing. District 5 is the Parks district responsible for maintaining properties such as the Jordan River Trail, McClelland Trail, Model Port and various medians.When the Parks Division went through a reassignment,there was not enough funds to supply District 5 with a seasonal crew. The second initiative is for a Weed Abatement program. Public Lands has been asking the Cityfor funding for this initiative for the past few years but has not been successful.Currently, Public Lands only responds to weeds on a complaint basis.This initiative seeks to secure funding for the staff and equipment needed to have a year- round weed abatement crew. Lewis Kogan shared two budget initiatives from the Trails and Natual Lands Division. The first initiative is a new properties and amenities initiative. This budget initiative seeks to secure funding for various Public Lands projects that will be coming online this year.This will support staffing and resource costs as well as needed communication and engagement resources. The second initiative is a native plant restoration program and habitat restoration program initiative.This initiative seeks to create dedicated ecology restoration positions and a full-time natural resource technician position that would implement and support projects across the entire Public Lands system. • Road Map of Public Lands projects anticipated for 2022 - Kristin Riker 5 mins Ms. Riker proposed this agenda item take place next month due to inadequate time. 5—Board Discussion and Action Items 6:35PM • Adopt Bylaws Revision Regarding Electronic and Hybrid Meetings(Action Item) 5 mins Ms. Finch motioned to adopt an addition regarding electronic and hybrid meetings to the bylaws. Mr.Whittaker seconded the motion. The motion was passed unanimously by the PNUT Board. • Board Chair and Vice Chair Elections for 2022 (Action Item) 10 mins Ms. Finch solicited a show of hands from the board to ratify the election result of Ms. Hart as Board Chair.The motion passed making Ms. Hart Chair of the PNUT Board. Ms. Finch solicited a show of hands from the board to ratify the election result of Ms. Binnebose as Vice Chair.The motion passed making Ms. Binnebose the Vice Chair of the PNUT Board. • Approve Annual Meeting Schedule (Action Item) 5 mins Clayton Scrivner motioned to approve the PNUT Board's 2022 meeting schedule. Mr. Whittaker seconded the motion. The motion was passed unanimously by the PNUT board. • Board Discussion on Public Lands FY2023 Budget Initiatives& 20 mins Recommendation The PNUT Board discussed their process for deciding which budget initiatives they will recommend. The board decided that they will follow a format similar to their CI P ranking process to formulate a budget initiative recommendation. 6—Confirmation of Next Meeting,Board Comments&Future Agenda Items 7:15PM • Board Subcommittee updates as needed Trails Subcommittee Update The trails subcommittee held their first meeting where they discussed their vision and reviewed documents supplied at the PNUT Board retreat.The trails subcommittee decided that their subcommittee's vision is rooted in environment, equitable access and experience for all citizens and public trust.The trails subcommittee will be meeting once a month. Bylaw Subcommittee Update The bylaw subcommittee met to discuss their next steps and assignments,go over the current bylaws and discuss if the current bylaws have been approved by a previous board. The subcommittee hopes to bring a revision to Kristin,the city attorney and the board to review and change the bylaws in the future. • Board Comment and Question Period Ms. Hart thanked Ms. Finch for her contributions to the PNUT Board as Board Chair. Ms. Binnebose asked if the 1992 Open Space Plan has been replaced by the Reimagine Nature Master Plan or if the plans are separate. Mr. Kogan answered that the 1992 Open Space Plan and Reimagine Nature Master Plan are two separate documents. Mr.Whittaker received three complaints from community members who have seen Public Lands staff members placing flags where phase 3 of the Foothills Masterplan would be constructed.They have also heard staff members stating that the Foothills Masterplan is not really experiencing a pause. Mr. Kogan responded that the flags currently placed in the Foothills are part of the studies currentlyta king place.The communications from staff were a miscommunication. Construction in the Foothills is currently paused so studies can take place to determine how to best move forward. • Next Meeting: February 3, 2022 • Request for Future Agenda Item Ms.Cannon requested a five-minute discussion around the current backlog of Public Lands construction and planning projects. • Upcoming Involvement Opportunities 7—Adjourn 7:25PM Mr.Whittaker motioned to adjourn the PNUT Board Meeting. Ms. Binnebose seconded the motion. All voted unanimously to end the meeting. Appendix Item A: Letter sent to City by Jan Hamming on December 21, 2021. Significant Miller Bird Refuge Issues Trees • Hundreds of trees have been cut annually in MBR since 2014. Although described as "non-native and/or invasive"these trees have severely reduced what was once a much more abundant and thriving nature park. Between 2014-2018, attempts were made to replace lost trees,with nearly total failure, according to the city. • During 2020 and 2021, the city acknowledged 600 trees were cut, but also acknowledged that none were replaced. The Great Salt Lake Audubon Society referenced the projected loss of 275 trees during renovation of the park in 2014. If you "do the math," MBR has lost about 900 trees during 2014, 2020 and 2021. The city has not yet released figures about how many trees were removed between 2015-2019. QUESTION: Please provide YNC with those statistics; trees removed between 2015- 2019. • On two occasions in 2014, the city was asked to halt tree removal in MBR. Both requests were denied.One was made by Yalecrest residents who signed petitions and presented them to the City Council. The second request came from Heather Dove,president of the Great Salt Lake Audubon Society, who expressed concern that tree removal during nesting season would not only violate federal laws but destroy nests and kill unborn birds. That her measured and professional opinion was basically ignored, raises serious questions about who can best protect MBR. • The city revealed that it hires seasonal park clean-up crews who work approximately from April-September.Any tree-cutting work in MBR between April-July,would be a violation of the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act. QUESTION: Please disclose if trees have ever been removed in MBR between April-July of ANY year in the past. • 2014 was one of the most drastic tree-cutting years in MBR because of a planned "restoration." Included were many tall, healthy and mature black locust trees— destroying screech owl habitat. Other, tall, mature trees were also taken out of the park as part of the park's reconstruction. • Removal of the park's canopy has encouraged the growth of cheatgrass which is more than a nuisance, it's a serious problem for dogs, wildlife, and landscapes. Cheatgrass is a prolific spreader, using its barb-like seeds to grow just about anywhere.Cheatgrass seeds can get stuck in pet fur, skin, eyes,nose,ears, or mouth. It has been found in dogs' lungs. The dense,dry, fine stalks of cheatgrass, which sets seeds and dries out by June,are particularly flammable fuel for wildfires. • City officials have maintained that most trees recently cut are only 1.5-inch caliper and less than 5 feet tall, yet residents have recent visual evidence that truckloads of trees up to 16 feet tall were removed. • Black locust trees were originally planted in the park by the pioneers who came to the Salt Lake Valley in the 1840s. They were banned in 2014 as part of an initiative to renovate the park after an oil spill. This policy was determined by a company hired by the city called Canyon Environmental, owned and operated by one individual, Christopher Jensen.* He earned a master's degree in agronomy from BYU. (Agronomy is the study of field crop production and soil management.)On his Linked In page, Jensen describes his expertise as "permitting and compliance for energy, mining and utility development projects."He also lists environmental site assessments and NEPA analyses" in his career experience. QUESTIONS: Does he have the correct credentials to determine if black locust trees should remain or be removed from Miller Park? What have urban foresters,trained arborists or tree experts said about the black locust tree in Utah, especially in locations like MBR where they have existed since the 1840s? In other words, does the city stand by this decision in 2014? Birds • The health and size of the bird population is unknown to the city despite statements the city made in November2021 that the bird population in MBR is "healthy" and "up."YNC learned that no scientific data has ever been officially collected. The first official study conducted by Tracy Aviary in the summer of 2021 won't be released to the public until early, 2022. • One evidence of bird health is the screech owl. Residents saythat screech owls were abundant and could be heard throughout the park in years past. Now,they are either nonexistent or rare, according to residents. In a December email,a conservation official with TracyAviary listed 53 bird varieties that had been "detected"in MBR, but no specific year or timeframe was given. A Western Screech Owl was on the list. QUESTION:When and by whom were the 53 birds observed? • Residents saw city crews spraying an herbicide on cheatgrass in 2021 disturbing a nest of 9 quail and causing them to scatter. QUESTION: How many times has the city sprayed herbicides on vegetation in MBR, specifically, the years and months it was applied, and the vegetation targeted, as well as the name(s)of the herbicide(s) used. Sprinklers and Irrigation • In 2012-2013,the head of Salt Lake City Parks Department decided that all irrigation systems in MBR be turned off, because"we live in a desert."After some pressure,she later relented but then determined in 2013 that the MBR irrigation system must be replaced because it was "antiquated." The existing commercial system,which relied on Toro 640 heads, had been operational without incident for less than 25 years.This same Toro equipment is used on golf courses throughout the region,where it has performed exceptionally for more than 65 years. • The original Toro 640 system in MBR was replaced with a residential system that needs frequent maintenance. In some areas of the park,the sprinklers don't work or only provide spotty coverage.Trees and vegetation are dying because of this poorly maintained system. • The new irrigation system was not correctly installed and some parts are missing. • Sprinkler heads and sprinkler boxes protrude vertically on the path, making it dangerous for walkers, runners, bikers and others. • Residents have personally witnessed the dismantling and removal of existing irrigation pipes, without any replacement of new equipment. In one instance, residents observed some of the original pipe was excavated, "new"equipment was laid in the trench,and, after city workers left the park,the company installing the new equipment removed it, placed it in their trucks and filled the hole with dirt.Told of the problem, the city did nothing. QUESTION: Why is the irrigation and sprinkler system in MBR poorly maintained and/or non-functioning and why is there little or no accountability by the city with vendors that it contracts with,even when infractions are reported? Water flow in the stream • Last year was the hottest on record in Utah with almost no precipitation. Additionally, there was no water flow from Red Butte Creek in the park for 30-80 days last summer, according to residents living near the park. Water intended for the park is tied up in water right disputes with Mt. Olivet Cemetery. The city is negotiating with Mt. Olivet for a solution. • An official in the adjudication office of The Utah Division of Water Right told YNC in Decemberthat water rights along Red Butte Creek are being adjudicated in Third District Court, which may effect the speed with which water rights in MBR are resolved. • Some residents in Yalecrest have been told by responsible sources working with the VA on the Superfund PCE mitigation, they are "certain" Red Butte Creek water has been diverted by Mt. Olivet to Rowland Hall St. Mark's School. • In the 1990's, the LDS Church's Garden Park Ward requested a short-term metered connection to a city hydrant on Yale Ave. The city determined the then-existing LDS water right had been utilized to fill an on-site pond for irrigation and must be relinquished to the city, and that future irrigation be connected to the city's culinary line. QUESTION: What is the status of this? Pesticides and Chemicals • During the summer of 2021, residents observed city crews using pesticides to spray bushes on the Miller Park slope. During one spraying, a covey of quail — about nine — who had been nesting, immediately ran from the bush being sprayed.The incident was reported to the city but ignored. • The city has used and may continue to use Picloram (commercial name:Tordon),a chemical sold by Dow Chemical to poison trees cut in MBR. It is one of the ingredients in Agent Orange, used in Vietnam.A USU forestry professor(Corey Ransom) and 40-year veteran with the US Forest Service (Eldon Guymon) both discouraged the use of this powerful chemical on trees — especially in a bird refuge.The product is only recommended for use in forest sites, fence lines roadsides and rights of way — none of which apply to Miller Park. It also comes with this warning: "never apply within the root zone of desired trees as they will also be affected through root uptake and soil." Because of the way Tordon has been used in MBR, there is near certainty that neighboring trees,soil and vegetation have been contaminated or damaged. QUESTION: Please disclose all chemicals used in MBR for the past 12 years, including Tordon, the last time it was/they were used and if it will be/they will be used in the future. The Stream Bed • After the Chevron oil spill, the stream bed underwent major revisions, which changed the natural flow of the water. Residents remember when their children would ice skate from one end of the stream to the other in the winter,which is no longer possible because of all the "dams" and blockages placed in the bed. • The actual flow-line is now obscured and well below the highly permeable cobble surface that precludes access by birds. During low flow events, Red Butte Creekdisappears within 200' of 900 South. • The chemistry and native habitat were altered by the installation of cobble and boulders from areas outside the Red Butte Creekwatershed, namely Willard. • Ironically, "dams"placed along the stream bed of the creek have dropped significantly and will continue to find a lower profile. Yet, impacts of the arbitrarily raised bed have already included dead trees due to submersion and the need to introduce additional retention to reinstate the lower path according to the CI P contract. • Eldon Guymon, who worked with the U.S. Forest Service in Utah for 40 years,told residents in 2014 the mass removal of trees from MBR and the radical re-design of the steam bed would: o Pollute the stream bed o Undercut the slopes (caused by the boulders) o Destroy the canopy (because of the large number of mature trees removed) • The arbitrarily widened channel violated the riparian overlay ordinance and has caused significant stream bank erosion.This was done, even though Chuck Call,the city's chief hydrologist,determined that the then 5'wide channel could easily accommodate all conceivable flood events,after consulting with FEMA. From The Salt Lake City Historic Landscapes Report about Miller Park, 2016, written by JoEllen Grandy, Landmark Design. 15 The following species were recommended for removal based on a Botanical Evaluation Ascssment conducted by Canyon Environmental:Siberian Elm(Ulmus pumila),Tree-of-Heaven(Ailanthus alti„ima).and Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia)(Biohabitats).